Florida State University General Bulletin 1998-1999

FSU Homepage Office of the Registrar On-Line Registration 1997-1999 Graduate Bulletin Table of Contents

Academic Departments and Programs (course descriptions)


Department of COMMUNICATION

COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION

Interim Chair: Daniel J. Montgomery;
Professors: Heald, King, Mayo, Sapolsky, Wotring, Young;
Associate Professors: Jordan, MacNamara, Montgomery, Moore, Nudd, Payne, Rackley, Rayburn, Ungurait;
Assistant Professors: Jackson, McDowell, Pekurny;
Associates in Communication: Brey, Sawyer, Solomon;
Visiting Assistant Professors of Communication: Brill, Pashupati;
Professors Emeriti: Minnick, Phifer

The Department of Communication offers a series of majors that are organized according to the various applications of communication skills and expertise in our society. This unique array of majors allows students to select a sequence of courses that directly reflects their own professional, artistic, and/or academic interests. Accordingly, one can major in any of four distinct areas: 1) advertising, communication for business and public relations; 2) communication studies; 3) general communication; and 4) mass communication.

Each major requires a series of courses designed to meet predetermined educational and career goals (the specific goals and requirements of each major are detailed in the following section entitled Descriptions of Majors). While some majors are professionally oriented and others stress theory and a liberal education, each introduces the student to the broad range of communication theory and practice and provides the student with an understanding of the fundamental human and mediated communication processes.

In terms of both academic criteria and extracurricula accomplishments, the students in the Department of Communication are of the very highest caliber and quality. The high quality of undergraduate students is reflected in the numerous University, state, and national scholarship and fellowship recipients. The exceptional caliber and character of communication students is also proven by their extracurricular activities. The Speech and Debate Program is considered one of the most experienced, talented squads in the nation. The program philosophy assures each student the best competitive experience possible. It emphasizes quality competition and provides the resources to help each student excel to the best of his or her abilities. Communication students are also involved in broadcasting and cablecasting activities, including the production of award-winning local and statewide television programs. Students participate in the production of a variety of sports-related programming as part of Seminole Productions. They also staff and manage the campus radio station, WVFS-FM. Other student activities include the Advertising Club, the student chapter of the Florida Public Relations Association, the student chapter of Women in Communication, and Lambda Pi Eta, the national honor society for communication students.

Both in and out of the classroom, the students of the Department of Communication have an established track record of national recognition and achievement. The Universitys communication graduates can be found working in virtually every country in the world and every state in the United States. They occupy productive and prominent positions in government, commercial communication, media-related activities, and private business interests.

The Department of Communication offers programs of study leading to the bachelor of arts (BA), bachelor of science (BS), master of arts (MA), master of science (MS), and doctor of philosophy (PhD) degrees. Consult the Graduate Bulletin for information regarding graduate programs.

State of Florida Common Course Prerequisites

The State of Florida has identified common course prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

The following lists the common prerequisites or their substitutions necessary for admission into this upper-division degree program:

1) Eighteen (18) semester hours outside the major are required.

Requirements

Entry Requirements

Admission to the Department of Communication is based upon availability of faculty and space by discipline. Students must meet a minimal set of criteria to be considered for admission. Final determination for admission, however, is competitively based. Meeting minimal requirements does not guarantee admission into any communication major. Accordingly, the following are the minimal criteria for consideration for admission: 1) an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.8 on all college coursework attempted; 2) an application form completed and submitted to the Department of Communication on or before February 15th for summer and fall admission, and September 15 for spring admission. Responses on the application form must be typed; 3) official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended; 4) 3.0 or higher average in all communication courses attempted; 5) applicants are encouraged to enroll in courses in a foreign language, computing, statistics, writing, as well as the departments entry-level courses (large enrollment 2000- and 3000-level); and 6) acceptance by a faculty committee will be based on a review of the application and transcript(s).

Transfer students must apply separately to the Department of Communication; admission to the University is not a guarantee of admission into the major.

The Department of Communication reserves the right to place students in another major within the department if the applicant is judged highly qualified and if the applicant's prioritized choices for major are full.

Once admitted to the communication major, the student has one semester to complete the liberal studies requirement. If the liberal studies requirement is not met in one semester, the student will be dismissed from the major.

