Florida State University General Bulletin 1998-1999

FSU Homepage Office of the Registrar On-Line Registration 1997-1999 Graduate Bulletin Table of Contents

Academic Departments and Programs (course descriptions)


Department of ENGLISH

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Chair: Fred Standley;
McKenzie Professors: Burroway, Kirby;
Daisy Parker Flory Alumni Professor: Standley;
Professors: Bickley, Bishop, Brock, Brubaker, Crook, Fenstermaker, Fowler, Gontarski, Hawkins, Lhamon, McElrath, Row, Taylor;
Associate Professors: Berry, Boehrer, Braendlin, Burke, Cunningham, Gardner, Johnson, Laughlin, Montgomery, ORourke, Moore, Rosenthal, Saladin, Straub, Suarez, Walker;
Assistant Professors: Barbour, Batker, Dickson-Carr, Haywood, Leverenz, McGregory, Mirtz, North;
Professors Emeriti: Davis, Flory, Harper, Herndon, Hunt, Pugh, Randel, Reaver

The Department of English offers students a curriculum that is central to the modern liberal arts education. One of the largest degree programs in the College of Arts and Sciences, the undergraduate major in English allows students to emphasize literature or writing; students may also pursue other specialized programs such as honors in the major, an English major with an emphasis in business, teaching certification, or other independent courses of study. In addition to its primary benefits to intellectual growth, the English major also offers practical preparation for professional careers in teaching, professional writing, law, medicine, business, religious affairs, and all levels of government service-local, state, and federal.

The study of literature includes not only contemporary texts but also all the historical periods of British, American and other literature. In addition to familiar period or major authors courses such as the Victorian novel or Chaucer, students will also find courses in related subjects such as linguistics, popular culture, gender studies, multiethnic literature, folklore, postcolonial literature, modern European fiction, and literary theory. All of these courses contribute to the students knowledge of human culture and how literary texts as cultural artifacts relate to other bodies of human knowledge such as philosophy, history, religion, psychology, classics, and modern languages.

The study of writing allows students to work not only in the familiar genres of poetry, fiction, drama, and the essay, but also to study related subjects such as rhetorical and composition theory. Students may also study the editorial and publishing process and take up internships in editing and publishing in a variety of settings.

The English honors program, traditionally the largest in the University, invites the very best students to supplement regular major work with specialized seminars and independent thesis work. Other options such as the English/business program or teaching certification allow students to supplement the major with rigorous and substantial minor courses of study.

A variety of activities and facilities are available to all majors. Two literary magazines, The Kudzu Review and Sundog: The Southeast Review, are published in the department. Many students gain journalistic experience by writing for the independent campus newspaper, the Florida Flambeau. The writing program sponsors readings one evening a week in the community as well as an annual Spring Writers Festival. The department also sponsors the Worlds Best Short Short Story contest, which attracts thousands of entries from around the world. The department maintains a growing videotape collection to supplement classroom instruction, and two computer classrooms house computer-assisted writing instruction. All majors with a GPA above 3.0 are eligible to apply for membership in Lambda Iota Tau, the local chapter of a national literary honor society, which sponsors a variety of social events and career programs.

The department annually recognizes outstanding achievement with the following awards and honors: the Fred L. Standley Award for Undergraduate Excellence in English, the George Harper Award for Outstanding Essay Writing, an Outstanding Undergraduate Creative Writing Award, the Cody Harris Allen Undergraduate Writing Award, the John McKay Shaw Academy of American Poets Undergraduate Award, and the George Yost Essay Award.

State of Florida Common Course Prerequisites

The State of Florida has identified common course prerequisites for this University degree program. These prerequisites are lower-level courses that are required for preparation for the University major prior to a student receiving a baccalaureate degree from The Florida State University. They may be taken either at a community college or in a university lower-division program. It is preferred that these common course prerequisites be completed in the freshman and sophomore years.

The following lists the common course prerequisites or approved substitutions necessary for this degree program:

  1. ENC 1101 and ENC 1102; or six (6) semester hours of courses taught in the English Department each with 6,000 words of evaluated writing for a total of 12,000 words.

Requirements

Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this General Bulletin.

Prerequisites For the Major

In order to satisfy prerequisites for the English major, students must accomplish the following:

  1. Completion of at least fifty-two (52) semester hours of acceptable college credit with an overall GPA of at least 2.0;
  2. Satisfactory completion (C- or better) of all courses necessary for the Gordon rule (FAC Rule 6A-10.030).

