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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

FAMU—FSU College of Engineering

Web Page: http://www.eng.fsu.edu/ece/

Chair: Simon Y. Foo; Associate Chair: Mark Weatherspoon; Professors: Andrei, Arora, L. DeBrunner, V. DeBrunner, Edrington, Foo, Li, Meyer-Baese, Perry, Roberts, Weatherspoon, Yu, Zheng; Associate Professors: Bernadin, Harvey, Kwan, Pamidi, Tung; Assistant Professors: Arghandeh, Faruque, Moss; Teaching Faculty I: Hooker, Hughes; Teaching Faulty II: Brooks; Research Professor: Lipo; Courtesy Professor: McGinnis

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers programs leading to the master of science (MS) degree in electrical engineering, and the doctor of philosophy (PhD) degree in electrical engineering. The MS program is designed to provide advanced coursework and experience in independent problem solving with a moderate degree of both breadth and specialization. The master’s thesis and its defense provide for independent in-depth study of a current electrical engineering topic.

The PhD program is intended to provide students with an independent mastery of a significant portion of the field of electrical engineering. The PhD program prepares students for a career in industry, research, and/or teaching. Successful candidates must demonstrate, through original research, a substantial contribution to their field of specialty.

Areas of specialization in these programs generally coincide with the research interests of the faculty as indicated in the “Graduate Faculty” chapter of this Graduate Bulletin. Current specialization areas supported include computer engineering, computer security, electromagnetics, communications, digital signal processing and controls, power systems, renewable energy, energy storage, energy conversion, robotics, and nanoelectronic engineering.

Facilities and Research Programs

Aeropropulsion, Mechatronics, and Energy Center

The Aero-Propulsion, Mechatronics and Energy (AME) Center at Florida State University focuses on the development of transformational research programs to foster cross-cutting technologies while integrating with exemplary educational and professional training programs.

Center for Advanced Power Systems

The Center for Advanced Power Systems (CAPS), initially funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), is the preeminent center for multidisciplinary research, development and education for advanced electrical power technologies serving transportation and utility systems. The Center has developed an academic-industrial consortium focused on recent advances in power semiconductors, materials, advanced controls and superconductivity applied to power system technologies. CAPS is developing a national resource in power systems technology that is built around an extensive simulation capability which will provide both off-line and real-time simulation of power systems with major hardware-in-the-loop capability.

Major equipment and facilities include a multi-unit RTDS system, a 5-MW dynamometer, a 5-MVA AC-DC-AC converter, a 200-kV impulse laboratory, a superconductor ac-performance evaluation laboratory, and a multi-agent industrial control laboratory.

Machine Intelligence Laboratory

The Machine Intelligence Laboratory with funding from the Department of Defense focuses on research in the areas of computer vision, pattern recognition, data mining, field-programmable-gate-array (FPGAs) for parallel computations, neural networks, evolutionary algorithms, biologically-inspired systems, and evolvable random number generators.

Applied Laser Laboratory

Applied Laser Laboratory involves development of novel materials for specific applications. The lab aim is fundamental and applied research in areas including nano-structural materials and solid thin films growth and characterization, and photonic and chemical sensors fabrication and modeling. The accomplishments include development of metal oxide semiconductor nanobelts, insulator-semiconductor-supercoductor thin films, wideband photodiodes, and chemical nano-sensors. The lab is equipped with excellent facilities including a pulsed laser deposition system consisted with an excimer laser and a vacuum chamber with multi-target rotator and RHEED probe.

Power Sciences Laboratory

Power Sciences Laboratory is a fully equipped facility for conducting new energy sources development, and involves development of high energy and high power densities power sources including fuel cells, batteries, ultracapacitors, and hybrid power devices. The accomplishments include development of highest energy and power densities ultracapacitors, a method for enhancing the dielectric breakdown strength of polymer films, and novel monolithic hybrid fuel cells. The fundamental research includes understanding of the capacity degradation mechanisms in Li-ion and Li-polymer rechargeable batteries and development of theories for energy density of ultracapacitors and hybrid capacitors. The lab is equipped with four battery test systems, a fuel cell test system, ac impedance spectrometer, electronic load, surface analyzer, and glove box.

