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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Medicine

College of Medicine

Web Page: http://med.fsu.edu/

Department of Biomedical Sciences-Chair: Richard Nowakowski; Professors: Blaber, Delp, Diaz, Galasko, Hurt, Kabbaj, Laywell, Levenson, Nowakowski, Olcese, Overton, Patrick, Ren, Romrell, Stefanovic, Y. Wang; Associate Professors: Arbeitman, Blackmon, Gunjan, Horabin, Kaplan, Kato, Kumar, C. Lee, Megraw, Stanwood, Zhou; Assistant Professors: Meckes, Pinto, Tomko, Y. Wang, Zhu; Eminent Scholar: Bhide; Research Faculty I: Bruck, Duclot, Graham, Jin, Kao, McCarthy, Nemec, Rodriguez, Vied, Wu, Zhang, Zorio; Research Faculty II: Bienkiewicz; Assistants in Medicine: Livingston; Associates in Research: Didier, Foster

Department of Clinical Sciences-Chair: Appelbaum; Professors: Applebaum, Berg, Bland, Bradley, Bush, Hartsfield, Maitland, Muszynski, Watson, Wetherby; Associate Professors: Alexandraki, Danforth, Khajavi, Stavros, Sweeney; Research Faculty I: Daly Holland, C. Nottke

Department of Family Medicine and Rural Health-Chair: Daniel Van Durme; Professors: Dunn, Fogarty, Littles, McLeod, Rodriguez, Stine, Van Durme; Associate Professors: Brown, R. Campbell, Harrison, Quintero, Rodriguez; Assistant Professors: Alexander, Myers, Speights, Welch; Instructional Specialist II: Clark; Assistant in Medicine: LaJoie

Department of Geriatrics-Chair: Paul Katz; Professors: Brummel-Smith, Granville, Kapp, Katz, Pomidor; Associate Professors: Agens, Suchak, Terracciano, Turner; Faculty Administrator: Baker; Research Faculty I: A. Nowakowski

Department of Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine-Chair: Beitsch; Professors: Bellamy, Beitsch, Glueckauf, Harman, Rust; Associate Professors: Flynn, Gabriel, Hayes, Painter, Reyes; Assistant Professors: Blackburn, Brownstein, Carretta, Houser, Nair-Collins, Rosado, Saunders, Sualdea, Sutin; Senior Research Associate: Aubrey; Assistants in Research: Geletko; Research Faculty I: Babcock, Dark, Goldfarb, Kinsell, Luchetti, Schleeter, Wells; Faculty Administrator: Leeds, M. Smith

For a complete listing of part-time clinical faculty, please visit the FSU College of Medicine Web site at http://med.fsu.edu/index.cfm?fuseaction=directory.home&usetemplate=column.

Doctor of Medicine (MD) Degree

Florida State University provides a four-year program of study leading to the Medical Doctor (MD) degree. The College trains students in allopathic medicine, which includes diagnosing, managing, and treating disease. Upon completion of the four-year MD educational program, physicians pursue graduate medical education (internship, residency and sometimes fellowships). Training in residency programs may take from three to nine additional years after completion of medical school. The medical school curriculum provides a generalist education and focuses on practice in ambulatory settings, specifically to serve currently underserved populations, i.e., rural, inner city, minority, and geriatric patients in the state of Florida.

Honors Medical Scholars Program

The FSU College of Medicine in conjunction with the FSU Honors Office has established a program that is open annually to qualified students. The program allows eligible FSU honors students to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree of their choice while also participating in the Honors Medical Scholars Program, which includes a seminar course, mentorship program, and required pre-medical courses and experiences. Students participating in the program may be eligible for early admission to the FSU College of Medicine upon completion of pre-med requirements. Applications and program details are available from the FSU Honors Office at (850) 644-1841.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Biomedical Sciences

The PhD in Biomedical Sciences program is designed to prepare the next generation of health scientists for medical research and teaching in an era of increasing coordination and integration of traditional disciplines. Undergraduate majors in biology, biochemistry, chemistry, microbiology, or other life sciences are suitable for graduate studies in biomedical sciences. Research rotations during the first year allow students to make an informed choice regarding the research area and major professor with whom they will conduct their PhD work. A core curriculum of the fundamentals, the choice of electives from other departments, and intellectual interaction with faculty and postdoctoral fellows encourage graduate students to mature into independent scientists. Graduates of the PhD in Biomedical Sciences program will be prepared to join the scientific workforce trained for careers in an interdisciplinary environment. Full information and course offerings within this program are available in the “Biomedical Sciences” chapter of this Graduate Bulletin.

