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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

School of Communication

College of Communication and Information

Web Page: http://comm.cci.fsu.edu/

Director: Gary Heald; Professors: Adams, Arpan, Houck, McDowell, Nudd, Opel, Proffitt, Raney; Associate Professors: Cortese, Jordan, MacNamara, Rayburn, Sypher; Assistant Professors: Bruker, Chapa, Clayton, Graves, Harlow, Hou, Lee, Merle; Specialized Teaching Faculty: DuBard, Heald, Laurents, Rodin, Solomon, Zeigler; Professors Emeriti: Heald, Mayo, Wotring, Young

The School of Communication offers graduate programs of study leading to the Master of Arts (MA), Master of Science (MS), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees. The student can select from several distinct major areas of emphasis which reflect specialized programs of study pertaining to either professional or academic careers in the communication field. Whether the student is interested in the traditional fields of human and speech communication, in the established discipline of media studies, or in the emerging areas of digital technologies, there are a variety of courses and course sequences available. The school also offers graduate-level certificates in the areas of Multicultural Marketing Communication and Project Management.

Specifically, at the master’s level programs of study are offered in communication with an emphasis in integrated marketing communication, and in media and communication studies. At the doctoral level, a program of study is available in communication theory.

Both thesis and non-thesis master’s options are available. Some non-thesis master’s programs are professionally oriented and assume the student will not pursue the doctoral degree in communication. Thesis master’s programs are often theoretically oriented and prepare the student for doctoral work. Each major specifies entry requirements and degree requirements to meet predetermined educational and professional goals. While each major has its own set and sequence of required courses, every program of study is planned individually with each student so as to ensure flexibility to meet individual student needs. Acceptance into each major is highly competitive and is based on student qualifications.

Faculty Distinctions

The graduate program in communication reflects the varied teaching and research interests of the faculty. Beyond their range of expertise in communication theory and research, faculty members remain united in their dedication to teaching excellence, as demonstrated by the regularity with which they receive teaching commendations and awards. Faculty members from the School of Communication have been elected and continue to serve as officers in major academic societies and professional associations. Faculty members have been and remain prominent in scholarly journals, serving as editors, associate editors, and, most importantly, authors. A series of journal publications, as well as books, convention papers, and monographs, have established a number of faculty members as nationally as well as internationally recognized leaders in their respective fields.

Assistantships/Scholarships

The School of Communication offers teaching and research assistantships to doctoral students and to master’s students (as funding is available). The number and amount of assistantships varies and is competitive. All assistantships also provide assistance with course tuition. Competitive scholarships are also offered each year.

In addition to University fellowships, the College of Communication and Information offers the college-wide teaching fellowship, which is awarded annually.

Applications and Admissions

  1. The candidate should apply online to the University Graduate Admissions Office Web site at http://admissions.fsu.edu. The school application instructions are also available online at http://comm.cci.fsu.edu. Applicants should upload their completed forms with supporting documents to the online university application. The school will accept new graduate applicants each semester.
  2. Minimum criteria to be considered for admission to the master’s program include a GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) for the last two years of undergraduate work and a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score of 148 verbal and 144 quantitative. Minimum criteria to be considered for admission to the doctoral program include a master’s GPA of 3.3, an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 for the last two years of undergraduate work, and a GRE score of 150 verbal and 147 quantitative. All applicants must submit three letters of recommendation and completed University and school application forms.
  3. Applicants for the doctoral program may be asked to complete an interview with the doctoral program committee, preferably in person although telephone is acceptable. Under certain conditions a videotaped statement in response to a set of questions provided by the committee could be substituted for the interview.

If the student completed a master’s degree in the School of Communication at Florida State University, the master’s supervisory committee must have made a written recommendation that the student be recommended to continue for the PhD degree at this University. In such cases, the student is expected to have completed a thesis option.

International students are required to submit GRE scores and a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 600 or above or an Internet-based TOEFL score of 100 or above. Regardless of TOEFL scores, some international students may be required by the International Admissions Office, the graduate admissions committee, or their advisory committee to enroll in the Center for Intensive English Studies program in order to begin in the program, regardless of the degrees that have been earned in their home countries. If an international student has earned an English competency, some of these requirements may be waived.

