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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science

College of Arts and Sciences

Web Page: http://www.eoas.fsu.edu/

Chair: James F. Tull; Professors: Baco-Taylor, Bourassa, Cai, Chanton, Chassignet, Clarke, Dewar, Ellingson, Fuelberg, Hart, Hu, Huettel, Humayun, Landing, Liu, MacDonald, Marcus, Misra, Nicholson, Nof, Odom, Ray, Salters, Speer, Sura, Tull, Wang, Wise, Wu; Associate Professors: Ahlquist, Kish, Parker; Assistant Professors: Chagnon, Farris, Fuentes, Holmes, Knapp, Kranz, Mason, Mookherjee, Owens, Spencer, Stukel, Wing, Young; Professors Emeriti: Barcilon, Burnett, Gleeson, Hsueh, Krishnamurti, LaSeur, Long, Loper, O’Brien, Pfeffer, Staley, Stern, Sturges, Thistle, Weatherly, Winchester

Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science

In 2010, the departments of Geological Sciences, Oceanography, and Meteorology merged to form the Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science (EOAS). While retaining their respective programmatic focus, the geology, oceanography, and meteorology faculty offer a new level of interdisciplinary integration. This creates fresh opportunities for undergraduate and graduate education in the geosciences. The department provides students with an opportunity for holistic study of Earth’s physical environment in preparation for professional careers in government, private, and academic sectors. Due to concerns about climate change, environmental sustainability, availability of natural resources and environmental pollution and degradation, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects an overall 16% increase in geoscience-related occupations between 2012 and 2022, which is 5% faster than the growth rate for all U.S. occupations. Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science offers graduate degrees in aquatic science, geology, oceanography, and meteorology. The opportunities for study and the degree requirements are described below.

Geology

Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science offers post-baccalaureate studies leading to both the Master of Science (MS) and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees in geology through a wide variety of specialties. The doctoral degree program is intended to develop independent research abilities for those students who have the talent and motivation for original and creative work.

The FSU Geology program was formed in 1949. The Geology PhD program was initiated in the early 1960s. Faculty interests encompass many specialties, including geochemistry, micropaleontology, marine geology, hydrogeology, sedimentology and coastal processes, structure and tectonics, geochronology, petrology, and environmental geology.

Geology majors, as well as students from other disciplines with a strong background in natural sciences, may enter the program. Research programs may be conducted within the program, or they may involve collaborative work with members of the departments of Physics and Chemistry, the College of Engineering, the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Institute, the Department of Scientific Computing, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. Within EOAS, Geology conducts cooperative programs with the Florida Geological Survey, Northwest Florida Water Management District, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, and the United States Geological Survey. The department provides a service to the international geological community, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), by maintaining a repository for marine cores in the Antarctic Research Facility.

The department’s main geochemistry laboratories are at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. Instrumentation available for research includes inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers, thermal ionization mass spectrometers, light isotope mass spectrometer, electron spin resonance spectrometer, atomic absorption and UV-VIS spectrometers, gravimeter and magnetometer, recirculating sediment transport flume, automated settling tube, electrozone particle counter, computerized image capture and analysis system, and facilities for hydrologic studies of surface and ground waters (saturated and unsaturated). A number of research microscopes, image analysis system, GIS laboratory, and field vehicles, as well as geochemical sample and thin-section preparation equipment, also support the program.

In addition to holding faculty positions at major universities around the world, graduates of the program have outstanding records in government and industry. In Florida, large numbers of graduates are employed by the Water Management Districts of the state, the Department of Environmental Protection, the Florida Geological Survey, the phosphate and clay mining industry, and numerous geologic and engineering consulting companies. Outside the state, a large number of graduates hold scientific and executive positions with major petroleum, mining, and high-tech industries. Other geology graduates hold civil service positions with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, United States Geological Survey, Soil Conservation Districts, Army Corps of Engineers, and state geological surveys.

Fellowships, as well as teaching and research assistantships, are available to highly qualified students. This financial support is awarded on a competitive basis. In addition, numerous geologically related part-time jobs, with both governmental and private agencies, are available in Tallahassee. Graduate students who require some type of financial assistance can normally find it.

Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the “College of Arts and Sciences” chapter of this Graduate Bulletin. The following requirements for the MS and PhD degrees are spelled out in greater detail in the Geological Sciences Graduate Handbook.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the graduate program requires and undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 and GRE Revised General Test scores above the 50th percentile for both the verbal and quantitative portions of the exam are recommended. International students whose native languages are other than English are also required to achieve a score of 80 or better on the Educational Testing Service’s Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), and to take (and report scores to this department) the Test for Spoken English (TSE).

A beginning graduate student should normally have preparation equivalent to that required for a baccalaureate degree, preferably in the natural sciences.

Master of Science (MS) Degree Program

Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science offers only the thesis-type program for the master’s degree in geology.

Coursework appropriate to the needs of the individual student should be arranged with the graduate student advisor or with the major professor and the supervisory committee. One semester per year of seminar (GLY 5931r) also is required. For details, consult the Geological Sciences Graduate Handbook.

A thesis advisor and supervisory committee should be selected and a program of study approved no later than the end of the first semester of the student’s graduate program. Students must present to the supervisory committee and publicly defend a description of proposed thesis research (prospectus). During the term that this is scheduled, the student must enroll for GLY 8966r, Master’s Comprehensive Examination.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Degree Program

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is based on satisfactory completion of required coursework, broad scholarship built on wide and critical reading, and the ability to do original and independent scholarly work. The department strongly encourages the preparation of the dissertation as a series of published or publishable journal articles.

Doctoral students must participate in one seminar annually. For details, consult the Geological Sciences Graduate Handbook. A minor subject outside the department may be pursued.

