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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Department of English

College of Arts and Sciences

Web Page: http://www.english.fsu.edu/

Chair: Eric Walker; Eppes Professor: Robert Butler; Kellogg W. Hunt Professor: Kathleen Yancey; George Matthew Edgar Professor: Gary Taylor; Bertram H. Davis Professor: Bruce Boehrer; Janet Burroway Professor: Mark Winegardner; Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professors: S.E. Gontarski, David Kirby; Professors: Belieu, Berry, Burke, Coldiron, Daileader, Faulk, Fleckenstein, Goodman, Johnson, Kimbrell, McGregory, Montgomery, O’Rourke, Roberts, E. Stuckey-French, Suarez; Associate Professors: Edwards, Epstein, Gants, Gardner, Kennedy, Laughlin, Moore, Neal, Saladin-Adams, N. Stuckey-French, Ward; Assistant Professors: Crucet, Gaines, Kilgore, Lathan, Mariano; Senior Lecturers: Coxwell-Teague, Schacochis; Associate Lecturer: Hambv; Professors Emeriti: Bickley, Burroway, Crook, Fenstermaker, Lhamon, McElrath, Ortiz-Taylor, Rowe, Standley

The Department of English offers work leading to the Master of Arts (MA), Master of Fine Arts (MFA), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees. Reflecting its transformation from the Florida State College for Women into a comprehensive research institution at the close of World War II, Florida State University offered its first MA in English in 1945 and its first PhD in 1955. In the subsequent fifty-plus years, hundreds of Florida State University English students have taken postgraduate degrees and have filled teaching and research positions in colleges and universities across the nation. The department is a charter member of the South Atlantic Graduate English Cooperative, an organization of thirteen MA and PhD degree-granting institutions in the region. Each year, students in the department hold Legacy Fellowships, Dissertation Research Fellowships, or Kingsbury Writing Scholarships. In addition, minority students often hold the Leslie N. Wilson-Delores Auzenne Assistantship or McKnight Fellowships.

Trained at premier research institutions throughout North America and Europe, faculty members—including one Eppes Professor and two Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professors—are award winning teachers and internationally recognized scholars. Over twenty faculty members have won University-wide teaching awards and three are named University Distinguished Teaching Professors. In addition to prize-winning original fiction and poetry, writing faculty also produce nationally acclaimed textbooks in both fiction and poetry that have an impact on writing students across the nation. Faculty research regularly appears in books published by distinguished university presses as well as in the foremost professional journals, such as Publications of the Modern Language Association (PMLA), English Literary History (ELH), American Literature, The Journal of Advanced Composition (JAC), and the Journal of English and Germanic Philology (JEGP), Journal of Modern Literature, and Modern Drama.

Candidates for the MA, MFA, and PhD degrees emphasize literature, creative writing, or rhetoric and composition, but the department offers coursework and degree options in a number of related fields such as popular culture, folklore, and critical theory. The English department is home to the History of Text Technologies, an innovative interdisciplinary program which combines studies in the history of the book and media cultures. Students can take the History of Text Technologies as an area of concentration for the MA and PhD.

For the MA degree, students elect literature or rhetoric and composition concentrations. Master’s students in literature must defend a Capstone Master’s Essay. Master’s students in rhetoric and composition can either defend a thesis or submit and defend a portfolio. Master of Fine Arts students submit and defend a creative thesis. All PhD students satisfy core requirements in literature, research methods, language study, and literary theory; students then take comprehensive preliminary examinations and present dissertations based on a set of major and minor areas described below. A special feature of the Florida State University program is that students may present a body of creative work for the dissertation.

The teaching apprenticeship program is a strong feature of the department’s graduate program. Each year the department appoints a number of graduate teaching assistants (TAs) who normally teach two sections each semester, usually of freshman English but advanced graduate students also teach introductory literature courses, in addition to enrolling in at least nine semester hours of coursework. Faculty supervisors support these teachers in their work. New TAs without previous teaching experience participate in a teacher-training program during the summer term preceding their appointment, for which they receive a modest stipend; faculty specialists in rhetoric and composition conduct this program and train teachers not only for classroom instruction but also for tutorials and writing clinics in the department’s Reading/Writing Center. Moreover, two computerized classrooms and two laptop-ready classrooms allow graduate students to teach computer-assisted writing.