For Upper-Division Courses in the Major

(Non-Liberal Studies)

Satisfactory completion (pass) of at least two semesters of college-level classical or modern foreign language courses or the equivalent (native speakers of a foreign language excepted).

Only majors who have satisfied these prerequisites will be permitted to register for upper-division non-liberal studies English courses.

Requirements for a Major in English

General Requirements: Thirty-three (33) semester hours of English in courses numbered above 1999. At least twenty-one (21) semester hours must be in courses at the 3000 and 4000 levels, including at least nine (9) semester hours at the 4000 level. Honors thesis hours may be applied toward the bachelor of arts (BA) degree, but only three (3) semester hours will be accepted for major credit. Majors who complete teacher certification requirements may count three (3) semester hours of internship elective credit at the 3000 level. One English course used to satisfy the humanities requirement for liberal studies may be counted as part of the major. All courses counted toward the major must carry the grade of C- or better. A minor in another department is also required.

Each student will choose one of the following areas:

1) Concentration in Literature

a) Three (3) semester hours in ENG 3014 Critical Issues in Literary Studies [must be taken before student reaches ninety (90) semester hours].

b) Literature Courses: At least eighteen (18) semester hours of literature courses beyond the 2000 level.

Specifically required are:

i) Three (3) semester hours in United States literature at the 3000 or 4000 level;

ii) Six (6) semester hours in British literature before 1800, including at least three (3) semester hours before 1660, at the 3000 or 4000 level;

iii) Three (3) semester hours in British literature after 1800 at the 3000 or 4000 level;

iv) Three (3) semester hours in ENG 4934 Senior Seminar in English [must be taken after student reaches ninety (90) semester hours]; and

v) Three (3) semester hours in other literature courses at the 3000 or 4000 level.

vi) Three (3) semester hours in ENG 3014 Critical Issues in Literary Studies.

c) Electives: Twelve (12) semester hours in other English courses.

2) Concentration in Writing

a) Writing Courses: Fifteen (15) semester hours in at least two of the following categories, of which at least nine (9) semester hours shall be in workshop courses listed below in type. Workshop courses with the r designation are repeatable with the instructors permission.

Note: only three (3) semester hours of ENC 3310r Article and Essay Workshop may count toward the nine (9) semester hours in workshop courses.

i) Article and Essay: ENC 3310r, ENC 4311r; ENG 4020; ENC 4212, ENC 4500, ENC 4942r.

ii) Fiction: CRW 3110, CRW 4120r.

iii) Poetry: CRW 3311, CRW 4320r.

iv) Drama: CRW 3410, CRW 4420r.

b) Literature Courses: Fifteen (15) semester hours of literature, of which at least three (3) semester hours shall be in English literature before 1900.

c) Electives: Three (3) semester hours in other English courses.

3) Concentration in English Studies

Students desiring to structure their own concentrations may propose a coherent program emphasizing, for example, a period, a genre, a theme, theory and criticism, or a combination of areas such as popular culture and film. The proposal, formulated in close consultation with and approved by the students adviser, should include a total of at least twenty-four (24) semester hours at the 3000 and 4000 levels [nine (9) of these twenty-four (24) semester hours must be at the 4000 level in English and nine (9) may be in relevant courses outside the department]. The proposal must be submitted to the faculty undergraduate committee for approval before midterm in the last semester of the students junior year. To be eligible for the concentration in English studies, students must have at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA.

Exit Surveys/Interviews

To be eligible for graduation, each student must complete an exit interview or survey.

Honors in the Major

The Department of English offers honors in the major to encourage talented students to undertake independent research. For requirements and other information, see the University Honors Program and Honor Societies section of this General Bulletin.

Requirements for a Minor in English

Minor: At least twelve (12) semester hours in English courses numbered above 1999. Students must have at least a C- average in the minor.

English Major with an Emphasis in Business

This program is designed for those students who are interested in a liberal education that will at the same time give them maximum preparation for a business career. The curriculum combines extensive training in the broad field of the liberal arts with specialized training in the field of business. At the end of four years the student graduates with a bachelor of arts degree with a major in English and an emphasis in business. Students pursuing this program will meet the requirements of the English major and take a specified number of hours in business, normally thirty (30) semester hours. For a list of the business courses required and other information concerning the program, the student should contact the director of undergraduate English studies. This program, emphasis in business, is in contrast to the eighteen (18) semester hours which constitute a minor in business for arts and sciences majors.