For complete details on degree requirements, plus a description of the College, its facilities, opportunities and available financial assistance, refer to the “College of Medicine” chapter of this Graduate Bulletin.

Definition of Prefixes

BCC—Basic Clinical Clerkships

BMS—Basic Medical Sciences

ENT—Entrepreneurship

GMS—Graduate Medical Sciences

IHS—Interdisciplinary Health Sciences

MDE—Medical Electives

PAS—Physician Assistant

Graduate Courses

BCC 7112. Internal Medicine (6). This clerkship is designed to allow students to participate in the management of patients with common clinical presentations encountered in the general practice of internal medicine.

BCC 7113. Internal Medicine Sub-Internship (4). Prerequisites: Completion of 3rd year of medical school, including completion of M3 IM Clerkship. This clerkship allows students the opportunity to participate in the management of patients with common clinical presentations encountered in the practice of hospital-based internal medicine. Each student has the opportunity to experience a broad range of illness severity ranging from acute care upon presentation to the emergency department to life-threatening processes in the intensive care unit. Students also have the opportunity to improve their basic clinical skills, learn new inpatient procedures and examination techniques, and assess the effectiveness of their clinical interventions.

BCC 7130. Obstetrics/Gynecology Clerkship (6). This clinical clerkship is designed to acquaint the student with the varied aspects of medical care for women, with emphasis on acquiring the basic skills of gynecologic and obstetrical history-taking and physical examination, participating and assuming responsibility in the evaluation and care of outpatients and inpatients, and acquiring practical experience in the operating and delivery room areas.

BCC 7140. Pediatrics Clerkship (6). Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of all year-one and year-two curricula. This pediatrics clerkship is a six-week learning experience with an emphasis on ambulatory pediatrics. Students learn under the supervision of clerkship faculty trained to teach in the clinical setting. Students interact with pediatric patients who present a variety of common pediatric diseases/conditions.

BCC 7150. Psychiatry Clerkship (6). Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of all year-one and year-two curricula. Students learn pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of common problems in mental health and psychiatry in hospital and out-patient settings.

BCC 7160. Surgery Clerkship (6). Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of all year-one and year-two curricula. In this course, students learn pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of common problems in general surgery, otolaryngology, orthopedics, OB/GYN, urology, and neurosurgery in hospital and out-patient settings.

BCC 7170. Community Medicine (2). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of all year-one and year-two curricula. This two week course in the third year of the medical curriculum is designed to broaden students’ understanding of the role played by community agencies in health promotion and disease prevention. Students are assigned to a community health agency where they work under the supervision of a preceptor to assist the agency in fulfilling its goals.

BCC 7174. Primary Care Geriatrics (4). Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of all year-one, year-two, and year-three courses. This required 4th year clerkship provides varied primary care experiences with older adult patients. The major goal is to provide an in-depth exposure of the medical student to the intricacies, subtleties, barriers and obstacles to be overcome in providing quality primary care to older patients in the settings where that care most frequently occurs. Emphasis is placed on the physician’s role in maintaining, restoring and rehabilitating the older adult patient to achieve the most independent function possible. Consistent with a “school without walls” concept, students follow assigned patients in an effort to explore how continuous and coordinated geriatric care might be provided. Competency in the identification, evaluation and treatment of common geriatric problems and syndromes is pursued.

BCC 7175. Clerkship in Family Medicine (6). This community-based, ambulatory clerkship emphasizes the identification, evaluation and treatment of family practice patients with common medical, surgical and psychological conditions. Students in this course spend eight patient care sessions/week under supervision of the family physician in the office; complete two required clerkship projects; and utilize Web-based self-directed learning activities.

BCC 7176. Family Medicine Sub-Internship (4). Prerequisite: Completion of all required third-year clerkships. The goal of the Advanced Family Medicine Clerkship (AFMC) is to expose students to an intense clinical experience in a family medicine setting. Consistent with the college’s mission to train physicians to care for patients located in rural areas and patients who are medically underserved, the clerkship takes place in settings that expose students to these patient populations. Students select one of two available options for the AFMC–a rural site or a family medicine residency program in Florida.

