Florida State University General Bulletin 1998-1999

FSU Homepage Office of the Registrar On-Line Registration 1997-1999 Graduate Bulletin Table of Contents

Academic Departments and Programs (course descriptions)


Department of Physics

College of Arts and Sciences

Chair: Kirby Kemper;
Associate Chair: Van Winkle;
Professors: Baer, Berg, Brooks, Cottle, Crow, Dagotto, Dennis, Duke, Edwards, Fisk, Hagopian, Kemper, Kimel, Manousakis, W. Moulton, Owens, Petrovich, Rikvold, Riley, Robson, Schlottman, Schrieffer, Sheline, Skofronick, Tabor, von Molnar, Wahl, Wang;
Service Professors: Fletcher, Shelton;
Associate Professors: Lind, Moreo, Ng, Prosper, Shaheen, Van Winkle;
Assistant Professors: Blessing, Bonesteel, Capstick, Dobrosavljevic, Xiong;
Visiting Assistant Professor: Sarty;
Professors Emeriti: Albright, Desloge, Fox, Hunt, Kromhout, G. Moulton, Nelson, Philpott, Plendl, Testardi

The Florida State University’s Department of Physics offers many exciting programs and opportunities for students interested in learning physics. Our physics curriculum is flexible, structured according to the students long-range goals, and provides a solid foundation for future graduate work or immediate employment opportunities. Interdisciplinary degree options are available and many students pursue double majors which include physics. There are many reasons students seek the challenges and rigors which come from making physics a part of their undergraduate studies. Those who do find themselves in a field which both expands their abilities and provides them with an immense feeling of accomplishment. Perhaps the most important benefits gained from physics training are the confidence and the ability to tackle complex technical problems. As a result of this training, physicists find themselves capable of contributing in many professions.

Physics is the foundation of all sciences and has been the pursuit of some of the greatest minds in all history including, Aristotle, Galileo, Newton, Maxwell, Einstein, and Dirac. Their discoveries and quest for knowledge form the foundation of our physics program. This proud tradition and passion for inquiry has produced a modern professional community of physicists whose contributions are continually expanding and changing our society. Whether it is on the end of the spaceboom fixing the Hubble space telescope, creating and developing the World Wide Web, searching for the fundamental fabric of our universe, exploring safer and more reliable ways to diagnose and treat illnesses or finding new and better ways to live, you will always find physicists on the frontier. So if you enjoy mathematics and science and are ready for a challenge, you should make physics a part of your education.

The internationally recognized faculty includes many who have earned prestigious awards for their research and teaching, including the Nobel prize. The faculty believe that the quality of teaching, at all levels, is enhanced by a strong research program. Undergraduates, graduate students and post-doctoral fellows participate in all aspects of research in physics at The Florida State University. In fact, most undergraduate physics majors participate in research projects and many are co-authors on publications. This research includes strong programs in the areas of computational, experimental and theoretical physics in high energy, nuclear, condensed matter, and atomic and molecular physics. There are also many opportunities for interdisciplinary research, particularly in the Center for Materials Research and Technology (Martech), the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), the Supercomputer Computations Research Institute (SCRI), the Institute of Molecular Biophysics (IMB), and, as a separate degree program, in Chemical Physics.

Available experimental facilities include: a 9.5 MV Super FN Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator with superconducting post accelerator, 3- and 4-MV Van de Graaffs, electron spin resonance and electron double nuclear resonance spectrometers, a detector development laboratory for high-energy particle detectors, high resolution Fourier transform IR spectrometers, liquid helium refrigerators, thin film preparation facilities including sputtering and laser ablation, ultrahigh vacuum instrumentation including surface analysis (LEED, Auger, optical) and molecular beam epitaxy, synthesis and characterization facilities for novel materials including high temperature superconductors, 3 X-ray diffractomers with various sample stages for high and low temperature studies, multi-sample analysis and small angle studies, scanning electron, tunneling and optical microscopies with image analysis, quasi-elastic light scattering, polarized electron energy loss spectroscopy, and a helium atom surface scattering facility. The NHMFL provides a modern infrastructure enabling research in magnetic fields including the highest powered DC fields in the world, mainly used for materials science research; and facilities providing the highest fields in the world for nuclear, ion cyclotron and electron magnetic resonance spectometers as well as magnetic resonance imaging.