Definition of Prefixes

AML - American Literature

CRW - Creative Writing

ENC - English Composition

ENG - English: General

ENL - English Literature

ENS - English for Nonnative Speakers

LAE - Language Arts and English Education

LIN - Linguistics

LIT - Literature

Undergraduate Courses

ENC 1101. Freshman Composition and Rhetoric (3). Drafting and writing of expository essays and a journal for a total of 7,000 words. May not be taken by students with credit in ENC 1149. No auditors.

ENC 1102. Freshman Writing About Literature (3). Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or 1149. Drafting and writing of essays and a journal for a total of 7,000 words on topics drawn from selected short stories, drama, and poetry. Not a literature class. No auditors.

ENC 1121. Freshman Composition and Rhetoric: Honors (3). This accelerated course is designed for honors students. Therefore, their level of performance will be expected to exceed the level attained by students in ENC 1101. Enrollment through the honors program.

ENC 1122. Freshman Writing About Literature: Honors (3). As a literature-based composition course, essay topics will be drawn from selected short stories, drama, and poetry. This accelerated course is designed for honors students; thus, their level of performance will be expected to exceed the level attained by students in ENC 1102. Enrollment through the honors program.

ENC 1142. Freshman Imaginative Writing Workshop (3). Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or 1149. Freshman-level creative writing with some critical analysis of literature; emphasizes workshop atmosphere with class participation. Workshops offered in both poetry and fiction. Written work will total 7,000 words. Should not be taken by students with final grades below C in ENC 1101. No auditors.

ENC 1144. Freshman Article and Essay Workshop (3). Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or 1149. Designed to help students attain a level of competency in nonfiction prose beyond that attained in ENC 1101. Emphasizes workshop atmosphere with class participation. Written work will total 7,000 words. No auditors.

ENC 1145. Freshman Special Topics in Composition (3). Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or 1149. Freshman-level nonfiction prose writing on selected subjects for a total of 7,000 words. Topics vary. No auditors.

ENC 1149. Basic English Skills (6). Credit by CLEP examination only.

ENC 1905r.Improving College-Level Writing (1-3). (S/U grade only.) Individualized program of instruction in writing, including CLAST skills. Open to students from all levels and major areas. May be repeated for a maximum of three (3) semester hours.

REA 1905r.Improving College-Level Reading (1-3). (S/U grade only.) Individualized program of instruction in critical and comprehensive reading, including CLAST skills. Open to students from all levels and major areas. May be repeated for a maximum of three (3) semester hours.

AML 2011. American Authors to 1875 (3). Important writings by representative American authors from the colonial period through the postCivil War era. Typically included are Franklin, Irving, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Douglass, and Emily Dickinson.

AML 2600. The African-American Literary Tradition (3). An examination of the canonical works of black Americans, including Douglass, Chesnutt, Hurston, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, Morrison, and Walker.

ENC 2305r. Topics in Composition (3). Prerequisites: ENC 1101, 1102. Study and practice in various topics in expository writing. Instruction focuses on the conventions and purposes of particular kinds of writing or on certain aspects of composition. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

ENL 2012. British Authors: Beginnings to 1790 (3). Survey of English masterworks intended for students in Liberal Studies and those exploring a literature major. Among the authors typically considered are Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton.

ENL 2022. British Authors: Early Romantics to the Present (3). Survey of English masterworks intended for students in liberal studies and those exploring a literature major. Among the authors typically considered are Wordsworth, Dickens, and Conrad.

LIT 2020. The Short Story (3). Tone, narration, form, and theme in representative short stories.

LIT 2081. Contemporary Literature (3). Poetry, fiction, drama from WWI to the present. For beginning students.

LIT 2189.Postcolonial Literature in English (3). Introduction to English-language literature from third world countries that were former British colonies in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean.

AML 3024. American Authors Since 1875 (3). Significant works by representative Realists, Literary Naturalists, Modernists, and contemporary writers. Authors typically covered include Twain, James, Crane, Chopin, Eliot, Hemingway, Frost, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Wright, Baldwin, Morrison, and O'Connor.

AML 3311. Major Figures in American Literature (3). Examination of selected works of major American writers.