The candidate must present to the supervisory committee and publicly defend a description of proposed dissertation research (prospectus). In addition, students must demonstrate by the fourth semester, by means of written and oral examination (preliminary exam), proficiency in their area of specialty and geology related to it. The oral examining committee normally will be comprised of the student’s supervisory committee, appointed by the chair. During the term that this oral examination is scheduled, the student must enroll for GLY 8964r, Preliminary Doctoral Examination.

Oceanography

A graduate program in oceanography has existed at Florida State University since 1949. The department offers both the Master of Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees in oceanography with specializations in: biological, chemical, geochemical, and physical oceanography. Especially during the last decade, the oceanography program has gained both national and international recognition. Our faculty members often chair sessions at national and international scientific conferences, and their research is reported in the best professional journals. Oceanography faculty members have been elected Fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Meteorological Society and the American Physical Society. An Emeritus faculty member has also been a recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim Award and has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, and a current faculty member (Professor Allan Clarke) received the Nansen Medal from the European Geosciences Union.

Current research projects are funded by the National Science Foundation, NOAA, NASA, U.S. Department of Energy, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, Office of Naval Research, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. This combined research includes ocean modeling with supercomputers, direct observations of ocean currents with current meters, analysis of environmental pollution, and studies of microbial and zooplankton populations, and benthic ecology.

Frequently utilized external resources include the FSU Coastal Marine Laboratory (FSUCML) at Turkey Point, forty-five miles away from Tallahassee on the Gulf of Mexico; the Department of Scientific Computing; the Geochemistry Program at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and the Electron-Microscopy Laboratory. Internal facilities include laboratories for radiochemistry, trace-element analysis, benthic ecology, water analysis, phytoplankton ecology, numerical modeling, and fluid dynamics. Extensive use is made of the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS) fleet as well as the Florida Institute of Oceanography vessels, R/V Bellows and R/V Weatherbird, which are berthed in St. Petersburg. The FSUCML has recently obtained the 65’ RV Apalachee, which is suitable for research and teaching throughout the NE Gulf of Mexico. The department’s students and professors routinely participate in research cruises in oceans and seas around the globe.

Admission Requirements

Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the “College of Arts and Sciences” chapter of this Graduate Bulletin.

The MS and the PhD degrees in oceanography are offered with specialties in biological, chemical, geochemical, and physical oceanography. Interdepartmental studies, for example, atmospheric chemistry, air-sea interaction, and geophysical fluid dynamics, are arranged within Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science or in cooperation with the Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Statistics, and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Institute. There is also a non-thesis MS degree in Aquatic Environmental Science and a Professional Science MS degree in Aquatic Environmental Science.

As a minimum standard, a “B” average is expected in all undergraduate classes, and GRE Revised General Test scores above the 60th percentile (in both verbal and quantitative) are recommended. Current enrollment trends indicate that a record considerably above the minimum is necessary to assure admission to the limited number of places available. International students whose native languages are other than English are also required to achieve a score of 80 or better on the Educational Testing Service’s Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and to take (and report scores to this department) the Test for Spoken English (TSE).

The paragraphs below suggest the proper preparation for each of the four areas of specialization in oceanography.

Master’s in Aquatic Environmental Science

The Aquatic Environmental Science program provides students with a broad understanding of the interaction of the physics, biology, chemistry and geology of aquatic (marine and freshwater) systems and how such interactions are affected by and impact upon human activities. It is intended for students whose career goals do not include the pursuit of scientific research.

The Aquatic Environmental Science master’s degree program is open to anyone who holds a bachelor’s degree in one of the natural sciences, mathematics, or engineering. Applicants must have a 3.0 GPA and GRE Revised General Test scores above the 60th percentile (verbal and quantitative) are recommended. The program is course-based, and includes a capstone experience. Thirty-six hours of 5000-level coursework is required. Three hours must be Capstone Experience credits. In the Capstone Experience, students produce and present a paper on an issue, policy or problem in environmental science demonstrating adequate knowledge of the environmental science field and the ability to synthesize information from multiple sources into a cohesive and meaningful paper. A faculty director guides students’ progress in the program. The University requires that at least twenty-one of the thirty-six hours must be taken on a letter grade basis. The required coursework must be taken in the Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science or in other scientific disciplines as the individual’s interest and capstone experience paper dictate. An option within the AES program is to obtain a Professional MS degree, which requires business and management classes substituting for selected STEM classes.

If an AES student is admitted to the department for a research-based master’s in Oceanography, his or her supervisory committee decides on a case by case basis if any courses taken for the master’s in Aquatic Environmental Sciences can be applied to the Oceanography degree requirements.

General Undergraduate Preparation

The recommended preparation for admission to the Oceanography program in EOAS would include one year of college physics, one year of college chemistry, and one year of calculus.

Specialty Undergraduate Preparation

Biological: Bachelor of Science (BS) or Bachelor of Arts (BA) in biology with coursework in organic chemistry and introductory statistics; Chemical: BS or BA in chemistry, with coursework in geochemistry and environmental or global-change science; Geochemical: BS or BA in geology; Physical: BS or BA in physics, geophysics, meteorology, or mathematics or a BS in engineering; coursework in advanced mechanics, differential equations, advanced calculus (including vector calculus), partial differential equations, asymplistic methods, and fluid mechanics.

The MS degree requires that the student complete thirty-three semester hours of coursework and submit a thesis covering an original research topic. Reading knowledge of a foreign language is not required. A minimum of eighteen of the required thirty-three semester hours must be taken in the Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science or in other scientific disciplines as the individual’s interest and research project dictate.

The student pursuing the PhD degree is required to take eighteen semester hours of formal coursework beyond the requirements for the master’s degree and perform original research leading to a dissertation. Doctoral candidates are offered considerable freedom in course load, commensurate with their interests and prior training.