Computers are an integral part of almost all research programs in the department. Continuously, the computational infrastructure is upgraded to keep pace with advances in technology. The department is fully connected to the Internet, and maintains a Physics Instructional Computer Laboratory (PICL) for students. In addition to using computers in research, students are expected to utilize numerical methods for problem solving in their course work.

Programs Offered

The Department of Physics offers programs leading to the following degrees: bachelor of science (BS), bachelor of arts (BA), master of science (MS), and doctor of philosophy (PhD). An undergraduate interdisciplinary program designed to prepare students to work in areas that combine physics with other fields is available. The departmental course offerings include courses for non-science majors, courses for nonphysical science majors, and courses for physical science majors. Honors work is available. Details may be obtained from the chair of the department.

State of Florida Common Course Prerequisites

The State of Florida has identified common course prerequisites for this University degree program. These prerequisites are lower-level courses that are required for preparation for the University major prior to a student receiving a baccalaureate degree from The Florida State University. They may be taken either at a community college or in a university lower-division program. It is preferred that these common course prerequisites be completed in the freshman and sophomore years.

The following lists the common course prerequisites or approved substitutions necessary for this degree program:

Physics

  1. CHM 1045/1045L or CHM 1040 and CHM 1041 or CHM 1045C or CHM 1045E;
  2. CHM 1046/1046L or CHM 1046C or CHM 1046E;
  3. MAC 2311;
  4. MAC 2312;
  5. MAC 2313;
  6. PHY 2048/2048L or PHY 2048C;
  7. PHY 2049/2049L or PHY 2049C.

Interdisciplinary Physics Program

  1. CHM 1045/1045L or CHM 1040 and CHM 1041 or CHM 1045C and CHM 1045E;
  2. CHM 1046/1046L or CHM 1046C or CHM 1046E;
  3. MAC 2311;
  4. MAC 2312;
  5. Choose between the CHM or PHY sequence:
a)CHM 2210/2210L and CHM 2211/2211L or CHM 2210C and CHM 2211C;
or
b)PHY 2048/2048L and PHY 2049/2049L or PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C or PHY 2053C and PHY 2054C.

Requirements Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this General Bulletin.

A brochure stating degree requirements in detail and containing outlines of undergraduate programs that will meet all departmental and University requirements is available from the departmental undergraduate affairs office. Students expecting to major in physics or in the interdisciplinary program in physics should obtain this brochure as soon as possible.

Major in Physics

A major is required to take general physics A (PHY 2048C or 2048), general physics B (PHY 2049C or 2049), intermediate mechanics (PHY 3221), intermediate modern physics (PHY 3101), optics (PHY 3424), mathematical physics (PHZ 3113), intermediate electricity and magnetism (PHY 4323), thermal and statistical physics (PHY 4513), quantum theory of matter A (PHY 4604), intermediate laboratory (PHY 3802L), advanced laboratory (PHY 4822Lr), and at least two of the following courses: advanced mechanics (PHY 4222), advanced electricity and magnetism (PHY 4324), quantum theory of matter B (PHY 4605), electronics (PHY 3722C or 3741Conly one may be used to satisfy the requirement). A major must also complete one semester of general chemistry (CHM 1045/1045L or CHM 1050/1050L), mathematics through differential equations (MAP 2302) or engineering mathematics I (MAP 3305), calculus III (MAC 2313), and satisfy the language requirement with French, German, Japanese, or Russian.

Students who are planning to conduct graduate work in physics are strongly advised to include advanced mechanics (PHY 4222), advanced electricity and magnetism (PHY 4324), and, if possible, quantum theory of matter B (PHY 4605) in their programs. Students who are planning to pursue careers in applied physics or experimental physics are strongly advised to include digital electronics (PHY 3741C) and/or analog electronics (PHY 3722C) in their programs.

No physics course with a grade below C may be used to satisfy the above requirements.

