Skip to main content

This is your Donation message.

2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Department of Classics

College of Arts and Sciences

Web Page: http://classics.fsu.edu/

Chair: Pullen; Leon Golden Professor: Marincola; M. Lynette Thompson Professor: de Grummond; Professors: Cairns, Fulkerson, Pullen; Associate Professors: Luke, Pfaff, Sickinger, Slaveva-Griffin, Stover; Assistant Professors: Clark, De Giorgi, Lewis, Weiberg; Associate Teaching Professor: Branscome; Professors Emeriti: Golden, Plescia

The Department of Classics is committed to advancing our knowledge and critical appreciation of the ancient Mediterranean world through excellence in research and in teaching. The department seeks to create an atmosphere that fosters traditional scholarly approaches to the classical past while at the same time welcoming and encouraging innovative methods and perspectives. The department values the interdisciplinary nature of the classics and strives to achieve an integrated understanding of the ancient world that includes a full appreciation of history, literature, and material culture. Students are encouraged to view the classics within the context of the traditional humanities as well as in terms of the contemporary criticism of received cultural canons.

The faculty in Classics is distinguished in teaching and research. Several members of the faculty have received university and national teaching awards. Research strengths lie in ancient literature, particularly poetry, the archaeology of Greece and Italy, and the political and social history of Athens and of Rome. The department administers the Langford Family Eminent Chair in Classics, which brings distinguished classicists to campus, and it plays host to two major conferences each year, the Langford Seminar in the fall and the Langford Conference in the spring. It also welcomes distinguished classicists from the U.S. and abroad to its lecture program, which includes the endowed Hunter Lecture. The department’s Thompson Library houses a full collection of Classics resources for students and faculty, and graduate students have access to up-to-date computing facilities and software. Graduate students can participate in archaeological fieldwork conducted by faculty members in Italy and Greece, while other opportunities for fieldwork and overseas study are available in Italy, Greece, and elsewhere.

The department enjoys a close relationship with other departments in the University, especially art history, anthropology, history, interdisciplinary humanities, philosophy and religion, each of which offers graduate level courses of interest to classicists.

The Department of Classics offers several programs of graduate study leading to the MA and PhD degrees. MA programs are offered in Classical Archaeology, Classical Civilizations, Classics (Greek and Latin), Greek, Latin, and Ancient History. The focus of each program differs, but all are designed to prepare students for teaching careers in secondary schools or to help students develop the skills necessary for study at the PhD level. Students also have the opportunity to work toward certification in Museum Studies. The PhD program has concentrations in Classical Archaeology or Classical Philology and trains students to become teachers and scholars at the college or university level. Students work closely with the director of graduate studies and departmental faculty to design a graduate program which meets their personal and professional requirements.

Admission Requirements

The minimum admission requirements for all programs leading to the MA are:

  1. A Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree;
  2. A 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (GPA) in all upper-division work and a score in the 90th percentile or higher on the Verbal section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and no less than the 50th percentile on the quantitative portion of the GRE. The former is estimated to be 162 or higher on the new GRE scale, the latter is approximately 150 or higher on the new GRE scale;

Note: Effective August 2011, the GRE Revised General Test replaced the GRE General Test. To learn more about this new test, go to http://www.ets.org/gre.

  1. Sufficient undergraduate work in Classics to warrant study on the graduate level.

The minimum requirements for admission to the doctoral program are:

  1. A Bachelor of Arts (BA) or Master of Arts (MA) degree in Classics or related field;
  2. A 3.6 GPA overall and 3.8 GPA in upper division coursework;
  3. A GRE score in the 90th percentile or higher on the Verbal section (estimated to be 162 or higher on the new GRE scale) and no less than the 50th percentile (approximately 150 or higher on the new GRE scale) on the quantitative portion of the GRE;

Note: Effective August 2011, the GRE Revised General Test replaced the GRE General Test. To learn more about this new test, go to http://www.ets.org/gre.

  1. Sufficient language skills in Greek and Latin to begin graduate-level coursework (normally two years each of college-level Greek and Latin with average grades of at least “A–”);
  2. Well-developed writing abilities.

Master of Arts (MA) Degree Requirements

The department offers a variety of programs leading to the MA degree. Each program is designed to prepare students for doctoral-level work in classical studies. Students are encouraged to study the particulars of each program with care and to consult with the director of graduate studies when making decisions about which program to enter. Students in some programs may also prepare themselves for a career teaching Latin or as a professional contract archaeologist.