AML 3630.Latino/a Literature in English (3). Introduction to landmark Latino/a works written in English.

AML 3680. American Multi-Ethnic Literature (3). Introduction to backgrounds, traditions, themes, and techniques. Typically includes DuBois, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, Baraka, Momaday, Kingston, Silko, and Anaya.

CRW 3110. Fiction Technique (3). Analysis of and exercises in the elements of fiction: point of view, conflict, characterization, tone, and image.

CRW 3311. Poetic Technique (3). For aspiring poets and critics. Study of the elements of poetry, some practice in writing poetry.

CRW 3410. Dramatic Technique (3). An introduction to playwriting, with emphasis on the relation of the written drama to production. Both published plays and student work will be analyzed.

ENC 3310r. Article and Essay Workshop (3). Writing of nonfiction prose. Papers totaling 8,000 words. Five private conferences. For students above the freshman level. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours. This course will satisfy up to 7,000 words of writing requirements for FAC 6A-10.030.

ENG 3014.Critical Issues in Literary Studies (3). Introduction to the issues and debates that inform contemporary literary studies. Required of all literature track majors.

ENG 3060. The History of Standard English (3). A survey of the evolution of English sounds, inflections, syntax, vocabulary, and orthography from Anglo-Saxon times to the present.

ENG 3110. Film Genres (3). Film as a means of exploring the problems of genre studies: relationship to literary genres, historical continuity, transformation of genre in the film medium.

ENG 3115. Film Theory and Criticism (3). Close reading of forms of film criticism: history, theory, genre studies, and reviews. Typically Eisenstein, Kracauer, Bazin, Sontag, Bogdanovich, Kael, and Sarris. Some films will be viewed.

ENG 3931r. Topics in English (1-3). May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four (24) semester hours.

ENL 3210. Medieval Literature in Translation (3). Literature of the Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman periods: Beowulf, Romance of the Rose, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and others.

ENL 3334. Introduction to Shakespeare (3). An introduction to the study of Shakespeare at the college level. Consideration of representative genres-comedy, history, tragedy, tragi-comedy--drawn from throughout the playwrights career.

LIN 3010. Introduction to Language Study (3). The relationship between meaning, form, and sound in language, including language acquisition, dialects, and grammar.

LIT 3043. Modern Drama (3). From O'Neill, Pirandello, Miller, and Theatre of the Absurd to the present.

LIT 3383. Women in Literature (3). An examination of the representation of women in literature.

AML 4111. The 19th-Century American Novel (3). From Brown and Cooper to Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, and Crane.

AML 4121. The 20th-Century American Novel (3). Typically Dreiser, Dos Passos, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Bellow, and Wright.

AML 4261. Literature of the South (3). Survey from Colonial times to the present, including Byrd, Poe, Simms, Cable, Faulkner, Warren, O'Connor, and others.

AML 4290.Studies in Ethnic Literature (3). Advanced study of a particular ethnicity, period, or topic in ethnic literatures of the United States. May be repeated up to a maximum of twenty-four (24) semester hours.

AML 4604.The African American Literary Tradition (3). Course examines the canonical works of black Americans including Douglass, Chestnutt, Hurston, Wright, Ellison, Morrison, and Walker.

CRW 4120r. Fiction Workshop (3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Practice in short story, novella, or novel. Students will be expected to work toward submission and publication of manuscripts. May be repeated for a total of twenty-four (24) hours credit.

CRW 4320r. Poetry Workshop (3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. For poets who approach excellence and aspire toward publication. May be repeated for a total of twenty-four (24) hours credit.

CRW 4420r. Drama Workshop (3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Students will write, revise, and prepare for submission a one to three-act play; playing time: not less than one hour. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four (24) semester hours.

ENC 4212. Editing: Manuscripts, Documents, Reports (3). Actual editing of anothers work, synthesizing anothers ideas and data, structuring and clarifying.

ENC 4311r. Advanced Article and Essay Workshop (3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Writer-editor relationship between student and instructor. For writers who aspire toward publication. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four (24) semester hours.

ENC 4500. Theories of Composition (3). Prerequisites: ENC 3310r, permission of instructor. An examination of topics in the teaching of composition, including theories of the composing process, invention, revision, assigning, and evaluating student writing, and the relationship between writing and reading.

ENC 4942r. Internship in Editing (0-3). (S/U grade only.) Practical experience in editing, public relations, and other forms of written communications. ENC 4212 recommended as a prerequisite. May be repeated to a maximum of three (3) semester hours.