The department also publishes two literary magazines, The Kudzu Review and The Southeast Review, and faculty members edit such scholarly journals as The Journal of Beckett Studies and The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies. Many students also gain journalistic experience by writing for the independent campus newspaper. The writing program sponsors weekly literary readings and an annual Spring Writer’s Festival. The department also sponsors the World’s Best Short Short Story contest, which attracts thousands of entries from around the world. Each fall, the literature faculty sponsors the English Colloquium, which features lectures by Florida State University and invited lecturers who present their most recent scholarship, and graduate students offer their first scholarly research at various university-sponsored colloquia.

The department annually recognizes outstanding achievements among its postgraduate students in both teaching and scholarship with the following awards and honors: the Bert and Ruth Davis Award for Outstanding Graduate Career; the George Harper Award for Outstanding Graduate Essay Writing; the Robert O. Lawton Award for Excellence in Teaching; the Fred L. Standley Award for Excellence in Teaching; the Marian C. Bashinski Award for Excellence in Teaching; the Bert and Ruth Davis Award for Outstanding Dissertation in English Literature, Criticism, or Rhetoric; the J. Russell Reaver Award for Outstanding Dissertation in American Literature or Folklore; the Ann Durham Award for Outstanding Creative Writing by an MA Student; the Academy of American Poets Graduate Award; and a departmental Award for Outstanding Graduate Creative Writing.

Application Deadlines

Students are admitted to begin coursework in the Fall term. To be considered for Fall admission, completed applications must be on file in the Department of English by the January deadline established on the English department Web site.

College Requirements

Please review all college-wide degree requirements in the “College of Arts and Sciences” chapter of this Graduate Bulletin.

Master’s Programs in English

Admission to the program is determined by a departmental committee and normally requires: 1) an undergraduate major in English, or its equivalent, ordinarily with an upper-level average of at least 3.0; 2) Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores; verbal scores in the 86th percentile range are typical among successful candidates; 3) three letters of recommendation assessing the applicant’s potential to do master’s level work in English; and 4) a writing sample. These are minimum criteria, and meeting them does not guarantee admission.

A candidate for the Master of Arts (MA) in English may elect to emphasize literature or rhetoric and composition. To ensure that students have ready assistance in shaping a program designed to meet their needs and in planning a course of study which will meet the requirements of their particular emphasis, all students are expected to consult their advisors every term. The Director of Graduate Studies in English will serve as advisor to all first-term master’s candidates or until another advisor is chosen.

To complete the Master of Arts (MA) or Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in English, students must satisfy the following requirements:

  1. Earn thirty-three credit hours for the Master of Arts (MA) or forty-five credit hours for the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better in approved courses, as described below, for each emphasis;
  2. Satisfy a foreign language reading requirement demonstrated by certification by the appropriate language department or completion of twelve semester hours in a foreign language with an average grade of at least 3.0, or four years of a single language in high school. (MFA students are exempt from this requirement);
  3. Satisfactorily complete a final requirement as follows:
    1. Students emphasizing literature must satisfactorily complete and defend a Capstone Master’s Essay;
    2. Students emphasizing rhetoric and composition must satisfactorily complete and defend a thesis or present and defend a portfolio;
    3. Students in the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree program must satisfactorily complete and defend a creative thesis.

At least twenty-seven semester hours for the Master of Arts (MA) or at least thirty-three for the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) must be taken on a letter-grade basis. With the permission of the director of graduate studies, up to six elective hours may be taken in directed individual study (ENG 5906r). Of the courses with LAE prefixes (professional courses in college-level teaching), only LAE 5370 may be used to fulfill course requirements at the master’s level; students in the rhetoric and composition track only can also count LAE 5946 toward the degree.

A student entering the program from another master’s program may be permitted to transfer up to six semester hours of credit. When a student’s background is deficient, the department may require additional work beyond the minimum requirement for the master’s degree.