Master of Arts (MA) and Master of Science (MS) Degree

Supervisory Committee and Program of Studies

  1. Prior to or during registration for the first semester, students should meet with the coordinator for their emphasis area. The coordinator will help the student plan coursework for the first semester.
  2. For non-thesis students, the area coordinator will serve as chair of the student’s standing supervisory committee. Students pursuing a thesis must select a major professor or committee chair. This person is usually a specialist in the student’s major area. It is the student’s responsibility, after consultation with the area coordinator, to secure consent of an eligible faculty member to serve as the major professor and to work with the major professor to form a committee. Master’s thesis supervisory committees have a minimum of three members, of which two must be (all three may be) from within the School of Communication. Master’s project supervisory committees have a minimum of three members, two from within the School of Communication and one from a different department at FSU. All members on master’s supervisory committees must hold GFS.
  3. No later than the end of the first semester, the student must submit a program of study to the committee for approval. The program must closely follow the guidelines of the selected major and must meet school and University requirements. The proposed program of study should be developed with the help and advice of the major professor. If a committee meeting is required, the program of study should be submitted to all committee members at least five days before the committee meets. At the meeting, the committee will discuss and modify the program of study as necessary.
  4. If the student’s undergraduate preparation is weak, out of field, or insufficient for work in the area chosen, the admissions committee or supervisory committee may require that the student complete specified undergraduate courses in areas of deficiency. These make-up courses will not normally be credited toward master’s requirements.
  5. Not more than six semester hours may be transferred from another graduate institution and then only with the approval of the supervisory committee. Not more than six semester hours of directed individual study (COM 5906) may be applied toward the master’s degree.
  6. With the prior approval of the supervisory committee, up to six hours of letter-graded 4000-level work may be counted in the master’s program. Courses taken at the 4000 level on an S/U basis may not be counted, nor may any work below the 4000 level.
  7. The program of study must be approved by all committee members, the area coordinator and the school director. The student should provide signed copies to all signatories, with the director’s copy filed in the student’s folder. Changes in the program of study or in the composition of the supervisory committee are accomplished with special forms obtained from the school. The forms are signed by all committee members, the area coordinator and the school director, and are attached to the student’s original program of study.
  8. A master’s program normally requires the equivalent of one and one-half calendar years of full-time coursework. Students with less background in their chosen area of specialization, or with degrees outside of communication, or who are completing a thesis should expect to spend longer to complete a master’s program.
  9. Graduate students are required to earn grades of “B–” or better in all courses in their graduate major in order for the courses to be counted toward the degree. A GPA of at least 3.0 must be maintained for all master’s work.
  10. There is no University-wide residency requirement.
  11. Each master’s candidate must demonstrate, by term papers or thesis, writing skills that are acceptable to the student’s committee.
  12. The English proficiency of domestic and international students will be evaluated by the student’s supervisory committee at least by the end of the student’s second semester of residency. If the committee decides that the student’s English usage is deficient, the committee will recommend remedial action. If, as a result of remedial action, the student’s English proficiency is still considered to be below an acceptable level, the student may be dismissed.
  13. There is no school-wide foreign-language requirement. If the student wishes to receive the Master of Arts degree, the University requires: a) Proficiency in a foreign language demonstrated by certification by the appropriate language department, or completion of twelve semester hours in a foreign language with an average grade of at least 3.0 (“B”), or four years of a single language in high school; b) six or more semester hours of graduate credit in one or more of the following fields: art; classical language, literature, and civilization; communication (not to include speech correction); English; history; humanities; modern languages and linguistics; music; philosophy; religion; and theatre.
  14. Depending on the major area in which the student is enrolled, the student may elect a thesis or non-thesis program. To qualify for the master’s degree under the thesis program, the student must complete a minimum of thirty-three semester hours including six hours of thesis credit. At least twenty-four of those hours must be taken on a letter-grade basis.
  15. To qualify for the master’s degree under the non-thesis capstone program options, the student must complete a minimum of thirty-three semester hours, twenty-seven of which must be on a letter-grade basis, and either pass written and oral comprehensive examinations, or a thesis-scope project, or a residency (Note: The residency option is limited to the IMC master’s program; in the MCS program, residencies count toward regular course credit). Students may also qualify for the master’s degree under the coursework-only option for which they must complete a minimum of thirty-six semester hours. The non-thesis program is considered a terminal degree (i.e., the student is normally not expected to continue for the doctorate). The supervisory committee may require an oral examination of the project or capstone residency report. Copies of clearance forms are signed and placed in the student’s file.
  16. Written comprehensive examinations must be completed at least four weeks prior to the end of the semester. The oral defense is limited to a two-week period following the written portion of the comprehensive examination.
  17. Students must complete requirements for the master’s degree within forty-three semester hours maximum including thesis. Any hours taken beyond forty-three will not be credited toward the master’s degree nor can they be counted in a PhD program. The student must complete the master’s degree and be recommended for continuation by the supervisory committee before beginning doctoral coursework.
  18. A prospectus must be approved by all committee members prior to research or data collection for a thesis project. Signed copies are to be filed in the student’s school folder.
  19. During registration for the final semester the student should enroll in master’s comprehensive examination and master’s thesis defense or project, or capstone residency.
  20. At the same time, the student should make application for graduation and the diploma.
  21. The manuscript and final clearance advisor in the Graduate School must approve the form of the thesis before final preparation. It is recommended that students consult with this advisor early in the preparation stage and obtain a copy of Guidelines and Requirements for Electronic Thesis, Treatise, and Dissertation Writers.
  22. Prior to the oral defense of the thesis, an announcement must be sent to the Graduate School. This announcement must be published at least two weeks prior to the defense. At least one week prior to the oral defense of a thesis, capstone residency, project, or of comprehensive examinations, the candidate is responsible for notifying all school faculty of the time and place of the defense. Graduate students may also attend the defense. The candidate is responsible for scheduling the oral defense at a time convenient for all the committee members.
  23. The defense should be scheduled at least two weeks after copies of the thesis, reports, or examinations have been distributed to committee members. These must be seen by the candidate and the major professor as final copies. The academic calendar in the Registration Guide specifies deadline dates.
  24. The major professor will bring to the oral examination the school graduate exam clearance form which is to be signed by all committee members and by the school director.
  25. At the office of permanent records, evaluation, and graduation, the candidate will receive a final term degree clearance form which provides space for certification by all parties concerned that all requirements for the degree have been met. After the oral defense, the master’s candidate must submit to the manuscript and final clearance advisor this completed form and an electronic copy. Notice the submission deadline published in the Registration Guide. It is courteous to give all members of the committee and the school copies of the thesis. The Graduate School sends the major professor one electronic copy.

