Florida State University General Bulletin 1998-1999

FSU Homepage Office of the Registrar On-Line Registration 1997-1999 Graduate Bulletin Table of Contents

Academic Departments and Programs (course descriptions)


MOTION PICTURE, TELEVISION, AND RECORDING ARTS

SCHOOL OF MOTION PICTURE, TELEVISION, AND RECORDING ARTS

Dean: Raymond Fielding;
Professor: Stowell;
Associate Professor: Richard;
Filmmakers in Residence: Chase, Kaleko, Kiefer, Leonard, Patterson, Portman;
Visiting Assistant in Film: Ruben;
Screenwriters in Residence: Johnson, Long;
Courtesy Appointments: Hoffman, LaFrance

The Florida State University School of Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts (the Film School) offers a bachelor of fine arts (BFA) and master of fine arts (MFA). The BFA combines schooling in filmmaking with solid grounding in liberal studies. The curriculum directs students through the program in such a way that they will begin learning the special language of film by making short 16mm silent films, progress to 16mm double system sound films, and culminate with a senior project film. The Film School funds all student production expenses, including those of the thesis films. Screenwriting, production, and film analysis are viewed as part of an integrated process. The goal of the program is to produce educated, literate, creative filmmakers; the focus of the program is on fictional narrative films. Undergraduate students in the BFA program will receive a well-rounded liberal arts education which includes writing courses. The major courses include screenwriting and storyboarding, directing, editing, camera and lighting, sound, production management, film history, and aesthetics. Please consult the Graduate Bulletin for information regarding the MFA program.

The purpose of these curricula is to furnish the conceptual framework, the professional training, and the working environment for eventual participation in a profession that is a powerful influence in our culture. The goals of the School of Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts are to fully educate students and to help them become integral members of the academic community of The Florida State University, responsible members of the entertainment profession, and participants in a creative and artistic process.

The program in motion picture, television, and recording arts is still in its formative stages, and as such is under constant review and subject to change. For current information contact Dr. Peter Stowell, Director of the Undergraduate Film School.

State of Florida Common Course Prerequisites

The State of Florida has identified common course prerequisites for this University degree program. These prerequisites are lower-level courses that are required for preparation for the University major prior to a student receiving a baccalaureate degree from The Florida State University. They may be taken either at a community college or in a university lower-division program. It is preferred that these common course prerequisites be completed in the freshman and sophomore years; they may also be completed after admission to the major.

The following lists the common course prerequisites or approved substitutions necessary for this degree program:

  1. FIL X401 History of Motion Picture I or FIL X400 History of Motion Picture or FIL X400 History of Film or FIL X400 History of Film I or FIL X400 Film: History and Aesthetics;
  2. FIL X203 Motion Picture and Television Production I or FIL X200 Introduction to Film Production or FIL X200 Film Production I or FIL X200 Film Production or FIL X200C Film I;
  3. FIL X100 Film and Television Writing or FIL X100 Film & Television Writing or FIL X100 Writing for Film & Television or FIL X100 Motion Picture Writing I;
  4. FIL X212 Motion Picture and Television Production or FIL X250 Post-Production Workshop or FIL X250 Film Editing & Post-Production Workshop. Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts

Requirements for a Major in Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts

This major emphasizes three areas: production skills, screenwriting, and interpretative analysis. Traditional classes will be supplemented with 1) problem-solving seminars simulating entertainment business dilemmas; 2) laboratory courses in production techniques; 3) screenings conducted by active professionals in which their contributions are analyzed; and 4) workshops by professional filmmakers.

The degree will require completion of a minimum of one hundred twenty (120) semester hours. This should take approximately ten (10) semesters, including three summer sessions, for students entering the program as freshmen.

Selected students will be invited to participate for one semester in the overseas study center in London, administered by The Florida State University.

Admission

This is a limited access program, therefore admission is selective and competitive. Approximately fifteen (15) freshmen and fifteen (15) transfer students are admitted each year as apprentice film students. For freshmen, the apprenticeship will last two years; for transfer students, the apprenticeship will last one year. A student seeking to enter the program must offer an acceptable grade point average (GPA) and be eligible for admission to FSU. Applications must be made to The Florida State University Office of Admissions, as well as special application to The School of Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts (available from the office of the Film School). All applicants must submit a 500 to 1,000 word essay describing their background, artistic experiences, creative influences, personal objectives, and future career goals. Deadline for application to the undergraduate program is January 31 for students seeking admission in the fall semester.

Grade Requirements

BFA students must maintain a B average in all major requirements.

Invitation into the Major

At the end of the apprenticeship period, faculty will invite into the major those apprentices felt most suited for the Film School mission.

