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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems

College of Education

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/

Chair: Betsy Becker; Professors: Becker, Dennen, Driscoll, Eklund, Klein, Pfeiffer, Shute, Tenenbaum; Associate Professors: Almond, Canto, Darabi, Ebener, Jeong, Ke, Losh, Osborn, Paek, Phillips, Roehrig, Turner, Yang; Assistant Professors: Chow, Dong, Krach, Swanbrow Becker, Zhang; Professors Emeriti: Branson, Kaufman, Keller, Kelly, Oosterhof, Pargman, Peterson, Reardon, Reiser, Wager

The Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems is committed to improving human learning and performance in a variety of settings, including schools, universities, adult learning contexts such as government agencies, business, human services, and industry. Specifically, the department seeks to provide service to the college; prepare graduates for leadership roles in universities, school districts, state departments of education, educational research organizations, human service agencies, and private industry; and conduct research designed to expand the knowledge base of our field and improve the quality of education and training.

The following degrees, majors, and certificate programs are offered by the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems:

  • Counseling and Human Systems
  • Career Counseling – Combined MS/EdS
  • Mental Health Counseling – Combined MS/EdS
  • School Psychology – Combined MS/EdS
  • Counseling Psychology and Human Systems
  • Combined Program in Counseling Psychology and School Psychology D
  • Educational Psychology
  • Learning and Cognition M,D
  • Sport Psychology M,D
  • Instructional Systems and Learning Technologies M,D
  • Measurement and Statistics M,D
  • Certificate in Human Performance Technology
  • Certificate in Online Instructional Development
  • Certificate in Measurement and Statistics

Educational Psychology Program

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/graduate-programs

The program offers master’s and doctoral degrees in two major areas: Learning and Cognition, and Sport Psychology.

The major in Learning and Cognition is theory- and research-oriented at both the master’s and doctoral levels. The major includes coursework in cognition, learning theory, research methods, and an emphasis on educational applications. Graduates of this major are prepared to take positions in universities, educational agencies, research organizations, and private enterprises that focus on improving educational practice. The thesis-track master’s, which is recommended for those interested in pursuing doctoral studies, is only available for face-to-face students. Online distance master’s students complete the comprehensive-exam track.

The major in Sport Psychology provides the basis for understanding and influencing the behavior of people involved in sport, exercise, and other types of physical activity. Graduates with this major are prepared to take positions in college and university settings or sport and exercise settings as teachers, researchers, and performance enhancement consultants for athletes and coaches.

Admission Requirements

For all programs, applicants must provide transcripts, a letter of intent indicating career goals and expectations, and three recent letters of recommendation. Letters should be from former teachers/professors or other persons qualified to make predictive statements regarding the applicant’s probable success in graduate studies, personal and work characteristics, intellectual ability, and/or scholarly attainments.

Learning and Cognition: The Learning and Cognition program admits students every semester. Applications for Fall and Summer are due February 15. Applications to begin in Spring are due October 1. It is strongly recommended that PhD applicants complete their applications early (by December 15) to be considered for fellowships beginning in the following Fall semester.

  • A minimum requirement for admission to the master’s degree program includes an upper-division undergraduate grade-point average of 3.0 and the minimum scores shown below for the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) as well as the TOEFL, if applicable.
  • A minimum requirement for admission to the specialist or doctoral programs includes a grade-point average of 3.3 or better in a graduate program, a master’s degree from a recognized institution, and the minimum scores shown below on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) as well as the TOEFL if applicable.
  • A minimum score at the 50th percentile on the verbal reasoning section of the GRE is required. Preference will be given to applicants who earn a percentile rank of 75% or above on the verbal reasoning section.
  • A minimum score at the 20th percentile on the quantitative reasoning section of the GRE is required. Preference will be given to applicants who earn a percentile rank of 35% or above on the quantitative reasoning section.
  • A score of 3.5 or above on the analytical writing section is required, if the GRE revised General Test was taken.
  • A score of 90 or above on the Internet-based version of the TOEFL is required of international students whose native language is other than English.

Sport Psychology: Minimum requirements for admission to a master’s degree program include a grade-point average of 3.0 in the last two years of the undergraduate program and scores at least at the 50th percentile on the verbal reasoning and quantitative sections of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Also, a score of 90 or above on the Internet-based version of the TOEFL is required of international students whose native language is other than English.

Minimum requirements for admission to the doctoral programs include an upper-division undergraduate grade-point average, a master’s degree from a recognized institution, and the following minimum scores on the revised GRE:

  • A score of 153 or above (500 or above on the prior scale) on the verbal reasoning section of the GRE. Preference will be given to applicants who earn a percentile rank of 75% or above on the verbal reasoning section of the GRE.
  • A score of 146 or above (550 or above on the prior scale) on the quantitative reasoning section of the GRE. Preference will be given to applicants who earn a percentile rank of 50% or above on the quantitative reasoning section of the GRE.
  • A score of 3.5 or above on the analytical writing section of the GRE.
  • A score of 90 or above on the Internet-based version of the TOEFL is required of international students whose native language is other than English.

Exam Policies

Master’s students who are taking the thesis option and all doctoral students are expected to write and defend both a prospectus and final thesis/dissertation to their committee. The committees must be formed according to the rules of The Graduate School and College of Education.

Learning and Cognition: All committee members and the student must attend the entire defense in real time, either by being physically present or participating via distance technology. A grade of PASS for the defense requires the approval of all members of the committee.

Sport Psychology: Both the defending student and all committee members will attend all defenses in person. However, if this is impossible, Skype or another form of video conferencing can be used under the following guidelines: the defending student must attend in person; two examiners may attend the PhD dissertation defense via Skype/videoconference, all others must attend in person. If more than two examiners are unable to attend in person, the defense must be rescheduled.

Instructional Systems & Learning Technologies Program

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/instructional-systems-and-learning-technologies

This program offers a Master of Science (MS) and a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Instructional Systems and Learning Technologies (ISLT). Emphasis is placed on facilitating learning and improving performance through the analysis, design, development, implementation, evaluation, and management of appropriate processes and tools. The program has a strong focus on instructional design, emerging technologies, and human performance improvement. Excellent job opportunities and salaries await graduates of the program. Alumni work in a variety of settings including large corporations, colleges and universities, government agencies, consulting firms, the military, and public schools.