Electromagnetics Research Laboratory

The Electromagnetics Research Laboratory is a comprehensive research facility involved in studies of electromagnetics with emphasis on optical fiber technology and millimeter waves. The optics area of the laboratory is investigating fiber-optic sensors and switches, high-resolution imaging systems, opto-mechanical and interferometric sensors, and optical fiber characterization. The millimeter waves area is researching contactless material characterization, beam waveguides and open resonator techniques, mechanical and interferometric sensors, quasi-optics, and bioelectromagnetics. Other activities include microwave circuits and striplines, slot-lines, and antenna arrays. The laboratory is equipped with high-quality optical equipment including a precision reflectometer, an optical spectrum analyzer, lasers, detectors, power meters, optical benches, and translation gauges. The millimeter waves area has several state-of-the-art W-band (80 to 110 GHz) millimeter-wave sources, a high-resolution spectrum analyzer, detectors, and support equipment.

High-performance Computing and Simulation Research Laboratory

The High-performance Computing and Simulation (HCS) Research Laboratory focuses on research in advanced computer architectures, networks, systems, services, and applications for critical applications in reconfigurable, parallel, distributed, and fault-tolerant computing. This multi-university laboratory is headquartered in the ECE Department at the University of Florida (HCS-Gainesville), with the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering (HCS-Tallahassee) participating as a partner lab site. Both sites house key facilities linked by the Florida Lambda Rail. The lab has been cited by the NSA as a Research Center of Excellence in High-Performance Computing and Networking.

Activities focus on core areas in high-performance computer engineering whose contributions are critical for scalable, high-performance, dependable, and secure communications and computations far into the new century. Researchers address key issues that span the entire spectrum, from low-level hardware to grand-challenge applications, in a manner that emphasizes both theoretical and applied research to bring to fruition new concepts, models, techniques, and tools.

Information Processing and Transmission Engineering Research Laboratory

The research activities of the IPTEL group are oriented toward the convergence of information sensing, processing, and transmission. The goal is to address the many technical challenges in the design of seamless and integrated wireless sensors for practical applications. The latest research efforts are focused on two key areas: wireless sensor networks and signal processing. The thrust of the wireless sensor networks research efforts is to develop intelligent wireless sensor networks that exhibit swarm behavior. The main research topics currently being investigated include architectures, optimal protocols, data privacy, and fault tolerance for swarm-intelligent wireless sensor networks. The thrust of the signal processing research efforts is to develop innovative signal processing techniques and algorithms suited for automatic target detection, classification, and tracking. The emphasis is placed on approaches that are based on physical principles, detection theory, statistical techniques, multi-resolution signal processing, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and swarm intelligence.

Wireless Intercommunication Laboratory

The Wireless Intercommunication Laboratory, initially started and funded by the NASA Kennedy Space Center, studies wireless voice and data communication as an extension of the existing digital intercommunication system. The research engaged in the laboratory includes wireless communication systems, real-time embedded digital signal processing, spread-spectrum rapid synchronization, wireless network protocols and error control coding. Other research conducted in the laboratory has focused on reliability of wired and wireless communication systems in the high lightning environment of the state of Florida.

The department also is an active contributor to the Florida Engineering Education Delivery System (FEEDS), which provides graduate education throughout the state of Florida using tutored videotape. A two-way television link between the College of Engineering and the Florida State University Panama City campus provides live, interactive instruction for students in the Panama City area and allows students in Tallahassee to benefit from faculty teaching on the Panama City campus.

Financial assistance often can be provided for graduate students through teaching or research assistantships and tuition fee waivers. Teaching assistantships involve assisting in the supervision of laboratory courses grading and related duties. Students awarded research assistantships participate in departmental or externally sponsored research projects under the guidance of a faculty member. Selection is competitive and is based upon potential for teaching (including language skills), Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) test scores, grade point average (GPA), and recommendations. Application for departmental financial assistance should be made directly to the graduate coordinator in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Master of Science

Admission

To be considered for admission, candidates must have earned a bachelor of science degree (or equivalent) in electrical engineering, or a closely related discipline, from an Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET)-approved program, a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for all work attempted beyond sixty semester hours of undergraduate study, and a minimum score of 148 points for the quantitative section and 145 points for the verbal section of the GRE.

International candidates must also pass TOEFL and obtain a minimum of 80 on the Internet-based exam or 550 on the paper-based exam or IELTS and obtain a minimum of 6.5 points.

Students with a bachelor’s degree in a field other than electrical engineering may be required to complete a department-designated sequence of undergraduate courses with grades of “B” or better prior to attempting graduate electrical engineering work.