BCC 7180. Emergency Medicine (4). Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of three years of medical school. Students engage in appropriately directed patient history and physical exams, physical diagnoses, medical decision making, acquisition of procedural skills, and exposure to a broad base of undifferentiated patients with a wide variety of personal, social, and cultural issues that influence patient care. This environment places a premium on physical exam skills, diagnostic reasoning, recognition of life-threatening situations, and initiation of resuscitation in a wide range of diseases with varying degrees of urgency. Students are taught to appreciate the dynamic state of emergency medicine knowledge, the necessity for maintaining currency, and the means to do it.

BCC 7182. Doctoring 3 (6). (S/U grade only). Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of all year-one and year-two curricula. The purpose of this course is to enhance students’ clinical knowledge and skills and provide them opportunities to explore issues that extend across all medical disciplines.

BCC 7201. Residency Preparation Boot Camp (4). This course provides didactic and hands-on activities that reinforce and demonstrate the graduating medical student’s competency and preparedness to perform the core patient-care activities of an intern.

BMS 6015. Doctoring 101 (3). (P/F grade only.) This course is an introduction to the biopsychosocial model of health and illness and the application of the behavioral sciences to understanding and treating patients. Students learn the principles of the patient-centered clinical method and approaches to analyzing ethical issues in patient care.

BMS 6016. Doctoring 102 (5). (P/F grade only.) This course is a continuation of the first-year doctoring course. It emphasizes normal biobehavioral development across the life-span.

BMS 6017. Doctoring 103 (5). (P/F grade only.) This course is a continuation of the first-year doctoring course. It emphasizes an introduction to diagnostic reasoning and clinical decision-making.

BMS 6030r. Foundations Medicine 2: Molecules to Mechanisms (5–10). (P/F grade only). Prerequisite: Matriculation to FSU College of Medicine MD program or the FSU College of Medicine Bridge to Clinical Medicine major of the MS Program in Biomedical Sciences. This course covers fundamental concepts in three major areas basic to medicine: cellular structure and function, cell communication, and pharmacology. The course integrates knowledge from across the traditional disciplines in basic, behavioral and clinical sciences. Students incorporate this knowledge in understanding and treating patients as they learn to organize and perform a medical interview within the biopsychosocial model of health care. May be repeated to a maximum of ten semester hours.

BMS 6037r. Medicine I: Foundations (10–13). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Matriculation to FSU College of Medicine M.D. program or the FSU College of Medicine Bridge to Clinical Medicine major of the M.S. Program in Biomedical Sciences. This course introduces the biopsychosocial model of health care, integrating knowledge of basic, behavioral and clinical sciences for understanding and treating patients. The principles of the patient-centered clinical method provide the context for learning the physical exam, structure and function of the human body, basic diagnostic imaging, and analysis of ethical issues in medicine.

BMS 6040r. Medicine 3 Human Systems in Health and Disease: Gastrointestinal System (6–8). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Matriculation to FSU College of Medicine MD program. This course provides core knowledge about the structure and function of the human gastrointestinal system and nutrition in health and disease across the lifespan. The course integrates knowledge from across the traditional disciplines in basic, behavioral and clinical sciences and applies that knowledge in understanding and treating patients.

BMS 6041r. Medicine 3 Human Systems in Health and Disease: Host-Defense (4–6). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Matriculation to FSU College of Medicine MD program. This course covers fundamental concepts of immunology, immunopathology and neoplasia. The course integrates knowledge from across the traditional disciplines in basic, behavioral and clinical sciences and applies that knowledge in understanding and treating patients.

BMS 6042r. Medicine 3 Human Systems in Health and Disease: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Systems (10–12). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Matriculation to FSU College of Medicine MD program. This course provides core knowledge about the structure and function of the human cardiovascular and respiratory systems in health and disease across the lifespan. The course integrates knowledge from across the traditional disciplines in basic, behavioral and clinical sciences and applies that knowledge in understanding and treating patients.

BMS 6043r. Medicine 3 Human Systems in Health and Disease: Renal-Urinary System (8–10). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Matriculation to FSU College of Medicine MD program. This course provides core knowledge about the structure and function of the human kidney and urinary system in health and disease across the lifespan. The course integrates knowledge from across the traditional disciplines in basic, behavioral and clinical sciences and applies that knowledge in understanding and treating patients.

BMS 6044r. Medicine 3 Human Systems in Health and Disease: Hematologic System (4–6). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Matriculation to FSU College of Medicine MD program. This course provides fundamental medical knowledge of the human hematologic system, with an emphasis on the recognition, diagnosis and treatment of the diseases and disorders that involve it over the lifespan. The course integrates knowledge from across the traditional disciplines in basic, behavioral and clinical sciences and applies that knowledge in understanding and treating patients.