The MS program prepares students to become a practitioner in the ISLT field. It requires a minimum of 36 credit hours and can be completed in two years. The ISLT master’s degree is offered both on campus and online. Non-Florida residents (including international students) accepted to the online MS program may be eligible for reduced tuition.

The PhD program prepares students to conduct and interpret research in ISLT. Students who have earned a master’s degree in ISLT or a related field are required to take a minimum of forty-eight credit hours and complete a dissertation. The ISLT doctoral degree is a residential program.

The ISLT program also offers graduate certificates in both Human Performance Technology and Online Instructional Development. Each certificate program requires a minimum of fifteen credit hours of coursework and can be completed on campus or online along with a graduate degree or as a stand-alone certificate.

Admission and Application Information

The following are required for admission to the Instructional Systems and Learning Technologies program:

  • A bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution
  • A minimum GPA of 3.0 is required for admission to the MS and certificate programs; a minimum GPA of 3.2 is required for admission to the ISLT PHD program
  • GRE verbal reasoning scores at or above the 50th percentile and a score on the quantitative reasoning section for all degrees; GRE analytical writing scores of at least 3.5 for the MS program, and at least 4.0 for the PhD program; applicants to the PhD program must also score at or above the 50th percentile on the quantitative reasoning section.
  • A statement of purpose explaining career goals and aspirations
  • Letters of recommendations from three individuals who can address your likelihood of success in graduate school
  • A professional resumé
  • A TOEFL score of 90 or above is required all international students whose native language is not English.

Exam Policies

Students enrolled in the ISLT MS program are required to complete a portfolio as part of their degree requirements. The purpose of this portfolio is to assess the degree to which the competencies expected of an ISLT MS graduate have been mastered.

Students enrolled in ISLT PhD program are required to complete a qualifying review by the end of their first year and a preliminary examination before beginning work on their dissertation. ISLT PhD students are also expected to write and defend both a prospectus and final dissertation to their committee. The committees must be formed according to the rules of the Graduate School and College of Education. The candidate and all committee members must attend and participate in the defense meetings. The student and major professor must be physically present in the room. One committee member may join electronically (e.g., via Skype or telephone) if necessary. Exceptions to this policy (e.g., if two members request electronic participation) must be approved by the program faculty on a case-by-case basis prior to the defense. Should a committee member be unable to attend at the last minute, an alternate member who meets the criteria for committee membership set forth by the Graduate School may be substituted.

Measurement and Statistics Program

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/measurement-and-statistics

The Measurement and Statistics program offers master’s and doctoral degrees.

The Measurement and Statistics major is designed to prepare leaders in educational research to serve in the following types of professional positions: educational measurement and educational statistics specialist for a test publisher or governmental licensing, certification or assessment unit, director of measurement activities for a school or school system; measurement and educational statistics expert for a regional education laboratory; or professor in measurement and statistics at a college or university.

Admission Requirements

The Measurement and Statistics program admits students in all semesters. However, opportunities to wire funding are most likely for Fall admissions. Completed applications for those interested in scholarship funding should be submitted by January 1. Completed applications will be considered for admission until available Fall student slots are filled, after which the application portal will be closed.

  • For admission to the master’s degree program, students must have a grade-point average of 3.0 or better in the last two years of the undergraduate program, or an average of at least a 3.0 in a master’s degree from an accredited institution.
  • For admission to the doctoral program, students must have a grade-point average of at least a 3.3 or better in the last two years of the undergraduate program, or an average of at least a 3.0 in a master’s degree from an accredited institution.
  • For both programs a score of at least the 50th percentile on the verbal reasoning and quantitative sections of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required. Preference will be given to applicants with a percentile rank of 85% or above on the quantitative reasoning section. A TOEFL score of at least a 550 on the paper-based exam and 80 on the internet-based exam is required of international applicants whose native language is other than English.

Exam Policies

Defenses can be held with the assistance of distance technology (e.g., Skype); the student and major professor must be physically present. A grade of PASS for the defense of a thesis or dissertation requires approval of a majority of the committee.

Definition of Prefixes

APK—Applied Kinesiology

DEP—Developmental Psychology

EDF—Education: Foundations and Policy Studies

EDG—Education: General

EDP—Educational Psychology

EGI—Education: Gifted

EME—Education: Technology and Media

PET—Physical Education Theory

SOW—Social Work

SYP—Social Processes

Graduate Courses

APK 5404. Sport Psychology (3). This course provides an introductory graduate survey of sport psychology topics and research.

APK 6412. Sport and Exercise Psychology Ethics (3). This course consists if in-depth elaboration on current important professional issues related to ethics in sport and exercise psychology. The issues presented and discussed in class consist of book chapters, the American Psychological Association (APA) and the Association of Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) Codes of Ethics publications.

DEP 5068. Life-Span Human Development (3). This course discusses central theories and topics in developmental psychology across the life span, focusing especially on the implications of developmental theory and empirical research on counseling and other helping professions.

EDF 5300. Motivation and Emotion (3). This graduate-level seminar provides students with information to understand underlying processes of humans’ motivations and emotions.

EDF 5400. Basic Descriptive and Inferential Statistics Applications (4). This course prepares students to both read and write papers containing basic statistical analyses. Topics covered include descriptive statistics, basic plots and graphing, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, correlational techniques, and introduction to the general linear model.

EDF 5401. General Linear Model Applications (4). Prerequisite: EDF 5400. In this course, topics included are general linear model applications including multiple regression, ANOVA, ANCOVA, aptitude-treatment-interaction analysis, and other techniques.

EDF 5402. Advanced Topics in Analysis of Variance Applications (3). Prerequisite: EDF 5400 or equivalent. This course explores topics such as multiway ANOVA, covariance, repeated measures designs, nested designs, and generalizability theory.