General Requirements of all MA programs

Students should review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the “College of Arts and Sciences” chapter of this Graduate Bulletin. All graduate students are required, during their first fall semester in residence, to take CLA 5936, Proseminar in Classical Studies. All students must demonstrate competence in a modern foreign language (French, German or Italian). This is accomplished by:

  1. Completing twelve semester hours of college level work with a grade point average of 3.0 or above;
  2. Earning a 480 or above on the appropriate examination in the Graduate School Foreign Language Tests administered by ETS;

or

  1. Passing the Reading Knowledge Examination (FRE 5069, GER 5069 or ITA 5069).

Graduate students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade point average in all graduate work, and no course in classics for which a student receives a grade of “C” or below may count toward any graduate degree in the department.

All students pursuing the thesis option for a degree are expected, before arranging their comprehensive or translation exams or commencing work on a thesis, to select a major professor. The major professor will help the student to select his or her MA committee, will direct the student’s thesis or paper and will work with the director of graduate studies in order to be certain that the student has met every requirement for the MA degree. Students are expected to familiarize themselves with University regulations concerning required forms and deadlines, as well as with the Classics Graduate Student Handbook available on the Department of Classics Web site (http://classics.fsu.edu/).

Master of Arts (MA) with a Major in Classical Archaeology

The program in classical archaeology allows a student to focus his or her coursework on archaeology and art history. It is recommended for students who intend to pursue further graduate work in classical archaeology.

All students must achieve at least a 3000 level proficiency in either Greek or Latin and the equivalent of one year’s study of the other of the two classical languages. These requirements should be viewed as the minimum of language preparation. Students in archaeology are strongly encouraged to achieve graduate level proficiency in at least one ancient language.

Requirements (Thirty-two semester hours total)

Students are required to write master’s paper (a substantial research paper that is usually an expanded version of a seminar paper) during the semester in which they are registered for CLA 5919.

Required Courses Required Hours
CLA 5936 Proseminar 1
CLA 5789r Fieldwork 4
Seminars (usually CLA 5799) 6
Archaeology courses 9
Electives in classics 9
CLA 8961r Comprehensive examination 0
CLA 5919 MA paper 3

There are various means of meeting the fieldwork requirement. Students should consult with the archaeology committee in order to determine the most appropriate means of fulfilling this requirement.

Comprehensive Examinations for Classical Archaeology

The comprehensive exam in classical archaeology is divided into two parts:

  1. One hour of identifications:
    1. twenty-five slides each viewed for two minutes. Students are asked to identify and to explain the significance of major monuments of the type typically found in introductory textbooks on Greek and Italian archaeology.
  2. Two hours of essays:
    1. Select one essay from either the Bronze Age or Hellenic period;
    2. Select one essay from either the Etruscan or Roman period.

The comprehensive exams are given each year in late September. For the purposes of the comprehensive examinations, the archaeology committee is the examination committee.

Master of Arts (MA) with a Major in Classics (Greek and Latin)

The program in classics (Greek and Latin) enables a student to concentrate his or her coursework on both languages. The program will prepare students for further graduate work in classical studies or for a career in teaching.

Requirements (Thirty-three semester hours total)

Students are required to write a master’s paper (substantial research paper that is usually an expanded version of a seminar paper) during the semester in which they are registered for CLA 5919.

Required Courses Required Hours
CLA 5936 Proseminar 1
Six courses at the 5000 (or 6000) level in Greek or in Latin (at least two courses must be taken in each ancient language) 12
One history course 3
One archaeology course 3
Electives in classics 5
LNW/GRW 8966r Translation examination 0
CLA 5919 MA paper 3

See below for a description of the translation examinations.

Master of Arts (MA) in Latin

The program in Latin enables the student to concentrate his or her coursework on that language. This program will prepare students for further graduate work and for teaching in the schools. Students hoping to proceed to doctoral-level work should also have some coursework in Greek.

Requirements (Thirty-three semester hours total)

Students are required to write a master’s paper (a substantial research paper that is usually an expanded version of a seminar paper) during the semester in which they are registered for CLA 5919.

Required Courses Required Hours
CLA 5936 Proseminar 1
Six courses at the 5000 (or 6000) level in Latin 18
One history course 3
One archaeology course 3
Electives in classics 5
LNW 8966r Translation examination 0
CLA 5919 MA paper 3

See below for a description of the translation examinations.

Master of Arts (MA) in Greek

The program in Greek enables the student to concentrate his or her coursework on that language. Students hoping to proceed to doctoral-level work should also have some coursework in Latin.

Requirements (Thirty-three semester hours total)

Students are required to write a master’s paper (a substantial research paper that is usually an expanded version of a seminar paper) during the semester in which they are registered for CLA 5919.

