Florida State University General Bulletin 1998-1999

FSU Homepage Office of the Registrar On-Line Registration 1997-1999 Graduate Bulletin Table of Contents

Academic Departments and Programs (course descriptions)


Department of Nutrition, Food, and Movement Sciences

College of Human Sciences

Chair: Bob Moffatt;
Professors: Harris, Haymes, Moffatt, Sathe, Shea, Toole;
Associate Professors: Abood, Anderson, Cook, Dorsey, Overton, Rankins;
Assistant Professor: Levenson;
Adjunct Professor: Dupont;
Coordinator of Food Service Administration: Truesdell;
Professors Emeriti: Cate, Erdman, Kassouny, Watts;
Affiliate Faculty: Gibson, Oravitz, Sehgal

The undergraduate program in the Department of Nutrition, Food and Movement Sciences offers three majors under the Food and Nutrition degree. In response to the wide diversity of training needs and career opportunities in the field these are: 1) dietetics; 2) nutrition and fitness and 3) food and nutrition science. Although students may choose to take electives from a second major, no double majors or minors are allowed within the degree program.

The purpose of the dietetics emphasis is to meet the competencies of the American Dietetics Associations Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) in order to prepare students for post baccalaureate training (dietetic internship or advanced pre-professional practice program) needed to sit for the Registration Examination for dietitians. In addition to requirements for graduation, ADA requires the elective of food service laboratory. Careers are available for dietitians in clinical settings, research, community, management, education and consulting.

The food and nutrition science major has a strong science base that prepares students for graduate study in the field, medical school or other careers in the medical field. Students are prepared for job opportunities in the food industry and government agencies.

Nutrition and fitness emphases meet the demand for professionals with expertise in both human nutrition and exercise physiology. Four options are available in this major: fitness, exercise physiology, sports medicine (athletic training) and pre- physical therapy. Students in the fitness option are prepared for graduate study as well as positions as personal trainers and health fitness instructors with both hospital-based wellness programs and corporate fitness programs. The exercise physiology option prepares students for graduate study in exercise physiology and for medical school. Students in the pre- physical therapy option complete course work required for entrance to physical therapy programs. The sports medicine option provides the course work for certification by National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA). In addition, many students can qualify for the NATA certification exam by completing required practicum training as electives.

For each undergraduate major, students may have the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills through supervised practicums. In the practicum courses, students may be assigned to work with specific medical, food service or community agencies or an adult fitness class.

Academic Performance

  1. Students who earn more than five unsatisfactory grades (U, F, D-, D, D+) in any course required for the majors in dietetics, food and nutrition science or nutrition and fitness (including chemistry, biological sciences, statistics, or required electives) at The Florida State University or elsewhere, whether or not repeated, will not be permitted to graduate with a degree in food and nutrition.
  2. In order to graduate with a degree in food and nutrition students must have a minimum GPA of 2.5.

State of Florida Common Course Prerequisites

The State of Florida has identified common course prerequisites for this University degree program. These prerequisites are lower level courses that are required for preparation for the University major prior to a student receiving a baccalaureate degree from The Florida State University. They may be taken either at a community college or in a university lower division program. It is preferred that these common course prerequisites be completed in the freshman and sophomore years.

The following lists the common course prerequisites or approved substitutions necessary for the dietetics major:

Dietetics

  1. CGS 2060 or CGS 1061;
  2. CHM X045/X045L or CHM X030X or CHM X025C;
  3. CHM X046/X046L;
  4. CHM X200C or CHM X210/X210L and CHM X211/X211L;
  5. ECO 2013 or ECO 2023 or ECO 2000;
  6. HUN X201 or NUR 1192;
  7. MAC 1105 or MAC X142;
  8. PCB 2010;
  9. PSY 2012 or PSY 2020 or PSY 2013;
  10. SYG 2000;
  11. MCB 2004/2004L.

A grade of "C-" or better is required in all courses to be counted toward the degree.

Core Program

  1. Liberal Studies. Required courses which may be taken in fulfillment of liberal studies include: basic nutrition, general chemistry, organic chemistry, general psychology, sociology, economics, mathematics, computer science, statistics, and/or microbiology.
  2. College of Human Sciences Core. The college core is to be met by taking the following courses: HOE 3050 and FAD 2230 plus one of the following depending of the major/emphasis: HEE 4054, 4171 or FAD 4601.
  3. Courses required for all majors/emphases. CGS 2060 or equivalent; CHM 1045/1045L and 1046/1046L or CHM 1030; CHM 2200C or 2210; HUN 1201, 3224, 3225; MAC 1105 or better; BSC 2085/2086 or PET 3301C; STA 2122 or 3014.