Students interested in obtaining a teaching assistantship should submit the TA/Grader Application Form as soon as they have been admitted to the program. Students who are not native speakers of English should take the speaking section of the TOEFL test (and have a score of twenty-six points or higher) or the SPEAK test at FSU (and have a score of forty-five points or higher) in order to be eligible to apply to for a teaching assistantship. More information about teaching assistantships can be found on the TA/Grader Application Form.

Course Work Requirement (Thesis)

The students must complete a minimum of thirty credit hours of course work to obtain the degree. The thirty credit hours should satisfy:

  • Six credit hours should be from the list of core courses (see the Core Courses section for the list of core courses).
  • At least three credit hours should consist of a course in advanced mathematics, typically a 5000-level course or above, or a departmental approved substitute.
  • At least six credit hours of EEL 6971r (MS thesis).
  • At least eighteen credit hours should be from letter grade courses.

Course Work Requirement (Non-Thesis)

The students must complete a minimum of thirty-three credit hours of course work to obtain the degree. The thirty-three credit hours should satisfy:

  • Six credit hours should be from the list of core courses (see the Core Courses section for the list of courses).
  • At least three credit hours should consist of a course in advanced mathematics, typically a 5000 level course or above, or a departmental approved substitute.
  • At least twenty-four credit hours should be from letter grade courses.

Core Courses

All graduate students need to take at least two out of the following four core courses:

EEE 6353 Semiconductor Device Theory (3)

EEL 5173 Signal and System Analysis (3)

EEL 5250 Power Systems Analysis (3)

EEL 5764 Computer System Architecture (3)

Graduate Seminar

All full-time MS degree candidates are required to enroll in the graduate seminar, EEL 6932r, for each semester that they are enrolled in the graduate program. The details of the seminar are given under “Course Listing”.

Advisor and Supervisory Committee

Each student must identify an advisor (also called major professor) by the end of the first semester of course work and is required to submit a plan of study by the time he or she has completed twelve credit hours of graduate studies. The plan of study must be approved by the departmental Graduate Coordinator and the student’s advisor. The student’s advisor will also assist the student in forming the Student’s Supervisory Committee (also called thesis committee).

The Supervisory Committee of a master’s degree thesis program student must have at least three faculty members from the student’s home department with Graduate Faculty Status (GFS). Additional members may be added provided they have GFS in their home department. At least one Tallahassee campus faculty member with GFS must serve on a thesis committee chaired or co-chaired by a Panama City Campus faculty member. One Panama City Campus faculty member with GFS must be annually appointed by the ECE department chair to serve on the ECE graduate committee.

The chair of the Supervisory Committee and must be granted the privilege of chairing master’s level thesis committees prior the student defend his or her thesis. Granting of this privilege requires an affirmative majority vote of the GFS faculty of the department and approval by the department chair. Faculty holding this privilege will be reviewed periodically by the department chair. Those not meeting performance expectations may have this privilege revoked upon recommendation of the department chair, an affirmative majority vote of the GFS faculty of the department, and approval of the academic dean.

Thesis Requirements (Thesis)

All Master of Science (MS) thesis program students must complete a written thesis. Upon completion of the thesis, an oral defense is required, which consists of a public presentation of the student’s work to the department and the student’s supervisory committee. Students must register for EEL 8976, Master’s Thesis Defense, during the semester they plan to graduate. The thesis should be in the hands of the major professor and the examining committee at least ten days before the date of the oral examination.

Master’s Thesis Defense Announcement (Thesis)

It is the student’s responsibility to post the thesis defense announcement within the department and the College of Engineering at least one week prior to the defense. The announcement should include: thesis title; student’s name; student’s department; major professor and committee members; date, time and location of student’s defense.

Master’s Comprehensive Exam Requirements (Non-Thesis)

All students in the non-thesis MS degree program must register for and successfully pass the Master’s Comprehensive Exam, EEL 8966. The students must apply to take the examination in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering office by the end of the prior semester. A maximum of two attempts will be permitted.