ENG 4013. Literary Criticism (3). An historical overview of critical texts that consider the nature of literature from antiquity to the early 20th century. Typically includes readings from Plato, Aristotle, Wroth, Dryden, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Arnold, Eliot, Woolf.

ENG 4020. Rhetorical Theory and Practice (3). Prerequisites: ENC 3310r, permission of instructor. Emphasis on contemporary developments in rhetoric and their applicability to writing. For upper-division students who intend to teach English composition.

ENG 4043. Contemporary Critical Theory (3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Advanced study of crosscurrents in later 20th-century critical theory.

ENG 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1-3). Topic to be approved by the director of undergraduate English studies. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four (24) semester hours.

ENG 4932r. Studies in English (1-3). Topics vary. For senior majors and qualified students. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four (24) semester hours.

ENG 4934.Senior Seminar in Literature (3). Prerequisites: Ninety (90) semester hours of college work. Topics vary. Includes an evaluation of oral communication. Required for senior English majors concentrating in literature. Does not count toward the major for concentration in Writing.

ENG 4936r. Honors Thesis (3). Prerequisite: Permission required. For English honors students only. The honors student takes two semesters of thesis work. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

ENG 4938.Advanced Seminar in English (3). For English Honors students only. The honors student takes two seminars. Permission required. May be repeated up to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

ENL 4112. The 18th-Century British Novel (3). Typically includes Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Burney, and Radcliffe.

ENL 4122. The 19th-Century British Novel (3). Typically includes Scott, Thackeray, Dickens, Trollope, Eliot, and Hardy.

ENL 4132. The Modern British Novel (3). Typically includes Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Greene, Spark, and Lessing.

ENL 4161. Renaissance Drama (3). English drama by Shakespeares contemporaries and successors from Marlowe until the closing of the theatres in 1642.

ENL 4171. Restoration and 18th-Century Drama (3). Representative plays of the period 1660-1800. May include plays by Dryden, Etherege, Wycherley, Otway, Congreve, Farquhar, Steele, Rowe, Gay, Fielding, Goldsmith, and Sheridan.

ENL 4218.Middle English Romance (3). An introduction to the Medieval English romance tradition from its beginning with Geoffrey of Monmouth to Malory's Morte d'Arthur.

ENL 4220. Renaissance Poetry and Prose (3). Lyric poetry and prose from Wyatt and Spenser to Shakespeare and the metaphysicals: Donne, Herbert, Marvell, and Vaughan.

ENL 4230. Restoration and 18th-Century British Literature (3). Studies in British poetry and prose from 1660 to 1800.

ENL 4240. British Romantic Literature (3). Studies in poetry and prose from 1785 to 1832.

ENL 4251. Victorian British Literature (3). Studies in poetry and prose from 1830 to 1900.

ENL 4273. Modern British Literature (3). British poetry, fiction, and essays since 1900. Typically includes Hardy, Conrad, Joyce, Yeats, Lawrence, Woolf, Auden, and Lessing.

ENL 4311. Chaucer (3). The High Middle Ages in England seen through the perspective of the Canterbury Tales read in Middle English.

ENL 4333. Shakespeare (3). Study of representative Shakespearean dramas and their relationship to the Renaissance. Typically may include attention to relevant contemporary intellectual, historical, and political movements.

ENL 4341. Milton (3). Miltons life and works; emphasis on Lycidas, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes, and Miltons important libertarian prose.

ENS 4405r. Spoken English for International Teaching Assistants (1-3). (S/U grade only.) Practice and training in speaking current American English appropriate for university classrooms, development of cultural and interpersonal language skills necessary for performing duties as a teaching assistant. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours.

ENS 4406r. Advanced Spoken English for International Teaching Assistants (1-2). (S/U grade only.) Development of speaking and language skills necessary for instruction in a university classroom. Emphasizes content-specific varieties of American English; practice in conversational management required for instruction. May be repeated to a maximum of eight (8) semester hours.

ENS 4407. American Pronunciation for International Teaching Assistants (1-3). (S/U grade only.) Systematic coverage of the sounds of modern American English. Emphasis is on the role of prosodic features in comprehensibility, development of critical listening, activities for developing self-monitoring competencies.