BMS 6045r. Medicine 3 Human Systems in Health and Disease: Autonomic Nervous System, Endocrine, and Reproductive Systems (8–10). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Matriculation to FSU College of Medicine MD program. This course provides core knowledge about the two principle regulatory systems in the human body, the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system, and the closely related reproductive system in health and disease. The course integrates knowledge from across the traditional disciplines in basic, behavioral and clinical sciences and applies that knowledge in understanding and treating patients.

BMS 6046Cr. Medicine 3 Human Systems in Health and Disease: Neuroscience: CNS and Behavior (10–12). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Matriculation to FSU College of Medicine MD program. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the structure and function of the human central nervous system, with emphasis on its role in cognition and behavior across the lifespan, in health and in neurological and psychiatric disease. Dissection laboratory sessions are included. The course integrates knowledge from across the traditional disciplines in basic, behavioral and clinical sciences and applies that knowledge in understanding and treating patients.

BMS 6047r. Medicine 3 Human Systems in Health and Disease: Musculoskeletal and Integumentary Systems (4–6). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Matriculation to FSU College of Medicine MD program. This course provides an integrated overview of the structure and function of the human musculoskeletal and integumentary systems and the diseases and disorders that involve them over the lifespan. The course integrates knowledge from across the traditional disciplines in basic, behavioral and clinical sciences and applies that knowledge in understanding and treating patients.

BMS 6060r. Health Issues in Medicine II (2). (P/F grade only.) This course provides an introduction to health care, grounding in health policy, health reform, and patient safety. A great deal of attention is devoted to epidemiology and biostatistics, as well as research design, and preventive medicine. The critical appraisal of recent medical literature is also emphasized.

BMS 6110C. Histology and Cell Biology (4). (P/F grade only.) The microscopic anatomy and functions of the cells, tissues, and glands comprising the organs and systems of humans.

BMS 6115C. Clinical Anatomy, Embryology and Imaging (10). (P/F grade only.) This course provides a basic understanding of the entire body and serves as a foundation for the remainder of the student’s medical education. It is designed to present the applications of anatomy and embryology to the clinical sciences, and for the use of radiologic imaging in the diagnosis of clinical disorders. Students are introduced to anatomical terminology commonly used in medicine today, which, in conjunction with the acquired anatomical knowledge base is reinforced in the integrated format of the full four-year curriculum.

BMS 6204. Medical Biochemistry and Genetics (5). (P/F grade only.) This course develops knowledge and understanding of the basic biochemistry and molecular genetics of normal life processes; biochemical causes, diagnosis and basis of treatment of human diseases; genetic defects and biochemical consequences causing inherited diseases; and advances in biochemistry and genetics that impact future medical practice.

BMS 6301. Medical Microbiology 201 (3). (P/F grade only.) This course covers the basic principles of medical microbiology and infectious disease. Topics include mechanisms of infectious-disease transmission, principles of aseptic practice, the role of the human body’s normal microflora, as well as the biology of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic pathogens and the diseases they cause. The course provides relevant clinical experiences and opportunities to develop informatics and diagnostics skills, including the use and interpretation of laboratory tests in the diagnosis of infectious diseases.

BMS 6302. Medical Microbiology 202 (2). (P/F grade only.) This course builds upon the principles learned in BMS 6301 and covers infectious diseases in organ systems in detail. The biological characteristics and pathologic mechanisms of infectious bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites are covered. Functional and clinical implications are presented in the form of relevant clinical examples.

BMS 6401. Medical Pharmacology 201 (3). (P/F grade only.) This course covers concepts of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, emphasizing the biochemical and physiological bases for understanding drug action while introducing many major classes of drugs.

BMS 6402. Medical Pharmacology 202 (4). (P/F grade only.) This course builds upon the principles covered in BMS 6401. Learners study in detail the pharmacologic agents used in treating organ systems disorders. Drug classes, interactions, and specific usages with functional and clinical applications are presented along with relevant clinical examples and the use of therapeutic drug monitoring.

BMS 6511. Organ Physiology (6). (P/F grade only.) Cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal physiology; physiology of the adrenal and thyroid gland; metabolism.

BMS 6601. Pathology 201 (6). (P/F grade only.) This course provides instruction about basic functions of the immune system and the general mechanisms of human diseases, including immune diseases. Emphasis is placed on the clinical, histopathological, and molecular aspects of diseases. The course also covers specific diseases involving the cardiovascular and respiratory organ systems.