The exam is taken over a five-week period. In preparing for the examination, the student shall present a forty-page literature review report to a committee demonstrating an understanding of the theoretical framework in a given area of research based on an in-depth literature review. In demonstrating an understanding of the literature, the student must include a discussion that identifies the state-of-the-art and knowledge gaps in that area. Upon submission of the literature review report, the committee will respond to the student with questions related to the report itself and the area of research. The following is a schedule of events for the successful completion of the examination:

  • The student must make arrangements with the advisor to schedule a five-week time period for the examination. The examination committee should contain at least three faculties with GFS status from the ECE Department.
  • With the consultation of the advisor, the student will submit a research review report to the examination committee. This document should abide by the format of each university’s PhD thesis and the topic should be determined by the students and major advisor. The student is encouraged to submit the research review report by the middle of the semester for which he/she registered for the Preliminary Examination. The student should abide by the IEEE plagiarism policy.
  • The committee will submit written questions to the advisor for collection by the student two weeks after submission of the research review report. These questions will relate to the research review report.
  • The student will have two weeks to develop written responses to the questions in preparation of the oral exam. These responses will be submitted to the advisor, who will then distribute the responses to the committee members. The student should submit a complete bound set of answers to each committee member.
  • The oral examination will be held within one week of submission of the written responses. This examination will be primarily related to the research area and the student’s written responses. Appropriate related fundamental concepts may also be covered.
  • Pass/Fail is determined on the combined written and oral responses to committee questions. A majority of committee votes and a pass vote by the committee chair is required to pass.
  • After the examination is completed the Preliminary Examination Report Form should be filled and submitted to the ECE Graduate Coordinator. A student who passes the examination will be recognized as a candidate for the PhD degree.

Transfer Credits

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate courses not counted toward a previous degree from another regionally accredited graduate school may be transferred from another academic institution(s) to the student’s current master’s degree program, with the approval the ECE Departmental Graduate Committee. A grade of “B” or better is required in all transferred coursework.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission

To be considered for admission, candidates must have earned a bachelor’s degree or a master’s degree (or equivalent) in electrical engineering, or in a closely related discipline, from an Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET)-approved program, a grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 on a 4.0 scale on all baccalaureate coursework and any graduate work attempted, and a minimum score of 151 points for the quantitative section and 145 points for the verbal section of the GRE.

International candidates must also pass TOEFL and obtain a minimum of 80 on the Internet-based exam or 550 on the paper-based exam or IELTS and obtain a minimum of 6.5 points.

Students with a bachelor’s degree in a field other than electrical engineering may be required to complete a department-designated sequence of undergraduate courses with grades of “B” or better prior to attempting graduate electrical engineering work.

Students interested in obtaining a teaching assistantship should submit the TA/Grader Application Form as soon as they have been admitted to the program. Students who are not native speakers of English should take the speaking section of the TOEFL test (and have a score of twenty six points or higher) or the SPEAK test at FSU (and have a score of forty five points or higher) in order to be eligible to apply to for a teaching assistantship. More information about teaching assistantships can be found on the TA/Grader Application Form.

Course Work Requirement

The course work requirement depends on the previous degree obtained by the student. Thus, we distinguish five tracks:

  • BS-to-PhD: if the student has a BS degree in EE or related areas.
  • MS/EE-to-PhD: if the student has a MS degree in electrical engineering or equivalent.
  • MS-to-PhD: if the student has a MS degree in Physics, Mathematics, or other Engineering Fields.
  • MS/Thesis-to-PhD: if the student has a MS degree in EE from the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering and has graduated with the thesis option.
  • MS/Non-Thesis-to-PhD: if the student has a MS degree in EE from the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering and has graduated with the non-thesis option.

The default track for students enrolling in the PhD program is BS-to-PhD. PhD students that want to follow a different track need to fill in PhD Track Approval Form at the beginning of their program. The number of credits required for each of the five tracks is summarized in the table below:

From: To: BS PhD MS/EE PhD MS PhD MS/Thesis PhD MS/Non-Thesis PhD
Core Courses 9 9 9 0 0
Electives (could be inside or outside department) 18 3 9* 3 0
Supervised Research 3 3 3 3
Dissertation Hours 24 24 24 24 24
Total 51 39 45 30 27

*Up to six credit hours can be 4000-level courses

Graduate Seminar Requirement

All full-time PhD candidates are required to enroll in the graduate seminar, EEL 6932r, for each semester that they are enrolled in the graduate program.

In addition, all the PhD candidates need to make at least one oral presentation about their research in the Graduate Seminar, after passing the PhD Preliminary Examination and before graduation.

