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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

College of Arts and Sciences

Web Page: http://www.chem.fsu.edu/

Chair: Timothy M. Logan; Associate Chairs: Susan Latturner, Michael Roper, Geoffrey Strouse; Professors: Alabugin, Albrecht-Schmitt, Cross, Dalal, Dorsey, Dudley, Holton, Li, Latturner, Logan, Marshall, Mattoussi, Saltiel, Sang, Schlenoff, Shatruk, Steinbock, Stiegman, Strouse, Yang; Associate Professors: Goldsby, Hilinski, Knappenberger, Miller, Roper, Stagg, Zhu; Assistant Professors: Bleiholder, DePrince, Frederich, Hanson, Hu, Kennemur; Teaching Professor: Kearley; Teaching Assistant Professor: DePrince; Coordinator of General Chemistry Laboratories: Dillon; Coordinator of Organic Chemistry Laboratories: Profeta; Professors Emeriti: Clark, Cooper, DeTar, Dougherty, Fulton, Johnsen, Light, Linder, Mellon, Safron, Schwartz, Vickers; Professors Emerita: Gilmer, Hoffman

The graduate program in Chemistry and Biochemistry at Florida State University was established in 1949 and is a prominent graduate program nationally and internationally. The Department offers programs leading to the Master of Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees in analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, nuclear, materials, and physical. The Department also participates in interdisciplinary programs in materials science and molecular biophysics.

Department research operations are housed in the newly-opened, 168,000 square foot Chemical Sciences Laboratory and the interconnected Dittmer Laboratory of Chemistry and Molecular Biophysics buildings. These laboratory buildings house state-of-the-art facilities, instrumentation, and research laboratories. In addition, state-of-the-art University facilities, such as the Department of Scientific Computing and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, offer the graduate student outstanding opportunities for research. Department teaching functions are carried out in the adjacent Hoffman Teaching Laboratory and Fisher Lecture Halls.

Major research instruments and equipment available to all faculty and graduate students are housed in several specialized laboratories within the Department. Professional scientists and engineers supervise these laboratories and provide assistance and technical guidance in the use of each. The FSU NMR Facility is among the best in the Southeast region. The NMR Lab houses instruments dedicated to all types of magnetic resonance measurements. These include new Bruker 700, 600, 500 and 400 MHz spectrometers with a cryoprobe accessory available on the 700 MHz instrument. The new Bruker devices complement existing Varian 500 and 300 MHz solution instruments and a new Bruker 500 MHz wide bore system devoted to solids. The facility has a number of probes available that allow measurements on gel-phase macromolecules and any NMR-active small molecule. The magnetic characterization facility includes two Quantum Design SQUID magnetometers and a Quantum Design physical property measurement system, as well as a Bruker EPR spectrometer with X- and Q-band capabilities. The X-ray Diffraction Facility provides state-of-the-art instrumentation for structural characterization of solids. The major shared instruments for single crystal diffraction include the Bruker Apex II single-crystal diffractometer with a CCD detector and two Bruker D8 Quest X-ray diffractometers. Powder diffraction is carried out on a Panalytical X’Pert Pro powder diffraction system with a variety of sample-holder options, including hot and cold stages, or the Rigaku Ultima-III microarea powder diffraction system specifically designed for characterization of nanomaterials. The Mass Spectrometry Laboratory has the ability to obtain low-, medium- and high-resolution mass spectra using electron impact, chemical ionization, electrospray or matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization. Molecular spectra can be acquired on a variety of instruments: JEOL JMS-600H double focusing high resolution mass spectrometer, JEOL JMS-T100 AccuTOF time-of-flight mass spectrometer, Agilent 6870/5873 GC-MS combination, and Bruker Autoflex-III MALDI-TOF system. Stable isotope ratio analyses for C, H, N, O and S can be obtained with a Finnigan Delta S isotope ratio GC/MS. The Biochemical Synthesis and Services Laboratory (BASS) carries out synthesis of DNA, RNA, and peptides, as well as the sequencing of proteins. Other major instrumentation available in the Department include Multi-Angle Laser Light Scattering (MALLS) and Panalytical Epsilor 3 X-ray fluorescence spectrometers for multi-element analyses of liquids and solids, Perkin Elmer Lambda 950 UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer with a Universal Reflectance Accessory, Perkin Elmer Spectrum 100 FT-IR spectrometer with a Universal ATR Sampling Accessory, Horiba JY Fluoromax-4 fluorometer, Edinburgh LP-980 nanosecond transient absorption, Thermo Scientific Nanodrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer, and TA Instruments thermal analysis suite. State-of-the-art macromolecular X-ray crystallography and computational modeling facilities are located in the Molecular Biophysics building. The Department maintains excellently staffed glassworking, machine, electronics, and woodworking shops in support of teaching and research activities.