EDF 5404. Bayesian Data Analysis (3). Prerequisite: EDF 5000. Corequisite: EDF 7418. This course provides students with practice in applying Bayesian methods for linear, generalized linear, and hierarchical linear models to educational data sets. The class covers using both the EM and MCMC algorithms in R and Stan. The course emphasizes interpretation of results and writing summaries of analyses.

EDF 5406. Multivariate Analysis Applications (3). Prerequisite: EDF 5401. This course examines design and analysis of research studies with multiple independent and dependent variables including path analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and exploratory factor analysis.

EDF 5409. Causal Modeling (3). Prerequisite: EDF 5406. This course considers causal modeling techniques, including structural equation modeling, longitudinal growth modeling, multiple-sample structural equation modeling, as well as assumptions underlying causal modeling.

EDF 5410. Nonparametric Analysis Applications (3). Prerequisite: EDF 5400. This course discusses the consideration and application of topics in nonparametric statistics.

EDF 5431. Classroom Assessment (3). This course prepares prospective teachers for activities related to assessing students including establishing validity evidence, enhancing generalization of observations, using traditional and alternative assessment strategies, interpreting and using data to improve achievement, and utilizing assessment in the process of learning.

EDF 5432. Measurement Theory I (3). Prerequisite: EDF 4440 or EDF 5400. This course is an introduction to test theory; mathematical bases for operational procedures; practical applications of theory.

EDF 5434. Measurement Theory II (3). Prerequisite: EDF 5432. Pre- or corequisite: EDF 5402 or EDF 5401. This is an advanced course in the theory, principles, and techniques of measurement.

EDF 5435. Theory of Scaling (2). Prerequisite: EDF 5434. This course focuses on the theory and application of uni-dimensional and multidimensional scaling techniques.

EDF 5442. Inquiry and Measurement for Practitioners (3). This foundational course addresses inquiry and measurement concepts for master’s students. It focuses on inquiry to support data-based decision making processes related to learning and human performance.

EDF 5443. Measurement and Evaluation in the Classroom (3). This course prepares teachers for activities in testing, grading, test construction, interpretation and use of test scores, and evaluation of instructional effectiveness.

EDF 5445. Assessment of Learning Outcomes (3). This course helps students understand and develop tests that directly measure student achievement.

EDF 5448. Scale and Instrument Development (3). Prerequisites: EDF 5400, and EDF 5431 or EDF 5432. This course provides the skills essential to conceptualizing, designing, producing, administering, and interpreting educational and psychological scales and instruments. Focuses upon measures of achievement, aptitude, attitude, and interest.

EDF 5462. Evaluation of New Educational Programs and Practices (3). Prerequisite: EDF 5461. This course is an advanced level seminar on the theoretical and pragmatic aspects of program evaluation. Students begin with an overview and understanding of evaluation theoretical roots and the philosophical premises shaping evaluation theory. This leads to further understandings about the application of different research designs to the practice of evaluation, as presented in evaluation cases.

EDF 5481. Methods of Educational Research (3). This course is a survey of selected types of educational research and appropriate related techniques; emphasis on criteria of validity.

EDF 5484. Educational Data Analysis (3). Prerequisite: EDF 5401. This course provides students with practice in applying linear and generalized linear models to educational data sets. The focus is not on specific methods, but rather on identifying which methods are appropriate for a given data sets, interpreting the results and writing up reports summarizing the results.

EDF 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

EDF 5910r. Supervised Research (1–9). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

EDF 5916. Research Proposal Writing (1). Corequisite: EDF 5481. This course provides the opportunity to develop a written research proposal (including literature review) and to select and specify the appropriate research design and data collection methods to answer one’s research questions.

EDF 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

EDF 5942r. Field Laboratory Internship (1–8). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

EDF 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

EDF 5973r. Specialist in Education Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

EDF 6057. Large-Scale Assessment (3). Prerequisite: EDF 5432. Corequisite: EDF 5434. This course prepares students to work on large-scale assessment programs. Students gain familiarity with all aspects of the program including: item development, field-testing, test construction, scaling, equating, vertical linking, standard setting and generating technical reports.

EDF 6499. Discourse and Conversation Analysis (3). This course prepares students to use discourse and conversation analysis techniques in their research.

EDF 6683. Family Support for Learning (3). This course addresses the theories, current research, and research methods associated with the multiple influences families have on students’ educational achievement, with particular attention to issues of development and diversity.

EDF 6755. Theoretical and Practical Issues in Education (3). This course is designed as a synthesis for some of the most important themes relevant to learning, cognition, and instruction, including theoretical and practical issues in education related to lifespan development, human cognition, theories of learning and instruction, motivation and emotion, and family support for children. The goal of this course is to consider the implications of these issues for instructional practices across the lifespan.

EDF 6933. Measurement Seminar: Decision Processes (2). Prerequisite: EDF 5434. Examples of topics in this course are: item bias, adaptive testing, decision theory.

EDF 6937r. Seminar in Advanced Research Problems (1–3). This course may be repeated to a maximum of fifteen semester hours. The course is designed for advanced students.

EDF 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only). May be repeated in the same semester.

EDF 7418. Multilevel Modeling (3). Prerequisite: EDF 5401. This course provides an introduction to multilevel models. Through this course, students learn about a variety of multilevel or hierarchical models appropriate for a broad range of applications. Topics discussed within the context of each multilevel model include hypothesis testing, evaluation of model fit, and computer packages that can be used to estimate the various multilevel models.

EDF 7489. Meta-analysis (3). Prerequisites: EDF 5400 and either EDF 5401 or EDF 5402. This course covers conceptual issues and analysis methods relevant to research reviews and quantitative synthesis methods. Students are introduced to the issues and controversies in the area of research synthesis and to a set of quantitative procedures for summarizing sets of related studies.

EDF 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

EDF 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

EDF 8969r. Specialist in Education Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

EDF 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

EDF 8979r. Specialist in Education Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

EDF 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

EDG 5932r. Seminar in Instructional Design (1–2). (S/U grade only). In this course, faculty members and other instructional systems specialists present lectures on current topics and projects.

EDG 6287. Needs Assessment for Performance and System Planning (3). This course explores the characterization and development of models and procedures for strategic planning, needs assessment, needs analysis, quality management, and front-end analysis, and their use in system planning.

