Florida State University General Bulletin 1998-1999

FSU Homepage Office of the Registrar On-Line Registration 1997-1999 Graduate Bulletin Table of Contents

Academic Departments and Programs (course descriptions)


Department of CLASSICAL LANGUAGES, LITERATURE, AND CIVILIZATION

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Chair: Nancy T. de Grummond;
Professors:N. de Grummond, W. de Grummond, Glenn, Golden, Plescia;
Associate Professors: Pullen, Tatum;
Assistant Professors: Mueller, Pfaff, Sickinger;
Professor Emerita: Thompson

The influence of the art, languages, literatures and cultures of the Greco-Roman world pervades every western and many non-western societies. Modern America is no exception. A meaningful appreciation of our classical past is vital both for understanding the impressive continuity of western institutions and values as well as for recognizing how recent innovations and transformations of received assumptions have rendered aspects of the classical world alien and sometimes exceptionable. The classics are crucial both to the perpetuation and to the critique of the western liberal arts education.

The Department of Classical Languages, Literature and Civilization is committed to advancing our knowledge and critical appreciation of the ancient Mediterranean world through excellence in research and in teaching. The department seeks to create an atmosphere that fosters traditional scholarly approaches to the classical past at the same time as it welcomes and encourages innovative methods and perspectives. The department values the interdisciplinarity of the classics and strives to achieve an integrated understanding of the ancient world that includes a full appreciation of history, literature, and material culture. Students are encouraged to view the classics within the context of the traditional humanities as well as in terms of the contemporary criticism of received cultural canons.

All courses in classics emphasize critical thinking, careful analysis and effective speaking and writing skills. Some who major in classics will go on to academic careers as philologists or archaeologists. Others will become teachers in the schools or specialists in museum work. But most classics majors find that their broad liberal arts background is excellent preparation for pursuing careers in the learned professions, such as government, journalism or law.

In addition to offering instruction to majors, the department participates in the Universitys Liberal Studies Program and offers innovative courses that satisfy the University's multicultural requirement. Courses in beginning Greek or Latin can be used to fulfill the language requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences.

The faculty in classics is distinguished in teaching and research. Several members of the faculty have received University and national teaching awards. Individual faculty members have also won numerous competitive grants. The department boasts special strengths in ancient literary criticism, the archaeology of Greece and Italy, the political and social history of Athens and of Rome, and Roman religion.

Majors and elective students alike will find many intellectual opportunities in the classics department. There is an active chapter of Eta Sigma Phi (the classics honor society) and a vigorous Student Archaeology Club. The department conducts its own archaeological field school in conjunction with its excavation of the Etruscan/Roman site of Cetamura del Chianti in Italy, application to which is open to all students. Each year the department hosts several distinguished guest speakers and a visitng professor of international stature, the Langford Family Eminent Scholar, who teaches a course specifically for undergraduates. In conjunction with the visit of each Langford Scholar, the department sponsors a major conference in which scholars from America and abroad offer lectures devoted to a single theme or issue. Recent conferences have concentrated on the comedies of Aristophanes, the Great Altar in Pergamum and the role of Greek tragedy in the ancient city-state.

Students interested in the classics are encouraged to discuss their future plans with the undergraduate advisor. Most students will find that their needs are best accommodated by the departments very flexible program in classical civilization (see below), but students who intend to pursue postgraduate research in ancient history, classical archaeology or philology will need to enter more specific programs of study. There is also a joint major in classics and religion.

State of Florida Common Course Prerequisites

The State of Florida has identified common course prerequisites for this University degree program. These prerequisites are lower-level courses that are required for preparation for the University major prior to a student receiving a baccalaureate degree from The Florida State University. They may be taken either at a community college or in a university lower-division program. It is preferred that these common course prerequisites be completed in the freshman and sophomore years.

The following lists the common course prerequisites or approved substitutions necessary for this degree program:

Classics

1) Six to twelve (6-12) semester hours of coursework in classics.