With an active faculty of approximately thirty-two members, the Department offers a fully developed program, encompassing theoretical and experimental research in all areas of chemistry and many interdisciplinary areas. Faculty members have been widely recognized for their achievements, and count among their ranks a Nobel Laureate, members in the National Academy of Sciences, The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences, the Brazilian Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Faculty members have been recipients of the American Chemical Society (ACS) Field Franklin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Mass Spectrometry, the ACS Award in Chromatography, the ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry, the ACS ExxonMobil Faculty Fellowship in Solid State Chemistry, the ACS Award for Young Investigators in Separation Science, the Air Force Young Investigator Award, the Chemical Manufacturing Association award for excellence in chemical education, National Science Foundation CAREER awards, Sloan Fellowships, Coblentz award, and numerous regional and local awards for both research and teaching. Several faculty are now American Chemical Society Fellows and Royal Society Fellows. For additional information, see the departmental Web site at: http://www.chem.fsu.edu.

Requirements

Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the “College of Arts and Sciences” chapter of this Graduate Bulletin.

The Department offers Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) and thesis- and course-type Master of Science (MS) programs. Performance of original research is a primary characteristic of the thesis MS and PhD programs, and programs of study are correspondingly highly individualized. The PhD degree requires completion of graded classwork, graded directed individual study (DIS), oral presentations in multiple years, a written and oral candidacy exam, a written thesis with an oral defense, and publication of original research. A 3.0 grade point average must be maintained in all formal chemistry coursework.

The MS program represents a specialty tract in the Department. A handbook of information for graduate students, including specific departmental requirements, is available from the student affairs office of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and on the Web site.

All graduate students in the Department must participate in teaching activities at some time during their graduate careers. To prepare students to meet this requirement, the Department offers a course in chemical education (CHM 5945) that every graduate student is expected to take. Minimum teaching requirements are listed for each of the degree programs below. Inquiries regarding departmental teaching assistantships should be directed to the graduate student coordinator in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

The ability to communicate in spoken English is a necessary component of the graduate training in chemistry. Students whose first language is not English must demonstrate competency during their first year of graduate study or participate in a course on spoken English.

Requirements for Thesis-Type Master of Science (MS) Degree

The thesis-type program is designed to provide the student with advanced work in chemistry and experience in chemical research. Once students have selected a major professor to direct their research, a supervisory committee chaired by the major professor is formed. A course of study, consistent with University- and college-wide requirements, is formulated for each student by the supervisory committee and consists of a minimum of eighteen hours of graded classroom work and three hours of graded directed individual study (DIS). The program may consist entirely of courses in chemistry or may include courses from related areas, depending upon the interests and goals of the student. At least one semester of teaching is required. The student conducts research in consultation with the major professor and prepares a thesis with the professor’s guidance. The student presents and defends the thesis before the supervisory committee.

Special Requirements for Course-Type Master of Science (MS) Degree in Chemistry

The course-type program is designed to provide the student with a strong technical education, but with less emphasis on research. In this program, at least twenty-one of the University-required thirty-two semester hours of credit must be taken on a letter-grade basis at the 4000 level or above. The coursework requirement includes eighteen hours of graded classroom coursework and three hours of graded directed individual study (DIS). A supervisory committee must be formed to guide the student.

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Degree

The heart of the PhD degree is research. The degree is granted to students who have mastered a definitive field of knowledge, who have demonstrated capacity to do original and independent scholarly investigation, and who have shown an ability to integrate their field of specialization with the larger domains of knowledge and understanding. The student will complete a minimum of eighteen hours of graded classroom work and three hours of graded directed individual study (DIS). The program may consist entirely of courses in chemistry or may include course from related area, depending upon the interests and goals of the student.

Within the first semester of residence in the program, students will identify a major professor to direct their research activities. In consultation with the major professor, students select a supervisory committee which will guide them in selecting programs of study and will provide evaluation by conducting the oral and written portions of the Ph.D. preliminary examination and the defense of dissertation.