ENS 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1-3). (S/U grade only.) Typically emphasizes classroom observation, self-monitoring techniques, and specialized training. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours.

LIT 4033. Modern Poetry (3). Introductory analysis of techniques and meanings. Typically includes Whitman, Dickinson, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Eliot, Auden, Thomas, and Plath.

LIT 4044r. Readings in Dramatic Literature (3-6). Specific topics in the study of British, American, or Continental drama. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) hours credit.

LIT 4093. Currents in Contemporary Literature (3). Diverse, resurgent, and oppositional trends in literature since 1945; Mailer, Brautigan, Bellow, and others.

LIT 4134. The European Novel Through WWI (3). Includes Balzac, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and others. In translation.

LIT 4144. The Modern European Novel (3). Typically Grass, Robbe-Grillet, Kafka, Solzhenitsyn, Calvino, Duras, Ginzburg, and Kundera in translation.

LIT 4184. Irish Literature (3). Synge, Yeats, Shaw, O'Casey, Joyce, Beckett, and others.

LIT 4304. The Literary Expression of American Popular Culture (3). An introductory course treating the wide variety of literary manifestations of American popular culture as reflections and symptoms of the concerns of modern American society.

LIT 4322. Folklore (3). Introduction to myth, legend, tale, song, ballad, beliefs, and customs.

LIT 4329.African American Folklore (3). This course provides an overview of the major forms of cultural expression developed by African-Americans. The focus will be on African-American folklore as a living tradition to be understood and interpreted.

LIT 4385. Major Women Writers (3). An examination of selected works by significant women writers.

Graduate Courses

AML 5017r. Studies in U.S. Literature to 1875 (3).

AML 5027r. Studies in U.S. Literature Since 1875 (3).

AML 5267r. Studies in Literature of the American South (3).

AML 5296r. Studies in Multi-Ethnic Literature (3).

AML 5608r. Studies in the African-American Literary Tradition (3).

AML 5637r. Studies in Latino/a Literature in English (3).

CRW 5130r. Fiction Workshop (3).

CRW 5331r. Poetry Workshop (3).

CRW 5430r. Drama Workshop (3).

ENC 5216. Editing: Manuscripts, Documents, Reports (3).

ENC 5317r. Article and Essay Workshop (3).

ENC 5700. Theories of Composition (3).

ENC 5720. Research Methods in Rhetoric and Composition (3).

ENC 5945r. Internship in Editing (0-3). (S/U grade only.)

ENG 5009. Introduction to Advanced Studies in English (3).

ENG 5028. Rhetorical Theory and Practice (3).

ENG 5048. Contemporary Critical Theory (3).

ENG 5049r. Studies in Critical Theory (3).

ENG 5057. Poesis: Literary and Creative Writing (3).

ENG 5068r. Studies in Language and Linguistics (3).

ENG 5138r. Studies in Film (3).

ENG 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1-3). (S/U grade only.)

ENG 5933r. Topics in English (1-3).

ENG 5998r. Tutorial in English (1-3). (S/U grade only.)

ENL 5206r. Studies in Old English Language and Literature (3).

ENL 5216r. Studies in Middle English Language and Literature (3).

ENL 5227r. Studies in Renaissance Literature (3).

ENL 5236r. Studies in Restoration and 18th-Century British Literature (3).

ENL 5246r. Studies in British Romantic Literature (3).

ENL 5256r. Studies in Victorian Literature (3).

ENL 5276r. Studies in 20th-Century British Literature (3).

LAE 5370. Teaching English in College (3).

LAE 5946. Teaching English as a Guided Study (3).

LAE 5948r. Supervised Teaching (0-8). (S/U grade only.)

LIT 5017r. Studies in Fiction (3)

LIT 5038r. Studies in Poetry (3).

LIT 5047r. Studies in Drama (3).

LIT 5185r. Studies in Post-Colonial Literature in English (3).

LIT 5186r. Studies in Irish and/or Scottish Literature (3).

LIT 5309r. Studies in Popular Culture (3).

LIT 5327r. Studies in Folklore (3).

LIT 5388r. Studies in Womens Writing (3).

LIT 5399r. Studies in Gender in Literature (3).

ENG 6907r. Directed Readings (1-6). (S/U grade only.)

ENG 6939r. Seminar in English (3).

For listings relating to graduate course work for thesis, dissertation, and masters and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

 

ENGLISH EDUCATION: see Curriculum and Instruction