Greek

1) Six to twelve (6-12) semester hours of coursework in Greek or a demonstration of proficiency by testing or completion of intermediate level.

Latin

1) Six to twelve (6-12) semester hours of coursework in Latin or a demonstration of proficiency by testing or completion of intermediate level.

Requirements for a Major in Classics

Students should review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this General Bulletin. No course for which a student receives a grade of C or lower may be counted toward satisfaction of major requirements. In addition, courses used to satisfy the college foreign language requirement may not be counted toward satisfaction of any major requirements. Interested students should consult with the undergraduate advisor as early as possible to choose a course of study best suited to their needs and goals.

Latin

Twenty-four (24) semester hours above the 1000 level. Two courses at the 3000 level are required, including LNW 3215 and 4340r, along with six (6) additional semester hours at the 4000 level. LNW 3010r and 3011 are recommended. At the discretion of the adviser, up to four (4) semester hours of Greek or classical civilization may be counted toward this major. Students working toward secondary school certification will have other requirements as well.

Greek

Thirty (30) semester hours chosen in consultation with the departmental adviser. This program will normally include GRE 1120 and 1121.

Classics-Program A (Latin and Greek)

Thirty (30) semester hours in Greek and Latin chosen in consultation with the departmental adviser. At least twelve (12) semester hours are required in each language. The student must take 4000 level courses in at least one of the languages. If secondary school certification is sought in connection with this program, the major must include twenty-four (24) hours of Latin.

Classics-Program B (Classical Civilization)

Thirty (30) semester hours chosen in consultation with the departmental adviser. These hours may be selected from any of the courses listed below. No more than twelve (12) semester hours of Latin, Greek, and Sanskrit may be counted. Either CLA 4935r or an equivalent 4000 level course chosen in consultation with the departmental adviser is required and CLA 2010 is recommended. Students are strongly encouraged to take some courses in the Greek or Latin language. Courses used to satisfy the college foreign language requirement, however, may not be counted toward the major.

Classical Archaeology

Thirty-three (33) semester hours of course work. ARH 3130 and 3150 are required in addition to three of the following advanced archaeology courses: ARH 4110, 4118, 4120, 4131, 4151, and 4173. Competence in one ancient language at the third-semester level is required; this requirement may be fulfilled by taking the Greek language sequence of GRE 1120, 1121, and 2230, or the Latin language sequence of LAT 1120, 1121, and 2230. In addition to the twelve (12) semester hours of Latin or Greek required for the classical archaeology major, the BA degree requires twelve (12) semester hours of ancient or modern language study [three sequential four (4) semester hour courses]. It is strongly recommended that the student fulfill the requirement through the study of French, German, or Italian. Six (6) semester hours of electives in classics are also required, to be chosen in consultation with the departmental adviser; only three (3) semester hours of those elective courses taken to fulfill the humanities requirements may also be counted towards the requirements of the major. Students are encouraged to participate in the classics departments excavations at Cetamura, Italy, as well as to study at the University's study center in Florence.

Honors in the Major

The Department of Classical Languages, Literature, and Civilization offers a program in honors in the major to encourage talented juniors and seniors to undertake independent and original research as part of the undergraduate experience. For requirements and other information, see the University Honors Program and Honor Societies section of this General Bulletin.

Requirements for a Minor in Classics

A minimum of twelve (12) semester hours in classical civilization, Greek, or Latin. The minor in classical civilization requires no knowledge of Greek or Latin and may consist of any four courses listed under departmental offerings in classical civilization and literature; however, with the approval of the department, appropriate courses in Greek and Latin may be included in this program. In Greek or Latin the sequence may begin at the 1000 level (provided this does not duplicate the foreign language requirements for the baccalaureate degree) or at any appropriate higher level.

Definition of Prefixes

ARH - Art History

ASH - Asian History

CLA - Classical and Ancient Studies

CLT - Classical Literature in Translation

EUH - European History

GRE - Greek (Language Study)

GRW - Greek Literature (Writings)

HEB - Hebrew Language

LAT - Latin (Language Study)

LNW - Latin Literature (Writings)

SAL - Sanskrit

Undergraduate Courses

ARH 2090.Great Discoveries in World Archaeology (3). An introduction to the discipline of archaeology and to the work of famous archaeologists through an examination of selected archaeological discoveries in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas.