Retention Standards

Before graduation, all students must successfully complete the writing and mathematics requirements outlines in FAC 6A-10:30 (Gordon Rule) as well as achieve a passing score on the College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST).

If at any time the student's GPA falls below the 2.8 minimum necessary for retention, the student will be placed in a probationary status for one semester. If the GPA is not at or above the minimum at the end of the probationary semester, the student will be dismissed from the major. The Department of Communication reserves the right to refuse admission or to discontinue enrollment of any student at any time if, in the judgment of the faculty, the student does not meet the standards of the department or the major.

Requirements for a Major in Communication

Admission to The Florida State University does not assume admission to a major in the Department of Communication; students applying for admission to a departmental major must also apply to the University through the Office of Admissions. The student must apply for, and be accepted into, one of the departments majors. Acceptance into each major is based on student qualifications and is competitive.

Normally, a student will not be considered for acceptance into any major until the student has reached junior standing. Applications are available from the departmental office.

Different majors specify different graduation requirements which lead to the baccalaureate degree in communication. Description of each majors required and elective course sequences are available from the Department of Communication.

The Department of Communication has the following requirements for graduation beyond minimum University requirements and those specified by each major: 1) only course work with grades of C- or above will count toward a students major in communication; 2) completion of a minor; 3) no more than six (6) semester hours of the following course work combined will count toward a communication major-COM 3950r, 4905r, 4910r, and SPC 2594r; and 4) a maximum of three (3) semester hours of COM 4945r (internship) may count toward the communication major (see descriptions of individual majors for total number of hours permitted). The department requests that a student wishing to intern make arrangements with an instructor and submit departmental application forms the semester prior to enrollment.

Required Minor

A minor of at least twelve (12) semester hours, approved by the students adviser, is required. All work counted toward the minor must carry a grade of C- or better. The minor must be in a department other than the Department of Communication. Requirements for the minor are established by the minor department, which can be found under the appropriate entry of this General Bulletin. The student should consult the major coordinator in selecting a minor. The student is encouraged to complete the minor in an area related to the students career goals. See individual descriptions of majors below for suggestions.

Honors in the Major

The Department of Communication offers a program in honors in communication to encourage talented juniors and seniors to undertake independent and original research as part of the undergraduate experience. For requirements and other information, see the University Honors Program and Honor Societies section of this General Bulletin.

Requirements for a Minor in Communication

The minor consists of twelve (12) semester hours in communication. No more than four (4) semester hours of the following course work combined will count toward a communication minor: COM 3950r, 4905r, 4910r, 4941r; and SPC 2594r. Internship credit (COM 4945r) will not count toward the minor. Only coursework with a grade of C- or above will count toward the minor.

In cooperation with the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Communication also offers an interdepartmental film studies minor. For additional information on this minor refer to the School of Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts sections of this General Bulletin.

Description of Majors

Advertising, Communication for Business, and Public Relations

Career and Educational Goals. Students in this major will master skills necessary for a career in advertising, public relations or business and organizational communication.

Skills to be Developed. Students in the major will develop a variety of skills. Advertising students will focus on account management, creative strategy, media planning and research skills. Public relations students will concentrate on public relations writing, tactics, research and campaign management skills. Communication for business students will develop skills related to assessing communication/management problems, developing change strategies and managing organizational performance.

Emphasis Areas. The major consists of three emphasis areas: advertising, communication for business and public relations. A student applying to the major is required to indicate on the application form his/her preferred emphasis area. If the chosen emphasis area is filled, the student will be assigned to one of the other emphasis areas unless they too are already filled.

Major Hours Required. Thiry-nine (39) semester hours. Students must retake any course with a grade below C-.

Required Minor. A minor, approved by your advisor, is required. All work must be in a department other than the Department of Communication. All work counted toward the minor must carry a grade of C- or better. Requirements for the minor are established by the minor department and can be found in this General Bulletin. Suggested minors include: business, psychology, English, journalism (FAMU), political science, social science, and others, depending upon ones career objectives.

Internship. Students are required to enroll in a minimum of six (6) semester hours of internship (COM 4945r). A student may enroll for up to twelve (12) semester hours of internship, but a maximum of nine (9) semester hours may be credited toward the advertising, communication for business, and public relations major.