Meteorology

The meteorology program was founded in 1949. At that time, the department had the only meteorology program in the southeastern United States. Throughout its history meteorology has had one of the leading programs in the country and at present is considered to be one of the top ten in the nation for overall excellence of broadly based programs.

Meteorology graduate students are candidates for either the Master of Science (MS) or Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees. Graduate students normally specialize in dynamic, physical, synoptic meteorology, or climatology.

Faculty members and graduate students in the department are conducting research in many areas, including air/sea interaction, boundary layer meteorology, coastal meteorology, climate prediction, climate changes and global warming, data assimilation, design of meteorological networks, large-scale flow, meso-meteorology, numerical weather prediction, ocean upwelling, physical climatology, radar meteorology, radiation physics, remote sensing, satellite meteorology, statistical prediction, tropical circulation, turbulence and vortex dynamics.

National and international honors have been bestowed upon departmental faculty members. Seven members of the meteorology faculty are Fellows of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). Further, Dr. O’Brien (emeritus) received the AMS Sverdrup Gold Medal; Dr. T. Krishnamurti has received the AMS Second Half Century Award and the Rossby Research Medal, as well as the World Meteorological Organization’s IMO Prize; Dr. Ellingson earned the U.S. Department of Energy Distinguished Associate Award; Dr. Nicholson has received the Hugh Robert Mill Medal from the Royal Meteorological Society; and Dr. Hart was awarded the Banner Miller Award.

Members of the Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science enjoy the benefits from advanced scientific equipment and a cooperative research environment with the Department of Mathematics, the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Institute, and the Department of Scientific Computing. Scientific computations are handled by local server clusters for relatively simple computations. For larger computational jobs (such as running numerical weather and climate models) the department has access to resources in FSU’s high performance cluster (http://rcc.fsu.edu/services/hpc).

GOES and NOAA polar-orbitor satellite images are ingested by our direct readout ground stations and are available in real-time at various locations in the Love building and on our Web site, http://www.eoas.fsu.edu/. The department also maintains an atmospheric instrumentation laboratory to support education and research in the area of experimental meteorology.

College Requirements

Please review all college-wide requirements summarized in the “College of Arts and Sciences” chapter of this Graduate Bulletin.

Admission Requirements

Prior work in meteorology is not a requirement for admission to graduate study in the meteorology program, but candidates must have a strong preparation in mathematics and physics. Each student must have completed or must complete undergraduate level work in synoptic meteorology (MET 4500C; 4501C or equivalent), physical meteorology (MET 4420; 4450 or equivalent), and dynamic meteorology (MET 4301; 4302 or equivalent). MET 5311 and 5312 may be used to substitute for MET 4301 and 4302. It is recommended that all graduate students who have not had coursework equivalent to MET 2700, 2101, 3300, 3502C independently study this material during their first semester in graduate school, or consider beginning their graduate program in the summer. Students also should have completed mathematics through partial differential equations (MAP 4341 or equivalent), have had a course in FORTRAN programming (CGS 3460 or equivalent), and have had at least one year of physics with calculus. Satisfactory completion of these general requirements is expected to precede graduate level work. A score of at least 300 on the aptitude test (verbal and quantitative) of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in upper-division undergraduate courses is normally required for admission to the Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science. Fellowships and assistantships are available to well-qualified applicants; three letters of recommendation are required. International students whose native languages are other than English are also required to achieve a score of 80 or better on the Educational Testing Service’s Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), and to take (and report scores to this department) the Test for Spoken English (TSE).

Master of Science (MS) Degree Program

A candidate for the MS degree must satisfy all University-wide MS requirements. At least eighteen semester hours must be earned on a letter grade basis for the thesis plan and twenty-one semester hours for the course plan. The minimum university requirements are thirty semester hours for the thesis plan and thirty-two semester hours for the course plan, of which supervised research (MET 5910) and supervised teaching (MET 5979) can be used for the MS degree. Students electing the thesis plan must have credit for at least six semester hours of thesis (MET 5971). All candidates for the MS degree must satisfactorily pass MET 5930, Master’s Seminar. This includes presentation of a seminar to the department and submission of an approved written version of the seminar. All candidates for the MS degree must satisfactorily pass MET 5910, Supervised Research.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Degree Program

Candidates may specialize in many areas including dynamical, physical, synoptic meteorology, or climatology.

All doctoral candidates in meteorology must satisfy the following requirements: 1) the doctoral preliminary examinations, which may be combined with the master’s comprehensive examination; 2) one hour of MET 6930 for oral presentation of prospectus and one hour of 6930 for oral presentation of dissertation; and 3) an acceptable doctoral dissertation. There is no foreign language requirement.

Definition of Prefixes

ESC—Earth Science

GLY—Geology

ISC—Interdisciplinary Sciences

MAP—Mathematics Applied

MET—Meteorology

OCB—Biological Oceanography

OCC—Chemical Oceanography

OCE—General Oceanography

OCG—Geological Oceanography

OCP—Physical Oceanography

SCE—Science Education

Geology Graduate Courses

ESC 5211r. Current Topics in Earth Science (3). This course is an overview of recent advances in earth sciences for secondary school earth science teachers. May not be taken for major credit in earth science. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ESC 5215r. Current Topics in Earth Science (3). This course is an overview of recent advances in earth sciences, for secondary school earth science teachers. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. May not be taken for major credit in earth science.

GLY 5135. Quaternary Geology (3). This course examines the following subjects: geochronology; paleomagnetism; other nonchronometric dating methods; causes of climate change; alluvial and marine terraces; mean sea-level history; gravity and isostasy (including post-glacial rebound); ice deposits; causes of ice ages.

GLY 5265. Nuclear Geology (3). Prerequisite: GLY 4240 or equivalent. This course discusses the nucleosynthesis and systematics of the nuclides, radioactive and radiogenic isotopes as natural tracers, theory and application of isotopic fractionation.