Advisor and Supervisory Committee

The Graduate Coordinator is by default the initial advisor of all incoming graduate students. However, students are strongly encouraged to select another advisor among the current faculties as soon as they arrive in the ECE Department by filling in the Advisor Form. The student should be in contact with the advisor on a regular basis and all the decisions related to the course work and the plan of studies development of the student should be approved by the advisor. The student’s advisor also will assist the student in forming the Student’s Supervisory Committee (also called dissertation committee) by the end of the first year of studies.

The Supervisory Committee of a doctoral degree thesis program student must have at least at least four members with Graduate Faculty Status (GFS). Three of the four members must be faculty members from the student’s home department. The fourth member, the University Representative, must be a tenured member of the faculty holding GFS from outside the ECE department.

The chair of the Supervisory Committee must have experience in chairing a master’s thesis committee or serving on a doctoral dissertation committee prior to earning the privilege of chairing a dissertation committee. Granting of this privilege requires an affirmative majority vote of the GFS faculty of the department and approval by the department chair. Faculty holding this privilege will be reviewed periodically by the department chair. Those not meeting performance expectations may have this privilege revoked upon recommendation of the department chair, an affirmative majority vote of the GFS faculty of the department, and approval of the academic dean. FSU Panama City Campus faculty with GFS cannot serve as a chair of a doctoral dissertation committee.

PhD Preliminary Examination

The Preliminary Examination is the final requirement for doctoral candidacy. This exam is taken over a five-week period. It must be successfully completed by the student’s fourth semester (for the BS-to-PhD track), or third semester (for all the other tracks). The student is allowed to retake the exam only once.

In the semester the student intends to take the Preliminary Examination, he/she needs to register for the zero-credit hour EEL 8964 (Prelim Exam). This registration must be done only once.

The exam is taken over a five-week period. In preparing for the examination, the student shall present a forty-page literature review report to a committee demonstrating an understanding of the theoretical framework in a given area of research based on an in-depth literature review. In demonstrating an understanding of the literature, the student must include a discussion that identifies the state-of-the-art and knowledge gaps in that area. Upon submission of the literature review report, the committee will respond to the student with questions related to the report itself and the area of research. The following is a schedule of events for the successful completion of the examination:

  • The student must make arrangements with the advisor to schedule a five-week time period for the examination. The examination committee should contain at least three faculties with GFS status from the ECE Department.
  • With the consultation of the advisor, the student will submit a research review report to the examination committee. This document should abide by the format of each university’s PhD thesis and the topic should be determined by the students and major advisor. The student is encouraged to submit the research review report by the middle of the semester for which he/she registered for the Preliminary Examination. The student should abide by the IEEE plagiarism policy.
  • The committee will submit written questions to the advisor for collection by the student two weeks after submission of the research review report. These questions will relate to the research review report.
  • The student will have two weeks to develop written responses to the questions in preparation of the oral exam. These responses will be submitted to the advisor, who will then distribute the responses to the committee members. The student should submit a complete bound set of answers to each committee member.
  • The oral examination will be held within one week of submission of the written responses. This examination will be primarily related to the research area and the student’s written responses. Appropriate related fundamental concepts may also be covered.
  • Pass/fail is determined on the combined written and oral responses to committee questions. A majority of committee votes and a pass vote by the committee chair is required to pass.
  • After the examination is completed the Preliminary Examination Report Form should be filled and submitted to the ECE Graduate Coordinator. A student who passes the examination will be recognized as a candidate for the PhD Degree.

Prospectus Examination

After passing the PhD Preliminary Examination, the student should pass the Prospectus Examination. This examination is usually passed by the end of the third year and needs to take place at least eight months before the graduation date. The student must submit a Prospectus Examination Application/Approval Form to the ECE Graduate Committee. The student’s advisory committee administers this exam, which may be in the form or a written or a combination of written and oral examination. The content and scope of the exam are at the discretion of the committee. The Prospectus Examination represents the defense of the Dissertation Proposal.

Dissertation Defense Announcement

It is the student’s responsibility to post the dissertation defense announcement within the department and the College of Engineering at least two weeks prior to the defense. The announcement should include: dissertation title; student’s name; student’s department; major professor and committee members; date, time, and location of student’s defense. Academic courtesy requires that the dissertation be submitted to each member of the supervisory committee at least four weeks before the date of the oral examination.

Dissertation and Defense

The PhD dissertation must be an achievement in original research constituting a significant contribution to knowledge and represent a substantial scholarly effort on the part of the student. It is the responsibility of the major professor to supervise the preparation of the prospectus and the dissertation. The manuscript must be prepared according to the style and form prescribed by the department and must conform to the University requirements regarding format.