Course Requirements for the Advertising, Communication for Business, and Public Relations Major

  1. Required Core Courses: sixteen (16) semester hours;
  2. Emphasis Area (one of three areas): twelve to fifteen (12-15) semester hours;
  3. Internship: six to nine (6-9) semester hours; and
  4. Electives: three to five (3-5) semester hours.

Total: thirty-nine (39) semester hours.

A specific listing of courses is available from the Department of Communication.

Communication Studies: Interpersonal Communication, Legal Communication, Public Discourse, and Speech Communication

Career and Educational Goals. Students graduating in this major should have a solid liberal education with an emphasis in speech communication. Degrees in speech communication are applicable to a number of fields including law, ministry, speech writing, management, lobbying and sales.

Major Hours Required. Thirty-nine (39) semester hours. Students must retake any course with a grade below C-.

Required Minor. A minor, approved by your advisor, is required. All work must be in a department other than the Department of Communication. All work counted toward the minor must carry a grade of C- or better. Requirements for the minor are established by the minor department and can be found in this General Bulletin. Recommended minors include: English, political science, psychology, theater, journalism (at FAMU), sociology, criminology, social sciences, american studies, womens studies, black studies, british studies (Florida State University London Program). A fifteen (15) semester hour interdepartmental minor is also possible, provided the course work is approved in advance by the major advisor and the department chair.

Internship. The student may complete an internship (COM 4945) as an elective. Students may register for a total of twelve (12) semester hours of internship credit, however a maximum of three (3) semester hours may count toward the communication studies major.

Recommended Extracurricular Activities. Debate, V89, Women in Communication, student government, theatre productions, Seminole Uprising.

Course Requirements for the Communication Studies Major

Of the three areas in communication studies (interpersonal, political/legal communication and public discourse), students select one as an area of emphasis, one as a secondary area, one as a third area.

  1. SPC 3601: three (3) semester hours;
  2. Two Core Skills Courses: six (6) semester hours;
  3. Three 3-credit courses in Area of Emphasis (at least one of these courses must be at the 4000 level): nine (9) semester hours;
  4. One 3-credit senior seminar course in Area of Emphasis;
  5. Two 3-credit courses in Secondary Area: at least one of these courses must be at the 4000 level): six (6) semester hours;
  6. Two 3-credit courses in Third Area: six (6) semester hours; and
  7. Six (6) semester hours of Elective Courses: (three (3) semester hours must be for a letter grade): six (6) semester hours;

Total: thirty-nine (39) semester hours.

A specific listing of courses is available from the Department of Communication.

General Communication

Career and Educational Goals. General communication offers students exposure to speech communication, mass communication and advertising/communication for business/public relations. General communication is designed for students wishing to obtain a broad knowledge of the field of communication and at the same time have maximum flexibility in planning and completing a program of study. Depending on the courses and the internship selected, the degree is applicable to students considering graduate school or communication-related work in the public or private sector.

Areas of Knowledge and Skills to be Developed. General communication provides students with an opportunity to study in the principal areas of the field. The core courses guarantee that students gain some knowledge of communication theory, oral communication, advertising, organizational communication, public relations, and mass communication. Students then determine the other skills and knowledge received in the major by selecting courses offered in the department.

Major Hours Required. Thirty-nine (39) semester hours. Students must retake any course with a grade below C-.

Required Minor. A minor, approved by your advisor, is required. All work must be in a department other than the Department of Communication. All work counted toward the minor must carry a grade of a C- or better. Requirements for the minor are established by the minor department and can be found in this General Bulletin. Recommended minors include: English, political science, psychology, theater, journalism (at FAMU), sociology, criminology, social sciences, american studies, womens studies, black studies, british studies (The Florida State University London Program). A fifteen (15) semester hour interdepartmental minor is also possible, provided the course work is approved in advance by the major advisor and department chair.

Recommended Extracurricular Activities. Participation in forensics, Lambda Pi Eta, a communication honor society, Women in Communication, V-89, the campus radio station, the advertising or public relations society, Seminole Uprising, theatre productions, the production and publication of campus newspapers and periodicals and other communication-related activities is strongly encouraged.

Internship or Related Activities. Students are required to enroll in three (3) semester hours chosen from the following: COM 3950r Communication Activities, COM 4910r Application of Research Methods, COM 4941r Application of Instructional Methods, and/or COM 4945r Internship. Students can begin meeting this requirement anytime following admission. A maximum of three (3) semester hours may count toward the general communication major.