Master’s Program in English with an Emphasis in Literature, Folklore, or Cultural Studies

Master’s students who choose to emphasize literature will complete thirty-three semester hours of coursework, to include the following:

  1. ENG 5079 Issues in Literary and Cultural Studies;
  2. One course pre-1600;
  3. One course pre-1800;
  4. One additional course 1660-1900
  5. One literature course whose chief organizing principle is the study of alterity, such as race, class, gender, sexual orientation, ability or ethnicity. In this one instance the course fulfilling this requirement may, as well, fulfill another.
  6. Eighteen additional hours of coursework, six of which may, with the permission of the Director of Graduate Studies in English, be outside the department.

As a final requirement, students emphasizing literature must enroll in ENG 5835 (Topics in Publishing: Professional Research and Writing) and complete and defend a Capstone Master’s Essay.

Master’s Program in English with an Emphasis in Rhetoric and Composition

Master’s students who choose to emphasize rhetoric and composition will complete thirty-three semester hours of coursework, to include:

  1. At least twelve hours of coursework in rhetoric and composition, from the following: ENC 5700, 5720; ENG 5028; LAE 5370, 5946; and ENG 5933 or ENG 6939 when the topic is rhetoric and composition;
  2. Six hours of thesis credit;
  3. ENG 5079 Issues in Literary and Cultural Studies
  4. Twelve additional hours of coursework.

Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in English with an Emphasis in Creative Writing

Students who wish to obtain the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Creative Writing must complete forty-five semester hours of coursework, to include:

  1. Twenty-one to twenty-four semester hours of work in writing, of which:
    1. Twelve to fifteen semester hours will be taken in any combination of the following courses, provided at least two of the courses are taken: Fiction Workshop, Poetry Workshop, Drama Workshop, Article and Essay Workshop (the four workshops in writing may be repeated for credit), or Writing Seminar;
    2. Nine to twelve semester hours will be devoted to writing a creative thesis;
  2. Twenty-one to twenty-four semester hours in literature and related courses, including ENG 5079, Issues in Literary and Cultural Studies.

Doctoral (PhD) Program in English

Admission to the program is determined by a departmental committee and normally requires: 1) a master’s degree in English, or its equivalent, from an accredited college or university, with a GPA of at least 3.5; 2) Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores; verbal scores in the 86th percentile range are typical among successful candidates; 3) three or more letters of recommendation assessing the applicants potential to do doctoral work in English; and 4) a writing sample. These are minimum criteria, and meeting them does not guarantee admission.

In order to obtain the doctoral degree, students must successfully complete at least twenty-seven semester hours, excluding dissertation credit, beyond the MA degree with an overall GPA of 3.5 or better; pass the preliminary examination formally admitting them to candidacy for the doctorate; submit and obtain approval for a prospectus; and write and successfully defend a doctoral dissertation (at least twenty-four semester hours). Although all PhD students must take a minimum of twenty-seven hours of coursework beyond the MA, any or all of the specific course requirements listed below may be waived, based on an evaluation of MA coursework. The following are the specific course requirements for the English doctoral degree:

  1. Satisfy the MA distribution and language requirements listed above.
  2. Eighteen (total) hours in an area of concentration (nine hours for those delivering a creative dissertation) chosen from the approved list of eligible concentrations or another area approved by the Director of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Committee, in preparation for the PhD preliminary exam in the major field. Students can bring forward a maximum of nine hours from the master’s level towards the eighteen-hour PhD concentration requirement. Individual caucuses comprised of faculty specializing in the area will detail subdivisions to Areas of Concentration. Individual Areas of Concentration may involve additional requirements in that area. Faculty in the Area of Concentration will set these requirements. Students must fulfill the requirements of the Area of Concentration before they can sit for a preliminary major exam drawn from that area.
  3. Some additional coursework in a minor area of concentration also chosen from the approved list of concentrations. The student will take the third day of their preliminary exams in this minor area.
  4. Twenty-four hours of dissertation credit (ENG 6980r). PhD candidates who are not teaching assistants or do not have college teaching experience must take either LAE 5370 or ENC 5700. All PhD students must fulfill the university residency requirement. Details on this requirement can be found in the graduate edition of the Bulletin, under “Residency Requirement”.