GLY 5267. Stable Isotopic Tracers in the Environment (3). This course is an introduction to the basic principles of stable isotope geochemistry. The application of stable isotopes to geochemical, hydrological, and ecological problems.

GLY 5297r. Advanced Topics in Geochemistry (1–3). This course consists of special topics on demand in low temperature geochemistry. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GLY 5395r. Advanced Topics in Petrology (1–3). This course consists of special topics on demand in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary petrology. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GLY 5425. Tectonics (3). Prerequisite: GLY 3400C or equivalent. This course explores the advanced treatment of crustal deformation in mountains; the sequence of events and evaluation of deformation styles.

GLY 5455. Introduction to Geophysics (3). Prerequisites: MAP 2302, PHY 2049, or instructor permission. This course focuses on plate tectonics and earth structure. Current methods of probing the interior: seismology and seismic tomography, geomagnetics, geoid and gravity, geochemistry and geochronology. Heat flow, mantle convection, core convection and the geodynamo.

GLY 5465. Geomechanics (3). Prerequisites: MAP 2302, MAP 3305, and PHY 2048C. This course is a systematic investigation of the dynamic behavior of geological materials, in the context of continuum mechanics, with emphasis on one-dimensional motions including seismic waves, surface-water waves, tsunamis, river flows, floods, glaciers, sliding and slumping. As time permits, motions involving thermal effects are considered, including lava flows, volcanic eruptions and certain aspects of flow in the earth’s mantle.

GLY 5495r. Advanced Topics in Geophysics (3). Prerequisites: GLY 4451 or GLY 5455. This course consists of special topics on demand in geophysics. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GLY 5497r. Advanced Topics in Structural Geology (3). This course consists of special topics on demand in structural geology, rock deformation, and tectonics of mountain building. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GLY 5516. Stratigraphy and Sequence Analysis (3). Prerequisite: GLY 3340C. This course focuses on the interpretation of stratigraphic sequences, including an overview of sedimentary petrogenesis; principles of lithostratigraphic, biostratigraphic, and chronostratigraphic correlation; geochronology and geophysical correlation, including magnetic, seismic, and subsurface correlation; tectonics and stratigraphy.

GLY 5556. Hydrodynamics (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2312 and PHY 2048C. This course focuses on the dynamics of flowing water on and near the earth’s surface; porous-media flows and boundary flows as they pertain to geologic phenomena.

GLY 5573. Fluvial Processes (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2313 and PHY 2049C. This course covers topics such as fluvial hydrology, sediment movement, and channel evolution.

GLY 5575. Coastal Geology (3). In this course, topics include sedimentologic processes operating along modern coasts, erosion and deposition, shoreline evolution, effects of sea level and climate change on shorelines, coastal morphodynamics, responses to critical erosion, and sediment transport.

GLY 5577. Sedimentary Basin Analysis (3). Prerequisite: GLY 4511. This course examines analytical techniques for the interpretation of sedimentary basins, including: lithofacies analysis, depositional systems, thermal history, seismic reflection and sequence stratigraphy. Also addresses climatic and tectonic controls on basin evolution; subsidence modeling, provenance studies and cyclic sedimentation.

GLY 5595r. Advanced Topics in Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (1–3). This course consists of special topics on demand in fluvial, shoreline, and oceanic sedimentation and in stratigraphic principles or regional stratigraphy. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GLY 5624C. Introduction to Micropaleontology (3). This course examines the taxonomy, ecology, and paleoenvironmental aspects of selected microfossils with emphasis on foraminifera.

GLY 5625C. Advanced Micropaleontology (3). This course examines biostratigraphic and evolutionary studies with emphasis on smaller foraminifera.

GLY 5695r. Advanced Topics in Paleontology (1–3). This course consists of special topics on demand in paleontology. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GLY 5696Cr. Mesozoic Planktonic Calcareous Nannofossils (4–8). This course explores the biostratigraphy, biogeography, and taxonomy of this widely occurring group of marine microfossils. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

GLY 5697Cr. Cenozoic Planktonic Calcareous Nannofossils (4–8). This course explores the biostratigraphy, biogeography, and taxonomy of this widely occurring group of marine microfossils. May be repeated for a maximum of eight semester hours.

GLY 5736. Marine Geology (3). This course discusses many topics including shoreline, shelf, and deep ocean processes; marine sediment types and sedimentary environments; plate tectonics; origin of the ocean; paleooceanography; marine mineral resources. The course includes research methods cruise for familiarization with marine geologic sampling and sensing devices. Credit may not be received for both GLY 5736 and OCG 5050.

GLY 5757C. Fundamentals of Remote Sensing, Air Photo Interpretation and GIS for the Earth Sciences (4). Prerequisites: GLY 3400C and PHY 2049. This course covers an introduction to the study of the earth using photographic and electronic imaging acquired from aircraft and satellites; physics of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and materials of earth’s surface and hydrosphere; principles of electronic and microwave imaging; and use of digital analysis and GIS in the study of earth resources and global change.

GLY 5825. Physical Hydrology (3). Prerequisites: GLY 5827, MAC 2312, and PHY 2048. This course explores introductory treatment of the physical processes and geological constraints that govern the occurrence and movement of subsurface waters. Emphasis is placed on how water movement is conditioned by fluid, soil and rock properties; and by topographic, stratigraphic, and structural boundaries.

GLY 5826. Numerical Modeling of Groundwater Flow (3). Prerequisite: GLY 5825. This course is an introduction to many topics including finite difference and finite element methods for groundwater modeling; fundamental equations of groundwater flow; numerical solutions for steady state and transient flow problems; multiphase dispersive flow of contaminants in groundwater.