Course Requirements for the General Communication Major

  1. Core Courses: twelve (12) semester hours;
  2. Electives at the 3000 level: up to twelve (0-12) semester hours;
  3. Electives at the 4000 level: twelve to twenty-four (12-24) semester hours;
  4. Internship and/or related activities: three (3) semester hours;

Total: thirty-nine (39) semester hours.

A specific listing of courses is available from the Department of Communication.

Mass Communication:

Mass Media Studies and Media Production

Career and Educational Goals. Students majoring in mass communication may pursue careers in broadcasting, cable, advertising, video production, arts and entertainment, emerging information technologies and related fields. The degree will also prepare students to pursue graduate study in mass communication.

Areas of Special Knowledge and Skills to be Developed. The mass communication major will expose students to the history, evolution and changing state of mass media. Students will develop an appreciation for the economic underpinning of the media, the social effects of the media, legal and ethical issues affecting the production and dissemination of products and programs, the nature of new communication technologies, and techniques employed in the production of the mass media. The major will impart such skills as writing for the media, audience research, computing, on-camera performance, video production, video editing, and developing media plans.

Emphasis Areas. The mass communication major consists of two emphasis areas: mass media studies and media production. A student applying to the mass communication major is required to indicate on the application form his/her preferred emphasis area. If the chosen emphasis area is filled, the student may be assigned to the other emphasis area unless this too is already filled. A limited number of students are accepted annually into the media production emphasis area.

Major Hours Required. Thirty-nine (39) semester hours. Students must retake any course with a grade below C-.

Required Minor. A minor (or second major), approved by the students adviser, is required. All work must be in a department other than the Department of Communication. All work counted toward the minor must carry a grade of a C- or better. Requirements for the minor are established by the minor department and can be found in this General Bulletin. Recommended minors include: business, education, English, political science, psychology, theatre, journalism (at FAMU), sociology, criminology, social sciences, American studies, British studies (The Florida State University London Program). A fifteen (15) semester hour interdepartmental minor is also possible, provided the course work is approved in advance by the major advisor and department chair.

Internship. An internship (COM 4945) is recommended. A student may enroll for up to twelve (12) semester hours of internship, but a maximum of nine (9) semester hours may be credited toward the major. The department strongly recommends internships be taken during the summer term, as close to graduation as feasible, and for the maximum number of hours possible (nine to twelve [9-12] credit hours).

Course Requirements for the Mass Communication Major

I. Emphasis in Mass Media Studies

  1. Required Core Courses: twelve (12) semester hours;
  2. Advanced Courses: six (6) semester hours;
  3. Techniques Courses: three (3) semester hours;
  4. Activities Courses: three (3) semester hours;
  5. Electives (includes Internship): fifteen (15) semester hours;

Total: thirty-nine (39) semester hours.

II. Emphasis in Media Production

  1. Required Core Courses: twelve (12) semester hours;
  2. Research/Theory Courses: six (6) semester hours;
  3. Techniques Courses: three (3) semester hours;
  4. Activities Courses: six (6) semester hours;
  5. Production Courses: twelve (12) semester hours;

Total: thirty-nine (39) semester hours.

A specific listing of courses is available from the Department of Communication.

Definition of Prefixes

ADV - Advertising

COM - Communication

FIL - Film

MMC - Mass Media Communication

ORI - Oral Interpretation

PUR - Public Relations

RTV - Radio-Television

SED - Speech Education

SPC - Speech Communication

Undergraduate Courses

ADV 3000. Principles of Advertising (3). Advertising and promotion as related to level of economic growth, cultural influences, and sociolegal environments.

ADV 3001. Creative Strategy I (3). A foundation class in advertising where creativity is explored in a workshop environment.

ADV 3352. Mass Media Law (3). Comprehensive review of laws, rules, and regulations affecting both the advertising and broadcast industries as well as other forms of mass media. Includes review of libel, slander, invasion of privacy, gathering of information, and copyright laws.

ADV 4002. Creative Strategy II (3). Prerequisite: ADV 3001. Creative and emphatic skills necessary in communicating via print and electronic media; utilizing these skills in creating integrated advertising campaigns.