Master of Arts (MA) and Master of Science (MS) Degree Programs

Master’s Degree in Professional Communication with an Emphasis in Integrated Marketing Communication

Career Goals. This program is designed for students interested in careers that merge advertising, public relations, cross-cultural marketing communication, new communication technologies, and applied research. It provides a foundation for students who wish to pursue professional careers in integrated marketing communication, digital marketing communication and Hispanic marketing communication. The program can also lead to advanced graduate studies.

Educational Goals. The student will follow a course of studies providing: 1) basic knowledge of communication theories, with particular emphasis on those that apply to marketing communication, new communication technologies and Hispanic marketing communication; 2) preparation for professional careers in digital media production using new technologies in marketing and/or management roles; 3) development of fundamental proficiencies in applied research; 4) skills in developing and organizing data/information systems, and facilitating data-based decisions; 5) insights into the coordination of promotional communication, cross-cultural communication initiatives, new technologies and applied research strategies to facilitate organizational and promotional goals; and 6) experience in making formal marketing/management communication presentations.

Areas of Special Knowledge and Skills to be Developed. Depending on career path and specific course of study, the proportion of coursework within each of the following will vary: marketing communication techniques, including strategic and performance-based project management, account planning, desktop multimedia applications, and cross-cultural promotions; traditional and new media marketing communication strategies, including advertising and public relations research, marketing communication planning, design, implementation and evaluation; application of research methods to marketing communication, including quasi-experimental and survey design, content analysis, focus groups, database research techniques, and data analysis; digital media applications and digital marketing communication; and computer-mediated communication research skills and tools.

Required Hours. A minimum of thirty-three semester hours are required; thirty-six semester hours are required with a coursework-only option. It is possible to complete the program in one academic year, though many students spread the degree requirements across four semesters. Students who have insufficient backgrounds in communication and related subjects at the undergraduate level may be required to take three to nine semester hours of letter-graded undergraduate coursework as determined by their supervisory committees. These additional hours will not count toward completion of master’s degree requirements.

For specific course requirements, visit the school Web site at http://comm.cci.fsu.edu or contact the school.

Master’s Degree in Communication and digital media with an Emphasis in public interest media and Communication

Career goals. This program is designed for graduate students interested in working in the communication areas of non-governmental organizations, political campaigns, government agencies, and social service groups. The program also may serve as preparation for doctoral work in communication, leading to a teaching or research position.

Educational goals in this master’s program students will be introduced to practical digital media production skills, as well as theory and research methods. The program prepares students to: 1) conceptualize, design, and produce effective digital media/video, 2) harness the power of social media distribution networks, 3) analyze data to determine how messages are being received and acted upon, and 4) use communication theory to guide media creation and evaluations.

Areas of special knowledge and skills to be developed. By the conclusion of this master’s program, students will be able to: create digital video media content; evaluate audience reception of media campaigns; apply communication theory in the development of media campaigns; and tailor media messages to specific audiences and respond to audience feedback

Required Hours. A minimum of thirty-six semester hours are required. Students who have completed insufficient coursework in communication at the undergraduate level (e.g., students who did not major in a communication-related area) may be required to take six to twelve semester hours of letter-graded, undergraduate coursework as determined by their supervisory committee. These additional hours will not count toward completion of the thirty-six semester hours.