The PhD preliminary examination consists of written and oral portions. The written portion tests the student’s mastery of the major field at an advanced level and consists of preparation of a research proposal outlining the student’s research efforts toward completing the PhD thesis. The oral portion has two parts and consists of defense of the research proposal and the demonstration of adequate knowledge in the student’s programmatic area. All the preliminary examination requirements must be completed by the seventh term in the graduate program. At the completion of the PhD candidacy a student will receive a MS degree from the Department and become a PhD candidate.

Two semesters of teaching experience are required for PhD candidates. Completion of a significant body of individual research is, of course, the chief requirement for the degree. The research results must be orally presented and defended before the supervisory committee in the defense of dissertation. In addition, a publication requirement exists in the Department for receipt of the PhD degree.

Definition of Prefixes

BCH—Biochemistry (Biosphysics)

CHM—Chemistry

Graduate Courses

Analytical Chemistry

CHM 5086. Environmental Chemistry I (3). This course focuses on the application of chemical and geochemical principles to environmental issues. Topics include: an evaluation of contaminants in surface and ground water; hydrocarbon geochemistry and petroleum contamination; waste management, including solid, toxic, and nuclear waste; air quality issues; environmental methods and instrumentation, quality assurance and quality control in environmental analysis; principles of toxicology; and risk assessment and risk management.

CHM 5087. Environmental Chemistry II (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate organic chemistry. This course explores organic geochemistry of natural waters and sediments. It includes an overview of the sources of organic matter in aquatic systems, the important reactions and transport mechanisms that control the biogeochemical cycling of organic carbon in these systems, and the impact of naturally-occurring organic carbon on environmental and ecological processes. Attention also devoted to anthropogenic (xenobiotic) organic molecules. Discussion of how analytical techniques such as 13C NMR, mass spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, and chromatography provide useful organic biogeochemical information.

CHM 5138. Mass Spectrometry (3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course covers principles and techniques of ion formation, focusing, collision, fragmentation, and reaction; interpretation of mass spectra; mass analyzers and ion traps; selected chemical, analytical and biological applications.

CHM 5140. Introduction to Chemical Instrumentation (3). This course is an examination of the factors that limit the accuracy, precision and speed of measurements with instruments with detailed discussions of the meaning and implications of signal bandwidth, signal orthogonality, impedance relationships, modulation and phase sensitive detection, sampling, the Fourier transform, information theory, analog signal handling with negative feedback and digital signal handling.

CHM 5151. Optical Methods of Chemical Analysis (3). This course explores fundamentals of optics (lens, prism, grating), spectroscopic instrumentation, spectroscopic techniques for chemical analysis, including atomic emission and absorption spectroscopy, molecular absorption and luminescence, infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

CHM 5153. Electrochemistry (3). This course covers instrumentation and techniques in electrochemistry, including such topics as electrode processes, potentiometry, voltammetry, and coulometry.

CHM 5154. Chemical Separations (3). This course explores the primary theme of chromatography, including gas-solid, gas-liquid, capillary gas, ion-exchange, and high-performance liquid methods. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental physical processes, modern instrumentation, and response characteristics of detectors relevant to these methods. Ancillary techniques discussed include solvent extraction, thin layer techniques, electrophoresis, field-flow fraction, and chromatographic measurements of physiochemical parameters.

CHM 5180r. Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

CHM 5454. Polymer Characterization (3). This course covers the characterization of synthetic polymers by various analytical techniques, including spectroscopy, molecular weight measurements, structure, surface studies and mechanical properties. The course includes sufficient introductory material in polymer synthesis to relate structure and properties.

CHM 6190r. Analytical Chemistry Seminar (1). May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHM 6191r. Analytical Chemistry Seminar (1). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Biochemistry

BCH 5405. Molecular Biology (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate biochemistry. This course discusses gene organization and replication; control of gene expression in transcription and translation; application of recombinant DNA techniques.

BCH 5505. Structure and Function of Enzymes (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate biochemistry. This course addresses elements of protein structure and structural motifs, structure determination methods; protein folding and stability; enzyme kinetics and mechanisms; structure-function relationships.

BCH 5745. Chemical and Physical Characterization of Biopolymers (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate biochemistry. This course covers biopolymer types and conformations; solution properties of biopolymers; macromolecular equilibria; hydrodynamic behavior; determination of size and shape; biopolymer separations; introduction to biological spectroscopy.

BCH 5884. Programming for Chemists and Biochemists (3). This course covers the fundamentals of programming using the scripting language Python and is geared towards chemistry graduate students with a need to process data in novel ways. Students are introduced to programming through the use of example problems researchers often face in chemical and biochemical research. No previous knowledge of programming is required.