ADV 4500. Advertising Research (3). Prerequisite: ADV 3000. Survey, observational, and experimental methods and processes. Research design, planning, questionnaire construction, sampling, validity measurements, field work, tabulations, presentation, and interpretation.

ADV 4600. Media Planning (3). Prerequisite: ADV 3000. Coordination of advertising and marketing research, planning, creative strategy, and selection of media and production activities leading to the development of advertising campaigns.

COM 3120. Communication for Organizing (3). Communication and group problem solving in bureaucracies.

COM 3310.Communication Research Methods (3). Prerequisites: STA 3014, STA 4122 or QMB 3200; Corequisite: COM 3310L Introduction to communication research methods. Examines survey, experimental, observational and content analysis methods. Philosophy of science, research design, measurement, sampling, data collection, analysis, interpretation and reporting.

COM 3310L.Communication Research Methods Laboratory (1). Corequisite: COM 3310. Applications and simulations of communication research methods. Lecture material covering research design, measurement, sampling, data collection, analysis, interpretation and reporting practiced using computer technology.

COM 3332.New Communication Technology and Contemporary Society (3). Relates the design, development, and the use of new communication technologies to social, economic and policy implications. Lecture, labs, and discussion groups.

COM 3510. Political Communication and Campaigning (3). Campaigns, elections, and American politics in a communication framework; planning campaign strategies.

COM 3930r. Special Topics in Communication (3). An analysis of specialized topics of current concern in communication. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours; duplicate registration allowed.

COM 3949r. Cooperative Education Work Experience (0). (S/U grade only.)

COM 3950r. Communication Activities (1). (S/U grade only.) May be repeated to a maximum of four (4) semester hours; duplicate registration allowed.

COM 4121.Foundation of Organizational Communication (3). The course explores the use of communication in conjunction with the theory and practice of PM/OBM for increasing productivity and analyzing performance problems.

COM 4123.Introduction to Assessing Organizational Communication (3).

COM 4140.Fundamentals of Communication for Organizational Development (3). Introduces students to the communication issues involved in the theory and practice of organizational development.

COM 4330.Communication and the Internet (3). Develops technical and communication skills in Internet-based communication technologies. Hands-on survey of Internet technologies with focus on communication issues, problems and competencies. Lecture and lab.

COM 4465. Communication and Conflict (3). Introduces students to the theory and practice of conflict resolution with emphasis on the role of communication.

COM 4470.Desktop Multimedia (3). Course provides overview of operations and applications of software packages; principles of design and presentation for print-based as well as audio-visual productions.

COM 4480.Legal Communication (3). An analysis of how communication affects and is affected by our legal institutions and processes.

COM 4481.Attorney, Client, Pretrial Communication (3). Prerequisite: COM 4480. Course introduces students to the core elements of the attorneyclient relationship across a variety of contexts and the numerous elements of pretrial communication and preparation.

COM 4482.Courtroom and Jury Persuasion (3). Prerequisite: COM 4480. Course introduces students to the nature and implications of effective courtroom persuasion and the process of jury analysis and jury selection.

COM 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1-3). (S/U grade only.) Departmental approval required. May be repeated to a maximum of eight (8) semester hours; duplicate registration allowed.

COM 4909r. Honors Work (3). For students in the honors program who are working on an honors thesis. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours; duplicate registration not allowed.

COM 4910r. Application of Research Methods (1-3). (S/U grade only.) Departmental approval required. Experience in methods and strategies of research in communication concepts. Individually designed to accomodate students background and objectives. May be repeated to a maximum of four (4) semester hours; duplicate registration allowed.

COM 4930r.Undergraduate Seminar in Communication (3). Explores advanced communication issues with an emphasis on research. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours; duplicate registration allowed.

COM 4941r. Application of Instructional Methods (1-3). (S/U grade only.) To provide experience in methods and strategies of teaching communication concepts within the University context. Individually designed to accommodate students background and objectives. Departmental approval required. May be repeated to a maximum of four (4) semester hours; duplicate registration not allowed.

COM 4945r. Communication Internship (1-12). (S/U grade only.) Departmental approval required. Supervised internship. Credit proportional to scope and significance of work. Credit may not be applied to graduate degrees. Individually designed to accomodate students background and objectives. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours; duplicate registration not allowed.