BMS 6602. Pathology 202 (7). (P/F grade only.) This course provides instruction about basic functions of the immune system and the general mechanisms of human diseases, including immune diseases. Emphasis is placed on the clinical, histopathological, and molecular aspects of diseases. The course also covers specific diseases involving the cardiovascular and respiratory organ systems.

BMS 6706C. Clinical Neuroscience (6). (P/F grade only.) The study of clinical neuroscience includes neurophysiology, neuroendocrinology and functional neuroanatomy. This course lays the foundation for future work in neurology and enables students to understand neural function and the nature of neurological disorders.

BMS 6800r. Medicine 4: Integrated Cases (12–14). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Matriculation to FSU College of Medicine MD program. The course focuses on the synthesis of knowledge and skills acquired throughout the previous blocks and clinical experiences and the further development of clinical reasoning. The course prepares the student to begin to contribute meaningfully to real patient care in the workplace during the clinical rotations in Years 3 and 4.

BMS 6801Cr. Medicine 5: Preclerkship Preparation Boot Camp (8–10). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisites: Matriculation to FSU College of Medicine MD program. Student must have taken USMLE Step 1. This course provides students with opportunities to learn and practice basic procedural skills and tasks they use in a variety of health care settings during the clinical rotations in Years 3 and 4. The course prepares the student to begin to contribute meaningfully to real patient care from the first day of their clerkship.

BMS 6821. Medicine and Behavior I (2). (P/F grade only.) This course covers the physiological and social basis of patient and physician behavior and the influence of these factors on health, illness, and the practice of medicine.

BMS 6822. Medicine and Behavior II (2). (P/F grade only.) This course covers the physiological and social basis of patient and physician behavior and the interrelationship between these factors of health, illness, and the practice of medicine. Emphasis is on the application of behavioral principles introduced in BMS 6821 to major health concerns (e.g., obesity, substance abuse, and unhealthy life styles) and chronic illnesses (e.g., diabetes, CHF, cancer, and chronic pain syndromes). Ethical dilemmas and challenges in treating patients for the conditions listed above are discussed. Medical informatics and the use of evidence-based medicine are regularly incorporated in addressing patient-care topics in this course. Physicians’ behavior is also addressed as it pertains to coping with uncertainty and dealing with the personal reactions to medical errors.

BMS 6824r. Cross-Cultural Medicine (2). (P/F grade only.) This course exposes students to delivery of primary care in a cross-cultural and cross-language setting. This is a cultural immersion experience in which students work and live together in the community they serve. The clinical work takes place during spring break. Students are expected to participate in the planning and organization of the experience prior to the clinical week. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

BMS 6831. Doctoring 201 (7). (P/F grade only.) This course is a component of a three-year longitudinal curriculum aimed to provide the basic knowledge and skills needed to evaluate patients, while, at the same time, emphasizing the importance and integration of behavioral medicine, ethics, information technology, professionalism, clinical reasoning, and systematic physiology.

BMS 6832. Doctoring 202 (7). (P/F grade only.) This course is a component of a three-year longitudinal curriculum aimed to provide the basic knowledge and skills needed to evaluate patients, while, at the same time, emphasizing the importance and integration of behavioral medicine, ethics, information technology, professionalism, clinical reasoning, and systematic physiology.

BMS 6930. Special Topics in Medicine (2). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Admission to the College of Medicine. Course topics may vary.

BMS 6940. Internship/Practicum/Clinical Practice (1). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: BMS 6015. Pre- or corequisite: BMS 6017. This is a clinically intensive practicum experience for first-year medical students. Students spend three weeks in approved rural, urban, or geriatric facilities, where they participate in supervised patient care.

BMS 6960r. USMLE Step 1 Preparation (1-6). (P/F grade only.) This course allows time, faculty support, and resources for adequate preparation for the USMLE Step 1 exam through self-directed learning. The course includes a high stakes clinical skills exam that demonstrates preparedness to advance to the clinical clerkships. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ENT 5627. Healthcare Innovation and Medical Entrepreneurship (3). This course provides training in the leadership of innovation in patient care delivery. The course allows students to develop and deploy patient-centered solutions that create value by improving both quality and efficiency in their systems and communities.