Required Courses Required Hours
CLA 5936 Proseminar 1
Five courses at the 5000 (or 6000) level in Greek 15
One history course 3
One archaeology course 3
Electives in classics 8
GRW 8966r Translation examination 0
CLA 5919 MA paper 3

See below for a description of translation examinations.

Master of Arts (MA) with a Major in Classical Civilizations

The program in classical civilization offers the student the most flexibility of any program in the department. A student may proceed to doctoral-level work through this program, but must take care to have raised his or her languages to a suitable level of competency. If the student hopes to be involved in advanced work in archaeology, he or she must take care to acquire a background in archaeology sufficient to meet the requirements of doctoral programs in classical archaeology. Students in this program can easily combine language study with courses in archaeology and history. Graduates of this program have also gone on to teach in the schools. However, that opportunity requires that the student acquire sufficient skill in Latin. It is also possible to pursue this degree in order to prepare for further work in fields other than classics (such as comparative literature or humanities). Students will be required to pass either one of the Master’s Comprehensive Exams in Greek or Latin (GRW 8966 or LNW 8966) or the Master’s Comprehensive Exam in Classics (CLA 8961).

Requirements (Thirty-three semester hours total)

Students are required to write master’s paper (a substantial research paper that is usually an expanded version of a seminar paper) during the semester in which they are registered for CLA 5919.

Required Courses Required Hours
CLA 5936 Proseminar 1
Two courses in 1) Greek or Latin or 2) two courses in literature-in translation (or a combination thereof) 6
Two history courses (may be substituted for by taking courses in archaeology, Latin or Greek (at the 5000 level) 6
One archaeology course 3
Electives in classics 14
CLA 5919 MA paper 3
CLA 8961 or GRW 8966 or LNW 8966 Comprehensive Examination 0

Translation Examinations for Classics, Latin or Greek

Students seeking an MA in Classics, Latin or Greek will sit a translation examination. Passages will be drawn from the MA reading list in the Classics Graduate Student Handbook. All passages will be of medium difficulty. The level of competence required to pass the exam is that which might reasonably be expected of a student who has completed two years of graduate study. The exams are offered each year in late Fall and Spring.

Classics: from a selection, a student will translate four passages; one in Greek prose, one in Greek poetry, one in Latin prose and one in Latin poetry.

Greek or Latin: from a selection (in the relevant language), a student will translate two passages: one in prose and one in poetry.

Master of Arts (MA) with a Major in Ancient History

The major in Ancient History offers students an opportunity to focus on historical authors in the original languages, achieve in-depth historical training, and write an MA paper or thesis on an historical topic.

Requirements (Thirty-three semester hours total)

Students are required to write a master’s paper (a substantial research paper that is usually an expanded version of a seminar paper) during the semester in which they are registered for CLA 5919.

Required Courses Required Hours
Proseminar (CLA 5936) 1
Four courses at the 5000- or 6000-level in Greek or Roman History (at least one course must be a 6000-level seminar) 12
Two courses at the 5000- or 6000-level in Greek or Latin (at least one course must be a 6000-level seminar, one course must be on a historical author) 6
One Archaeology course 3
Three additional courses (5000- or 6000-level) which may be based in related departments (students are encouraged to use at least one elective for further advanced language study of a historical author) 8
Translation Exams in Greek or Latin 0
Comprehensive Exam in Ancient History 0
MA paper (CLA 5919) 3

Comprehensive Examinations for ancient history

All students must pass a translation exam in Greek or Latin, which will normally follow the same format as the departmental Comprehensive Exam but be based upon the Ancient History Reading Lists. All students must also pass a Comprehensive Exam in ancient history.

PhD with Majors in Classics or Classical Archaeology

The department offers the PhD in classics (ancient history, philology, literary criticism) and in classical archaeology. Students holding the BA with sufficient training in classics and who wish to pursue doctoral-level work in the department may apply directly to the PhD program. Students holding the BA, but without sufficient training in classics, should first apply to the MA program. Students entering the MA program may, upon recommendation and review by the faculty, be admitted to the PhD program before completion of the MA.

The PhD requires thirty semester hours of coursework beyond the MA, at least twelve semester hours of which must be at the 6000 level. Students should consult the Classics Graduate Student Handbook, available on the Department of Classics Web site (http://classics.fsu.edu/) for details of requirements, annual evaluations, and examinations. Each program requires a series of comprehensive examinations.

The program in classics requires: reading list examinations in Greek and Latin; demonstration of proficiency, by exam or through coursework, in Greek and Roman history; detailed examinations in Greek and Latin literature; a special author examination; a special field or topic examination; an examination in an interdisciplinary topic.