For specific course requirements, visit the school Web site at http://comm.cci.fsu.edu, or contact the school.

Doctor in Philosophy (PhD) in Communication

PhD in Communication

The School of Communication offers a PhD program in communication research and theory.

Minimum Required Hours: Students are required to complete a minimum of forty-eight course credit hours beyond the Master’s degree, plus twenty-four hours of dissertation credits. Course credits will include three required foundation courses, as well as study in a primary and secondary area of emphasis and research methods and design. Specific course requirements are determined by the doctoral supervisory committee in accordance with school and university requirements.

Required Cognate: An outside cognate of twelve semester hours approved by the doctoral supervisory committee is required.

Special Note: All communication doctoral students must register for the required communication research colloquium (COM 5920) during every semester of full-time coursework.

For specific course requirements, visit the Web site at http://comm.cci.fsu.edu or contact the school.

Program Overview

Beginning with a common set of foundational courses, students will encounter a range of philosophical, theoretical, and methodological approaches to communication scholarship. A major goal of the program is for students to gain knowledge of and an appreciation for the complexities and interdependencies within communication inquiry. To that end, students will gain a theoretical grounding in the broad communication discipline and then will pursue more advanced study through doctoral-level seminars, directed independent studies, and supervised research experiences. Students will be actively mentored to present the results of their work at regional and national conferences, culminating in publication in refereed outlets. Additionally, most students will have the opportunity to develop teaching and classroom management skills through our funded assistantship program.

Program Objectives

This program is primarily designed for students who are interested in pursuing academic teaching and research careers within the communication discipline. However, some may choose to use the degree to launch a career in one of the various communication-related industries, research, consultancy, not-for-profit organizations, or governmental affairs. Regardless of the student’s chosen career path, the primary objective for all will be to become an independent and original scholar.

The educational goals of the program are to provide students with advanced knowledge of or experience in: 1) communication theory and inquiry; 2) selected extant communication literatures; 3) research methods applicable in either theoretical or applied settings to the study of selected communication texts, processes, audiences, systems, organizations, or effects; 4) research design and data/textual analysis; and 5) teaching undergraduate students at a state-supported university.

Communication Theory and Research

Career Goals: Teach communication in a college or university; management position within a communication or research organization; consultant in media, research, or marketing in for-profit, not-for-profit, and governmental settings.

Additional Educational Goals: Knowledge of communication theories and research; training in both quantitative and qualitative research design and analysis; experience with various methods for basic and applied communication research.

Skills to be Developed: Ability to conduct independent research; ability to teach at university or college level; quantitative and qualitative research methods; effective written communication.