BCH 5886r. Special Topics in Biochemistry and Cell Biology (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of four times or to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

BCH 5887r. Special Topics in Biochemistry and Cell Biology (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of four times or to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

BCH 6896r. Biochemistry Seminar (1). May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

BCH 6897r. Biochemistry Seminar (1). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Inorganic Chemistry

CHM 5442. Kinetics and Mechanisms (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate inorganic chemistry. This course covers basic kinetics applied to common reactions in inorganic chemistry, including ligand substitution, electronic transfer and oxidation/reduction, organometallics, photophysics and photochemistry, as well as bioinorganic. Topics in kinetics cover experimental and derived rate laws, transition state theory and activation parameters, as well as operational tests for intimate mechanisms.

CHM 5620. Principles of Inorganic Chemistry (3). This course covers descriptive chemistry, including main group and transition elements, coordination and organometallic chemistry.

CHM 5680r. Current Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (1–3). This course covers group theory and vibrational spectroscopy. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

CHM 5681r. Current Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (1–3). This course currently rotates between physical inorganic (emphasis on spectroscopic methods) and solid state chemistry (emphasis on materials). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

CHM 6690r. Inorganic Chemistry Seminar (1). May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHM 6691r. Inorganic Chemistry Seminar (1). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Materials Chemistry

CHM 5715r. Topics in Materials Chemistry I (1-3). This course introduces materials chemistry, focusing on the structure, properties, and functions of metals and alloys, glasses and ceramics, semiconductors, and nanomaterials. Recommended for students involved in materials research. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of three semester hours.

CHM 5716r. Characterization of Materials I (1-3). This course deals with microscopic and diffraction methods used for structural characterization of materials, as well as with transport and magnetic measurements. Recommended for students involved in materials research. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of three semester hours.

CHM 5717r. Characterization of Materials II (1-3). This course deals with polymer and small molecule characterization using NMR and other physical and spectroscopic techniques. This course is comprised of lectures and a practical component performed at an instrument germane to the specific section of the course. Recommended for students involved in materials research. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of three semester hours.

CHM 5718r. Topics in Materials Chemistry II (1-3). This course introduces materials chemistry, focusing on the structure, properties, and functions of polymers; organic and soft materials, and bio-inspired materials. Recommended for students involved in materials research. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of three semester hours.

CHM 6936r. Materials Chemistry Seminar I (1). (S/U grade only). This course consists of a series of talks presented by the faculty and graduate students, as well as by invited speakers. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

CHM 6937r. Materials Chemistry Seminar II (1). This course consists of a series of research presentations and original research proposal defenses delivered by graduate students enrolled in the Materials Chemistry Program. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

Organic Chemistry

CHM 5225. Advanced Organic Chemistry—Structure (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate organic chemistry. This course covers advanced description of structural stereochemistry, stereochemical aspects of reactions, theoretical aspects of structure.

CHM 5226. Advanced Organic Chemistry—Reactions (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate organic chemistry. This course is an advanced treatment of reactions of importance in organic syntheses.

CHM 5245. Physical Organic Chemistry (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate organic chemistry. This course covers linear free energy relationships, inductive effects, treatment of steric effects, prediction of enthalpies and entropies of formation, kinetics and potential energy diagrams, isotope effects, general acid-base catalysis, acidity functions and their use in studies of mechanisms, strategies of investigation of mechanisms.

CHM 5250. Advanced Organic Synthesis (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate organic chemistry. This course covers retrosynthetic analysis and synthetic strategy. Applications of the following topics to total synthesis: enolate chemistry; Diels-Alder; Claisen, Cope reactions; fragmentation reactions; photochemical reactions; stereochemistry and conformational analysis; blocking and protecting groups.

CHM 5330. Graduate Survey of Organic Chemistry (3). This course is an intense survey of organic chemistry covering structure, reactions, synthesis, analysis, and spectroscopy of organic compounds. Restricted to beginning graduate students in chemistry.

CHM 5380r. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

CHM 6390r. Organic Chemistry Seminar (1). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Physical Chemistry

CHM 5440. Physical and Chemical Kinetics (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate physical chemistry. This course includes topics such as comprehensive chemical reaction kinetics and dynamics; phenomenological rate laws; reaction mechanisms; diffusion-controlled and activation-controlled reactions; and experimental and numerical techniques for kinetic studies.

CHM 5442. Kinetics and Mechanisms (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate inorganic chemistry. This course covers basic kinetics applied to common reactions in inorganic chemistry, including ligand substitution, electronic transfer and oxidation/reduction, organometallics, photophysics and photochemistry, as well as bioinorganic. Topics in kinetics cover experimental and derived rate laws, transition state theory and activation parameters, as well as operational tests for intimate mechanisms.