GLY 5827. Principles of Hydrology (3). Prerequisites: Basic chemistry and basic physics (for science majors). This course focuses on the fundamentals of hydrogeology with emphasis on groundwater flow and hydrochemistry. Both theory and applications are addressed.

GLY 5885. Geologic Hazards Assessment (3). This course is designed as an overview for understanding the geologic perspective in assessing environmental hazards. Topics covered include: beach processes and erosional effects of severe storms, evaluation of flood-prone and wetland areas, evolution of sink holes, landfill sitings and remediation, mine reclamation problems, contaminant transport and contamination plumes, nuclear waste disposal, slope stability issues, etc.

GLY 5887. Environmental Geology I (3). This course explores the application of geologic and geochemical principles to environmental issues. Topics include: evaluation of contaminants in surface water and ground water; hydrocarbon geochemistry and petroleum storage tank problems; waste management, including solid, toxic and nuclear waste; air quality issues, including radon and asbestos; geologic hazards in upland and coastal areas; environmental geologic methods and instrumentation; quality assurance and quality control in environmental analysis; principles of toxicology; risk assessment and risk management; and environmental assessments.

GLY 5896r. Advanced Topics in Hydrology (1–3). This course consists of special topics on demand in the theory and application of groundwater flow equations, rock-water reactions, and radioactive tracers. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GLY 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3–15). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of fifteen semester hours.

GLY 5910r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). No more than three semester hours may apply to a master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

GLY 5931r. Graduate Seminar (1). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GLY 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. No more than three hours may apply to a master’s degree.

GLY 5971r. Thesis (3–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours of credit is required.

GLY 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only). A minimum of twenty-four semester hours of credit is required.

GLY 6982r. Doctoral Seminar (1). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

GLY 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

GLY 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

GLY 8975r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

GLY 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

ISC 5237. Uncertainty Analysis in Computational Science (3). Prerequisite: ISC 3222 or ISC 5226 or instructor permission. This course includes lectures and computer labs for understanding various uncertainty sources in computational science. Methods are taught for quantifying the uncertainties and their propagation through mathematical and computational modeling. Students learn how to communicate the uncertainty quantification to colleagues and decision-makers. They also discuss how to reduce predictive uncertainty to improve scientific understanding of complex systems.

Oceanography Graduate Courses

Core Curriculum

OCB 5050. Basic Biological Oceanography (3). This course introduces students to the organization of benthic and planktonic communities in the ocean.

OCC 5050. Basic Chemical Oceanography (3). Prerequisite: CHM 1046. This course introduces students to the chemical composition of seawater, carbon dioxide systems, nutrients, trace elements, and biogeochemistry.

OCG 5051. Basic Geological Oceanography (3). This course studies the structural and oceanographic setting of continents and ocean basins, plate tectonics, ocean margins, marine sediments, and ocean history.

OCP 5050. Basic Physical Oceanography (3). Prerequisite: MAC 2311. This course studies seawater properties, currents, waves, tides, and acoustics. Not open to students in physical oceanography option.

Biological Oceanography

OCB 5015. Marine Nekton: Larval Fish to Whales (3). Prerequisites: BSC 2011, BSC 2011L and PCB 3743 or PCB 4674. This course provides an overview of marine nekton, including bony and cartilaginous fishes, cephalopods, reptiles and mammals. It covers the taxonomy, anatomy and functional morphology and physiology of these groups, including aspects of their relationships with humans.

OCB 5067C. Ecology of Marine Sediments (4). Prerequisites: BSC 2011, CHM 1046, or instructor permission. In this course, students learn biological, chemical, and physical processes in marine sediments, and complete experiments addressing the ecology of marine sediments.

OCB 5264. Selected Topics in Coral Reef Ecology (3). Prerequisites: OCC 5050, OCG 5051, and OCP 5050. This course addresses selected topics in warm water reef ecology and focuses on the processes that cause the rapid deterioration of reef ecosystems. The lectures explain recent results in reef research, including physical, biogeochemical, and biological process studies. Discussions address initiatives in coral reef protection and management. The course format includes student presentation, readings, and class discussions.

OCB 5565. Marine Primary Production (3). This course studies the factors that affect the biomass production and spatial distribution of phytoplankton, seagrasses, and macroalgae in the ocean. It also explains the key role of marine primary production in the global carbon cycle.

OCB 5600. Biological Fluid Dynamics (3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Algebra. This course is designed to introduce biological oceanography and biology graduate students to the consequences of fluid flow for biological systems. The text, Vogel’s Life in Moving Fluids, is supplemented by movies, problem sets, and demonstrations. Students present a chapter from the text plus supplementary material at each meeting.

OCB 5635. Selected Topics in Coastal Ocean Ecology (3). Prerequisites: OCC 5050, OCG 5051, and OCP 5050. This course addresses selected topics in coastal ocean ecology with emphasis on changes caused by anthropogenic activities. The lectures address key physical, chemical and biological processes, including coastal upwelling, cycling of matter, hypoxia, and biological diversity changes. The course format includes student presentation, readings, and class discussions.

OCB 5636. Marine Microbial Ecology (3). This course studies the diversity, distribution and roles of marine microbes, whose members include viruses, bacteria, archaea and protists. These are presented through lectures, readings, class discussions, and field trips to regional marine habitats.

OCB 5639. Marine Benthic Ecology (3). Prerequisite: ZOO 4203C. College-level statistics recommended. This course is open to advanced undergraduates with instructor permission. The physical setting and community organization of these habitats are presented through lectures and substantial readings: rocky intertidal, sand beach, subtidal soft bottom, coral reef, deep-sea habitats.

Chemical and Geological Oceanography

OCC 5052. Aquatic Chemistry (3). Prerequisites: CHM 3400 and OCC 5050. This course focuses on thermodynamics, acid-base and redox reactions in natural waters, solution-precipitation reactions, complex formation, case studies of composition of seawater, and controlling processes.