FIL 2000. Elements of Film (3). The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an opportunity to study classic examples of superior filmmaking and develop critical skills that will help the individual understand and evaluate film communication, literature, and art.

FIL 3106. Film and Television Writing (3). Process and techniques of film scripting, including documentary, rhetorical, and narrative forms, for the film and television media.

FIL 3503. The Contemporary Cinema: Theory and Practice (3). Review and analysis of post-1950 motion pictures with emphasis on technique and industrial evolutions.

MMC 2000. Introduction to the Mass Media (3). An historical and social overview of the mass media and their relationship to the mass communication process in a modern society.

MMC 4210.Media Legalities (3). Corequisite: RTV 3000. Review and application of media business practices and legal requirements involved in the conception and production of media content for radio and television.

MMC 4300. Communication and Change: The Diffusion of Innovations (3). An analysis of the process of change in developing countries, particularly from the standpoint of how communication is used in the introduction, spread, and adoption of new ideas.

MMC 4602. Mass Media and Society (3). An analysis of the effects of mass media on public opinion and behavior. A review of social science research exploring the impact of TV on children and others.

ORI 3004.Performance Studies (3). Students collect, analyze and perform personal narratives and everyday conversations.

ORI 3110. Performance of Contemporary Literature (3). Analysis of and practical experience in the performance of poetry and prose.

PUR 3000. Introduction to Public Relations (3). Designed to introduce the student to the principles and practices of the public relations profession throughout all organizations using public relations.

PUR 3002.Public Relations Techniques (3). Prerequisite: PUR 3000. Tools and techniques of public relations. Application of public relations principles.

PUR 3100.Writing for Public Relations (3). Corequisite: PUR 3000. Designed to develop professional-level writing skills for public relations.PUR 3500.

Public Relations Research Methods (3). Introduction to public relations research methods. Primarily examines focus groups, content analysis, and survey methodologies.

PUR 3930. Public Relations Proseminar (1). (S/U grade only.) Corequisite: PUR 3000. Public relations majors must register for the proseminar on admission to the program. They are to become active in FPRA, PRSSA, or WICI and remain active during undergraduate work.

PUR 4600. Public Relations Management: Cases and Campaign Strategies (3). Prerequisites: PUR 3000, 3002, 3100. Designed to focus on the management function of public relations. Focus on significant cases and campaign strategies.

PUR 4940r.Public Relations Internship (1-12). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisites: PUR 3000, 3002, 3100. Practical application of classroom principles in public relations settings. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours.

RTV 2100. Writing for the Electronic Media (3). Non-fiction writing for television and radio including public affairs, commercials, and documentaries.

RTV 3000. Elements of Broadcasting (3). Surveys American broadcasting from the standpoint of communicators, organizations, content, and audience with special emphasis on research.

RTV 3104.Narrative Writing for Television and Film (3). Development and writing of fictional scripts for television and film.

RTV 3200. Media Techniques (3). Introduction to basic principles and terminology associated with photography, filmmaking, television, and radio.

RTV 3220. Television Production (3). Fundamentals of studio and field production including camera, audio, lighting and production planning using the crew system.

RTV 3221. Single-Camera Video Production (3). Prerequisite: RTV 3220. Course addresses direction and production of single-camera video projects including camera, audio, lighting and linear editing.

RTV 3225r. Video Workshop (1-3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Communication major status. A course designed for students to gain experience in the production of television programs and video projects. May be repeated to a maximum of three (3) semester hours.

RTV 3227.Multiple Camera Studio Production (3). Prerequisite: RTV 3220. Direction and production of multiple-camera studio video projects including camera, lighting, audio and live-to-tape switching.

RTV 3230. Television Interviewing and Hosting (3). Lecture-laboratory. Course introduces students to oncamera interviewing and hosting of news and public affairs programs including research and writing components.

RTV 3233.Directing Performance for the Camera (3). Prerequisite: RTV 3220. Students will direct student actors in a workshop setting. Actors and directors will gain experience with and appreciation for those on the other side of the camera. Lecture-laboratory.

RTV 3263.Video Post Production (3). Prerequisite: RTV 3220. Advanced editing and post production techniques applied to field and studio projects. Emphasis on digital non-linear editing systems.

RTV 3265.Computer Graphics and Animation (3). Prerequisite: RTV 3220. Design and production of computer-generated graphics and animation for video projects.