Retention

Continuation as an apprentice or as a major in the Film School will depend on the development of each student's talents, skills, professional discipline, and academic record. A students work and commitment are under continuous review, and any candidate who fails to maintain high standards will be dismissed from the program.

Probation and/or Dismissal

All apprentices and majors will adhere to the University Academic Honor System, Student Conduct Code, and Summons to Responsible Freedom.

At the end of each semester, the faculty and director will meet to discuss the work, behavior, grades and progress of some apprentices and majors. Certain students will be notified of probation or dismissal by a letter stating their status, with an invitation to meet with the director. A student may be placed on probation or dismissal under the following circumstances:

  1. Cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 in all major requirements resulting in a one semester probation. Student will be reinstated in good standing if the cumulative major GPA rises to 3.0 by the end of the following semester. Failure to raise the GPA will result in dismissal from the program. Attendance will be taken in all classes at the beginning of class. Anyone not in class at that time will be considered absent; anyone leaving class early may also be counted as absent. Two undocumented absences per class are permitted for all students. Approval of other absences is up to the instructor and will require documentation to confirm the legitimacy of the absence;
  2. Professional behavior is expected of apprentices and majors at all times. Therefore, behavior so negative, disruptive or destructive as to compromise the work of fellow students or the effectiveness of the faculty and/or inability to work positively in a collaborative environment shall constitute grounds for probation or dismissal. Peer evaluations will be considered in this evaluation process. A student will be reinstated in good standing if in the judgment of the faculty and the director behavioral problems have been corrected. A students failure to correct problems will result in dismissal from the program;
  3. Any unauthorized use or possession, or willful destruction of Film School equipment, facilities, film stock or finished film will result in immediate notification of the proper authorities. The outcome of their decisions will determine the actions of the Film School with respect to the student(s) involved.

Liberal Studies Program

All undergraduates majoring in film are required to meet The Florida State University liberal studies requirements as specified in the Undergraduate Degree Requirements section of this General Bulletin. It is recommended students register for CHM 1020 Chemistry for Liberal Studies and PHY 1020 Fundamentals of Physics as electives or to fulfill the requirement in the natural science area of liberal studies. These courses benefit the student in preparation for sound and lighting courses.

Transfer Students

Fifteen (15) transfer students will be accepted into the School of Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts. Applications must be made to The Florida State University Office of Admissions, as well as special application to the School of Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts (available from the office of the Film School). All applicants with an acceptable GPA must submit a 500 to 1,000 word essay describing their background, artistic experiences, creative influences, personal objectives, and future career goals. All application materials must be received by the School of Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts by January 31 for the applicant to be considered for admission the following fall semester. Transfer students must satisfy the same major requirements as students who take all of their course work in the School of Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts.

Honors in the Major

The undergraduate Film School offers a program in honors in the major to encourage talented juniors and seniors to write a feature length screenplay (or undertake independent and original research) as part of the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. For requirements and other information, see the University Honors Program and Honor Societies section of this General Bulletin.

Health Insurance

Students seeking degrees in certain majors, including film, assume any exposure to the particular hazards associated with that major. As protection for our students, the Film School requires that majors present proof of health and accident insurance (copy of policy showing the student as covered) prior to registration in the fall semester each year. Students are expected to maintain this insurance throughout their enrollment in the Film School. Registration will be administratively canceled at the end of the second week of classes for any students failing to provide proof of insurance.

Film Studies Minor in the School Of Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts

Director: Peter Stowell, Film School

The film studies minor will give students the opportunity to select a program of study that examines the many facets of American and international films. The interdisciplinary nature of the program allows students to experience different approaches to film study: film and cultural differences, basic film vocabulary, film history, film and social forces, film genres, film study theories, film directors, and film aesthetics.

Requirements for a Minor in Film Studies

The interdisciplinary minor requires the completion of fifteen (15) semester hours in courses approved for film studies. All students are required to take either FIL 2001 Introduction to Motion Picture and Television Appreciation or FIL 2000 Elements of Film. The remaining hours may be selected from the film studies' offerings. For assistance in advisement, contact Meryl Warren, A3103 University Center.

Core Courses

(One Required of all Minors)

FIL 2000 Elements of Film (3)

FIL 2001 Introduction to Motion Picture and Television Appreciation (3)

Other Film Studies Courses

ENG 3110 Film Genres (3)

ENG 3112 Film Theory and Criticism (3)

FIL 2400 History of Motion Pictures (3)

FIL 3106 Film and Television Writing (3)

FIL 3503 Contemporary Cinema (3)

FIL 4501 Film Aesthetics (3)

FRW 3391r French Cinema (3)

GEW 3391r German Cinema (3)

HUM 3321 Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th Century Culture (3)

ITW 3391r Italian Cinema (3)

RTV 3200 Media Techniques (3)

SPW 3391r Hispanic Cinema (3)

Definition of Prefix

FIL - Film

Undergraduate Courses

FIL 2001. Introduction to Film (3). Introduction to the basic terminology, techniques, and contributions of filmmaking and critical analysis skills of film/video form and content. Fulfills liberal studies area of fine and performing arts.