OCC 5062. Marine Isotopic Chemistry (3). Prerequisites: OCC 5050 and OCP 5050. Corequisite: CHS 4100C. This course studies the application of radiochemistry and stable isotope geochemistry in the oceanographic and environmental sciences.

OCC 5415. Marine Geochemistry (3). Prerequisite: OCC 5050. This course introduces students to geochemistry of earth with emphasis on processes controlling elemental cycling between the earths crust, oceans, and atmosphere. Controls on the chemical composition of seawater and its geological history.

OCC 5417. Geochemical Ocean Tracers (3). Prerequisites: OCC 5050 and OCP 5050. This course focuses on mixing models and processes affecting dissolved concentrations and distributions of chemicals and radiotracers in the world’s oceans.

OCC 5554. Atmospheric Chemistry (3). Prerequisites: CHM 4410, OCP 5050, and OCC 5050. This course studies the formation and transport of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols.

OCG 5457. Stable Isotopes as Tracers in Aquatic Ecosystems (3). Prerequisites: A 1000 level or higher course in chemistry and a course in mathematics. This course discusses the notation, fractionation effects, laboratory techniques and application of stable isotopes to aquatic ecosystems. Discussions include applications for stable isotope tracing techniques for deep sea sediments, estuaries and wetlands. Their uses extend from revealing climatic history to variations in food web dynamics.

OCG 5664. Paleoceanography (3). This course examines the paleogeochemical record of climate change, continental and oceanic archives of past environmental change, processes and models of climate evolution over the Cenozioc with emphasis on the most recent Ice Ages, and readings from the current literature.

Physical Oceanography

MAP 5431. Introduction to Fluid Dynamics (3). Prerequisites: MAP 4153 and PHY 2048C. Corequisite: MAP 4341, MAP 5345, or instructor permission. This course covers physical properties of viscous fluids, hydrostatics, kinematics of flow fields, governing equations. Dynamics of viscous incompressible fluids, vorticity, boundary layer flow, potential flow.

MAP 6434r. Advanced Topics in Hydrodynamics (2). This course covers selected topics such as stability problems, linear and nonlinear theories; regular and singular perturbation techniques. Also offered in the departments of Mathematics, Computer Science, and Meteorology. May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

OCP 5056. Introduction to Physical Oceanography (3). Prerequisite: MAP 2302, PHY 2049C, or instructor permission. This course studies the properties of seawater, equations of motion and continuity of volume, geostrophic motion, stability and double diffusion, ocean currents.

OCP 5160. Ocean Waves (3). Prerequisite: OCP 5253 or instructor permission. This course focuses on topics such as: general properties of waves; surface gravity, capillary, inertia-gravity, internal, Kelvin, Rossby; continental shelf and coastal trapped waves; many illustrations of how ocean variability can be described by free and forced waves.

OCP 5256. Fluid Dynamics: Geophysical Applications (3). Prerequisites: MAP 5431 and partial differential equations, or instructor permission. This course focuses on topics like: shallow water theory, Poincare, Kelvin, and Rossby waves; boundary layer theory; wind driven ocean circulation models; quasigeostrophic motion on a sphere, thermocline problem; stability theories. Also offered by the departments of Mathematics, Computer Science, and Meteorology.

OCP 5263. Equatorial Dynamics (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course focuses on topics such as: forced and unforced equatorial ocean waves, reflection of equatorial waves from ocean boundaries, equatorial currents, El Niño/Southern Oscillation dynamics.

OCP 5265. Main Ocean Thermocline (3). Prerequisites: MAP 5431, OCP 5261, or instructor permission. This course focuses on topics such as: large-scale ocean dynamics and observations; linear theories; classical nonlinear theories; ventilated-thermocline model and applications; relation of thermocline to ocean circulation.

OCP 5271. Turbulence (3). Prerequisite: OCP 5253. This course focuses on topics such as: turbulent transport of momentum and heat; dynamics of turbulence; homogeneous isotropic turbulence; wall bounded shear flows; statistical description of turbulence; spectra. Also offered by the Department of Oceanography.

OCP 5285. Dynamic Oceanography (3). Prerequisite: OCP 5056. This course studies topics such as: currents with friction, effects of turbulence, thermohaline circulation, waves.

OCP 5551. Physics of the Air-Sea Boundary Layer (3). Prerequisites: MET 4302, OCP 5285; or instructor permission. This course focuses on topics such as: flux of momentum, heat and water; study of air sea interaction; mechanisms of exchange and budgets. Also offered by the Department of Meteorology.

Specialized Instruction and Seminar

OCB 5930r. Special Topics in Biological Oceanography (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of thirty semester hours.

OCB 5939r. Biological Oceanography Seminar (1). (S/U grade only). This course consists of weekly meetings for reports and discussions of recent biological oceanographic research within and outside of the department. May be repeated to a maximum of ten semester hours.

OCC 5419C. Advanced Biogeochemistry: Field Methods and Concepts (3). Prerequisites: BSC 2010; CHM 1046. This course teaches a hands-on approach for the elucidation/quantification of environmental parameters and microbial processes and provides students with a tool kit of relevant field and lab techniques which may be used in a variety of environmental settings.

OCC 5930r. Special Topics in Chemical Oceanography (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of thirty semester hours.

OCC 5939r. Chemical Oceanography Seminar (1). (S/U grade only). This course consists of weekly meetings for reports and discussions of recent chemical oceanographic research within and outside of the department. May be repeated to a maximum of ten semester hours.

OCE 5908r. Directed Individual Study (1–12). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

OCE 5910r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree, five to the PhD.

OCE 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree, five to the PhD.

OCP 5930r. Special Topics in Physical Oceanography (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of thirty semester hours.