Each student must form a supervisory committee consisting of a major professor, two other members of the Department of English, and a tenured University representative from a department other than English. All committee members must have Graduate Faculty Status (GFS). In order to be admitted to formal candidacy for the doctorate, the student must pass a preliminary examination at least six months prior to the granting of the degree. The preliminary examination consists of: 1) a twelve-hour written examination (eight hours on the major area of concentration, four hours on the minor area of concentration) normally given over three days; and 2) a one- to two-hour oral examination administered by the student’s supervisory committee, normally one to three weeks following the written examination.

Acceptable areas of concentration for the preliminary examination are: 1) Medieval and Early Modern British Literary and Cultural Studies (through 1660); 2) British and Irish Literary and Cultural Studies: 1660-1900; 3) Post 1900 Literary and Cultural Studies (American, British, Irish); 4) American Literary and Cultural Studies to 1900; 5) African-American Literary and Cultural Studies; 6) Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; 7) History of Text Technologies; 8) Colonial, Postcolonial, and Transnational Literary and Cultural Studies; 9) A Literary Genre; 10) Rhetoric and Composition. The minor field and so exam may be a distinct subset of the major area or it may be derived from another area of concentration. Major and minor areas will be chosen in consultation with the major professor, subject matter of the exam will be determined in consultation with the entire committee.

After passing the preliminary examination, the candidate is required to submit to the supervisory committee a prospectus for the dissertation. A copy of the prospectus, signed by the committee members, should be placed in the student’s file in the Department of English at least one semester before the dissertation defense. Once the prospectus is approved, the candidate writes the dissertation, working in close consultation with the major professor. The dissertation may be either: 1) an extended essay; 2) three or more essays, normally related by subject; or 3) an extended original work in fiction, poetry, or drama. The defense of the dissertation is held on the basis of a complete draft rather than the final copy of the dissertation at least one month prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred. A grade of PASS for the defense of the dissertation requires the unanimous approval of the examining committee. Dissertation defenses will normally not be scheduled during the summer term or during final examination week.

Certificate in Publishing and Editing

The Department of English offers a certificate program in publishing and editing for graduate students interested in developing credentials and career experience in these fields. To qualify for the certificate, students must complete twelve credits, following these guidelines:

Six to nine semester hours from the following:

ENC 5216 Introduction to Editing and Publishing (3)

ENG 5933r Topics in English (Topics in/Theories of Publishing) (1–3)

ENG 6939r Seminar in English (Seminar in Publishing) (3)

HUM 6939r Seminar Topics (Seminar in Publishing) (3)

Three to six semester hours from the following:

ENC 5217r Topics in Editing (3–6)

ENC 5945r Internship in Editing (1–6)

For further details, contact the Director of Graduate Studies in English or see the English department Web site.

Definition of Prefixes

AML—American Literature

CRW—Creative Writing

ENC—English Composition

ENG—English: General

ENL—English Literature

LAE—Language Arts and English Education

LIT—Literature

Graduate Courses

AML 5017r. Studies in U.S. Literature to 1875 (3). This course takes various approaches to the study of U.S. literature from the colonial period to 1875. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

AML 5027r. Studies in U.S. Literature Since 1875 (3). This course takes various approaches to the study of U.S. literature from 1875 to the present. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

AML 5267r. Studies in Literature of the American South (3). This course takes various approaches to the study of American southern literature from the colonial period to the present. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

AML 5296r. Studies in Multi-Ethnic Literature (3). This course offers an intensive study of a particular ethnicity, period, or topic in ethnic literature of the U.S. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

AML 5608r. Studies in the African-American Literary Tradition (3). This course offer a study of the literary works of African-American writers. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

AML 5637r. Studies in Latino/a Literature in English (3). This course covers various approaches to the study of Latino/a literature, including the work of Mexican-Americans (Chicano/a), Puerto Rican-Americans, and Cuban-Americans. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

CRW 5130r. Fiction Workshop (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This workshop emphasizes the development of the craft of fiction writing. Students are expected to work toward publication. May be repeated with instructor permission to a maximum twenty-seven semester hours.