FIL 2102. Screenwriting I (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Introduction to the basic techniques of screenwriting and storyboarding. Exercises in story structure, dialogue, and character development. Introduction to screenwriting and storyboarding computer software. This course will satisfy up to 7,000 words of writing requirements for FAC 6A-10.030.

FIL 2201. Filmmaking I (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Provides a basic understanding of film production technology, equipment operation, terminology, and techniques.

FIL 2211.Film Editing (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Analyzes, discusses and puts into practice the skills and techniques required to edit a narrative motion picture.

FIL 2291.Film Sound (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Teaches the principles of sound and the basic practices involved in creating a motion picture sound track. Also covers the aesthetic use of sound in motion pictures.

FIL 2400.History of Motion Pictures (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Overview of film as an industry, mass medium and art form.

FIL 3111. Screenwriting II (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Development of sophisticated story ideas, treatments, character biographies, storyboards, step-outlines, first drafts, and revisions of both original ideas and adaptations. This course will satisfy up to 7,000 words of writing requirements for FAC 6A-10.030.

FIL 3201.Cinematography (3). Prerequisites: FIL 2000 and core; majors only. Emphasis on narrative; non-narrative potential and examination of film as an alternative means of image-making.

FIL 3202.Filmmaking II (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Provides understanding of objective oriented acting techniques and developing an effective method for working with actors in rehearsal and on set. Requires directing a short film project.

FIL 3231r.Documentary Filmmaking (1-6). Prerequisite: Majors only. View and discuss documentary films from various eras, countries, and points of view as a means of understanding personal aesthetic as a documentary filmmaker. Students plan, script, budget, shoot, edit and mix documentaries. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

FIL 3251.Film Camera and Lighting (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Provides a theoretical and practical knowledge of all aspects of cinematography cameras and lenses, filmstocks, exposure, lights, lighting and composition.

FIL 3502r.Film Styles (3-6). Prerequisite: Majors only. Analyzes motion picture form and content through the styles of filmmakers with emphasis on genres, national movements, and other topics of interest. Repeatable to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

FIL 3932r. Special Topics (3-12). Prerequisite: Majors only. An analysis of specialized topics in motion pictures. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours. May be repeated during the same semester.

FIL 3962.BFA Qualifying Exam (0). Prerequisite: Majors only. Evaluates the progress of the student and recommends continuance in the film school or directs the student toward other areas of study.

FIL 3971r.Thesis Film Support (2-12). Prerequisite: Majors only. Principles and responsibilities of grips, gaffers, assistant directors, assistant camerapersons, and production managers and performance of these responsibilities on the set of BFA thesis films. Repeatable to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours.

FIL 4112.Screenwriting III (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Development of thesis script story ideas, treatments, character biographies, storyboards, step-outline, first drafts, and revisions of both original ideas and adpatations. This course will satisfy up to 7,000 words of writing requirement for FAC 6A-10.030.

FIL 4122.Feature Screenwriting: Development (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Teaches the various techniques of scene breakdown, setting up, sequencing, character development and dialogue development. Also teaches rewriting techniques to strengthen first drafts.

FIL 4123.Feature Screenwriting (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Teaches aspects of feature screenwriting format, pitching ideas, creating and developing character, story and dialogue.

FIL 4213. Production: Advanced Editing (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Offers advanced study in film editing techniques and styles.

FIL 4253. Production: Advanced Cinematography (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Introduces advanced lighting techniques and allows hands-on excercises stressing the creative use of lighting for mood and storytelling.

FIL 4292r.Advanced Filmmaking (3-9). Prerequisite: Majors only. Advanced principles and practice of making a short, sync-sound, 16 mm film. May be repeated to a maximum of nine (9) semester hours.

FIL 4501. Film Aesthetics (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Analysis of film which attempts to answer three basic questions: 1) What is film? 2) How do we perceive film ? 3) How is an aesthetic developed?

FIL 4602.Film Business Planning (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Exposes students to current business trends and issues in the film industry; introduces case studies that examine all business aspects surrounding a feature film; introduces current readings on the film industry.

FIL 4603.Film Exhibition and Advertising (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. To provide background in the marketing, advertising and exhibition of film to the audiences of this product.

FIL 4604. Film Producing and Finance (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. An introduction to the techniques necessary to create a responsible business approach for the production of motion pictures and to create a greater individual awareness of the motion picture producer as a career.