OCP 5939r. Physical Oceanography Seminar (1). (S/U grade only). This course consists of weekly meetings for reports and discussions of recent physical oceanographic research within and outside of the department. May be repeated to a maximum of ten semester hours.

General

OCE 5009. Advanced General Oceanography (3). This course is an overview of geological, physical, chemical, and biological oceanography. The major hypothesis in each subdiscipline is described. Cross-linkages between subdisciplines are used to show the interdisciplinary nature of modern oceanography.

OCE 5009L. Coastal Oceanography and Marine Field Methods (4). Prerequisite: Enrollment in a natural or environmental science graduate program. This course provides a multidisciplinary, hands-on experience of the field methods most commonly used in oceanography. It gives graduate students the opportunity to gain a greater appreciation of the complexity of marine–ecosystem dynamics through active participation in ocean–science field research.

OCE 5018. Current Issues in Environmental Science (3). This course is taught at an introductory level and includes discussions of current ground-breaking research, environmental problems and approaches to solving them. This course consists of presentations by experts on their current research topics or on environmental issues.

OCE 5065. Marine Conservation Biology (3). This course helps students understand anthropogenic impacts on the world’s marine biological resources and ways to mitigate those impacts.

OCE 5077. Marine Environment Pollution (3). Prerequisite: BSC 2011, CHM 1046, or instructor permission. This course explains sources of marine pollutants, their effects on organisms, and ensuing consequences for marine ecosystems. Focal points are persistent anthropogenic pollutants that accumulate in the estuarine and marine environment. Pollutant amplification in the food web, physiological responses and degradation pathways are discussed.

OCE 5554r. Habitable Planet (3). This course provides an introduction to the origin and evolution of planet Earth, creation of the universe and the elements, early history of earth, radioisotopes and the timing of events in the universe, galaxy and on Earth. Formation of atmospheres and oceans, climate, life, evolution, and geologic history. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

OCE 5934r. Capstone Experience (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course explores a variety of environmental issues of local to global scale. Format varies between student and professor presentations. Students are guided to produce a terminal master’s project through this course. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

OCE 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

OCE 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only). A minimum of twenty-four semester hours is required.

OCE 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

OCE 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

OCE 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

OCG 5106. The Earth System (3). This course examines the modern approach to understanding Earth’s climate history and climate change on a global scale.

Meteorology Graduate Courses

Dynamical Meteorology

MAP 5431. Introduction to Fluid Dynamics (3). Prerequisites: MAP 4153 and PHY 2048C. Corequisites: MAP 3306, MAP 4341, MAP 5345, or instructor permission. This course covers the physical properties of viscous fluids, hydrostatics, kinematics of flow fields, governing equations. Dynamics of viscous imcompressible fluids: vorticity, boundary layer flow, potential flow.

MAP 6434r. Advanced Topics in Hydrodynamics (3). This course covers selected topics such as stability problems, linear and nonlinear theories; regular and singular perturbation techniques. Also offered in the departments of Mathematics, Computer Science, and Meteorology. May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

MET 5311. Advanced Dynamic Meteorology I (3). Prerequisites: MAP 3306 or MAP 4341, PHY 2049C. This course covers coordinate systems; conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy; equation of state; scaling; generalized vertical coordinates; geostrophic, gradient, cyclostrophic wind; thermal wind; vorticity and divergence equations; the omega equation; Reynolds averaging and turbulence; boundary layer and Ekman layer dynamics.

MET 5312. Advanced Dynamic Meteorology II (3). Prerequisite: MET 5311. This course covers scale analysis of the vorticity, divergence, and omega equations; quasi-geostrophic quasi-nondivergent systems; synoptic development of baroclinic disturbances; linear perturbations; sound, gravity, Rossby waves. Baroclinic instability; the two-level model; numerical weather prediction.

MET 5340r. Large-Scale Atmospheric Circulations (3). Prerequisite: MET 4302 or MET 5312. This course covers large scale atmospheric circulations featuring observational and experimental studies (global distribution of meteorological variables, momentum, and energy budgets; meridional circulation; available energy; laboratory studies) and theoretical studies (Eadys baroclinic instability model, integral theorems, numerical models, flow-over topography, wave-mean interactions). May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. May be repeated in the same semester.

MET 5406. Satellite Observations and Their Applications in Numerical Weather Prediction (3). Prerequisites: MAP 3305 or equivalent computer programming. This course covers techniques, research, and operational applications related to satellite observations and their applications in numerical weather prediction. Students gain hands-on experience and a comprehensive understanding of data assimilation and related application problems in atmospheric science.

MET 5541r. Dynamical Weather Prediction (3). Prerequisite: MET 4301 or MET 5311. This course covers prediction of atmospheric and oceanic flow patterns by numerical methods; numerical solution of partial differential equation; modeling. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

MET 6308r. Advanced Topics in Dynamical Meteorology (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

OCP 5256. Fluid Dynamics: Geophysical Applications (3). Prerequisite: MAP 5431 or instructor permission. This course focuses on topics like: shallow water theory, Poincare, Kelvin, and Rossby waves; boundary layer theory; wind driven ocean circulation models; quasigeostrophic motion on a sphere, thermocline problem; stability theories. Also offered by the departments of Mathematics, Computer Science, and Oceanography.

Physical Meteorology

MET 5407. Fundamentals of Atmospheric Data Assimilation (3). Prerequisites: MAP 3305 or equivalent computer programming. This course provides the fundamentals of objective analysis and data assimilation with an emphasis on the physical aspects of objective analysis. Students learn how the general mathematical concepts and methods are applied to solve many practical data analysis and assimilation problems in atmospheric science.

MET 5411. Radar Meteorology (3). Prerequisite: MET 4450 or instructor permission. This course discusses topics such as principles of incoherent and doppler radar; radar as an observational and analytical tool. The use of radar in basic research.