RTV 3920. Television Workshop for Non-Majors (1-3). (S/U grade only.) May not be applied toward communication major. A course designed for students to gain experience in the production of television programs and video projects. May be repeated twice to a maximum of three (3) semester hours.

RTV 3926r. Radio Workshop (1-3). (S/U grade only.) General staff work in any department of the campus student-run radio station. Designed to afford both entry-level training or advanced application of skills. Students must work three (3) hours per week for one (1) hour of credit. May be repeated to a maximum of three (3) semester hours.

RTV 3941r. Radio Practicum (3-6). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Advanced radio work in either of two areas: management or other supervisory roles at the student radio station; or special individual projects in the application, study, or research of audio pertaining to radio broadcasting. Instructor permission required. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

RTV 4467r. Television Practicum (3-6). Prerequisites: RTV 3220, 3221. Producing and directing television programs and video projects. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

RTV 4802. Radio-Television Station Operation and Programming (3). Prerequisite: RTV 3000. Purpose, function, organization, and programming of the radio and television station with an emphasis on research.

RTV 4970.Senior Thesis in Production (3). Prerequisite: Senior level status; twelve (12) semester hours of 3000 level production courses; instructor permission. A culminating course for students in production. Individual students, focusing on areas they have mastered in intermediate courses, will produce senior thesis video projects.

SPC 1600. Fundamentals of Speech (3). Survey and application of communication theory, including interpersonal communication, small group communication, and public speaking.

SPC 2330. Nonverbal Communication (3). Review of recent literature on nonverbal communication including such topics as kinesics, proxemics, kinesthetic behavior, environment, physical characteristics, and personal appearance.

SPC 2410. Parliamentary Law (3). The principles and rules governing voluntary organizations and deliberative assemblies.

SPC 2594r. Forensics Activity (1). Noncompetitive forensics participation for students with limited experience. Areas of emphasis may include: public discussion of issues, the entertainers, or academic debate. May be repeated to a maximum of eight (8) semester hours.

SPC 3120.Psychology of Oral Communication (3). A study of basic psychological principles involved in communication behavior with application to individual and group communication situations.

SPC 3190.Applied Voice and Diction (3). This course covers articulation, word choice and pronunciation, and introduces the student to the speech production mechanism and how speech sounds are produced and classified.

SPC 3210. Contemporary Human Communication (3). An introductory course that surveys current views in five areas of communication theory: nonverbal, small group, interpersonal, mass communication, and in language acquisition.

SPC 3301. Interpersonal Communication (3). A survey of recent literature on interpersonal commmunication including such topics as self-concept, emotional behavior, interpersonal conflict, and interpersonal attraction.

SPC 3350.Listening (3). This course teaches students to understand the complexity of listening and the nature of listening in the human communication process. In order to help students learn to improve their own listening behavior, this course will stress six skill areas: 1) hearing messages, 2) understanding messages, 3) remembering messages, 4) interpreting messages, 5) evaluating messages, and 6) responding to messages.

SPC 3425. Communication in Small Groups (3). This course in small groups includes both cognitive and experiential elements. Students study how small groups function as they create their own project groups and learn by doing.

SPC 3513. Argumentation (3). This course focuses on the principles of argumentation theory and the practical applications of these principles in different argumentative situations. Traditional as well as contemporary approaches to the study of argument are combined with the settings of argument to provide a practical experience for each student.

SPC 3593r.Competitive Intercollegiate Forensics (1). Competitive debate and individual events. Experienced students will develop and perfect their speaking skills in a highly competitive, structured format of instruction and competition. Students may not register concurrently for SPC 2594r. May be repeated to a maximum of eight (8) semester hours.

SPC 3595r.Competitive Intercollegiate Forensics (1). Competitive debate and individual events. Experienced students will develop and perfect their speaking skills in a highly competitive, structured format of instruction. May be repeated to a maximum of eight (8) semester hours.

SPC 3601. Public Speaking (3). Principles of and practical experience in public speaking.

SPC 4233. Classical Rhetoric (3). Students examine the origins of rhetorical theory during the classical period. The course emphasizes ideas on rhetoric of Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, and Quintilian.

SPC 4360. Interviewing (3). Prerequisite: SPC 3301. An analysis of the interview process in a variety of specific contexts and the development of communication skills used in interviewing.