Bachelor of Science

To complete requirements for the bachelor of science (BS) degree in food and nutrition, the following are required: 1) general graduation requirements for the University, 2) the preceding core requirements, and 3) specific requirements for the area of emphasis chosen. A minimum grade of C or better must be earned for all required courses. A course may not be retaken more than twice (for a total of three times).

The following are the specific requirements for each major (or area of emphasis) within the degree of food and nutrition.

Dietetics. Lower division: see liberal studies requirements, college core and common prerequisites. Upper division: BCH 3023; DIE 3003, 4244, 4244L, 4315; FOS 3022, 3022L, 4114C; FSS 4135, 4315; HEE 4054; HUN 3224, 3225; electives. In addition, students applying for internships will need to take FSS 4315L.

Food and Nutrition Science. Lower division: see liberal studies, college core plus: BSC 2010; ECO 2013 or equivalent; CGS 2060; CHM 1045, 1045L, 1046, 1046L, 2210, 2211, 2211L; HUN 1201; MAC 1113, 1140, 2311; MCB 2004, 2004L; PHY 2053C; PSY 2012; STA 2122 or 3014. Upper division: BCH 3023C; CHM 3120C; FOS 3022, 3022L, 4114C; HEE 4054 or 4171; HUN 3224, 3225; PET 3301C or BSC 2085 and BSC 2086; PSY 2012; three (3) semester hours of food and nutrition electives.

Nutrition and Fitness ( Exercise Physiology Option). Lower division: see liberal studies and college core plus: BSC2010, 2010L, 2011, 2011L; CGS 2060; CHM 1045, 1045L, 1046, 1046L, 2210, 2211; HUN 1201; MAC 1113, 1140, 2311; PHY2053C, 2054C; STA 2122. Upper division: BCH 3023C; HEE 4054, 4171 or FAD 4601; one (1) semester hour of HUN 4905r; PEL 4384C; PET 3102, 3301C, 3302C, 3380C, 4021, 4224C; three (3) semester hours of department electives.

Nutrition and Fitness (Fitness Option). Lower division: see liberal studies and college core plus: CGS 2060; CHM 1030, 2200C, HSC 2400; MAC 1105 or better; STA 2122 or 3014. Upper division: FOS 3395; HEE 4054 or 4171 or FAD 4601; HUN 3224, 3225; HSC 4711; PEL 4384C; PET 3102, 3301C, 3302C, 3368, 3380C, 3600, 4224C; three (3) semester hours of department electives.

Nutrition and Fitness (Pre Physical Therapy Option). Lower division: see liberal studies and college core plus: BSC 2010; 2010L, 2011, 2011L; CGS 2060; CHM 1045, 1045L, 1046, 1046L, 2200C or 2210; HSC 2400; HUN 1201; MAC 1113, 1140; PHY 2053C, 2054C; PSY 2012; STA 2122. Upper division: FAD 4601; HUN 3224, 3225; HSC 4711; ET 3102, 3301C, 3302C, 3380C, 3600, 4021C, 4224C, 4623; three (3) semester hours of department electives.

Nutrition and Fitness (Sports Medicine Option). Lower division: see liberal studies and college core plus: BSC 2010, 2011, 2011L; CGS 2060; CHM 1030, CHM 2200C, HUN 1201; PSY 2012; STA 2122. Upper division: FAD 4601, HUN 3224, 3225; HSC 4200, 4711; PET 3102, 3301C, 3302C, 3368, 3380C, 3600, 4021C, 4224C, 4623; SOW 4702 or NUR 4642. Students fulfilling clock hours for NATA certification must also take sport medicine practicum hours as electives. See the department.

Honors in the Major

The Department of Nutrition, Food and Movement Sciences offers a program in honors in the major to encourage talented juniors and seniors to undertake independent and original research as part of the undergraduate experience. Students complete a senior thesis which usually involves six (6) semester hours, and present an honors seminar. For requirements and other information, see University Honors Program and Honor Societies sections of this General Bulletin and your advisor.