The program in classical archaeology requires: a reading list examination in either Greek or Latin; demonstration of proficiency, by exam or through coursework, in Greek and Roman history; examination on a topic in Bronze Age or Greek archaeology; examination on a topic in Etruscan or Roman archaeology; a special field or topic examination; an examination in an interdisciplinary topic.

Doctoral students must complete and successfully defend a dissertation that makes an original contribution to scholarship.

Definition of Prefixes

ARH—Art History

CLA—Classical and Ancient Studies

CLT—Classical Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

EUH—European History

FLE—Foreign Language Education

GRE—Classical Greek (Language Study)

GRW—Classical Greek Literature (Writings)

LAT—Latin (Language Study)

LNW—Latin Literature (Writings)

Graduate Courses

ARH 5111. Art and Archaeology of the Bronze Age in the Aegean (3). This course is a detailed study of the major archaeological evidence related to the Bronze Age in Crete and Greece; the major sites, monuments, and artistic works are studied and analyzed.

ARH 5119. Archaeology of Ancient Egypt (3). This course is a survey of the archaeology and art of Ancient Egypt from the Pre-dynastic to the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. Emphasis on the art, architecture, and culture of the Old and New Kingdoms.

ARH 5125. Etruscan Art and Archaeology (3). This course is a critical study and appraisal of Etruscan monuments and artistic works; major archaeological evidence for Etruscan culture.

ARH 5140. Greek Art and Archaeology of the Fifth and Fourth Centuries BC (3). This course is an analysis of classical Greek architecture, painting, sculpture, and other arts, and of the archaeological evidence for the chronology and cultural history of the classical period.

ARH 5160. Art and Archaeology of the Early Roman Empire (3). This course is an analysis of Roman architecture, painting, sculpture, and other arts from Augustus through the Antonines, and of the archaeological evidence for the chronology and cultural history of the early Imperial period.

ARH 5161. Archaeology of the Late Roman Empire (3). This course comprises a study of Roman art and archaeology from the second to the sixth century CE with emphasis on important sites and monuments.

ARH 5174r. Studies in Classical Art and Archaeology (3). This course focuses on studies in specific aspects of Greek and Roman art and archaeology. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ARH 5934r. Tutorial in Classical Archaeology (1–3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course uses intensive readings and discussion within a small group centered upon a specific topic or research problem in classical archaeology. May be repeated when topics vary to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ARH 6937r. Doctoral Seminar in Classical Archaeology (3). Prerequisite: CLA 5936. This course is a doctoral-level seminar devoted to a specific issue in classical archaeology. May be repeated when topics vary to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

CLA 5155. Pompeii (3). This course provides a study of the archaeology of Pompeii and neighboring towns from the seventh century BCE to the first century CE.

CLA 5438r. Studies in Greek History (3). This course is a study of selected topics in Greek history in the Archaic, Classical, or Hellenistic periods. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CLA 5448r. Studies in Roman History (3). This course is a critical study of topics related to the Roman Republic or Empire. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CLA 5789r. Classical Archaeology: Fieldwork (1–6). (S/U grade only). This fieldwork affords students the experience of excavation through an approved archaeological field school or project. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

CLA 5799r. Seminar in Classical Archaeology (3). This course is a seminar on special topics in classical archaeology with emphasis on understanding the workings of the discipline. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CLA 5905r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

CLA 5910r. Supervised Research (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

CLA 5919. Master of Arts Paper (3). (S/U grade only). This course offers students a capstone, independent-research experience on an advanced topic to be chosen by the student in conjunction with the major professor.

CLA 5920r. Classics Colloquium (1-3). (S/U grade only). This course is a series of lectures and seminars given by FSU faculty and visiting scholars on current research topics in Classics. May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

CLA 5931r. Special Topics in Classics (3–9). This course examines specific aspects of Greco-Roman literature and culture. May be repeated when topics vary to a maximum of nine semester hours.

CLA 5936. Proseminar in Classical Studies (1). (S/U grade only). This course is an introduction to research in classical studies.

CLA 5940r. Supervised Teaching (0–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

CLA 5942r. Internship in Museum Studies (3–6). This course is an internship in a museum or similar institution. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CLA 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

CLA 6906r. Readings for Exams (1–12). (S/U grade only). This course is designed for graduate students who have completed required coursework and are preparing for comprehensive exams. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

CLA 6932r. Seminar in Classics (3–12). This seminar focuses on research topics dealing with specific aspects of Greco-Roman literature and culture. May be repeated when topics vary to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

CLA 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: CLA 8964r.

CLA 8961r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

CLA 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

CLA 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

CLA 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisites: CLA 6980r and CLA 8964r.