EDG 6328. Alternate Views of Teaching and Learning (3). This course is an overview of the empirical and conceptual basis for a variety of viewpoints regarding teaching, learning, and models of instructional design.

EDG 6362. Instructional Systems Research Seminar (3). This course aims to heighten students’ awareness of the critical issues in instructional systems. It examines how research methodologies have been used to study these issues, explores how research programs and theories are progressively honed, and defines programmatic areas of disciplined inquiry.

EDG 6363. Practicum in Experimental Learning Research (3). Prerequisites: EDF 5400 and EDF 5481. This course provides instruction and practice in planning, conducting, and describing (both orally and in writing) experimental research.

EDG 6925. Advanced Instructional Design and Development (3). Prerequisites: EDP 5216 and EME 5603. This advanced course explores theory and research that serve as the foundation for current and emerging instructional design (ID) practice. The course is aimed at graduate students who have already mastered basic knowledge and skills related to instructional design and learning theory.

EDP 5216. Theories of Learning and Cognition in Instruction (3). This course focuses on the applications of prominent contemporary theories of learning, cognition, and information processing to instructional settings.

EDP 5217. Principles of Learner Motivation (3). This course examines the study of theories and concepts of human motivation. The primary emphasis is on the motivation to learn and techniques for stimulating and sustaining learner motivation.

EDP 5275. Development of Children in School (3). This course discusses central theories and topics in developmental psychology across the life span, focusing especially on the implications of developmental theory and empirical research on counseling and other helping professions.

EDP 5285. Group Processes in Instruction (3). This course examines the theory, research, and practice in interpersonal interaction, group dynamics, and management of group processes in the classroom and school setting. Topics include group development, leadership, conflict management, organizational dynamics, values.

EDP 5935. Topics in Educational Psychology (3). This course surveys major theories with respect to students’ learning, motivation, individual differences in abilities, and development of cognitive and social skills as they apply to instructional decision making. The course components enable students to put research into practice and balance theoretical and practical perspectives of students’ learning and teachers’ practices.

EGI 5936. Seminar for Teachers of the Gifted (3). This course is a critical review of research and practice in the special education of the gifted and talented and their teachers.

EGI 5940. Mentorship Practicum for the Gifted (5). This course focuses on the planning, establishing, and implementing a computerized community resource network for secondary and postsecondary gifted student mentorship programs.

EME 5054. Educational Technology: Theory and Practice in Instruction (3). This course focuses on the current theories and practices of using technology in teaching and learning. Students participate in a computer supported learning environment and integrate theory and technology into their practices.

EME 5077. Mobile Learning (3). This course addresses issues related to design, development, and implementation of mobile solutions for learning and performance support.

EME 5405. Media, Text, and Technology (3). This course covers what media can and cannot do, about texts that can be produced and disseminated and about the technologies that help and hinder the process of understanding.

EME 5457. Introduction to Distance Learning (3). This course provides an overview of the foundations of distance learning and online educational programs. It examines the design and technologies necessary for quality interactive education at a distance.

EME 5601. Introduction to Instructional Systems (3). This course is an overview of systems theory applied to instructional systems development and includes principles and procedures for developing total instructional systems. In the course, students learn about the systematic approach to instructional design, the contexts in which this approach is applied, and the roles instructional systems professionals in the instruction design and performance improvement processes.

EME 5603. Introduction to Systematic Instructional Design (3). This course is an introduction to the systematic design of instruction. Includes practical experience in developing and evaluating instructional materials.

EME 5604. Designing Instructor-Led Courses (3). Prerequisite: EME 5603 or EDG 6925. This course examines procedures for the design and development of instructor-led courses.

EME 5606. Technology and Design (3). This course focuses on developing the visual design, multimedia, graphic design, and technology skills that are foundational to instructional design and development. Students learn to apply theory and principles to the development of instructional media using popular software programs.

EME 5608. Trends and Issues in Instructional Design (3). This course is an overview of the field of instructional design and technology. Includes historical perspective, research findings, and current issues and trends.

EME 5614. Design of Learning Games (3). This course is designed to guide students to design and prototype learning games by understanding and applying the interdisciplinary principles of game design, psychology of play, education, and cognitive science.

EME 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

EME 6356. Learning and Web Analytics (3). This course addresses the collection and use of data for decision making and assessment in learning and human performance contexts. Students get hands-on experience with small data sets and learn how big data sets are collected and used.

EME 6357. Evaluation of Training in HPT (3). This course focuses on the evaluation of training and instruction from a human performance technology perspective. The course provides the knowledge and skills for evaluating training systems and instructional programs. Students discuss training systems dynamics, interact with organizational environments, synthesize ideas through presentations, and write an evaluation proposal.

EME 6403. Designing for Online Collaborative Learning (3). Prerequisite: EME 5601. This course teaches strategies and techniques for designing instructional activities for distance learning based on theories and principles of collaborative learning.

EME 6414. Web 2.0-Based Learning and Performance (3). This course focuses on how the widespread use of social networking/media have influenced learning and human performance. Additionally, the course covers how instructional learning experiences and performance supports might be designed to take advantage of participatory culture.

EME 6415. Development of Computer Courseware (3). Prerequisite: EME 5603 or EDG 6925. This course focuses on procedures for the systematic design and production of computer-based instruction. Includes practice in computer-based course development.

EME 6476. Internet Based Inquiry (3). This course focuses on two key issues related to the Internet and research: (1) Conducting research on online settings and (2) Using Internet-based tools to support data collection and analysis.

EME 6507. Development of Multimedia Instruction (3). Prerequisite: EME 6415. This course is a study of the evolution of multimedia instruction, with an emphasis on contemporary research and theory. Includes practice in the design and development of multimedia learning systems.

EME 6613. Design and Development of Electronic Performance Support Systems (3). This course includes the description of the design of electronic support tools. Each student conceptualizes, designs, and develops a prototype for an electronic performance support tool.

EME 6616. Case Studies in Instructional Systems (2). This course studies representative contemporary instructional delivery systems, their planning, development, and implementation.