Supervisory Committee and Program of Studies

  1. A provisional advisor is assigned to the student at the time of acceptance into the program. During the student’s first semester in the program, the provisional advisor will assist the student in registering for courses and may be a source of information for the student concerning choice of major professor, cognate area, program of studies, and registration for the second semester.
  2. By the midpoint of the second semester, the student must designate a major professor who has consented to serve in that capacity. The major professor will take over the advising duties of the provisional advisor, will be the student’s principal advisor in choosing members for the doctoral supervisory committee, and will assist the student in developing a preliminary program of studies. Faculty members holding Graduate Faculty Status (GFS) with doctoral directing status are eligible to serve as major professors.
  3. The doctoral supervisory committee approves the program of studies, reviews and approves any proposed revisions to the program of studies, and designs and evaluates the doctoral preliminary examination. For both thesis and capstone creative project committees at the master’s level, the supervisory committee will consist of a minimum of three members of the faculty who all have Graduate Faculty Status (GFS). At least two faculty members must be from within the student’s department/school. The third member can be either from within the student’s department/school or from another unit on campus. Members of the committee must be selected by the student prior to the end of the student’s second semester of enrollment. The members of this committee will be decided by mutual agreement among the student, the major professor, and the prospective committee members. Doctoral supervisory committees have a minimum of four members: three from within the School of Communication plus one outside member. All members must hold GFS. The outside member of the committee must be from a different department at FSU. This outside member serves as the University’s representative-at-large who reports directly to the dean of the college and to the dean of the graduate school; accordingly, the outside member must hold university graduate faculty status and must be tenured.
  4. The first semester of the student’s coursework, a proposed program of study is completed. The program of study is a document detailing the courses that a student plans to take in the doctoral program, as well as a timeline for completing those courses. Before the beginning of the third semester of enrollment, the student must submit for approval a program of study to the doctoral supervisory committee, the director of doctoral studies and the school director. Additionally, the student must submit a statement of purpose, detailing the student’s major areas of interests, degree completion schedule, and career goals.
  5. At the end of a student’s coursework but before preliminary exams are taken, the doctoral supervisory committee will meet with the student to complete a final review of the program of studies. All changes will be reviewed and a final, corrected version of the program of studies is signed and sent to the director of doctoral studies for the additional signatures.
  6. The doctoral program often requires six or seven semesters of full-time coursework (48 hours of coursework) beyond the master’s degree and at least one year of dissertation work. Students with a master’s degree from a discipline other than communication may spend more time completing the doctoral program. Doctoral students must complete requirements for the Ph.D. within 135 semester hours maximum, including dissertation.
  7. According to University policy, all graduate students are required to earn grades of “B–” or better in all courses in order for the courses to be counted toward the degree. In addition, a grade point average of at least 3.0 (out of a possible 4.0) must be maintained for all PhD work.
  8. All students must meet Florida State University’s and the School’s Scholarly Engagement Policy requirement to ensure that doctoral students are active participants in the scholarly community. To meet the Scholarly Engagement requirement, doctoral students should interact with faculty and peers in ways that may include enrolling in courses; attending seminars, symposia, and conferences; engaging in collaborative study and research beyond the university campus; and utilizing the library, laboratories, and other facilities provided by the university for the purpose of knowledge creation. Activities that contribute to scholarly engagement in the School are described in the Guide to Doctoral.
  9. Prior to the preliminary examinations, every doctoral student is required to submit and have accepted three original scholarly papers or works to an appropriate journal and/or a state, regional, or national convention or festival (all work must be peer reviewed).
  10. The English proficiency of domestic and international students will be evaluated by the student’s doctoral supervisory committee at least by the end of the student’s second semester of residency. If the committee decides that the student’s English usage is deficient, the committee will recommend remedial action. If, as a result of remedial action, the student’s English proficiency is still considered to be below an acceptable level, the student may be dismissed.
  11. There is no school-wide foreign language requirement.
  12. The progress of all students in the PhD program is reviewed annually at the conclusion of the Spring semester by the director of doctoral studies, in consultation with the doctoral program committee or the student’s supervisory committee.
  13. At the end of coursework, students will enroll for and complete COM 8964, Doctoral Preliminary Examination (0). Details concerning the preliminary examination requirements can be found in the Guide to Doctoral Studies. The purpose of the preliminary examination is to determine if the student is sufficiently prepared to continue with the original, independent scholarly work required to complete a doctoral dissertation. The preliminary examination may not be taken if the student has one or more incomplete grades pending.
  14. Supervisory committees in our school have been given great latitude in determining the nature and content of the preliminary exams. The content covered on the exam is determined by the full committee. Typically, the outside member of the committee provides questions covering the cognate area of study. The nature of the exam is likewise determined by the supervisory committee. The committee is given an opportunity to further examine the student’s performance through the oral portion of the doctoral preliminary examination. The oral portion of the exam must occur between seven and fourteen calendar days following submission of the written portion to all committee members.
  15. Successful completion of the doctoral preliminary examination must occur at least six months prior to the degree being granted.
  16. All work for the doctoral degree must be completed within five calendar years after the time the student passes the doctoral preliminary examination, or the student must pass a new preliminary examination.
  17. Upon satisfactory completion of the preliminary examination the student is admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree and is eligible to enroll for dissertation credits. Upon a student’s admission to candidacy, the role of the doctoral supervising committee shifts to oversight of the student’s dissertation process: proposal defense and approval, guidance during dissertation completion, and defense and approval of the dissertation. Given this shift in responsibilities, the student may seek to change the composition of the doctoral supervising committee. All requirements for the committee’s makeup noted above remain in effect.
  18. Upon admission to candidacy, the student must register for dissertation credits (COM 6980r) each term in which a substantial amount of work is being done on the dissertation. Students must register for a minimum of twenty-four hours of dissertation credit in their program. The student must carry a minimum of two dissertation credits during every semester in which (s)he is using and requiring university facilities or requires faculty supervision. As noted above, enrollment in COM 6980r is not possible until a passing grade is recorded for COM 8964, Doctoral Preliminary Examination.
  19. A dissertation prospectus must be approved by all committee members prior to research or data collection for a dissertation. The purpose of the dissertation prospectus is to provide the committee members with a description of the proposed dissertation study, so they can determine the soundness and feasibility of, and the student’s preparedness, to accomplish the proposed project.
  20. With the major professor’s approval, the student must enroll in COM 8985, Dissertation Defense (0) for the semester in which the dissertation project will be completed and defended. The defense must be scheduled no later than one month prior to the final submission deadline published by the Graduate School.
  21. The manuscript and final clearance advisor in the Graduate School must approve the formatting of the final dissertation. The student should consult with the clearance advisor early in the preparation stage and closely follow the formatting rules set out in the Guidelines and Requirements for Electronic Thesis, Treatise, and Dissertation Writers publication.
  22. Prior to the oral defense of the dissertation, an announcement must be sent to the Graduate School. This announcement must be published at least two weeks prior to the defense. At least one week prior to the oral defense, the candidate is responsible for notifying all school faculty of the time and place of the defense. Graduate students may also attend the defense. The candidate is responsible for scheduling the oral defense at a time convenient for all committee members.
  23. A draft of the dissertation must be sent to the outside committee member at least four weeks prior to the oral defense. The defense must be scheduled at least four weeks after final copies of the dissertation have been distributed to committee members. The major professor will bring to the oral examination the school graduate exam clearance form, which is to be signed by all committee members and by the school director.
  24. The Final Term Degree Clearance form provides spaces for certification by all parties concerned that all requirements for the degree have been met. The form must be signed by the major professor, school director, and dean of the College following the oral defense. The doctoral candidate must submit the form to the manuscript clearance advisor in the Graduate School after all signatures have been acquired and by the published final approval deadline.
  25. After final approval by the supervisory committee, the student must submit the final manuscript electronically to the manuscript clearance advisor in the Graduate School. In addition to the electronic copy of the document, students must submit one original signed signature page, one paper copy of the title page, and several other forms requested by the Graduate School. Additionally, as a courtesy, the student should give all members of the supervisory committee electronic copies of the dissertation.
  26. All requirements and guidelines above are described in more detail in the Guide to Doctoral Studies, which all students receive upon entry into the program. The Guide should be consulted by students regularly.