GMS 5146r. The Immune Response to Infection and Cancer (3). Prerequisites: BMS 5525, PCB 5137, and PCB 5595. This course is an advanced biomedical sciences course for graduate students to introduce the recent developments in the immune response to virus infection and cancer. The course involves lectures and student-driven presentation and discussion. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GMS 5905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Study on a selected topic as designated by the student or directing professor. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

IHS 5905r. Directed Individual Study in Health Sciences (1–12). (S/U grade only). This is a course for graduate students who desire an individualized research experience in Biomedical Sciences, Medical Humanities and Social Sciences, Public Health or other fields represented in the College of Medicine. Students receive laboratory or other training in research methods and improve their readiness for and appreciation of research in health-related science. May be repeated to a maximum of thirty-six semester hours.

IHS 5906r. Directed Individual Study in Medical Sciences (1–12). (S/U grade only). This is a course for medical students who desire an individualized research experience in Biomedical Sciences, Medical Humanities and Social Sciences, Public Health or other fields represented in the College of Medicine. Students receive laboratory or other training in research methods and improve their readiness for and appreciation of independent research in health-related science. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

MDE 6041r. Elementary Medical Spanish I (1). (P/F grade only.) This course introduces medical students with little or no experience with the Spanish language to vocabulary and grammar related to human health and common diseases. Students begin to develop knowledge and skills important for effective and culturally appropriate communication with Hispanic populations in health care settings.

MDE 6042. Medical Spanish II (2). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: MEL 6141. Special emphasis in this course is placed on in-class activities such as interviewing, history taking, and role-playing of brief patient encounters in medical settings. Students have multiple opportunities to practice their Spanish with native speakers.

MDE 7012. Mind-Body Health (0). This course is a ten-week, non-credit elective course designed to improve first- and second-year medical students’ health and well-being, by combining yoga and mindfulness techniques with an educational component focusing on scientific research, mind-body medicine and neuroscience.

MDE 7126r. Student Health Elective (2-4). In this course, fourth year medical students spend five days a week at the FSU Health and Wellness Center seeing patients under the supervision of Student Health Center staff to evaluate, diagnose, and treat common illnesses/injuries and provide health care maintenance for patients who present to the Student Health Center. During this rotation, the medical student sees college students of all ages on a continuity and walk-in basis. This rotation is mostly urgent care medicine for the college student population, including but not limited to: sexual health, mental health, infectious diseases, preventative care and initial care of injuries. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

MDE 7167. Hospital Based OB/GYN in an At-Risk Population (4). In this course, students participate in all aspects in the hospital management of complicated pregnancies. The rotation is designed to acquaint the learner with care provided by Obstetrical Hospitalists and or Laborists.

MDE 7572r. Hand Surgery Elective (2-4). Prerequisite: BCC 7160. This course exposes students to recent evidenced-based methods of management of hand-related afflictions. In this course, it is necessary for students to practice and apply physical examination skills of bones and joints and interpret and identify abnormalities of the hand by x-ray studies.

MDE 7642r. Bariatric Surgery Elective (4). Prerequisite: BCC 7160. This course encourages increased student responsibility for the care of patients seen on a daily basis, and to assist the attending physician in the care of these patients, regardless of location. In this course, it is necessary for students to focus entirely on the surgical care and potential complications of patients who are seeking bariatric surgical procedures to improve co-morbidities. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

MDE 7812. Neuropsychology (2). This course helps students to understand the role of neuropsychology and rehabilitation in medicine. The course incorporates practical application of neuropsychology principles and examination in a medical context, neurological rehabilitation, and up-to-date outcomes research analysis.

PAS 5000C. Patient Assessment I (3). Prerequisite: PAS 5022. This course is the first of two courses (PAS 5XXX and PAS 5XXX) that provide the student clinician with the knowledge and skills necessary to complete a thorough assessment of a patient encountered in clinical practice. Students become proficient in patient interviewing, organization, execution and documentation of the physical exam.

PAS 5006. Patient Assessment II (3). Prerequisite: PAS 5000C. This course is second of two courses (PAS 5XXX and PAS 5XXX) that provide the student clinician with the knowledge and skills necessary to complete a thorough assessment of a patient encountered in clinical practice. Students demonstrate proficiency in patient interviewing, organization, execution and documentation of the physical exam.

PAS 5010. Clinical Medicine I (3). Prerequisites: PAS 5022, PAS 5025, and PAS 5045. This course is first in a series of four courses that provide the physician assistant student with a core understanding of the common disease processes encountered in clinical practice. Emphasis is on the recognition, diagnosis, management and prevention of these diseases, Systems discussed in this course include: Endocrine, Gastrointestinal, and Hematologic.