MET 5421. Radiative Transfer (3). Prerequisite: MET 4450 or instructor permission. This course covers molecular absorption, band models, solar and terrestrial radiative fluxes, and heating rates in the troposphere and stratosphere. Radiative properties of atmospheric aerosols.

MET 5425. Advanced Atmosphere Physics I (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2313 or equivalent, MET 2700, PHY 2048C, and PHY 2049C. This course covers classical equilibrium thermodynamics; first and second law, entropy, phase changes, and potentials; physics of moist air; physics of aerosols; and condensation of water vapor on aerosols.

MET 5451. Advanced Physical Meteorology II (3). Prerequisite: MET 5425 or equivalent. This course examines the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and the atmosphere; absorption and emission of light by the sun, the earth, and various components of the atmosphere, and the transfer of energy and scattering of radiation by the atmosphere.

MET 5455. Cloud Physics (3). Prerequisites: MET 4420, MET 4450, or instructor permission. This course covers microphysics of clouds; development of warm and cold rain processes; hail formation; microphysical parameterizations; microphysical basis for weather modification and electrication.

MET 5471. Satellite Remote Sensing of Planetary Atmospheres (3). Prerequisites: MET 4450; MET 4302 or MET 5312, or instructor permission. This course covers composition, extent, properties, cloud forms, general circulation; geophysics of the planets; theoretical deductions; implications for general circulation on Earth.

MET 6480r. Advanced Topics in Physical Meteorology (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

Synoptic Meteorology

MET 5505C. Advanced Synoptic Lecture-Laboratory I (3). Prerequisite: CGS 3460. Corequisites: MET 5311 and MET 5425. This course is an analysis of scalar and vector fields, an introduction to the three-dimensional structure of atmospheric systems, and thermodynamic diagrams.

MET 5506C. Advanced Synoptic Lecture-Laboratory II (4). Prerequisites: MET 5311, MET 5420, MET 5500C, and STA 2122. This course covers synoptic calculation and four-dimensional analysis of weather systems.

MET 5510C. Midlatitude Synoptic Scale Systems (4). Prerequisite: MET 4501C or instructor permission. This course is a lecture-laboratory on the structure and dynamics of middle-latitude atmospheric systems.

MET 5511C. Meso-Meteorology Lecture Laboratory (4). Prerequisite: MET 4501C. This course covers structure and dynamics of mesoscale atmospheric systems.

MET 5533. Tropical Meteorology I (3). Prerequisite: MET 4501C. This course is a lecture-laboratory on planetary and synoptic-scale systems of the tropics including hurricanes.

MET 5534. Tropical Meteorology II (3). Prerequisite: MET 4501C. This course covers convection, boundary layer processes, local weather phenomena, mesoscale tropical systems, hurricane structure.

MET 6561r. Advanced Topics in Synoptic Meteorology (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

Climatology

MET 5105. Global Climate System (3). Prerequisite: Basic climatology course or instructor permission. This course examines global climate system from radioactive and surface exchange processes. Their role in climate dynamics and climatic change is considered.

MET 5135. Dynamic Climatology (3). Prerequisite: Basic climate course or instructor permission. This course is an examination of climatology from both a synoptic and dynamic perspective. Regional climates are studied in the context of prevailing synoptic systems and links with general circulation features. Global patterns of climate and forcing mechanisms of climate variability are described.

MET 6155r. Advanced Topics in Climatology (1–3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course covers advanced topics and recent advances in climatology. Content varies covering such areas as climate modeling, physical climatology, dynamic climatology, climate change, and climate and the oceans. May be repeated up to six times to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

Other Courses

MET 5090r. Applied Time Series Analysis (3). Prerequisites: CGS 3460, MAP 3306, and STA 2122. This course analyzes real and complex-valued meteorological and/or oceanographic time series in the frequency and time domains by writing computer programs. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

MET 5403C. Meteorological Instruments and Observations (3). Prerequisites: MET 2700 and PHY 2048C. This course covers the theory and practice of calibration and operation of basic sensors measurement of temperature, heat flow, fluid flow, pressure and moisture.

MET 5905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

MET 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3).

MET 5910r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). Three semester hours are required for a master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours in each of the master’s and doctoral programs.

MET 5920r. Colloquium: Topics in Meteorology Research (1). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course covers reports and discussions in selected topics of meteorology research. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty semester hours.

MET 5930. Master’s Seminar (2). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course covers reports and discussions of meteorological research. All master’s degree candidates give an oral presentation and prepare a written report.

MET 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

MET 5979r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three hours may apply toward a master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours in each of the master’s and doctoral programs.

MET 6906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

MET 6930r. Doctoral Seminar (1). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course covers reports and discussions of meteorological research. Doctoral candidates give an oral presentation of their prospectus or dissertation. A minimum of two semester hours is required.

MET 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Admission to Doctoral candidacy.

MET 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

MET 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

MET 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

MET 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

OCP 5271. Turbulence (3). Prerequisite: MET 4301, MET 5311, or OCP 5253. This course focuses on topics such as: turbulent transport of momentum and heat; dynamics of turbulence; homogenous isotropic turbulence; wall bounded shear flows; statistical description of turbulence; spectra. Also offered in the Department of Oceanography.

OCP 5551. Physics of the Air-Sea Boundary Layer (3). Prerequisites: MET 4301 and OCP 5285; or instructor permission. This course focuses on topics such as flux of momentum, heat, and water; study of air-sea interaction mechanism of exchange and budgets. Also offered in the Department of Oceanography.

SCE 5836C. Teaching Earth and Space Science (3). This course includes the traditional discipline categories of geology, meteorology, astronomy, and oceanography. The course utilizes National Science Education standards to organize subject matter, which is the focus of this pedagogical course.