CLT 5295. Studies in Greek Tragedy: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides (3). This course examines readings and criticism of selected plays from the Greek tragedians in English translation.

CLT 5345. Studies in Greek and Roman Epic (3). This course is an analysis of the principal pieces of epic literature from the classical world read in English translation.

CLT 5379r. Seminar in Ancient Mythology (3). This course is a special study in seminar format of topics in ancient myth and its interpretation. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

EUH 5407. Hellenistic Greece (3). This course studies the Greek world from the death of Socrates (399 B.C.) to the Roman conquest (146 B.C., the sack of Corinth by Mummius).

EUH 5417. The Roman Republic (3). This course studies the history of Rome from its foundation (traditionally 753 B.C.) to the fall of the Roman Republic (31 B.C., the Battle of Actium).

EUH 5418. The Roman Empire (3). This course examines the Roman Empire from Augustus to Constantine. Emphasis on the evolution from the duarchy of the early empire to the monarchy of the late empire.

FLE 5810. Teaching Classics (3). This course prepares graduate students in classics for their role as teachers of undergraduates in lower-level courses in etymology, classical civilization, myth and Latin.

GRE 5305. Greek Syntax and Stylistics (3). Prerequisite: GRE 2220. This course is directed towards newly entering graduate students who need to improve their knowledge of the forms, vocabulary, and syntax of classical Attic Greek as well as develop their training in how to read, understand, and analyze Greek prose.

GRW 5215r. Studies in the Greek Prose Writers (3). This course focuses on the translation, commentary, and interpretation of readings from Greek prose writers. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GRW 5305r. Studies in Greek Drama (3). This course is a detailed study through readings in the original texts of selected Greek plays. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GRW 5345r. Greek Poetry (3). This course is a detailed study through readings in the original texts of selected Greek poets. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GRW 5505r. Greek Philosophical Writings (3). This course is a detailed study through readings in the original texts of selected philosophical works. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GRW 5908r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GRW 5909r. Tutorial in Greek (1–3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This tutorial consists of intensive work by a small number of postgraduates devoted to a specific topic or research problem in Greek studies. May be repeated when topics vary to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GRW 5971r. Thesis (3–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

GRW 6106. Survey of Greek Literature (3). Prerequisite: One 5000-level course in Greek or instructor permission. This course assists the student in working through the PhD/MA reading lists, outlines the basic genres of Greek literature in chronological order, and explores the style of its most renowned practitioners. Class sessions are normally divided between lectures on Greek literary history and authorial style and the translation of select passages from the assignment. A minimum of two years of college Greek is required, but students who have only had two years should consult with the instructor before registering for the course, as it is reading intensive.

GRW 6930r. Seminar in Greek (3). Prerequisite: CLA 5934. This doctoral-level seminar is devoted to a specific text or issue in Greek studies. May be repeated when topics vary to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

GRW 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

GRW 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

LAT 5069r. Graduate Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only).

LNW 5316r. Studies in Roman Drama (3). This course covers translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected plays from Plautus, Terence, or Seneca. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LNW 5325r. Roman Lyric, Elegiac, and Pastoral Poetry (3). This course covers translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected works from the Roman lyric, elegiac, and pastoral poets. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LNW 5345r. Studies in Roman Epic (3). This course covers translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected works from Vergil or the other Roman hexameter poets. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LNW 5365r. Studies in Roman Satire (3). This course covers translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected works from the Roman poetic satirists and satirical prose authors. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LNW 5385r. The Roman Historians and Cicero (3). This course is a careful study of historical texts in Latin from the historians or Cicero. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LNW 5908r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

LNW 5932r. Tutorial in Latin (1–3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course is an intensive study by a small number of postgraduates centering upon a specific topic or research problem in Latin studies. May be repeated when topics vary to a maximum of nine semester hours.

LNW 5971r. Thesis (3–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours of credit is required.

LNW 6106. Survey of Latin Literature (3). Prerequisite: One 5000-level course in Latin or instructor permission. This course assists the student in working through the PhD/MA reading lists, outlines the basic genres of Latin poetry in chronological order, and explores the style of its most renowned practitioners. Class session are normally divided between lectures on Latin literary history and authorial style and the translation of select passages from the assignment. A minimum of two years of college Latin is required, but students who have only had two years should consult with the instructor before registering for the course, as it is reading intensive.

LNW 6930r. Seminar in Latin (3). Prerequisite: CLA 5936. This doctoral-level seminar is devoted to a specific text or issue in Latin studies. May be repeated when topics vary to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

LNW 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

LNW 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

CLASSICAL LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION:

see Classics

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY:

see Psychology