In addition to satisfying the above requirements, the student must satisfy the general requirements of both the College of Arts and Sciences and the University with the exception that a minimum of one hundred twenty-four (124) semester hours rather than one hundred twenty (120) semester hours is required for graduation.

The Department of Physics will withhold acceptance as a physics major until the student, in consultation with one of the upper-division physics advisers, has laid out an acceptable program of studies.

Minor

The required mathematics is sufficient to constitute an acceptable minor in mathematics, but a student who so desires may take some other approved minor.

Major in the Interdisciplinary Program in Physics

The interdisciplinary program in physics is designed to prepare a student for work in areas which combine physics with other fields, such as management, high school teaching, medicine, political science, oceanography, environmental sciences, philosophy, computer science, and others.

An interdisciplinary physics major is required to take the following:

  1. General physics A (PHY 2048C or 2048), general physics B (PHY 2049C or 2049), intermediate modern physics (PHY 3101);
  2. At least three of intermediate mechanics (PHY 3221); intermediate electricity and magnetism (PHY 4323); optics (PHY 3424); mathematical physics (PHZ 3113); medical physics (PHZ 3701); thermal and statistical physics (PHY 4513); advanced mechanics (PHY 4222); advanced electricity and magnetism (PHY 4324); quantum theory of matter A (PHY 4604); quantum theory of matter B (PHY 4605); electronics (PHY 3722C or 3741Conly one may be used to satisfy the requirement);
  3. Two (2) semester hours of laboratory credits from among the following courses (where the number of laboratory credits associated with each course is indicated after the course number): intermediate laboratory A [PHY 3802L (1)]; intermediate laboratory B [PHY 3803L (1)]; advanced laboratory [PHY 4822Lr (2)]; digital electronics [PHY 3741C (1)]; analog electronics [PHY 3722C (1)];
  4. A mathematics minor is required that must include mathematics through differential equations (MAP 2302) or engineering mathematics I (MAP 3305), plus an additional three (3) hours of credit at the 3000 level or greater;
  5. One semester of general chemistry (CHM 1045/1045L or CHM 1050/1050L);
  6. A suitable set of courses in some discipline other than physics. The number and nature of these courses must be individually arranged and approved in advance by the committee of physics advisers.

No physics course with a grade below C may be used to satisfy the above requirements.

The Department of Physics will withhold acceptance as an interdisciplinary physics major until the student, in consultation with one of the upper-division physics advisers, has laid out an acceptable program of studies.

Minor

The required mathematics is sufficient to constitute an acceptable minor in mathematics, but a student who so desires may take some other approved minor.

Honors in the Major

The Department of Physics offers a program in honors in the major to encourage talented juniors and seniors to undertake independent research as part of the undergraduate experience. For requirements and other information, see the University Honors Program and Honor Societies section of this General Bulletin.

Minor in Physics

To obtain a minor in physics a student is required to take general physics A (PHY 2048C or 2048); general physics B (PHY 2049C or 2049); and at least one of the following courses: intermediate modern physics (PHY 3101); intermediate mechanics (PHY 3221); intermediate electricity and magnetism (PHY 4323); optics (PHY 3424); thermal and statistical physics (PHY 4513); analog electronics (PHY 3722C).

Definition of Prefixes

AST Astronomy
PHY Physics
PHZ Physics: Specialized
PSC Physical Science

Undergraduate Courses

ISC 3121. Science, Technology, and Society (3).
PSC 2801C. Physical Science for EC/EE Teachers (4).
SCE 4939r. Seminar in Contemporary Science, Mathematics, and Science Education (1).

Note: for descriptions of the above courses, see interdisciplinary science courses listed in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this General Bulletin.