The student must submit a PhD Presentation and Defense Application/Approval Form to the ECE Graduate Committee. Please refer to the Graduate Student Handbook from your university for further details.

The defense of the dissertation will be oral. All committee members and the student must attend the entire defense in real time, either by being physically present or participating via distance technology.

Transfer Credits

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate courses not counted toward a previous degree from another regionally accredited graduate school may be transferred from another academic institution(s), with the approval of the ECE Graduate Committee. A grade of “B” or better is required in all transferred coursework.

Journal Paper Submission Requirement

All PhD students are required to publish, or have accepted for publication at least one refereed article to a journal in their field of interest before their graduation will be approved.

Definition of Prefixes

EEE—Engineering: Electrical and Electronic

EEL—Engineering: Electrical

Graduate Courses

EEE 5280. Biomimetic Systems Theory (3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. This course covers natural systems and signal-processing theory as revealed by biological sensory systems. Focus is on innovative engineering applications inspired by nature sensory systems. Application of the biomimetic theory is reinforced through a course project which demonstrates successful mimicry of a natural sensory system concept.

EEE 5315. Digital Integrated Circuit Design (3). Prerequisite: EEL 4301. This course covers the design of integrated circuits, applications, solid-state-device switching characteristics, memory, computer-aided design, and layout.

EEE 5317. Power Electronics (3). Prerequisites: EEE 3300 and EEL 3135. This course helps students develop a basic understanding of using switched electronic circuits for the conversion and regulation of electric power. The course focuses on basic converters and their steady state analysis and covers dynamic-modeling analysis, converter-controller design, power-semiconductor device, and converter simulation.

EEE 5333. Solid State Sensors (3). Prerequisite: EEE 3300. This course covers the fabrication of solid-state sensors, their characterization, operational principles, and applications for acoustic, mechanical, magnetic, radiation, thermal, chemical, and biologic sensors.

EEE 5378. Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits (3). Prerequisite: EEL 5315. This course introduces mixed-signal processing using analog and digital integrated circuits. The course covers fundamentals of sampled data systems, nonlinear and dynamic analog circuits, Nyquist-rate data converters, over-sampling data converters, and digital filters, as well as the use of computer-aided design programs.

EEE 5452. Analysis of Quantum Scale Semiconductor Devices (3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. This course presents techniques for the analysis and simulation of nanometric-scale semiconductor devices (SDs), and focuses on the analysis of quantum-induced effects on the electronic transport and characteristics of SDs. The course covers generation-recombination processes in semiconductors, quantum and semiclassical modeling of SDs, noise and fluctuations in SDs, and numerical techniques for the simulation of SDs.

EEE 5542. Random Processes (3). Prerequisites: EEL 3135 and EEL 4021. This course covers topics such as random processes; analysis and processing of random signals; modeling of engineering systems by random processes; selected applications in detection; filtering; reliability analysis; and system performance modeling.

EEE 5557. Radar (3). This course introduces basic concepts of radar systems including radar range equation, radar cross section calculations, random processes and noise, array antennas, beamsteering, and doppler and range processing. FM and CW systems, pulse compression, synthetic aperture radar, and clutter also are covered.

EEE 6353. Semiconductor Device Theory (3). Prerequisite: EEE 3300 or equivalent. This course covers elementary quantum physics, energy-band theory, carrier properties, theory of p-n junctions, optoelectronics diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field-effect transistors.

EEE 6502. Digital Signal Processing I (3). Prerequisite: EEL 5173. This course discusses the fundamentals of digital signal processing and design of a variety of digital processors and filters. Introduction to DFT-FFT and spectral estimation theory and practice.

EEL 5025. Computational Electrical Engineering (3). Prerequisites: CGS 3408, EEL 3135, EEL 3472, EEL 3512, and EEE 3300. This course covers a broad range of computational methods and their applications to electrical engineering. Methods include solution of equations, matrices, differentiation, integration, solution of differential equations, Fourier analysis, and boundary-value problems. Applications include circuit analysis, signal processing, electromagnetics, and optics.

EEL 5173. Signal and System Analysis (3). Prerequisite: EEL 3135 or EEL 4652. This course focuses on continuous and discrete dynamic models with an emphasis on state variable models; Laplace transform, z-transform, and the time domain solutions. Includes real-time digital simulation and sampling theory.