PAS 5013. Evidence Based Practice (1). Prerequisite: Admission to the PA program. This course introduces the student clinician to the principals of evidence-based practice and information utilization. Students learn to critically appraise and interpret information in medical literature and pharmaceutical marketing material.

PAS 5020r. Clinical Medicine II (3). Prerequisites: PAS 5022, PAS 5025, and PAS 5045. This Course is second in a series of four courses that provide the physician assistant student with a core understanding of the common disease processes encountered in clinical practice. Emphasis is on the recognition, diagnosis management and prevention of these diseases. Systems discussed in this course include: Eyes, Ears, Nose, Throat, Dermatologic, Immune and Neurologic.

PAS 5022r. Clinical Gross and Radiographic Anatomy (6). Prerequisite: Admission to the PA program or approval of PA Program Director. This course in human cadaver dissection is designed to provide the student with a fundamental understanding of the structure and function of the human body with an emphasis on the clinical relationship of human anatomy to health and disease. Students participate in lectures, team-based human dissection labs, demonstrations, and discussion of clinical and radiographic anatomy.

PAS 5025. Foundations of Clinical Physiology (2). Prerequisite: Admission to the PA program. This course is first in a series of three physiology/pathophysiology courses that provide the student clinician with a solid foundation in normal human physiology and emphasizes its relationship to cell function, homeostasis and molecular interactions within the human body.

PAS 5028. Systemic Physiology and Pathophysiology I (3). Prerequisite: PAS 5025. This course is second in a series of three physiology/pathophysiology courses (Fundamentals of Physiology and Pathophysiology I/II) that provides the student clinician with a solid foundation in normal and abnormal physiology (pathophysiology). Emphasis is placed on the relationship to cell function, homeostasis and molecular interactions within the human body. Systems covered in this course include: endocrine, gastrointestinal, hematologic, immune and neurologic.

PAS 5029. Systemic Physiology and Pathophysiology II (3). Prerequisite: PAS 5025. This course is third in a series of three physiology/pathophysiology courses (Fundamentals of Physiology and Pathophysiology I/II) that provides the student clinician with a solid foundation in normal and abnormal physiology (pathophysiology). Emphasis is placed on the relationship to cell function, homeostasis and molecular interactions within the human body. Systems covered in this course include: genitourinary/renal, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory.

PAS 5030. Clinical Medicine III (3). Prerequisites: PAS 5022, PAS 5025, and PAS 5045. This course is third in a series of four courses that provide the physician assistant with a core understanding if the common disease processes encountered in clinical practice. Emphasis is on the recognition, diagnosis, management and prevention of these diseases. Systems discussed in this course include: Musculoskeletal and Genitourinary.

PAS 5034r. Clinical Medicine IV (3). Prerequisites: PAS 5022, PAS 5025, and PAS 5045. This course is fourth in a series of four courses that provides the physician assistant student with a core understanding of the common disease processes encountered in clinical practice. Emphasis is on the recognition, diagnosis, management and prevention of these diseases. Systems discussed in this course include: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary.

PAS 5045. Integrated Clinical Science (3). Prerequisite: Admission to the PA program. This course provides the student clinician with foundational knowledge in the basic clinical sciences needed throughout the physician assistant curriculum. Emphasis is placed on clinical microbiology, genetics and diagnostic labs that are utilized in the clinical management of health and disease. Prior coursework in microbiology and genetics are required to be successful in this course.

PAS 5050. Essentials of PA Practice (2). Prerequisite: Admissions to the PA program. This course provides the foundational knowledge essential for the entrance into the PA profession. Areas to be discussed include the history of the PA profession, the physician-PA team, professionalism, professional practice issues, certification and licensing, professional development and ethics.

PAS 5056. US Healthcare Systems and Policy (2). Prerequisite: Admission to the PA program. This course is an examination of the U.S. healthcare system, regulations, and policies that affect the delivery of healthcare in the United States.

PAS 5071. Clinical Pharmacology I (2). Prerequisite: Admission to the PA program. This course, in a series of four courses, introduces the student clinician to the basic principles of pharmacology. Students develop an understanding of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug classes and common adverse effects of each drug class.

PAS 5072. Clinical Pharmacology II (2). Prerequisite: PAS 5071. In this course, the second in a series of four courses, students learn to apply pharmacologic agents used in the treatment of disorders encountered during clinical practice. Students focus on drug classes, interactions, functional and clinical applications and monitoring. Groups of drugs discussed in this course include: endocrine, gastrointestinal, hematologic, oncologic, dermatologic, neurologic, antimicrobials and drugs related to the eyes.