Courses for Non-Science Majors

AST 1002. Planets, Stars, and Galaxies (3). Introductory astronomy. Basic astronomical concepts; gravitation and other cosmic forces; planets, moons, and other components of the solar system; nature and evolution of the sun and of other stars; structure of galaxies and of the universe as a whole. (Astronomy for liberal studies.)
AST 1002L. Introductory Astronomy Laboratory (1). Corequisite: AST 1002. Elective laboratory to accompany AST 1002. One period per week for two (2) hours. Experiments, measurements, and observations of planetary, stellar, galactic, and extragalactic astronomy. (Astronomy laboratory for liberal studies.)
AST 3033. Recent Advances in Astronomy and Cosmology (3). Prerequisites: A course in astronomy and fulfillment of the basic math requirement; or consent of instructor. Modern concepts and recent discoveries such as black holes, quasars, and the Big Bang.
PHY 1020. Fundamentals of Physics (3). A liberal studies course for the non-science major with a minimum of mathematics. Survey of light, mechanics, electricity, and magnetism and an introduction to atomic, nuclear and subnuclear physics with emphasis on how the physicist approaches the problem of describing nature. A qualitative, descriptive approach is used. Cannot be taken for credit by students who already have credit in PHY 2048C, 2053C, or equivalent.
PHY 1020L. Fundamentals of Physics Laboratory (1). Corequisite: PHY 1020. Elective laboratory to accompany PHY 1020. One period per week for two (2) hours. Experiments in mechanics, optics, electricity, and magnetism. (Liberal studies laboratory.)
PHY 2464. Physical Basis of Music (3). A study of musical sound using basic physical principles. Applications to musical instruments, room acoustics, and high-fidelity systems.

General Physics for Physical Sciences

PHY 2048C. General Physics A (5). Prerequisite: MAC 2311 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor; Corequisite (recommended): MAC 2312. An introduction to mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics for physical science majors, designed to be taken as a sequence with PHY 2049C. Calculus is used. Course consists of lectures, recitations, and laboratory. A student who has taken PHY 2053C or an equivalent course may take PHY 2048 rather than 2048C.
PHY 2048. General Physics A without Laboratory (3). Same course as PHY 2048C, except that the student does not take the laboratory. May only be taken by students who have passed PHY 2053C or an equivalent course.
PHY 2049C. General Physics B (5). Prerequisite: PHY 2048C or 2048 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor. An introduction to electricity, magnetism, and optics for physical science majors. Calculus is used. Course consists of lectures, recitations, and laboratory. A student who has taken PHY 2054C or an equivalent course may take PHY 2049 rather than 2049C.
PHY 2049. General Physics B without Laboratory (3). Same course as PHY 2049C, except that the student does not take the laboratory. May only be taken by students who have passed PHY 2054C or an equivalent course.

College Physics for Nonphysical Science Majors

PHY 2053C. College Physics A (4). Prerequisites: MAC 1140 and 1113 with grades of C or better; or appropriate score on a mathematics placement examination; Corequisite: CHM 1045. An introduction to mechanics, heat, and waves for nonphysical science majors. Examples from biology, geology and medicine are incorporated. First course in a two-semester sequence. Calculus not required. Two lectures, one recitation, and one laboratory each week. Students who have previously received credit for PHY 2048C may not register for PHY 2053C.
PHY 2054C. College Physics B (4). Prerequisite: PHY 2053C or 2048C. An introduction to electromagnetism, light, and modern physics for nonphysical science majors. Two lectures, one recitation, and one laboratory each week. Students who have previously received credit for PHY 2049C may not register for PHY 2054C.
PHZ 3701. Medical Physics (3). Corequisite: PHY 2054C or 2049C. Applications of physics in physiology and medicine.

Physics for K-12 Educators

PHY 4012C. Physics for Science Teachers A (3). Intended for pre-service and in-service middle and high school science teachers who are not seeking certification in physics. Forces, work and mechanical energy, linear momentum, centripetal force, gravity, and rotational motion waves. Labs are incorporated into class time. Cannot be used toward the requirements for the degree in physics.
PHY 4013C. Physics for Science Teachers B (3). Prerequisite: PHY 4020. The second semester of the introductory physics sequence intended for pre-service and in-service middle and high school science teachers who are not seeking certification in physics. Electricity, magnetism, light, atomic physics, nuclear science, and the physics of stars. Cannot be used toward the requirements for the degree in physics.
PHY 4040C. Physics of the 20th Century (3). Prerequisites: PHY 2049C, 2054C, or 4013C. Experimental observations that have led to the development of quantum mechanics, relativity and modern theories of the creation of the universe will be explored. The course is descriptive rather than emphasizing the mathematical power of current physics theories. Laboratory work will be an integral part. Designed for pre- and in-service high school teachers. Can be used for science credit for science education majors in masters and doctoral degree programs, but not for a major or minor in physics.
PSC 2801C. Physical Science for EC/EE Teachers (4). This course is designed for prospective elementary and early childhood education majors. The course integrates physics and chemistry with the laboratory integral to the course. Students will work in groups in a hands-on, minds-on approach to learning physical science.