Requirements for a Minor in Food and Nutrition or in Nutrition and Fitness.

A minimum of twelve (12) semester hours are required for a minor.

A minor in nutrition and food science must include HUN 1201; FOS 3395 or FOS 3022; plus any six (6) hours from PET 3368 or any courses with prefixes HUN, FOS, or DIE.Students should be aware that many courses have additional prerequisites.

A minor in nutrition and fitness must include HUN 1201; PET 3301C, 3368, and 3380.

Masters and Doctoral Degrees

The Department of Nutrition, Food and Movement Sciences offers work leading to the master of science (MS) in nutrition and food science, the master of science (MS) in movement science, the doctor of philosophy (PhD) in human sciences, and the doctor of philosophy (PhD) in movement science. Consult the Graduate Bulletin for details.

Definition of Prefixes

DIE Dietetics
FOS Food Science
FSS Food Service System
HSC Health Education and Safety
HUN Human Nutrition
PEL Physical Education Activities (General): LandObject Centered
PET Physical Education Theory

Undergraduate Courses

Note: These courses are open to all majors. Please note prerequisites.

DIE 3003. Introduction to Dietetics (1). (S/U grade only.) An introduction to dietetics, the professional opportunities for registered dieticians, and the role of the American Dietetic Association in dietetics education and practice.
FOS 3395. Food and the Consumer (3). Prerequisites: CHM 1030; HUN 1201. Food composition, nutritional quality, and safety. Influence of food processing on food quality and safety. Consumer aspects of food including food selection, food management, and safety.
HSC 2400. First Aid (2). Successful completion allows students to earn American Red Cross certification in community first aid and safety. This includes adult CPR, child CPR, and first aid. In addition, OSHA recommendations, blood borne pathogen precautions and injuries will be discussed.
HUN 1201. The Science of Nutrition (3). Elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
HUN 2125. Food and Society (3). Impact of society on human food ways, role of food and nutrition in national development and global politics. For nonmajors.
HUN 3412. Life Cycle Nutrition (3). Prerequisite: HUN 1201. Nutrition during pregnancy, lactation, and growth. Effects of nutrition on mother and child. Interrelationships of diet, nutrition, emotional development, behavior, and stress. Open to non major.
PET 2104. Lifestyle Patterns for Optimal Well-being (3). Designed to integrate the health-related disciplines found in the Department of Nutrition, Food, and Movement Sciences. Intended as an elective for the general student population.
PET 3102. Introduction to Exercise Sciences (1). (S/U grade only.) An introducton to fields of study and careers in areas of exercise physiology, motor behavior, athletic training, health and fitness, physical therapy. Students will examine preparation for careers, including the role of various accrediting organizations. Current professional issues will be discussed. This course is open to non-majors.
PET 3301C. Functional Anatomy and Physiology I (4). The study of the functional anatomy and physiology of the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary and endocrine systems, and part of the nervous system. This course serves as the first part of a two-semester sequence.
PET 3302C. Functional Anatomy and Physiology II (4). Prerequisite: PET 3301C. Continuation of a two semester sequence of functional anatomy and physiology which includes the integumentary, nervous, lymphatic, immune and reproductive systems.