Certificates

The School of Communication offers graduate level certificates in Multicultural Marketing Communication and Project Management. Contact the School for more information.

Definition of Prefixes

ADV—Advertising

COM—Communication

MMC—Mass Media Communication

RTV—Radio: Television

SED—Speech Education

SPC—Speech Communication

VIC—Visual Communication

Graduate Courses

ADV 5007. Foundations of Integrated Marketing Communications (3). This course covers the development of Integrated Marketing Communication that has now become part of business models in many corporations and service organizations, as well as universities.

ADV 5415. Hispanic Marketing Communication (3). This course prepares professionals to field the increasing number of positions that require marketing expertise to serve the U.S. Hispanic market.

ADV 5416. Multicultural Marketing Communication (3). Recommended prerequisites: ADV 5415 and COM 5331. This course explores consumer behavior similarities and differences among Hispanic, Asian, African-American, and Non-Hispanic White cultural market segments in the United States. The course also provides opportunities for original research into issues of culture and marketing communication.

ADV 5503. Media Consumer Behavior (3). This course deals with the research and analysis of consumer behavior.

ADV 5605. Account Planning (3). This course prepares students to connect consumers with advertising and marketing in public relations and other communication fields.

ADV 5701. Communication Career Futures (3). (S/U grade only). Recommended prerequisite: At least one semester of the graduate program. This course is directed to Communication graduate students who intend to pursue applied, non-academic careers upon completion of their degree. The course assists students in setting up job-search strategies, preparing documentation for seeking employment, developing job-related oral communication field skills, and understanding career opportunities in the communication field.

COM 5126. Organizational Communication Theory and Practice (3). This course provides an overview of the major organizational communication theorists and shows students how they can be used to diagnose and solve communication and performance problems.

COM 5127. Assessing Organizational Communication (3). This course introduces students to the methods of assessing organizational communication including survey, feedback methodology, assessment, and related issues in applied research.

COM 5312. Research Methods in Communication (3). This course is an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods.

COM 5314. Measurement of Listener-Viewer Attitude and Response (3). This course focuses on quantitative and qualitative research methods, with particular emphasis on surveys, for measuring mass audiences.

COM 5316. Statistical Methods in Communication Research (3). Recommended prerequisite: COM 5331. This course examines statistical methodologies for communication research.

COM 5317. Content Analysis in Communication Research (3). This course focuses on content analysis methodologies for communication research.

COM 5331. Computers in Communication Research (3). This course explores the application of computers to the analysis of communication research data. Use of microcomputers to build and manage quantitative research databases. Emphasis on SPSS/PC+. Graphing and report writing.