Mechanics, Thermal, and Statistical Physics

PHY 3221. Intermediate Mechanics (3). Prerequisite: PHY 2048C; Corequisite: MAP 2302 or 3305. Principles and applications of the Newtonian mechanics of particles and systems of particles. Noninertial reference frames, simple and damped harmonic motion, central force motion, motion of a rigid body in a plane.
PHY 4222. Advanced Mechanics (3). Prerequisite: PHY 3221. Kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies, introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, dynamics of oscillating systems.
PHY 4513. Thermal and Statistical Physics (3). Prerequisite: MAC 2313; Corequisite: PHY 3101. The fundamental laws of thermodynamics and their application to simple systems. The kinetic theory of an ideal gas. An introduction to the classical and quantum statistical mechanics of weakly interacting systems.

Electromagnetism and Electronics

PHY 3722C. Analog Electronics (4). Prerequisites: MAC 2312; PHY 2049C or, with consent of the instructor, PHY 2054C. Physical description of solid-state and thermionic devices. Analysis of DC and AC circuits, power supplies, amplifiers, electronic feedback, and electronic noise. Introduction to nonlinear circuits. The course includes a three (3) hour laboratory devoted to electronic measurements, characterization of electronic circuit elements, and study of electronic circuits.
PHY 3741C. Digital Electronics (4). Prerequisite: PHY 2049C, 2054C, or consent of instructor. The basic principles of digital electronics and its application in small computers and scientific measurements. Includes laboratory with integrated circuits and microcomputers.
PHY 4323. Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism (3). Prerequisites: PHY 2049C; PHZ 3113. Electrostatics, magnetostatics, time-varying electric and magnetic fields, Maxwells equations.
PHY 4324. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism (3). Prerequisite: PHY 4323. Applications of Maxwells equations, electromagnetic waves, and radiation.

Mathematical Physics, Optics, and Modern Physics

PHY 3101. Intermediate Modern Physics (3). Prerequisite: PHY 2049C. Special relativity. Quantum properties of light and matter, origins of the universe.
PHY 3424. Optics (3). Prerequisite: PHY 2049C. Geometrical optics, wave optics, optical instrumentation, properties of light, lasers, fiber optics.
PHY 4604, 4605. Quantum Theory of Matter A, B (3, 3). Prerequisites: PHZ 3113; PHY 3101. Quantum mechanics and its applications to particles, nuclei, atoms, molecules, and condensed matter.
PHZ 3113. Mathematical Physics (3). Prerequisite: PHY 2049, 2049C, or 2054C; Corequisite: MAP 2302 or 3305. Mathematical methods applied to physical systems; vectors, specialized techniques of integration, integral transforms, special functions, boundary-value problems, numerical methods.

Intermediate and Advanced Laboratories

PHY 3802L. Intermediate Laboratory A (1). Corequisites: PHY 3101, 3424. Experiments in optics, modern physics, and electricity and magnetism. The emphasis is on the development of experimental technique, assessment of the validity of experimental data, and on the development of skill in the written presentation of results. This course will satisfy up to 7,000 words of writing requirements for FAC 6A-10.030.
PHY 3803L. Intermediate Laboratory B (1). Prerequisite: PHY 3802L. Experiments in atomic spectroscopy, mechanics, radio-frequency and microwave measurements, vacuum technique, and data accumulation with microprocessors. The area of emphasis is arranged between the student and the instructor.
PHY 4822Lr. Advanced Laboratory (2). Prerequisite: PHY 3802L. Experiments in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and other areas of modern physics. Students are expected to work without detailed instructions. The course may be repeated for a maximum of six (6) semester hours for special projects arranged in advance between the student and the instructor.
PHY 4910r. Research Participation (2). Projects in theoretical or experimental physics arranged in advance between the student and a member of the teaching faculty of the physics department. May be repeated to a maximum of eight (8) semester hours.

