Skip to main content

This is your Donation message.

2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Department of Finance

College of Business

Web Page: http://business.fsu.edu/academics/departments/finance

Chair: William A. Christiansen; Professors: Ang, Cheng, Clark, Humphrey, Da. Peterson; Associate Professors: Autore, Christiansen, Hutton, Jiang, Knill, Perfect; Assistant Professors: Liu, Sun; Teaching Faculty III: Bliss, G. Smith; Teaching Faculty I: Gunter, Mahon, De. Peterson, D. Smith; Fannie Wilson Smith Eminent Scholar in Banking: Humphrey; Bank of America Eminent Scholar in Finance: Ang; Wells Fargo Professor of Finance: Da. Peterson; BB&T Professor of Finance: Christiansen; Gene Taylor/Bank of America Professor: Cheng, Knill; Dean L. Cash Professors of Finance: Autore; SunTrust Professor of Finance: Jiang; Dean’s Emerging Scholar: Jiang

The Department of Finance faculty has diverse interests spanning all areas of finance including financial management, investments, financial institutions and markets, multinational financial management, financial modeling, and quantitative methods. The faculty possesses a commitment to excellence in teaching, research, and service activities.

The fundamental responsibilities of the finance faculty are to preserve existing knowledge, to create new knowledge, and to transmit knowledge to others. To transmit knowledge to the graduate student a variety of teaching techniques and methodologies are employed, including case studies, lectures, simulations, computer modeling, oral and written presentations, discussions groups, study groups, co-research projects, and independent study and research.

The faculty members consider their research activity important for two reasons. First, the constant search for, and testing of, new knowledge is a basic foundation of economic progress. Second, as the financial and economic environment changes, current knowledge may become obsolete. The finance faculty members are involved in the development of new financial and management techniques so that their students are prepared to meet the challenges they will face during their careers. The faculty’s research appears in many scholarly publications.

The finance faculty is dedicated to the advancement of the finance profession not only through its teaching and research activities but also through its involvement with outside government, business, academic, and professional organizations.

Master’s Degree

The Master of Science in Finance (MS) is a one-year, lock-step program that emphasizes the applied aspects of finance. All students start in the second six-weeks of the Summer semester and complete the program the following Spring semester. The program consists of thirty-two semester hours and includes a blend of theory, empirical analysis, and applications. The deadline for receipt of all application materials is March 1st.

The college offers the Master in Business Administration (MBA) degree. As the ever-changing economic, political, and social trends place expanding needs and expectations on businesses, government agencies, and not-for-profit organizations, the demand for a wider range of financial and management skills has never been greater. The effective functioning of our economic and financial system is a concern to all members of our society. The MBA focuses on assembling, acquiring, and developing knowledge and skills that are related to the effective workings of our economic and financial system.

For additional information related to graduate Finance programs, contact the Graduate Office, College of Business, P.O. Box 3061110, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, 32306-1110, or via e-mail at gradprograms@business.fsu.edu.

Doctoral Degree

A Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in business administration is offered by the college. The Department of Finance offers a concentration in finance. The finance doctoral program facilitates the development of a solid foundation in the use of analytical and research tools applicable to finance problems and a thorough understanding of modern finance theory and applications. The primary objective of the curriculum is to develop the knowledge and skills necessary for prospective teachers and researchers in finance. The employment goal of most finance doctoral students is to teach and conduct research at the college or university level. However, many employment opportunities for PhD graduates exist in government and business.

The prospective finance doctoral student must meet college-wide admission standards and be recommended by the finance faculty. Students plan their program in consultation with the finance doctoral advisor and an advisory committee. The student must complete the courses in the finance primary area, a support area, and the analytical and research tools area. The support area can be chosen from another area of business or from a non-business discipline such as economics, mathematics, or statistics. Extensive student-faculty interaction is stressed throughout the program and culminates in the completion and defense of a dissertation under the guidance of the finance faculty.

For additional information related to graduate Finance programs, contact the Graduate Office, College of Business, P.O. Box 3061110, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, 32306-1110, or via e-mail at gradprograms@business.fsu.edu.

Definition of Prefixes

ECP—Economic Problems and Policy

FIN—Finance

GEB—General Business

MAN—Management

Graduate Courses

Master’s

Note: The 5000-level courses are reserved exclusively for graduate students. Courses which may be repeated for credit are designated by “r” immediately following the course number.

ECP 5706. Economic Analysis for Management (3). An examination of managerial concepts underlying business activity as related to the production of management and the process of decision making.

FIN 5108. Fundamentals of Personal Finance (3). This course covers personal finance and financial planning and is an introduction to an individual’s financial decisions. Course topics include budgeting, saving, insuring, debt servicing, investing, retiring, and estate planning by individuals. Cannot be applied for credit for any graduate business degree.