COM 5338. Web Site Usability and Design (3). Prerequisite: COM 4470 or equivalent. This course covers human-computer interaction, design concepts, and usability research techniques. The course includes a series of papers and projects focusing on visual design, audience analysis, technology, and usability analysis in order to select displays, layout, typeface, color, and metaphor. The course helps students gain an understanding of how the above-mentioned techniques are used to help focus content and select the most appropriate interface for the needs of the target audience.

COM 5339. Interactive Programming and Design for the Web (3). Recommended prerequisite: COM 5338. This course, a continuation of COM 5338, focuses on the critical evaluation of existing Web sites based on information presented from readings and the analysis of the possibilities (and limitations) of Web-based communication. Through the study of tools and techniques commonly used to develop Web pages, animation and interactive modules, students complete a Web site as a deliverable.

COM 5340. Historical-Critical Methods of Research (3). This course is a review of historical methods, resources, and critical approaches in communication research.

COM 5348. Qualitative Methods in Communication Research (3). This course is a survey of contemporary qualitative methods for analyzing a range of media texts and speech.

COM 5364. Foundations of Digital Media (3). This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of digital video production. Topics include concepts of videography, video editing, and soundtrack design.

COM 5365. Computer Graphics and Animation (3). This course provides an introduction to the construction of graphics and animation using digital software tools. There are three primary areas of focus: 1) the manipulation of still images; 2) the creation of moving images using digital software tools; and 3) the enhancement of digital video through special effects.

COM 5401. Analysis of Communication Theory (3). This course analyzes the field of communication through the study of key theories of human communication research.

COM 5426. Media, Culture and the Environment (3). This course examines the role of language and representation in our understanding of the natural world. The course also examines news media coverage of environmental issues, environmental images in popular culture, as well as the communication strategies of environmental organizations.

COM 5450. Introduction to Project Management (3). This course covers the processes, tools and techniques for managing projects of any size while preparing students to sit for the Project Management Professional (PMP) certification exam.

COM 5451. Advanced Topics in Project Management (3). This course covers the theories of several important project managers of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, including Edward Deming, Peter Drucker, Thomas Peters, Eli Goldratt, Philip Crosby and others.

COM 5452. Agile Project Management (3). Prerequisite: COM 5450. This course covers the key concepts and approaches of Agile Project Management and prepares students to sit for the PMI-ACP certification exam.

COM 5467. System Thinking and Project Management (3). This course provides background and comparisons of strategic planning, and system thinking theories are presented. Project and management issues also are discussed.

COM 5526. Marketing Communication Management (3). This course addresses the principles and procedures for communications planning for marketing and culminates in the development of an integrated marketing plan for e-business.

COM 5546. Political Communication (3). This course focuses on the relationships between politics in the U.S. and internationally and the media. Considering the interdisciplinary nature of political communication, a field at the intersection of sociology, psychology, rhetoric, political science, and media effects, the overarching methodological approach may encompass qualitative and/or quantitative emphases. The course both outlines the main theoretical frameworks used in the scholarship, as well as address methodological concerns and current topical issues.

COM 5565. Social Media Advocacy Campaigns (3). This course introduces students to theories and research related to the role of social media in social change. The course also prepares students to design and implement an advocacy social media campaign.

COM 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours; duplicate registration allowed. School approval required.

COM 5911r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: School approval. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours; duplicate registration allowed. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

COM 5920r. Colloquium in Communication (0–1). (S/U grade only). This course is a series of lectures given by faculty, advanced graduate students, and visiting scholars. Required of all doctoral students. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

COM 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: School approval. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours; duplicate registration is not allowed. A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree.

COM 5946r. Communication Residency (1–6). (S/U grade only). This course provides work experience to apply and extend knowledge learned within the master’s program.

COM 5955. Capstone Creative Project (1–6). (S/U grade only). This course is an applied or creative project (comparable in scope to a thesis) that serves to demonstrate the skills or knowledge that students have developed throughout their master’s program resulting in a non-traditional deliverable (e.g., a performance, implementation of campaign, film/video, or other). Requires independent work reflecting analysis or interpretation, as well as application of skills or theoretical concepts to a new context. Must include a proposal and defense, as well as a final defense with a final deliverable. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

COM 5971r. Thesis (1–12). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours of credit is required.

COM 6015. Gender and Communication (3). This course explores contemporary perspectives on the relationship between gender and communication in three areas: (1) the nature of gender; (2) the construction of gender in the media; and (3) gendered communication within “queer” culture.

COM 6400r. Seminar in Communication Theory (3). This course is an analysis of existing theoretical perspectives and new developments in communication theory. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. Duplicate registration is allowed.

COM 6403r. Advanced Problems in Communication Theory and Research (2–8). May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours; duplicate registration allowed. School approval required.