SPC 4448. Group Dynamics and Leadership (3). A review of concepts and research in group process and group leadership.

SPC 4516. Evidence (3). The study of principles of evidence and proof in law, historical investigation, scientific discovery, and the social sciences. An analysis of argument and proof modes used for public policy decision making with an emphasis on developing standards of proof for public consumers of information as well as policymakers.

SPC 4540. Persuasion (3). A study of the psychology of attitude formation and change including theories of persuasion and principles of persuasive communication.

SPC 4604. The Principles of Speechwriting (3). Prerequisite: SPC 3601. History and principles of speechwriting, the ethical issues involved, and speechwriting skills based on sound principles of communication.

SPC 4630.Rhetoric of Womens Issues (3). Examination of selected social and political issues which affect women today; analysis of content, lines of argument, supporting evidence, and rhetorical strategies. Course satisfies the multicultural requirement (y).

SPC 4634. Rhetoric of Race Relations (3). History of the struggle for freedom and equality from preCivil War spokesmen to the 20th-century Black nationalists as evidenced in texts of selected public speeches and reaction to them. Course satisfies the multicultural requirement (y).

SPC 4644. Rhetoric and Human Affairs (3). An analysis of drama as an instrument for advancing a political or social thesis.

SPC 4651r. Rhetoric of Contemporary Issues (3). Examination and analysis of the problems and questions which confront our society from a rhetorical perspective; how communication skills and strategies have affected our perceptions and understanding of events. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours. Duplicate registration is not allowed.

SPC 4721. Interracial/Intercultural Communication (3). An exploration of interracial and intercultural communication and the philosophies that underly the concept. Course satisfies the multicultural requirement (x).

Graduate Courses

ADV 5503. Media Consumer Behavior (3).

ADV 5505. Media Market Research (3).

COM 5126. Organizational Communication Theory and Practice (3).

COM 5127. Assessing Organizational Communication (3).

COM 5145. Communication Issues in Organizational Development (3). (S/U grade only.)

COM 5305r. Interactive Communication Research (1-3).

COM 5312. Research Methods in Communication (3).

COM 5314. Measurement of Listener-Viewer Attitude and Response (3).

COM 5316. Statistical Methods in Communication Research (3).

COM 5317. Content Analysis in Communication Research (3).

COM 5331. Computers in Communication Research (3).

COM 5336. Interactive-Media Programming and Design (3).

COM 5340. Historical-Critical Methods of Research (3).

COM 5401. Analysis of Communication Theory (3).

COM 5469. Communication Planning and Dispute Resolution (3).

COM 5546. Political Language: Rhetoric and Persuasion (3).

COM 5655. Political Rhetoric: Language and Persuasion (3).

COM 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

COM 5911r. Supervised Research (1-6). (S/U grade only.)

COM 5920r. Colloquium in Communication (0-1). (S/U grade only.)

COM 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1-6). (S/U grade only.)

COM 6400r. Seminar in Communication Theory (3).

COM 6401r. Advanced Problems in Communication Theory and Research (2-8).

COM 6900. Preparation for the Preliminary Examination (2-4). (S/U grade only.)

COM 6931r. Special Topics in Communication Research (3).

MMC 5305. Comparative Systems of Mass Communication (3).

MMC 5600. Mass Communication Theory and Effects (3).

MMC 6920r. Colloquium in Mass Communication (3).

RTV 5426. New Communication Technology Theory and Research (3).

RTV 5702. Communication Regulation and Policy (3).

RTV 6425r. Advanced Seminar in New Communication Technologies (3-6).

SED 5340. Teaching Communication in College (3).

SPC 5234. Classical Theories of Rhetoric (3).

SPC 5449. Group Dynamics and Leadership (3).

SPC 5545. Studies in Persuasion (3).

SPC 5614. Criticism of Contemporary Public Address (3).

SPC 5639. Rhetoric of Womens Issues (3).

SPC 5645. Rhetoric and Human Affairs (3).

SPC 5655. Political Rhetoric: Language and Persuasion (3).

SPC 6236. Contemporary Rhetorical Theory and Criticism (3).

SPC 6306. Contemporary Topics in Interpersonal communication (3).

SPC 6920r. Colloquium in Speech Communication (3).

For listings relating to graduate course work for thesis, dissertation, and masters and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.