EME 6631. Managing Instructional Development (3). Prerequisite: EME 5601. This course is an introduction to procedures for managing instructional development projects and organizations. Includes project and organizational design and development, staff development, and leadership principles.

EME 6635r. Seminar in Advanced Instructional Systems Problems (3). This course is only offered periodically and addresses special topics that are not covered in other courses.

EME 6636. A Systems Approach to the Management of Change (3). This course discusses performance interventions in terms of changes in organizational environment, structure, processes, and workforce performance. The course examines the issues surrounding planning, implementing, sustaining, and evaluating changes that result from instructional and non-instructional interventions which target the overall improvement of organizational performance.

EME 6665. Synthesis, Analysis, and Argumentation in Instructional Systems Research (3). This course covers tools, techniques, and procedures for finding, synthesizing, analyzing, and summarizing research related to past and ongoing relevant topics in Instructional Systems.

EME 6691. Performance Systems Analysis (3). This course is an introduction to human-performance technology (HPT) and familiarizes students with HPT theoretical foundations and practical methodology through a performance-systems analysis (PSA) project. The course covers systems thinking, systematic processes involved in conducting a PSA, as well as PSA models and their application for identifying performance gaps and recommending solutions.

PET 5054C. Motor Skill Learning (3). This course focuses on research and theory of learning, performance, and related factors as applied to motor skills.

PET 5216. Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology (3). This course places emphasis on techniques and strategies for changing sport and exercise psychology as well as their theoretical bases.

PET 5222. Cognitive Processes in Sport Psychology (3). Prerequisite: PET 5216. In this course, cognitive processes (decision making, attention memory, etc.) are studied, with an emphasis upon explaining and optimizing sport-related behavior.

PET 5255. Social Bases of Physical Activity (3). This course examines the socio-cultural foundations of play, games, sport, and physical activity.

PET 5390. Measurement in Sport and Exercise Psychology (3). Prerequisites: EDF 5400, EDF 5432, or equivalent. This course considers the application of measurement theory to the domains of sport and exercise psychology. Currently available instruments are reviewed and scale development emphasized.

PET 6087. Exercise Effect on Health and Quality of Life (3). This course consists of in-depth elaboration on current important professional issues related to exercise effects on health and quality of life.

PET 6217. Stress and Motor Performance (3). This course emphasizes the importance of stress within motor performance. Examines various physiological, cognitive, and behavioral correlates of psychologically induced stress as well as contemporary treatment modalities for managing stress.

PET 6224. Exercise Effect on Cognitive Processes and Brain Functioning (3). This course consists of in-depth elaboration on current important professional issues related to exercise effects on cognitive functions. Each session consists of two or three presentations followed by debates and discussions.

SOW 5153. Human Sexuality (3). This course surveys issues and attitudes associated with human sexuality. It is primarily intended for social workers and other helping professionals who currently work with clients or plan to in the future. Using a biopsychosocial perspective, emphasis is placed on the social, cultural, familial, and individual differences in sexual and reproductive attitudes, values, and behavior. Students are introduced to common sex-related issues and to the particular concerns of various sexually discriminated against groups. Information is also provided about childhood sexual abuse and adult victimization and their relationship to intimacy issues clients typically present in direct practice.

SYP 5105. Theories of Social Psychology (3). This course examines the major theoretical orientations in contemporary social psychology. Special attention is given to perspectives such as symbolic interactionism, social learning theory, expectation states/status characteristics theory, emotions work theory, and Goffman’s dramatization theory.

Counseling Psychology and Human Systems

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/counseling-psychology-and-school-psychology

The Counseling Psychology and Human Systems program offers work leading to the following degrees: Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in the Combined Program in Counseling Psychology and School Psychology.

Combined Program in Counseling Psychology and School Psychology (PhD)

The doctoral degree in the Combined Program in Counseling Psychology and School Psychology prepares students for professional positions as university faculty, counseling psychologists in university counseling centers, school psychologists in educational settings, mental health care providers in community, medical, and business settings, administrators in public and private agencies, and researchers, evaluators, and planners of human service programs.

Students who apply for admission and are accepted into the Combined Doctoral Program in Counseling Psychology and School Psychology are expected to acquire basic competency in counseling psychology and school psychology, as well as advanced competency in counseling psychology or school psychology, leading to appropriate national certification and state licensure. Within this combined program all students share a common core of experience in research and practice in counseling psychology and school psychology, while expressing a professional focus by selecting a concentration in counseling psychology or school psychology. Students also have the option of dual concentration at the advanced competency level in both counseling psychology and school psychology by completing additional courses, practica, and internship hours. All majors within the program are offered under the degree title of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Counseling Psychology and Human Systems. The Combined Doctoral Program at Florida State University is accredited by the American Psychological Association as a Combined Professional Program in Counseling Psychology and School Psychology.

Counseling and Human Systems

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/graduate-programs

The Counseling and Human Systems program offers combined Specialist in Education (EdS) and Master of Science (MS) degrees in Career Counseling and Mental Health Counseling and School Psychology.

Career Counseling and Mental Health Counseling Majors in Counseling and Human Systems (MS/EdS)

The combined specialist/master’s degree in Counseling and Human Systems is designed to prepare individuals for professional positions at various levels in elementary and secondary schools, junior colleges, institutions of higher education, or in a wide variety of human-services agencies (e.g., mental health, substance abuse, career counseling, adult and child counseling). The combined specialist/master’s degree includes a minimum of sixty-eight semester hours for Career Counseling and sixty-nine semester hours for Mental Health Counseling. A supervised internship in an applied setting is also required. Students majoring in Counseling and Human Systems at the MS/EdS level select a specialization in Career Counseling and/or Mental Health Counseling. Each of these specializations is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) and students are eligible to take the National Counselor Examination during the Spring semester of their last year of study. This is a combined MS/EdS degree and as a result, the degrees cannot be completed separately.