COM 6900. Preparation for the Preliminary Examination (2–4). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: School approval. Doctoral students only. To be taken in the semester preceding preliminary examination.

COM 6931r. Special Topics in Communication Research (3). This course includes survey, analysis, and practicum of research in specialized topics relating to the process and effects of communication in the aural, oral, or mass media mode. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. Duplicate registration is allowed.

COM 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

COM 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

COM 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

COM 8975. Capstone Creative Project Defense (0). (S/U grade only). This defense course accompanies an applied or creative project (comparable in scope to a thesis) that serves to demonstrate skills or knowledge students have developed throughout their master’s program resulting in a non-traditional deliverable, e.g., a performance, implementation of campaign, film/video, or other.

COM 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

COM 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

MMC 5305. Comparative Systems of Mass Communication (3). This course is an examination of various international and national mass communication systems and the elements which determine the type of systems currently operating throughout the world.

MMC 5600. Mass Communication Theory and Effects (3). This course is an analysis of historical and current theories of mass communication with an emphasis on media effects.

MMC 5646. Political Economy of Media (3). This course covers the structure and functions of U.S. and other mass communication systems and their relationship to the political and economic systems.

MMC 6469. Diffusion of Innovations (3). This course is an examination of various theoretical and practical issues pertaining to communication’s roles in the diffusion of innovations.

MMC 6920r. Colloquium in Mass Communication (3). This course is a survey of issues of immediate interest and consequence to the area of mass communication. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. Duplicate registration is allowed.

RTV 5333. Documentary Video Production (3). This course offers instruction in the theory and practice of production of non-fiction documentary video. Students produce a final video product and a research paper after studying the documentary tradition, theory and history.

RTV 5423. New Communication Technology: Theory and Research (3). This course surveys key concepts and theoretical approaches in research on new communication technology.

RTV 5575. Digital Post Production (3). This course will cover a broad range of post-production topics, including compression and codecs, video editing, basic motion graphics, color correction, audio editing, and exporting. This course will include instruction in industry-standard software, and will also be balanced with exploration of the aesthetics and various theories of editing.

RTV 5596. Immersive Video Production (3). Prerequisite: Admission to the Public Interest Media and Communication major, or instructor permission. This course explores a range of new camera technology and software that allows for the post-production of immersive media, and identifies best practices for producing, shooting, editing and displaying immersive video products.

RTV 5652. Advanced Narrative Production (3). This course enables students to produce original student narratives through writing, re-writing, pre-production, production, and post -production stages.

RTV 5702. Communication Regulation and Policy (3). This course studies laws, regulations and policies for broadcasting, cable, telephone, and computer-communication industries.

RTV 6425r. Advanced Seminar in New Communication Technologies (3–6). This course is a doctoral-level seminar in the use of new communication technologies for information and entertainment. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

SED 5346. Teaching Oral Communication Courses (3). This seminar examines the critical and practical dimensions of evaluating student’s speeches and presentations. Current research and theory on college level instruction is also explored.

SPA 5058. Clinical Methods (4). This course introduces students to clinical practice in speech-language pathology. Students become acquainted with the scope of practice, ethical obligations and supervision of the SLPA, medical billing and documentation, implementing treatment plans, intervention strategies and techniques, service delivery options, behavior management and data collection.

SPC 5234. Classical Theories of Rhetoric (3). In this course, students examine the origins of rhetorical theory during the classical period of Greece and Rome. The course focus rests on the rhetorical theories of Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, and Quintilian.

SPC 5442. Group Dynamics and Leadership (3). This course is a review of important concepts and research in group process and group leadership.

SPC 5545. Studies in Persuasion (3). This course involves lecture, readings, and discussion of human behavior theories as applied to persuasive communication.

SPC 5614. Criticism of Contemporary Public Address (3). This course is a critical examination of principal speakers to and for the public.

SPC 6306. Contemporary Topics in Interpersonal Communication (3). This course is a forum for the in-depth examination of topics related to interpersonal communication theory and research. Topics include self-concept, verbal and nonverbal coding, listening, etc.

SPC 6715. Race, Culture, and Communication (3). This course is designed to give an advanced perspective on the study of race, ethnicities, and culture. As such, students have the opportunity to explore what constitutes communication competence when interacting with others with vastly different values and perspectives through experimental exercises and empirical research.

SPC 6920r. Colloquium in Speech Communication (3). This course is a survey of issues of immediate interest and consequence to the area of speech communication. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours; duplicate registration allowed.

VIC 5006. Visual Communication (3). This laboratory focuses on the creation and analysis of visual messages. Emphasis is placed on visual literacy, message construction and interpretation, as well as on design principles.