Miscellaneous

PHY 3002. Communications in Physics (2). Prerequisite: PHY 2048. Corequisite: PHY 2049. Instruction and practice in oral communications for physicists. Students will choose physics topics in consultation with instructor and present them to class.
PHY 3098r. Readings In Physics (1). Readings in physcis topics of current or historical interest beyond the core content of PHY 2048 and 2049. May be repeated to a maximum of two (2) semester hours.
PHY 3936r. Special Topics in Physics (13). (S/U grade only.) May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours.
PHY 3949r. Cooperative Work Experience (0). (S/U grade only.)
PHY 4905-4908r. Directed Individual Study [one to three (1-3) hours each]. Each course may be repeated to a maximum of eighteen (18) semester hours.
PHY 4936r. Special Topics in Physics (3). Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor. Advanced applications of physics to topics of interest, such as relativity, astrophysics, particle physics, advanced solid state physics, or advanced nuclear physics. Offered on demand. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours.
PHY 4937r. Undergraduate Tutorial in Physics (1-3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Upper division graduate standing. Selected topics in modern physics. Examination of primary research literature. May be repeated to a maximum of fifteen (15) semester hours. A maximum of eight (8) students allowed in each tutorial.
PHY 4970r. Honors Work (3). May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen (18) semester hours.
PHY 4975. Senior Thesis (1). Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHY 4910. A written report and an oral presentation discussing research work done under PHY 4910. The grade is assigned by a committee of three faculty members.
PHY 4990r. Senior Seminar (1). Prerequisite: PHY 3101. Corequisites: PHY 3XXX and 4910r. Students present results of their physics research to the class for discussion. May be repeated to a maximum of two (2) semester hours.

Graduate Courses

PHY 5142. Current Topics in Physics: Part II (3).
PHY 5226. Intermediate Mechanics (3).
PHY 5227. Advanced Mechanics (3).
PHY 5246. Theoretical Dynamics (3).
PHY 5326. Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism (3).
PHY 5327. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism (3).
PHY 5346, 5347. Electrodynamics A, B (3, 3).
PHY 5515. Thermal and Statistical Physics (3).
PHY 5524. Statistical Mechanics (3).
PHY 5607r, 5608r. Quantum Theory of Matter (3, 3).
PHY 5645, 5646. Quantum Mechanics A, B (3, 3).
PHY 5667. Quantum Field Theory (3).
PHY 5670. Quantum Mechanics C (3).
PHY 5846C. Techniques in Experimental Physics (3).
PHY 5908r. Directed Individual Study (3).
PHY 5909r. Directed Individual Study (112). (S/U grade only.)
PHY 5918r. Supervised Research (16). (S/U grade only.)
PHY 5920r. Colloquium (1). (S/U grade only.)
PHY 5930. Introductory Seminar on Research (1).(S/U grade only.)
PHY 5940r. Supervised Teaching (16). (S/U grade only.)
PHY 6935r. Advanced Seminar (1). (S/U grade only.)
PHY 6937r. Selected Topics in Physics (1-3).
PHY 6938r. Special Topics in Physics (3). (S/U grade only.)
PHY 6990r. Graduate Tutorial in Physics (1-3). (S/U grade only.)
PHZ 5305. Nuclear Physics I (3).
PHZ 5307. Nuclear Physics II (3).
PHZ 5354. High-Energy Physics I (3).
PHZ 5355. High-Energy Physics II (3).
PHZ 5491. Condensed Matter Physics I (3).
PHZ 5492. Condensed Matter Physics II (3).

For listings relating to graduate course work for thesis, dissertation, and masters and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

PHYSIOLOGY: see Biological Science

PIMS: see Medical Sciences