School Psychology Major in Counseling and Human Systems (MS/EdS)

School Psychology is offered as a separate major within Counseling and Human Systems as a specialist-level program with an integrated master’s degree leading to initial Florida certification in School Psychology. This educator Preparation program prepares personnel to practice as school psychologists within educational as well as nontraditional settings. This major is accredited by the National Association of School Psychologists and is a Florida Department of Education-approved Other School Personnel Preparation program in school psychology grades PK through 12 (DOE Certification Area 330). This is a combined MS/EdS degree and as a result, the degrees cannot be completed separately.

Associated Centers

The Human Services Center, located in the College of Education, serves as a site where graduate students in all degree offerings receive intensive training in skill development. Through the center, students provide educational, personal, and vocational counseling. School psychologist services are offered to members of the community in the Adult Learning and Evaluation Center, which is housed in the Human Services Center. Here students receive direct faculty supervision as part of their clinical training.

The Adult Learning Evaluation Center is a not-for-profit assessment center that provides low cost psycho-educational evaluations for college students and other adults who may be experiencing scholastic difficulties due to a possible Learning Disability or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. The clinic staff consists of faculty members, licensed psychologists, a clinical director, and graduate students in the specialties of school and counseling psychology. In addition to evaluation services, the center provides educational workshops and individual client coaching and maintains an ongoing research and training function.

The Center for the Study of Technology in Counseling and Career Development (Tech Center) assists practitioners, researchers, software developers, and policy makers in improving the design and use of computer applications in counseling and career development. The Center also assists practitioners, researchers, and policy makers in improving the cost effectiveness of career services. The Center’s Web site, http://www.career.fsu.edu/techcenter, expands this mission to include serving individuals and students interested in career development and computer technology.

Admission Requirements

All applicants must at least meet the minimum requirements for undergraduate grade point average, graduate grade point average (if applicable), and/or Graduate Record Examinations scores. Each degree offering may set different standards for admission based on programmatic objectives and the applicant pool. Applicants can find specific admission requirements on the Web page of the program of interest (see http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/graduate-programs). A formal application for graduate study must include the following: 1) official graduate application to Florida State University (apply online at https://admissions.fsu.edu/gradapp/), 2) three letters of recommendation, 3) a current resumé highlighting relevant educational, clinical and research experience, 4) an autobiographical/personal statement including how the degree sought can meet personal/professional goals. Admitted students who do not have the required prerequisite coursework will be expected to make up these deficiencies early in their program. Although not required, applicants who have completed courses in general psychology, human services, school settings, and/or related areas, and who have some full-time, part-time, or volunteer experience in counseling, education, or related social services fields, will be given preference in the application process. We value a diversity of perspective in our program and encourage students from diverse backgrounds to apply.

Admission to Educator Preparation Programs

Section 1004.04, Florida Statutes, Public Accountability and State Approval for Educator Preparation Programs, and State Board of Education Rule 6A-5.066 require that all students seeking admission into advanced educator preparation programs at Florida State University achieve a minimum GRE score or pass all four sections of the General Knowledge Exam of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam (FTCE).

Students planning to pursue an Educator Preparation program at Florida State University must be formally recognized as such by making application to the College of Education in the first term of program enrollment. Admission to an Educator Preparation program is administered by the Dean of Education and is assigned to the Office of Academic Services and Intern Support (OASIS), 2301 Stone Building. Admission to Educator Preparation is distinct from admission to a college or school in that students must meet State of Florida and Florida Department of Education criteria. For details on the criteria for admission, the student should refer to the ‘Planning Guide to Educator Preparation Programs’ section in the “College of Education” chapter of this Graduate Bulletin.

Per policy adopted by the Florida State University Professional Education Advisory Council, any student seeking readmission to an educator preparation program shall be responsible for meeting the most current course, clinical, and certification requirements set by that program; readmitted students in these programs will not be ‘grandfathered’ under the educator preparation requirements in effect at the time of original admission to the major.

The Educator Preparation admissions standard for state-approved programs is subject to revision based on changes in Section 1004.04, Florida Statutes, Public Accountability and State Approval for Educator Preparation Programs, and State Board of Education Rule 6A-5.066, Approval of Educator Preparation Programs.

Criteria for Admission to An Educator Preparation Program

  • Hold a current Florida Professional Educator Certificate OR earn passing scores on all four sections of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam, General Knowledge Test;
  • Have earned a baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited institution;
  • Submit an online Graduate Application for Admission to Educator Preparation to the Office of Academic Services and Intern Support: https://fsu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_00RfV2wNWTMD5hX. This online application is distinct from admission to the College or a specific academic program.
  • Approval of the respective department in accordance with departmental criteria; and
  • Approval of the Office of Academic Services and Intern Support.

Clinical Experience

  • At least thirty semester hours completed in the subject specialization area as determined by the student’s program;
  • Professional education coursework to include (a) the acquisition of reading literacy for the appropriate certification level; (b) integrated classroom management, school safety, professional ethics and educational law; (c) human development and learning; and, (d) assessment to include understanding the content measured by state achievement tests, reading and interpreting data, and using data to improve student achievement;
  • A series of clinical experiences in diverse settings throughout the program that culminates with a full-time student teaching experience of at least ten weeks duration in an approved setting; and
  • A Level II Security Check is required for all FSU students who will have direct contact with PreK-12 students. Students should be aware that if you have been arrested for certain crimes you may not be considered for a teaching position. Fingerprinting and Level II-background clearance are required for any placement in a PreK-12 setting.
  • Students should consult with a program advisor for specific course requirements.

Exam Policies

Master’s/specialist students who are taking the thesis option and all doctoral students are expected to write and defend both a prospectus and final thesis/dissertation to their committee. The committees must be formed according to the rules of the Graduate School and College of Education. For oral preliminary exams and oral prospectus defense, the student must be physically present; and one, but no more than one, committee member may participate via distance technology. For the dissertation defense, the student, major professor, and the University representative must be physically present on campus; remaining committee members may participate via distance technology. A grade of PASS for all oral exams requires the approval of the majority of the committee.