CRW 5331r. Poetry Workshop (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course allows students to write and revise poetry. Students are expected to work toward publication. May be repeated with instructor permission to a maximum of twenty-seven semester hours.

CRW 5430r. Drama Workshop (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. In this course, students will work on writing and revising plays of varying length. Students are expected to work toward publication. May be repeated with instructor permission to a maximum of twenty-seven semester hours.

ENC 5216. Introduction to Editing and Publishing (3). This course serves as an introduction to book and magazine editing and publishing.

ENC 5217r. Topics in Editing (3–6). (S/U grade only). This course offers instruction in the practical aspects of editing such as line editing, copy editing, and design. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

ENC 5317r. Article and Essay Workshop (3). This course is for students working toward publication of expository writing. Course is structured with writer-editor relationship between student and instructor. May be repeated with instructor permission to a maximum of twenty-seven semester hours.

ENC 5700. Theories of Composition (3). This course is a detailed investigation of topics in the teaching of college composition. The course examines major theories about various aspects of composition, including the composing process, invention, style, writing assessment, and historical studies.

ENC 5720. Research Methods in Rhetoric and Composition (3). This course is an introduction to research design and practice, the evaluation of research studies, and bibliographic resources for conducting research in rhetoric and composition.

ENC 5945r. Internship in Editing (1–6). (S/U grade only). This course offers practical experience in editing and professional writing. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ENG 5009. Introduction to Advanced Studies in English (3). This course introduces basic concepts and methods of advanced literary study.

ENG 5028. Rhetorical Theory and Practice (3). This course is a close study of classical and contemporary theory and its applicability to writing and teaching.

ENG 5049r. Studies in Critical Theory (3). This course covers various approaches to the study of literary criticism and theory. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

ENG 5053. Studies in Textual Reception (3). This course provides an introduction to topics in the history and theory of the reception of texts. Within the “sociology of text”, reception is perhaps the end point to the cycle that begins with the production of texts. This course introduces students to topics in the study of the reception of texts, such as reading as a material practice, the phenomenology of reading, the study of specific geographic or historic reading communities, as well as case studies in the reception histories of particular authors, texts, and genres.

ENG 5068r. Studies in Language and Linguistics (3). This course focuses on various approaches to language study covering such topics as the evolution of the English language and questions of language acquisition, dialects, and grammar. May be repeated a maximum of twelve semester hours.

ENG 5079. Issues in Literary and Cultural Studies (3). This course provides an overview of the fundamental questions, topics, and problems that organize contemporary practice in literary and cultural studies.

ENG 5138r. Studies in Film (3). This course discusses various approaches to the study of film, including but not limited to filmic genres, and other issues in film theory and criticism. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

ENG 5801. Introduction to the History of Text Technologies (3). This course provides an overview of the complex interactions between literary culture and the changing, overlapping, frustrating, and inspiring media technologies that have shaped the way we produce, transmit, transform, receive, and interpret creative representations of human experience. Beginning with the two opposed categories of the ephemeral and the monumental, it describes and analyzes the historical evolution of technologies from manuscript to digital multimedia, using a combination of case studies, hands-on experience, and sampling from the most influential theoretical formulations of the field.

ENG 5805. Studies in Textual Production (3). This course introduces students to the materials and mechanics of text in its history or production. Particular topics vary, but each course taught under this number takes the phenomenon of textual production as its core, which might be inscription on stone, or chirographic text, or the evolution of print, or visual and verbal text, or the development digital media. Students learn to describe and analyze the key historical causes, effects, and attributes of particular materials and forms of textual production, the reasons behind the development of the particular physical attributes of any medium; and students acquire an ability to use the critical vocabulary of the broader field.

ENG 5807. Studies in Textual Transformation (3). This course introduces theories and case studies in the history of textual transformations. Course topics vary, but each course taught under this number takes as its central focus the phenomena of major textual transformations. Examples may include the transformation of texts from script to print or from foliated to digital forms; or textual issues related to translation; cultural and historical changes that both permit and follow from major textual shifts; the reception problems involved in the textual transformations of particular authors’ works or particular genres of literature. The course attends to specific technical mechanisms of textual transformation and to their broadest literary-cultural effects.