CHM 5460. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate physical chemistry. This course covers the fundamentals of thermodynamics and basic concepts of quantum and classic statistical mechanics, thermodynamic functions from spectroscopic data, and gas imperfections.

CHM 5461. Advanced Statistical Mechanics (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate physical chemistry. This lecture course covers the foundation of quantum and classical statistical mechanics; density matrix formulation; correlation functions; dense systems.

CHM 5470. Valence Theory (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate physical chemistry. This course covers symmetry and group theory, operators and wave-mechanics; atomic orbitals; diatomic molecule electronic structure and spectra; spectral properties of polyatomic molecules.

CHM 5480. Quantum Mechanics (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate physical chemistry. This course covers basic theoretical concepts and mathematical framework; applications to simple systems.

CHM 5481. Advanced Quantum Mechanics (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate physical chemistry. This course covers mathematical and conceptual foundation; statistical nature of quantum theory; time dependent formulations.

CHM 5506. Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules I (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate physical chemistry. This course covers conformational statistics of random coil polymer chains; ordered polymer structures and order-disorder transitions; thermodynamics of polymer solutions; structure-property relationships of polymers. Cross-listed under Biochemistry.

CHM 5507. Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules II (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate physical chemistry. This course addresses principles and applications of spectroscopic methods to polymers and biological macromolecules including electronic, vibrational electron spin and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; and spectroscopic studies of dynamic systems. Cross-listed under Biochemistry.

CHM 5580r. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

CHM 5581r. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

CHM 5585. Experimental Methods in Physical Chemistry (3). Prerequisite: Mastery of undergraduate physical chemistry. This course offers a comprehensive survey of modern physical experimental techniques, including fundamental principles underlying the methodology and current applications of the techniques.

CHM 6590r. Physical Chemistry Seminar (1). May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Multiple Area Courses

CHM 5175r. Measurements and Data Analysis in Chemistry (1–3). This course covers fundamental concepts of measurements in chemical systems. Students study the fundamental aspects of signal detection, noise, fluctuations, and ensembles; of spectroscopy and interaction of light with matter; and of experiment design. May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

CHM 5555r. Chemical Reactivity (1–3). This course covers the fundamentals of chemical reactivity, including various types of reactions and factors that govern the rate and course of chemical processes. Students study fundamentals of kinetics and thermodynamics, which forms the basis for the follow-up study of organic, inorganic, and organometallic reactivity. May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

CHM 5710r. Chemical Structure and Bonding (1–3). This course covers the fundamentals of chemical bonding and structural organization of matter, including molecular orbital and ligand field theories, bonding and structure of small molecules, macromolecules, and extended solids, and theoretical approaches to electronic structures of molecules and solids. May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

CHM 5801r. Safety in Scientific Research (1). (S/U grade only). This course is a comprehensive survey of methods for evaluation of hazards related to scientific research, and strategies for development of risk mitigation and implementation of best practice techniques for lab management. May be repeated to a maximum of two semester hours.

CHM 5823r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three hours may be applied to a master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

CHM 5830r. Directed Individual Study (1–6). May be repeated to a maximum of sixty semester hours.

CHM 5831r. Directed Individual Study (1–6). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of thirty semester hours.

CHM 5832r. Directed Individual Study (1–6). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of sixty semester hours.

CHM 5833r. Directed Individual Study (1–6). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of sixty semester hours.

CHM 5908r. Focus on Physical Chemistry (3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course is a disciplinary focus group course designed to instruct graduate students on the location, analysis and interpretation of topical scientific journal articles for the purpose of communicating the content by both oral and written methodologies. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

CHM 5910. Chemical Research (3).

CHM 5911. Chemical Research (3).

CHM 5912. Chemical Research (3).

CHM 5935r. Chemistry Seminars (0). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of ten times.

CHM 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may be applied to a master’s degree.

CHM 5945. Seminar on Chemical Education (1). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Limited to chemistry graduate students new to Florida State University. This course is preparation for supervised teaching. Topics include safety, how to conduct classes and laboratories, exam construction, ethics of teaching, legal implications, written and oral communication of scientific material.

CHM 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours credit is required.

CHM 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only). A minimum of twenty-four semester hours is required.

CHM 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

CHM 8969r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

CHM 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

CHM 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

CHILD DEVELOPMENT:

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