ARH 3130. Survey of Greek Art and Archaeology (3). Survey of Greek art from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period and important archaeological discoveries in Greek lands.

ARH 3150. Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy (3). Survey of art in Italy from the Etruscan and Roman periods and important , Etruscan, and Roman archaeological sites.

ARH 4110. Art and Archaeology of the Bronze Age in the Aegean (3). Study of the art and culture of prehistoric Crete and Greece and important monuments and archaeological sites.

ARH 4118.Archaeology of Ancient Egypt (3). Survey of the archaeology and art of ancient Egypt, from the Predynastic to the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. An emphasis on the art, architecture, and culture of the Old and New Kingdoms.

ARH 4120. Etruscan Art and Archaeology (3). Study of Etruscan art and culture and important monuments and archaeological sites.

ARH 4131. Greek Art and Archaeology of the Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C. (3). Study of classical Greek art and important monuments and archaeological sites.

ARH 4151. Art and Archaeology of the Early Roman Empire (3). Study of Roman art from Augustus through Hadrian and important monuments and archaeological sites.

ARH 4173. Studies in Classical Art and Archaeology (3). Studies in specific aspects of the art and archaeology of Greece and Italy.

ARH 4999r. Tutorial in Classical Archaeology (1-3). Prerequisites: ARH 3130, 3150; instructor consent. Readings and discussions within a small group of advanced undergraduates concerning a specific topic or research problem in classical archaeology.

ASH 3200. History of the Ancient Near East (3). Survey of the Near EastAnatolia, Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Holy Landin the ancient period.

CLA 2010. Introduction to Greek and Roman Civilization (3). Introduction to Greek and Roman civilization: survey of classical literature, art, and philosophy with readings in translation from outstanding Greek and Roman authors.

CLA 2110.The Greek Way: Introduction to Greek Civilization (3). A survey of the daily life and the cultural and political achievements of the ancient Greeks from Homeric times to the period of Alexander the Great.

CLA 2123.The Roman Way: Introduction to Roman Civilization (3). A survey of the daily life and the cultural and political achievements of the Romans from the founding of Rome to the later Roman Empire.

CLA 2500.Ancient Greek Athletics (3). An introduction to the athletics of ancient Greece through an examination of archeaological evidence and literary texts.

CLA 3501.Gender and Society in Ancient Greece (3). This course examines the role and status of women in ancient Greek society, as depicted in its literature, art, law and religion.

CLA 3502.Women, Children, and Slaves in Ancient Rome: The Roman Family (3). This course examines the Roman family in its various facets. Its focus will not be only on the nuclear family but also on the broader concept of family which includes slaves and dependents.

CLA 4437r. Studies in Greek History (3). Study of specified periods of Greek history, whether Archaic, Classical, or Hellenistic. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

CLA 4447r. Studies in Roman History (3). Study of specified periods of Roman history in the Republic or Empire. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

CLA 4450r. Studies in Ancient Near Eastern History (3). Specific studies in the ancient Near East. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

CLA 4780r. Classical Archaeology: Fieldwork (1-6). Excavation experience through The Florida State University Field School at Cetamura, Italy. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours.

CLA 4880. Roman Law (3). Introduction to Roman civil law. This course provides a general perspective of Roman legal ideas and problems related to family law, property law, law of delicts, and law of procedure.

CLA 4909r. Honors Work (3). Up to twelve (12) semester hours may be taken in honors work.

CLA 4935r. Seminar in Classical Civilization (3-6). Prerequisite: Nine (9) semester hours of study in classical civilization or the consent of instructor. Special topics in classical culture presented around a seminar format. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

CLT 3041. Word Building: Greek and Latin Elements in the English Vocabulary (3). An introduction to Greek and Latin elements in English with special attention to word roots and the development of vocabulary through the application of these roots.