EEL 5247. Power Conversion and Control (3). This course introduces solid-state power conversion and control circuits, including analysis and design of nonlinear multiple-phase circuits with sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal variables; constant-frequency and variable-frequency input converters; variable-frequency inverters; sensing and processing circuits supporting control systems; and embedded microprocessor control systems.

EEL 5250. Power Systems Analysis (3). This course examines power system planning and operational problems. Subjects covered include load flow, economic dispatch, fault studies, transient stability, and control of problems. System modeling and computer solutions are emphasized through class projects.

EEL 5270. Power System Transients (3). Prerequisite: EEL 4213. In this course, topics include electrical transients in power systems; study of time domain, frequency domain and traveling wave techniques for transient analysis; study of switching transients associated with loads, capacitors, faults, line reclosing and single-pole switching; study of interaction between lighting and power systems; introduction to insulation coordination.

EEL 5285. Renewable Energy Generation I (3). This course is an introduction to renewable energy generation. Topics covered include smart grid system, hybrid electric vehicle, and grid-connected PV inverters. Emphasis is placed on the energy conversion techniques applied in the renewable energy source and energy storage elements.

EEL 5286. Renewable Energy Generation II (3). This course is an introduction to renewable energy generation. Topics covered include smart grid system, hybrid electric vehicle, and grid-connected PV inverters. Emphasis is placed on the energy conversion techniques applied in the renewable energy source and energy storage elements.

EEL 5288. Integration of Distributed Generation (3). Prerequisite: EEL 3216. This course introduces the concept of integration of alternate renewable resource based power generation technologies known as ‘Distributed Generation’. The course familiarizes students with various DG sources such as Wind, Solar, Hydro, Wave and Tidal, Geothermal, and Bio-fuel based energy generation technologies, however, PV and wind technologies are studied in details. The course also covers the modeling and simulation of distribution networks, modeling of PV and wind technologies, their integration technologies with the grid, possible impacts on grid due to the integration of DG, tariffs (feed-in tariff, net-metering etc.) for DG integrations, impact of variability, microgrids and its controls, IEE interconnection standards etc.

EEL 5416. Sonar (3). Prerequisites: EEL 3473 and EEL 3512. This course introduces basic concepts of sonar systems including acoustic propagation, transducers and projectors, target strength, reverberation, beamsteering, beamforming, beampatterns, and synthetic aperture sonar.

EEL 5426. RF/Microwave Circuits I (3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. This course is an introduction to passive RF/microwave circuit design. Topics include distributed transmission line theory; lumped circuit and network analysis; impedance matching; and the design of various microwave components such as filters, couplers, detectors and mixers.

EEL 5427. RF/Microwave Circuits II (3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. This course focuses on active RF/microwave design. Topics include two-port characterization of RF/microwave transistors; matching networks; RF/microwave transistor amplifier design using low-noise, high-gain, broadband and high-power design methods; and RF/microwave transistor oscillator design.

EEL 5454. Optical Sensors (3). Prerequisite: EEL 3512, EEL 3473 or equivalent. This course examines the basic concepts of optical sensors and essential optics. Topics include intensity, phase, and frequency modulated optical fiber sensors and their applications; distributive sensing systems; and optical fibers in signal processing.

EEL 5465. Antenna Theory (3). Prerequisite: EEL 3473 or EEL 4461. This course covers topics such as electromagnetic fields; radiation from simple sources and apertures; receiving antennas; arrays-uniformly spaced, non-uniform, pattern synthesis; cylindrical antennas and arrays; radiation from conical and spheroidal structures; slot antennas; open waveguides and small horns.

EEL 5486. Advanced Electromagnetic Theory (3). Prerequisite: EEL 3473. This course discusses advanced concepts and theorems in electromagnetic fields; plane, cylindrical, and spherical wave functions; perturbation and variational techniques; microwave networks.

EEL 5500. Digital Communication Theory (3). Prerequisite: EEL 4514. This course examines principles of modern digital communication systems including pulse-code modulation, error-control coding, optimal signal protection, and information theory.

EEL 5563. Optical Fiber Communications (3). This course is a review of the characteristics of basic optical components for optical communications systems, e.g., optical fibers, light sources, optical detector and fiber connectors; signal degradation in optical fibers; optical analog and digital communication systems; coherent optical fiber communications.