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

DIE 4225C. Diet Assessment (2). Prerequisite: Senior status. This elective for dietetics majors focuses on diet assessment in the computer lab using commercially available software. Emphases include the strengths and weaknesses of diet surveys, methods of recording diet intake, food composition data and the standards used to judge adequacy.
DIE 4244C. Nutrition in Disease (3). Prerequisites: HUN 3224 or BCH 3023, PET 3301C or BSC 3086. Corequisite: HUN 3225. Metabolism in disease and the adaptation of diet in the treatment or prevention of disease.
DIE 4244L. Nutrition in Disease Laboratory (1). Prerequisite: DIE 3003. Corequisite: DIE 4244. Application of the principles and concepts of nutrition therapy to meet nutrient, medical, social, and psychological needs of patients.
DIE 4315. Community Nutrition (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201; DIE 3003. The planning, implementation, and evaluation of nutrition programs in the community; public nutrition policy formulation.
FOS 3022. Foods (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201; CHM 1030. Introduction to the physiochemical properties of food and the relationship of these properties to preparation techniques and food quality. Management and service of food.
FOS 3022L. Foods Laboratory (1). Prerequisite or Corequisite: FOS 3022. Introduction to the physiochemical properties of food and the relationship of these properties to preparation techniques and food quality. Management and service of food.
FOS 4114C. Food Science (4). Prerequisites: FOS 3022, 3022L. Chemistry of foods and their behavior during processing. Assessment of food quality.
FOS 4914r. Tutorial in Food Science (1). (S/U grade only.) Small group discussions or project work. Topics selected in contemporary issues or current research. Maximum enrollment of ten (10) students per tutorial. Repeatable when topics change to a maximum of four (4) semester hours.
FSS 4135. Institutional Food Economics (3). Prerequisite: DIE 3003; ECO 2000 or 2013. Wholesale market functions and purchase of food for institutional use.
FSS 4315. Institutional Organization and Administration (3). Prerequisites: DIE 3003; FOS 3022; and permission of instructor. Managerial concepts and administration concerns involved with institutional food production.
FSS 4315L. Institutional Organization and Administration Laboratory (3). Prerequisites: FSS 4315, FOS 3022L. Practical laboratory experience in the application of management concepts to institutional food administration.
HSC 4711. Wellness/Health Risk Reduction (3). Emphasis is on positive lifestyle practices to achieve high-level wellness. Topics include mind/body relationships, nutrition, physical fitness, stress, immunity and infection, and chronic disease risk-reduction.
HSC 4999r. Tutorial in Health Promotion (1). (S/U grade only.) Small group discussions or project work. Topics selected in contemporary issues or current research. Maximum enrollment of ten (10) students per tutorial. Repeatable when topics change to a maximum of four (4) semester hours.
HUN 3224. Intermediary Metabolism of Nutrients I (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201; CHM 2200C. Part of a two-semester sequence emphasizing the physiochemical role of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in metabolic pathways; their integration and regulation; bases for determining requirements for energy-yielding nutrients and energy and dietary standards; cell growth and body composition.
HUN 3225. Intermediary Metabolism of Nutrients II (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201, BCH 3023C or HUN 3224, PET 3301 or BSC 3086. Part of a two-semester sequence. Emphasizes the physiochemical role of vitamins, minerals, and water in metabolic pathways; their integration and regulation; bases for determining requirements for vitamins, minerals, and water and dietary standards; nutrition surveys and evaluation of nutrition status.
HUN 3934r. Special Topics in Food and Nutrition (3-6). Prerequisite: HUN 1201. Topics in community nutrition, food science and technology, developmental and metabolic aspects of nutrition. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours as content changes. Consult instructor.
HUN 4905r. Directed Individual Study (13). May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.
HUN 4913r. Honors Thesis (36). May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.
HUN 4914r. Tutorial in Nutrition (1). (S/U grade only.) Small group discussions or project work. Topics selected in contemporary issues or current research. Maximum enrollment of ten (10) students per tutorial. Repeatable when topics change to a maximum of four (4)semester hours.
HUN 4931. Honors Seminar (1).
HUN 4941r. Nutrition Practicum (14). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisites: HEE 4054, 2.50 GPA. Supervised field experience with a selected government or nongovernment agency at the local or state level. May be repeated to a maximum of four (4) semester hours.
PEL 4384C. Exercise Testing and Prescription (3). Prerequisite: PET 3380C. This course is designed to examine techniques of evaluation for physical fitness and health with a particular emphasis on aerobic capacity, flexibility, strength, and body composition and to design, implement, and administer programs for developing physical fitness and lifestyle changes.
PET 3368. Nutrition and Sports (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201; PET 3301. The effects of sports training upon individual nutrient stores and requirements. The effects of nutrient intake upon sports performance.
PET 3380C. Applied Exercise Physiology (4). Prerequisite: PET 3301C. The nature of muscular, metabolic, cardiovascular, and respiratory adjustment to acute and chronic exercise.
PET 3600. Athletic Training (3). Prerequisite: PET 3301C. Course includes advanced topics and issues pertaining to athletic training as established by the national athletic trainers association to prepare students for national certification examination.
PET 3931r. Special Topics in Wellness and Exercise Science (36). Topics in wellness, health promotion, exercise physiology, biomechanics and motor behavior. Consult instructor. May be repeated as content changes for a total of six (6) semester hours.
PET 3940r. Sports Medicine Practicum (03). Prerequisites: HSC 2400 or equivalent; permission of the instructor; 2.5 GPA. Provides the competencies and clock hours required for certification as an athletic trainer. Students must apply through the department, typically in the spring of the freshman year. May be repeated with permission for a total of three (3) semester hours. Additional clock hours may be obtained without academic credit by registering for zero (0) hours.
PET 4021C. Biomechanics (4). Prerequisite: PET 3301C. The course is structured into two major instructional units: foundations of human movement, and mechanical analysis of human motion. These units function to stimulate interest in quantitative biomechanics that integrates basic anatomy, physics, calculus and neurophysiology for the study of human movement. This knowledge will assist students in developing an understanding of the biomechanical principles to incorporate in applied settings such as physical therapy, sports medicine and health and fitness programs.
PET 4213. Success in Sports (3). The course will focus on profiles of elite athletes. Emphasis will be placed on inherited and acquired capacities for elite performance. Pertinent supporting factors which enhance performance will be studied.
PET 4224C. Motor Control and Learning (4). Prerequisite: PET 3301C. Examines theories, principles, and practical applications in motor control and learning. Attention is given to the physiological and psychological foundations of motor control and learning. The motor control and learning laboratory portion of this course constitutes one (1) credit of the four (4) credit course. Required for nutrition and fitness majors.
PET 4623. Evaluation and Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries (3). Prerequisites: PET 3301C, 3600. Physiological and mechanical principles of therapeutic exercise, evaluation procedures, and rehabilitation procedures for treating sports injuries will be covered. Required for athletic training certification.
PET 4914r. Tutorial in Exercise Physiology (1). (S/U grade only.) Small group discussions or project work. Topics selected in contemporary issues or current research. Maximum enrollment of ten students per tutorial. Repeatable to a maximum of four (4) semester hours when the topic changes.
PET 4948r. Practicum in Exercise Sciences (16). Prerequisites: 2.75 GPA; HSC 2400 or equivalent; PET 3380C; permission of instructor. Supervised field experience in exercise physiology or motor control. May include research, athletic training or, community fitness projects. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours with permission of the instructor.