CLT 3370. Classical Mythology (3). A survey of Greco-Roman myth and legend, readings from illustrative ancient authors in English translation, approaches to the study of ancient myth.

CLT 3378.Ancient Mythology, East and West (3). This course will deal in a comparative way with the shared elements and influences found in the mythological traditions of selected cultures (e.g. Sumerian, Egyptian, Mayan).

CLT 3380. Classical Drama and Its Influence (3). A survey of the development of tragedy and comedy in the classical world. The theory of tragedy and comedy will be studied and the influence of classical models on the later history of tragedy and comedy will be traced.

CLT 4291. Greek Tragedy (3). An intensive study of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.

CLT 4340. Greek and Roman Epic (3). Study of the principal epics of the classical world in English translation.

CLT 4372r. Studies in Ancient Mythology (3). Specific topics in the study of ancient myth and its interpretation. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

CLT 4383.Studies in Ancient Comedy and Satire (3). Study of movements in Greek and Roman comedy, Roman satire, and ancient prose fiction through readings of selected works in English translation.

CLT 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1-4). May be repeated to a maximum of nine (9) semester hours.

EUH 3400. Rise and Fall of Classical Civilization (3). A survey of the histories of Greece and Rome and their major accomplishments.

EUH 4402. The Age of Alexander the Great (3). Study of the Greek world from the death of Socrates (399 B.C.) to the Roman conquest (146 B.C., the sack of Corinth by Mummius).

EUH 4412. The Roman Republic (3). Study of the history of Rome from its foundation (traditionally 753 B.C.) to the fall of the Roman Republic (31 B.C., The Battle of Actium).

EUH 4437. Classical Athens and Sparta (3). History of Greece from the beginning to Alexander the Great. Emphasis on the social and political structures of Sparta and Athens.

EUH 4447. The Roman Empire (3). The Roman Empire from Augustus to Constantine. Emphasis on the evolution from the principate of the early empire to the monarchy of the late empire.

GRE 1120, 1121. Beginning Greek I, II (4, 4). Introduction to the basic grammar and syntax of classical Greek. Meets the foreign language requirement for the BA degree. No language laboratory required.

GRE 2230. Introduction to Greek Literature (4). Translation and commentary on selected Greek readings. Meets the foreign language requirement for the BA degree. No language laboratory required.

GRW 3104r.Readings in Greek Literature (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected Greek works. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours with change of content.

GRW 4210r. Greek Prose Writers (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of readings from Greek prose writers. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

GRW 4301r. Greek Drama (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected Greek plays. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

GRW 4340r. Greek Poetry (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of readings from selected Greek poets. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

GRW 4500r. Greek Philosophical Writings (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of readings from the Greek philosophers or religious texts. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

GRW 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1-4). May be repeated to a maximum of nine (9) semester hours.

GRW 4999r.Tutorial in Greek (1-3). Prerequisites: GRW 3104; instructor consent. Intensive work by a small number of undergraduates on a specific topic or research problem in Greek studies. May be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

HEB 1120, 1121. Beginning Hebrew I, II (4, 4). Introduction to the basic grammar, syntax, and phonology of modern and classical Hebrew. Meets the foreign language requirement for the BA degree. No language laboratory required.

HEB 2230. Intermediate Hebrew (4). Translation and commentary of selected Hebrew readings. Meets the foreign language requirement for the BA degree. No language laboratory required.

LAT 1120, 1121. Beginning Latin I, II (4, 4). Introduction to the basic grammar and syntax of classical Latin. Meets the foreign language requirement for the BA degree. No language laboratory required.

LAT 2230. Introduction to Latin Literature (4). Translation and commentary on selected Latin readings. Meets the foreign language requirement for the BA degree. No language laboratory required.

LNW 3010r. Literature of the Republic (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected works by authors before Augustus. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

LNW 3011. Literature of the Augustan Age (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected works from authors of the Augustan Age.