EEL 5590. Advanced Topics in Communication (3). This course is designed to provide an in-depth knowledge of some of the advanced topics in communications. Topics covered include ideal communication systems; signal to noise ratio (S/N) for amplitude and angle modulation; design of systems to improve S/N ratio; satellite and mobile communication.

EEL 5591. Wireless Communications and Networking (3). Prerequisites: EEL 3135, EEL 4021, EEL 4514; “C” programming or equivalent. This course covers the fundamentals of wireless communications and systems. The core topics include radio-wave propagation characteristics of wireless channels; modulation and demodulation techniques for mobile radio; reception techniques for wireless systems; fundamentals of cellular communications; multiple access techniques; wireless networking; and hybrid networking of a wireless system and the Internet.

EEL 5667. Robot Kinematics and Dynamics (3). Prerequisite: EEL 4652. This course is an introduction to robot kinematics and dynamics, including forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, and differential kinematics. Also covers rigid motion and homogenous transformations, velocity and force/torque relations and resolved motion rate control; serial, parallel and kinematically redundant manipulators.

EEL 5707. ASIC Systems Design I (3). Prerequisite: EEL 3705. This course is an introduction to Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) families. Overview of programmable ASICs. Introduction to the VHDL design entry and simulation language. Programmable ASIC design methodology is introduced.

EEL 5722. Digital Signal Processing with Field Programmable Gate Arrays (3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course is a review of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), HDL, mathematics, signals and systems. Computer arithmetic concepts, DSP system design of FIR filters, IIR filters, DFT, FFT, and wavelets filter banks are also covered.

EEL 5764. Computer System Architecture (3). Prerequisites: EEL 3705 and EEL 4746. This course is a comprehensive study of computer organization, Von Neumann computer architecture, and the principles of RISC computer architecture and its future outlook.

EEL 5784. Computer Network Design and Analysis (3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. This is a first course in the fundamentals of computer network design and analysis. The course presents network architecture using a layered approach. Analysis and examples of network protocols and standards and techniques for evaluating network performance and selecting appropriate network protocols are covered.

EEL 5812. Advanced Neural Networks (3). Prerequisite: EEL 4810. This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of advanced topics in neural networks such as universal approximation networks, transformation-based neural networks, information theoretic models, and foundations of neurodynamics.

EEL 5905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Students can enroll in EEL 5905 during multiple semesters and take at most 9 credits per semester, however, these credits cannot be used towards the minimum credit requirement for the MS of PhD degrees.

EEL 5910r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). Prerequisites: Graduate standing and departmental approval. This course cannot be used as credit toward degree. May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours for candidates in master’s degree, and five semester hours for candidates in doctoral degree.

EEL 5930r. Special Topics in Electrical Engineering (3). This course examines special topics in electrical engineering at the graduate level with emphasis on recent research and developments. Content, credit, and prerequisites vary; consult instructor. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

EEL 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only). Prerequisites: Graduate standing and departmental approval. Cannot be used as credit toward degree. May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours for candidates in master’s degree, and five semester hours for candidates in doctoral degree.

EEL 6237. Modern AC Drives (3). Prerequisite: EEL 4220. This course offers an advanced study of AC drives. Topics covered include pulse-width modulation, drive system modeling, and vector controls. Emphasis is placed on the drives of induction and synchronous machines.

EEL 6266. Power Systems Operation and Control (3). Prerequisite: EEL 5250. This course examines modern power system operational and control problems and solution techniques, including state estimation, contingency analysis, load-frequency control, and automatic generation control. Additional subjects covered include load-flow analysis, unit commitment, and external equivalents for steady-state operations.

EEL 6905r. Directed Individual Study (1–9). Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours within the same term.

EEL 6930r. Special Graduate Topics in Electrical Engineering (3). This course explores special topics in electrical engineering at the graduate level with emphasis on recent research and developments. Content, credit, and prerequisites vary—consult instructor. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

EEL 6932r. Electrical and Computer Engineering Seminar (0). (S/U grade only). May be repeated a maximum of ten times. Presentations by faculty, students and visiting scholars. All full-time graduate students must enroll each semester.

EEL 6971r. Master’s Thesis (1–9). (S/U grade only). Prerequisites: Graduate standing and instructor permission. A minimum of six semester hours of credit is required. Departmental approval required.

EEL 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of forty-eight semester hours.

EEL 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.) May be repeated one time.

EEL 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.) May be repeated a maximum of two times.

EEL 8976. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

EEL 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.) May be repeated to a maximum of three times.