FIN 5306. Investment Banking (3). This course introduces the structure and major activities of investment banks, including trends in the investment banking business.

FIN 5317. Financial Institutions and Risk Management (3). Prerequisites: FIN 4424 and FIN 4504 or their equivalents. This course covers the identification of key risks facing bank managers, as well as modern techniques for measuring, pricing, and managing those risks.

FIN 5425. Problems in Financial Management (3). Prerequisite: ACG 5026. This advanced-case course includes an in-depth study of topics such as the investment, financing, and dividend decisions of the firms and the valuation theory.

FIN 5515. Investment Management and Analysis (3). Prerequisite: FIN 5425. This course offers an analysis of financial assets with emphasis on the securities market, the valuation of individual securities, and portfolio management.

FIN 5537. Financial Derivatives and Risk Management (3). Prerequisites: FIN 4504 or FIN 5515 or equivalent. This course covers issues related to the pricing and application of futures, swaps, and options. Emphasis is placed on different methods of valuing derivative securities and of hedging macroeconomic and firm-specific risks. The course examines real-world examples of derivative uses and how they impact firm value.

FIN 5605. Multinational Financial Management (3). Environment of international markets and institutions, with emphasis on implications of international business on capital budgeting, working capital management, and capital procurement.

FIN 5840. Applied Econometrics in Finance (3). Prerequisites: FIN 4504 or FIN 4424 or equivalent. This course covers statistical techniques commonly employed in financial studies. Students examine actual applications within a variety of financial studies in order to learn how to conduct statistical tests and interpret their results, and also familiarize themselves with WRDS and a variety of databases in order to learn how to conduct research.

FIN 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Consent of associate dean for academic programs. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

FIN 5907r. Special Studies in Management (1–3). Prerequisite: Consent of associate dean for academic programs. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

FIN 5917r. Supervised Research (1–3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Consent of associate dean for academic programs. For master’s candidates only. A maximum of three hours may apply toward the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

FIN 5935r. Seminar on Current Topics in Finance (3). In-depth study of current topics in finance. May be repeated to a maximum of three times as topics vary.

FIN 5946r. Supervised Teaching (1–3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Consent of associate dean for academic programs. A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

FIN 5971r. Thesis (3–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

FIN 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

GEB 5907r. Special Studies in Business (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

MAN 5716. Business Conditions Analysis (3). Problems of managing the firm in relation to the changing economic environment. Analysis of major business fluctuations and development of forecasting techniques.

Doctoral

Note: The doctoral curriculum includes courses selected from the following in addition to those offered at the 5000 level.

FIN 6449. Seminar in Finance (1–3). Focuses on the corporate finance literature with topics including the theory of financial management, cash and working capital management, capital budgeting and rationing; and financing decisions of the firm.

FIN 6527. Seminar in Finance - Investments (3). Prerequisite: FIN 6842. This seminar studies the development of investment theories and empirical research. Topics include asset pricing, utility analysis, risk measurement, the structure and efficiency of security markets, as well as other current issues in investments.

FIN 6709. Seminar in Finance (1–3). The advanced study of financial institutions and markets, monetary theory and policy, economic forecasting, and domestic and international capital markets.

FIN 6804. Foundations of Financial Theory (3). This course places emphasis on the foundations of financial theories and provides an in-depth examination of the major theoretical developments in finance, including the study of related empirical tests.

FIN 6842. Research Methods in Finance (3). Prerequisite: FIN 6804.This course offers a critical examination of empirical research in finance and its related issues including design, methodology, analysis, and critique. Students utilize financial databases with appropriate quantitative techniques to design and conduct empirical research.

FIN 6917r. Supervised Research (1–3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Consent of associate dean for academic programs. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

FIN 6946r. Supervised Teaching (1–3). (S/U grade only. Prerequisite: Consent of associate dean for academic programs. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

FIN 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only). A minimum of twenty-four semester hours is required.

FIN 8964r. Doctoral Preliminary Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

FIN 8985r. Dissertation Defense Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

GEB 6904r. Readings For Examination (1–12). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: All coursework required for PhD. This course is designed for PhD students who have completed all of their required coursework and are preparing to sit for their preliminary examinations in the current semester. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS:

see Mathematics

FOOD SCIENCE:

see Nutrition, Food, and Exercise Sciences

FOOD SERVICE SYSTEMS:

see General Bulletin - Hospitality; Nutrition, Food, and Exercise Sciences

FOREIGN/BIBLICAL LANGUAGES, LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION:

see Modern Languages and Linguistics

FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION:

see Teacher Education; Modern Languages and Linguistics

FRENCH LANGUAGE, LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION:

see Modern Languages and Linguistics

GENETICS:

see Biological Science