FIL 4605.Film Law (3). Prerequisite: Majors only. Provides a working knowledge of the specialized concepts and vocabulary pertaining to entertainment-related forms of intellectual property and the contractual relationships necessary to finance, create, and license various forms of entertainment.

FIL 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1-3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Junior standing; majors only. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

FIL 4910r. Application of Research and Creative Methods (1-3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Junior standing; majors only. Participation in a faculty or graduate student research and/or creative project. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

FIL 4923r.Undergraduate Film Seminar (1-6). Prerequisite: Majors only. Development of a creative film project under the direction of a faculty member or industry professional in various areas.

FIL 4940r. Application of Instruction Methods (1-3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Majors only. Participation in the instructional process under the strict supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.

FIL 4945r. Professional Internship (3-12). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Majors only. Apprenticeship experience with a company involved in film/video production, distribution, or exhibition. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours.

FIL 4970r. Thesis Defense (0). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Majors only. Presentation of senior thesis film to the faculty and student body for review and approval.

FIL 4972r.Thesis Film Production Management (3-6). Prerequisite: Majors only. Production management for BFA thesis films. May be repeated to a maximum of fifteen (15) semester hours.

FIL 4973r.Thesis Film (1-15). Prerequisite: Majors only. Study and practice of all the creative aspects of BFA thesis films. May be repeated to a maximum of fifteen (15) semester hours.

FIL 4975r.Undergraduate Honors Thesis (3-12). Prerequisite: Admission to undergraduate film school honors program; majors only. Student must complete a minimum of six (6) semester hours; may be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours.

Graduate Courses

FIL 5005. Introduction to the Motion Picture,

Television, and Recording Arts Industry (6).

FIL 5155. Screenwriting I: Techniques and Treatments (3).

FIL 5156. Screenwriting II: Narrative Techniques (3).

FIL 5157. Screenwriting III: Comedy Workshop (3).

FIL 5158. Screenwriting IV: Television Workshop (3).

FIL 5159. Screenwriting V: Motion Picture Workshop (3).

FIL 5209r. Basic Film Production (3-6).

FIL 5215. Producing I (3).

FIL 5216. Producing II (3).

FIL 5217r. Principles and Practice of Technical and Creative Support (3).

FIL 5218r. Basic Video Production (3-6).

FIL 5219. Practicum in Technical Support (3).

FIL 5256. Synchronous and Nonsynchronous Sound Workshop (3).

FIL 5257r. Editing and Postproduction Workshop (3-6).

FIL 5258. Production Design Workshop (3).

FIL 5259. Postproduction Sound Workshop (3).

FIL 5265r. Directing: Single-Camera Techniques (3-6).

FIL 5266r. Directing: Multicamera Workshop (3-9).

FIL 5267r. Directing: Single-Camera Workshop (3-9).

FIL 5268. Directing (3).

FIL 5278r. Camera and Light Mechanics (3-6).

FIL 5279. Lighting Workshop (3).

FIL 5285. Intermediate Television Editing (3).

FIL 5286. Advanced Television Editing (3).

FIL 5295. Acting for the Camera (3).

FIL 5415. History and Criticism I (3).

FIL 5416. History and Criticism II (3).

FIL 5505r. Critical Studies in Film and Television (3).

FIL 5506. Critical Methods in Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts (3).

FIL 5508. Critical Methods of Film Analysis (3).

FIL 5509. Aesthetics of Editing (3).

FIL 5605r. Production Management Workshop (3-6).

FIL 5606. Distribution and Financing Workshop (3).

FIL 5615r. Advanced Workshop in Area of Specialization (3).

FIL 5616r. Preproduction and Production Planning (3-12).

FIL 5617. Advanced Editing (3).

FIL 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3-12). (S/U grade only.)

FIL 5912r. Supervised Research or Creative Activity (3). (S/U grade only.)

FIL 5921r. Colloquium in Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts (3).

FIL 5930r. Proseminar in Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts (1). (S/U grade only.)

FIL 5931r. Special Topics in Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts (3-12).

FIL 5941r. Supervised Teaching (3). (S/U grade only.)

FIL 5955r. Apprenticeship (3-12). (S/U grade only.)

FIL 5962r. MFA Qualifying Project (3-15).

FIL 5964. MFA Qualifying Exam (0). (S/U grade only.)

FIL 5975r. Thesis (3-12). (S/U grade only.)

FIL 5977r. MFA Thesis Production (3-15). (S/U grade only.)

For listings relating to graduate course work for thesis, dissertation, and masters and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

 

MOTOR BEHAVIOR: see Nutrition, Food, and Movement Sciences

MOVEMENT SCIENCE: see Nutrition, Food, and Movement Sciences

MULTILINGUAL/MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION: see Curriculum and Instruction