LNW 3215. Readings in Selected Latin Prose (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of readings taken from the prose authors of all periods of Latin literature.

LNW 4313. Plautus and Terence (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected plays from Plautus and Terence.

LNW 4320r. Roman Lyric, Elegiac, and Pastoral Poetry (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of poetry selected from the Roman elegists, the lyric tradition, and Roman pastoral. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

LNW 4340r. Roman Epic (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of the works of Vergil or the other hexameter poets. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

LNW 4360r. Roman Satire (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected readings from Horace and Persius, Juvenal, Martial, Petronius, or Apuleius. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

LNW 4380r. The Roman Historians and Cicero (3). Translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected works from the Roman historians or Ciceros historical speeches and letters. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

LNW 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1-4). May be repeated to a maximum of nine (9) semester hours.

LNW 4999r.Tutorial in Latin (1-3). Prerequisities: LNW 3010, 3011, 3215; instructor consent. Intensive work by a small number of undergraduates on a specific topic or research problem in Latin studies. May be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

SAL 4100, 4101. Elementary Sanskrit I, II (3, 3). Introduction to the morphology and syntax of Sanskrit and introduction to Sanskrit texts.

Graduate Courses

ARH 5111. Art and Archaeology of the Bronze Age in the Aegean (3).

ARH 5119. Archaeology of Ancient Egypt (3).

ARH 5125. Etruscan Art and Archaeology (3).

ARH 5140. Greek Art and Archaeology of the Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C. (3).

ARH 5160. Art and Archaeology of the Early Roman Empire (3).

ARH 5174r. Studies in Classical Art and Archaeology (3).

ARH 5934r. Tutorial in Classical Archaeology (1-3).

ARH 6937r. Doctoral Seminar in Classical Archaeology (3).

CLA 5438r. Studies in Greek History (3).

CLA 5448r. Studies in Roman History (3).

CLA 5455r. Studies in Near Eastern History (3).

CLA 5789r. Classical Archaeology: Fieldwork (16).

CLA 5799r. Seminar in Classical Archaeology (3).

CLA 5885. Roman Law (3).

CLA 5905r. Directed Individual Study (1-4). (S/U grade only.)

CLA 5910r. Supervised Research (1-3). (S/U grade only.)

CLA 5936. Proseminar in Classical Studies (1). (S/U grade only).

CLA 5940r. Supervised Teaching (03). (S/U grade only.)

CLT 5295r. Studies in Greek Tragedy: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides (3).

CLT 5345. Studies in Greek and Roman Epic (3).

CLT 5379r. Seminar in Ancient Mythology (3).

CLT 5385r. Studies in Ancient Comedy and Satire (3).

EUH 5407. Hellenistic Greece (3).

EUH 5417. The Roman Republic (3).

EUH 5438. Hellenic History (3).

EUH 5448. The Roman Empire (3).

GRE 5069r. Graduate Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only.)

GRW 5215r. Studies in the Greek Prose Writers (3).

GRW 5305r. Studies in Greek Drama (3).

GRW 5345r. Greek Poetry (3).

GRW 5505r. Greek Philosophical Writings (3).

GRW 5908r. Directed Individual Study (1-4). (S/U grade only.)

GRW 5909r. Tutorial in Greek (1-3).

GRW 6930r. Seminar in Greek (3).

LAT 5069r. Graduate Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only.)

LNW 5300r. Studies in Roman Drama (3).

LNW 5325r. Roman Lyric, Elegiac, and Pastoral Poetry (3).

LNW 5345r. Studies in Roman Epic (3).

LNW 5365r. Studies in Roman Satire (3).

LNW 5385r. The Roman Historians and Cicero (3).

LNW 5908r. Directed Individual Study (1-4). (S/U grade only.)

LNW 5932. Tutorial in Latin (1-3).

LNW 6930r. Seminar in Latin (3).

SAL 5230, 5231. Intermediate Readings in Sanskrit I, II (3, 3).

For listings relating to graduate course work for thesis, dissertation, and masters and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE: see Graduate Bulletin; Communication