ENG 5835r. Topics in Publishing (3–6). This course offers instruction in the specific phases of the history and methods of publishing in academic journals. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ENG 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). Topic to be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

ENG 5933r. Topics in English (1–3). Topics vary. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

ENG 5935r. Speakers in English Studies (1–3). (S/U grade only). This course is required of all graduate students in English throughout their residence. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

ENG 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). Six semester hours of credit required.

ENG 5998r. Tutorial in English (1–3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course entails intensive work by one to four graduate students devoted to a specific topic or research problem in English studies. May be repeated when topics vary, to a maximum of six semester hours.

ENG 6907r. Directed Readings (1–12). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

ENG 6939r. Seminar in English (3). Topics vary. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

ENG 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

ENG 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

ENG 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

ENG 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

ENG 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

ENL 5206r. Studies in Old English Language and Literature (3). This course explores various approaches to the study of Old English literature. May emphasize developing a reading knowledge of Old English with an understanding of its phonology, morphology and syntax. May focus upon literary texts. Literature course requires a working knowledge of Old English language. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

ENL 5216r. Studies in Middle English Language and Literature (3). This course explores various approaches to the study of the languages and literary texts from the twelfth to the fourteenth century. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

ENL 5227r. Studies in Renaissance Literature (3). This course covers various approaches to the study of British works and authors from 1500 to 1660, including but not limited to poetry, prose, and drama. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

ENL 5236r. Studies in Restoration and 18th-Century British Literature (3). This course explores various approaches to the study of British works and authors from 1660 to 1800, including but not limited to poetry, prose, and drama. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

ENL 5246r. Studies in British Romantic Literature (3). This course explores various approaches to the study of British romantic poetry and prose from 1785 to 1832. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

ENL 5256r. Studies in Victorian Literature (3). This course explores various approaches to the study of Victorian literature from 1830 to 1900. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

ENL 5276r. Studies in 20th-Century British Literature (3). This course explores various approaches to the study of British literature since 1900. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics may vary.

LAE 5370. Teaching English in College (3).

LAE 5946. Teaching English as a Guided Study (3).

LAE 5948r. Supervised Teaching (0–5). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

LIT 5017r. Studies in Fiction (3). This course covers various approaches to the study of prose fiction, including but not limited to American, British, and European authors. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

LIT 5038r. Studies in Poetry (3). This course covers various approaches to the study of poetry and poets. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

LIT 5047r. Studies in Drama (3). This course utilizes various approaches to the study of drama and dramatists. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

LIT 5186r. Studies in Irish and/or Scottish Literature (3). This course covers various approaches to the study of Irish and/or Scottish literature and culture. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

LIT 5235r. Studies in Post-Colonial Literature in English (3). This course covers various approaches to the study of English-language literature from “Third World” countries that were former British colonies in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

LIT 5309r. Studies in Popular Culture (3). This course covers various approaches to the study of popular culture, its intellectual history and forms, and its influence on literature. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

LIT 5327r. Studies in Folklore (3). This course covers various approaches to the study of traditional lore, including myth, legend, tale, song, ballad, beliefs, and customs. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

LIT 5388r. Studies in Women’s Writing (3). This course covers various approaches to the study of women’s writing and women writers. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

LIT 5517r. Studies in Gender in Literature (3). This course covers various approaches to the study of masculinity, femininity, and sexual identity in literary and cultural texts. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

ENGLISH COMPOSITION:

see English

ENGLISH EDUCATION:

see Teacher Education

ENGLISH LITERATURE:

see English

ENGLISH FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS:

see Teacher Education

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING:

see Civil and Environmental Engineering

ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING AND NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT:

see Urban and Regional Planning

EUROPEAN HISTORY:

see Classics; History

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY:

see Biological Science

EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY:

see Nutrition, Food, and Exercise Sciences

EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF BEHAVIOR:

see Psychology

EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY:

see Psychology