Requirements for Lab Classes, Practicum and Internship in school psychology

A Level II Security Check is required for all Florida State University Students who will have direct contact with children (birth to age 18 years). Students should be aware that if they have been arrested for certain crimes they may not be considered for a position as a psychologist, school psychologist, or counselor. Fingerprinting and Level II background clearance are required for any placement in a setting with children (birth to age 18 years) including lab courses involving volunteers ages birth to 18 years.

Definition of Prefixes

MHS—Mental Health Services

PCO—Psychology for Counseling

PSB—Psychobiology

RCS—Rehabilitation Counseling Services

SDS—Student Development Services

SPS—School Psychology

Graduate Courses

Psychological and Counseling Services

MHS 5005. Foundations of Counseling and Rehabilitation (3). This course covers identification of the foundations underlying counseling and rehabilitation, including background philosophy, structure, and legislation.

MHS 5007. Foundations of Mental Health Counseling (3). This course provides a history and overview of the counseling profession, including ethical and legal issues, controversies in the field, and the impact of contemporary problems on mental health problems.

MHS 5010. Foundations of School Counseling (3). This course is an introduction to the field of school counseling with an emphasis on historical foundations, role and function, legal and ethical issues, and standards of practice. It provides a theoretical and practical orientation to applied counseling practice in the schools.

MHS 5060. Psychosocial and Multicultural Aspects of Counseling (3). This course examines the relationship among psychological, social, environmental, disability, and multicultural factors as they pertain to understanding human behavior.

MHS 5310. Counseling Technology and Information Systems (3). This course covers understanding and utilizing multimedia information systems in career development. Basic understanding of career development in the life cycle.

MHS 5340. Foundations of Career Development (4). This course examines the career development of individuals and the process of career counseling and guidance.

MHS 5341. Career Development Program Design and Evaluation (3). This course examines contemporary career interventions and strategies for program development and implementation.

MHS 5400. Introduction to Counseling Theories and Techniques (4). This course examines traditional theories of personality and counseling, as well as how to translate theory into effective practice. Develops basic counseling skills that include an awareness of self and a capacity to use one’s self in the counseling process.

MHS 5419. Systems Approach to Counseling (3). This course conceptualizes counseling problems in systems terms; focus is on counselor and client as part of systems; systems-level counseling interventions.

MHS 5496. Current Issues in the Psychology of the Gifted (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course exposes students to current issues and trends in the psychology of the gifted. Topics include intelligence and intelligence testing, characteristics of the gifted, creativity, talent development, underachievement, socio-emotional development of the gifted, and policy impacting the gifted. Students formulate a research proposal based on a review of the research literature in one area of giftedness.

MHS 5511. Group Counseling: Theory and Practice (3). This course covers introductory group leader training; theoretical and experiential components.

MHS 5710. Research in Human Services (3). Prerequisite: Introductory statistics. This course covers the development of skills in analyzing and critiquing research studies, and applying research knowledge to counseling practice.

MHS 5800r. Practicum: Counseling Concepts and Case Management (4). Corequisite: MHS 5400. This course develops basic counseling skills in beginning counselor trainees, with an emphasis on self-awareness. Students receive training in the human services center, through an appropriate combination of direct client counseling, role play, instruction, and observation.

MHS 5801r. Practicum in Counseling and Rehabilitation (4). This course provides intermediate training in counseling in the human services center, through direct client counseling, role play, instruction, and observation. May be repeated for a maximum of sixteen semester hours.

MHS 5860r. Supervised Teaching (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree.

MHS 5905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

MHS 5915r. Supervised Research (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree.

MHS 6220r. Individual Appraisal in Counseling (3). This course allows students to acquire skill in use and interpretation of selected instruments and techniques for individual assessment. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

MHS 6300. Theories of Vocational Behavior (3). This course covers the meaning of work, theories of vocational behavior, career development consultation.

MHS 6401. Evidence-Based Counseling/Psychotherapy (3). Prerequisite: MHS 5400 or equivalent. This course covers the nature of theory and instruction in a variety of counseling theories. Emphasis is placed on counseling-research literature and evidence-based practice.

MHS 6410. Behavior Management: Principles and Applications (3). This course provides understanding of behavior patterns of children and adolescents and develop effective strategies for behavior management.

MHS 6450. Substance Abuse and Addictions Counseling (3). This course is designed to provide graduate students with an overview of theories, concepts, and issues related to the etiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of persons with addictions and substance use disorders.

MHS 6600. Consultation and Organizational Development (3). This course covers problem identification, consultation strategies, development of social networks, conflict resolution, workshop development, individual and organizational change strategies in education and related agency settings.

MHS 6610. Supervision (3). This course covers the development of skills in clinical and managerial supervision. Understanding a variety of supervisory models.

MHS 6630. Program Development and Evaluation in Counseling (3). This course covers needs assessment, programmatic goals and objectives, program planning, evaluation design, accountability, and dissemination.

MHS 6715. Design and Critical Review of Research in Counseling (3). This course covers the conceptualization of counseling problems in researchable terms; critical review of published counseling research.

MHS 6803. Seminar in Ethics, Law, and Clinical Supervision (3). Prerequisite: MHS 5801. This seminar provides students with exposure to standards of practice in professional psychology, to ethical and legal issues in the provision of psychological services, and to clinical supervision. Students supervise beginning-level graduate students who are counseling clients in the on-campus Human Services Center.

MHS 6805r. Advanced Group or Individual Counseling Practicum (1–4). This course is intensive practice in counseling, consisting of closely supervised practical experience and critique of students practice. May be repeated to a maximum of sixteen semester hours.

MHS 6820r. Counseling Internship (3–6). (S/U grade only). This course is field counseling experience in a planned setting. May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

MHS 6938r. Special Topics in Counseling Psychology (3). This course is an in-depth investigation of a variety of topics in counseling psychology with different topics offered each year. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. May be repeated in the same semester.

MHS 6946r. Field Practicum in Counseling Psychology (2–16). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: MHS 6805. This practicum provides students with an opportunity to integrate theory and practice in the delivery of psychological services relevant to their career goals. Students completing the course enhance their competencies in assessment, intervention, or both. May be repeated to a maximum of sixteen semester hours.