Graduate Courses

DIE 5248. Clinical Nutrition in the Treatment and Prevention of Disease (4).
FOS 5424. Food Preservation (3).
FOS 5930r. Seminar in Food and Nutrition Science (1).
FOS 5936. Selected Topics in Food Science and Technology (3).
FOS 6351C. Physical and Chemical Techniques in Food and Nutrition (3).
FOS 6930r. Seminar in Food and Nutrition Science (1).
HSC 5605. Models of Health Behavior (3).
HUN 5242. Carbohydrates, Fats, and Proteins (3).
HUN 5243. Vitamins and Minerals (3).
HUN 5802. Research Design and Methodology (2).
HUN 5802L. Research Design and Methodology Laboratory (3).
HUN 5910r. Supervised Research (1-3). (S/U grade only.)
HUN 5930r. Food and Nutrition Seminar (1-4).
HUN 5938r. Special Topics in Nutrition (3).
HUN 6248r. Advances in Nutrition and Food Science (3-12).
HUN 6906r. Directed Individual Study (1-6). (S/U grade only.)
HUN 6911r. Supervised Research (3-6). (S/U grade only.)
HUN 6930r. Food and Nutrition Seminar (1).
HUN 6940r. Supervised Teaching (1-3). (S/U grade only.)
HUN 8945r. Supervised Field Experience (1-9). (S/U grade only.)
PET 5227. Motor Memory (3).
PET 5228. Motor Control (3).
PET 5235C. Motor Skill Learning (3).
PET 5355C. Advanced Exercise Physiology (3).
PET 5367. Nutrition and Exercise Performance (3).
PET 5389. Cardiorespiratory and Anthropometric Evaluation and Development of Exercise Programs (3).
PET 5930r. Seminar in Movement Sciences (1).
PET 6339. Neuromuscular Integration in Motor Skills (3).
PET 6365. Exercise and the Cardiorespiratory System (4).
PET 6368. Metabolic Responses to Exercise (3).
PET 6386. Environmental Aspects of Exercise (3).
PET 6930r. Seminar in Movement Sciences (1).
PET 6931r. Advanced Topics (1-4).
PET 8945r. Exercise Physiology Internship (1-9). (S/U grade only.)

For listings relating to graduate course work for thesis, dissertation, and masters and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.