MHS 6970r. Thesis (3–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

MHS 6971r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

MHS 6973r. Specialist in Education Thesis (3–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

MHS 7962r. Specialist in Education Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

MHS 7972r. Specialist in Education Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

MHS 8960r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

MHS 8961r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

MHS 8980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

MHS 8981r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

PCO 5095. Computer Applications in Counseling Psychology and Other Human Services (3). This course examines the effective application of computer technology in counseling psychology with an emphasis on mental health, education, and rehabilitation.

PCO 6930. Integrative Seminar (3). Prerequisites: MHS 6401 and MHS 6715. This course examines theory, research, and practice in counseling as a foundation for completing dissertation research and the doctoral internship.

PSB 5066. Biological Bases of Learning and Behavior (3). This course is an overview of human biological development and its influence on learning and behavior with an emphasis on disorders of learning and development.

RCS 5080. Medical Aspects of Disability (3).This course offers an introduction to the U.S. medicine structure; a survey of medical specialties and terminology; as well as a survey of body systems, common malfunctions, therapeutic services, restorative techniques, and disability evaluations.

RCS 5245. Psychosocial and Multicultural Aspects of Disability (3). This course explores the major theoretical perspectives and concepts of adjustment and adaptation to a disability and chronic illness. Social, cultural, and psychological factors of disability are viewed from a life-span perspective.

RCS 5250. Assessment in Counseling and Rehabilitation (3). This course offers an understanding of assessment approaches used with counseling and rehabilitation clients.

RCS 5320. Placement Methods and Techniques (3). This course offers an overview of major job placement approaches, including selective, consultative, and job seeking skills models. While applications to the employment of disabled persons is emphasized, these methods have implications for other hard-to-employ persons.

RCS 5410. Principles and Practices in Rehabilitation Counseling (3). This course provides an overview of the history, philosophy, theoretical concepts, intervention strategies, process, and legal ethical aspects of rehabilitation counseling.

RCS 5626. Administration and Supervision in Rehabilitation (3). This course offers an overview of rehabilitation administration and supervision both in public and private rehabilitation agencies.

RCS 5845r. Leadership Practicum in Rehabilitation (3–6). This course consists of individualized practicum experience in administration, teaching, or research. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

RCS 5930r. Special Topics in Rehabilitation (3). This course explores emerging issues in rehabilitation counseling, including developments in legislation, research, and policy and professional practice. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of six semester hours.

RCS 6249. Advanced Psychological and Social Aspects of Disability (3). This seminar examines the major psychological and social theories related to adjustment and adaptation to a disability or chronic illness with emphasis placed on research, the applicability, and the efficacy of these theories.

RCS 6259. Advanced Assessment in Rehabilitation Counseling (3). This course explores theories and research related to assessment and evaluation procedures used in various rehabilitation settings. Emphasis is placed on psychological, medical, vocational, and ecological assessment procedures.

RCS 6400. Advanced Theories and Principles of Rehabilitation (3). This course provides an in depth and comprehensive examination of major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy in relationship to rehabilitation settings and individuals with disabilities.

RCS 6700r. Professional Issues in Rehabilitation Counseling (3). This course facilitates students being knowledgeable and articulate discussants of current issues and trends in the field of rehabilitation. Emphasizes leadership development related to major policy trends and practices in the rehabilitation of persons with disabilities, as well as trends in rehabilitation education and professionalism. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

SDS 5820r. Internship (4–12). (S/U grade only). This course offers field practical experience in a planned setting. May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

SPS 5055. Foundations of School Psychology (3). This course introduces students to the field of school psychology including foci on role and function, historical perspectives, and legal, ethical, and professional standards issues. Provides an orientation to the nature of schooling and the relationship of schools to society and culture.

SPS 5105. Social-Emotional Disorders of Children and Adolescents: Characteristics and Assessment (3). This course is an overview of emotional, social, and behavioral disorders of children and adolescents with a focus on characteristics, classification, issues, and strategies in assessment.

SPS 5191. Assessment of Intelligence (4). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course is an overview of assessment of intelligence and cognitive functioning including foci on theories of intelligence, assessment instruments and approaches, disorders related to cognitive functioning, and assessment of adaptive behavior. The course includes practice administration of assessment instruments with activities related to interpretation and reporting of assessment data.

SPS 5192. Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention (4). Prerequisite: SPS 5191 or instructor permission. This course assesses educational problems utilizing standardized and non-standardized approaches, including foci on assessment of achievement and learning, preschool children, special populations, and assessment-based development of educational objectives and plans. The course includes activities related to collection, interpretation and reporting of assessment data.

SPS 5193. Laboratory in the Assessment of Socio-Emotional Problems in Children and Adolescents (3). Prerequisites: SPS 5105 and SPS 5191. This course focuses on activities related to the collection, interpretation, and reporting of assessment data of emotional, social, and behavioral problems in children and adolescents.

SPS 5205. Consultation in the Schools (3). Corequisite: MHS 6410. This course offers instruction and supervised experience in providing consultation to educators who are teaching students with behavioral and/or academic difficulties. Content includes an introduction to indirect models of service delivery, theories of consultation, consultative models, the process of consultation, systems level consultation, and ethics.

SPS 5207. Advanced School-Based Consultation (3). Prerequisite: SPS 5205.This course examines steps in the problem-solving process as it applies to the RtI/MTSS approach utilizing supplemental materials (e.g., assessment tools) and case studies based on real students. Existing skills in behavioral observation, interviewing, problem analysis, intervention selection, data graphing, assessing treatment integrity, and data-based decision making are refined and applied to the process of consultation within the schools. Furthermore, the course examines why problem-solving and RtI are natural extensions of school-based consultation, and the role of student support personnel (e.g., school psychologists) within RtI.

SPS 5615. Counseling Children and Adolescents (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course is an overview of counseling strategies used with children and adolescents and their parents and families.

SPS 5945r. Practicum in School Psychology (3–6). (S/U grade only). This course involves supervised experience in the delivery of school psychological services in schools and related settings. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

SPS 6948r. Internship in School Psychology (3–6). (S/U grade only). This course is an advanced supervised field experience in the delivery of school psychological services in an approved setting. May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.