PAS 5073. Clinical Pharmacology III (2). In this course, the third in a series of four courses, students learn to apply pharmacological agents used in the treatment of disorders encountered during clinical practice. Students focus on drug classes, interactions, functional and clinical applications and monitoring. Groups of drugs discussed in this course include: musculoskeletal, genitourinary, renal, cardiovascular and pulmonary.

PAS 5074. Clinical Pharmacology IV (1). In this course, the fourth in a series of four courses, students build upon the knowledge gained in the clinical medicine and pharmacology series of courses. Students discuss medications related to pain management, anesthesia, dependence/addiction and toxicology.

PAS 5110L. Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (2). Prerequisite: Admission to the PA program. This course provides the student clinician with the fundamental knowledge and skills to apply the principles of health promotion and disease prevention in the development of a patient-centered management plan to patients in a variety of clinical settings.

PAS 5127. Behavioral and Mental Health (2). Prerequisite: Admission to the PA program. This course provides the physician assistant with a foundation of knowledge and skills necessary to assess and treat common mental health disorders and address psychosocial issues found in clinical practice.

PAS 5254. Foundations of Clinical Nutrition (1). Prerequisite: Admission to the PA program. This course provides an overview of the principles of human nutrition that includes foundational content on the normal physiological and biochemical roles of nutrients, dietary guidelines, nutritional assessment, and the role of diet in health and disease.

PAS 6007. Clinical Procedures (2). Prerequisites: PAS 5010, PAS 5020, PAS 5030, and PAS 5034. This course provides an opportunity for the student clinician to learn and demonstrate proficiency in required procedural skills.

PAS 6053. Professional Development for the PA (1). Prerequisite: Admission to the PA program. This course builds upon the information gained during the didactic and clinical phase of the PA program and prepares the student for graduation, certification, licensure, employment and practice.

PAS 6097. Evidence-Based Research I (2). Prerequisite: PAS 5013. This course, first in a series of three courses, builds upon the information obtained in PAS 5013—Evidence-Based Practice. Students continue their critical appraisal of the medical literature and pharmaceutical marketing materials and develop skills in information utilization and dissemination.

PAS 6098. Evidence-Based Research II (1). Prerequisite: PAS 6097. In this course, the second in a series of three courses, students continue their critical appraisal of the medical literature and pharmaceutical marketing material and refine their skills in developing a clinical question which lays the foundation for the graduate project.

PAS 6099. Evidence-Based Research III (1). Prerequisite: PAS 6098. In this course, the final course in a series of three courses, students continue their critical appraisal of the medical literature and pharmaceutical marketing material and refine their skills in developing and answering a clinical question and leads to the completion of their graduate project.

PAS 6190. Internal Medicine Clerkship (5). Prerequisite: PAS 6941. This clerkship is designed to provide the physician assistant student with a six week supervised clinical practice experience (SCPE) in an inpatient and office based Internal Medicine practice. Students work with a qualified preceptor and provide care to patient populations across the lifespan that present with acute and chronic conditions as well as those seeking preventative care.

PAS 6200. General Surgery (2). Prerequisites: PAS 5010, PAS 5020, PAS 5030, and PAS 5034. This course introduced the student to the principles of general surgery. Students continue to develop their critical thinking skills, learn to and manage patients in a general surgical practice. Students develop competency in suturing, basic surgical techniques, procedure and asepsis.

PAS 6291. General Surgery Clerkship (5). Prerequisite: PAS 6941. This clerkship is designed to provide the physician assistant student with a six week supervised clinical practice experience (SCPE) in General Surgery. Students work with a qualified preceptor in a general surgical setting with an emphasis in pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative care.

PAS 6303. Pediatric Medicine (2). Prerequisites: PAS 5010, PAS 5020, PAS 5030, and PAS 5034. This course introduces the student to the principles of pediatric medicine. Students continue to develop their critical thinking skills and learn to identify and manage common medical and surgical conditions that affect the pediatric patient. Special emphasis is placed on the importance of communication with patients and families as well as injury and disease prevention.

PAS 6390. Pediatric Medicine Clerkship (5). Prerequisite: PAS 6941. This rotation is designed to provide the physician assistant student with a six week supervised clinical practice experience (SCPE) in Pediatric Medicine. Students work with a qualified preceptor in a pediatric medicine setting providing care to pediatric patients with acute and chronic conditions as well as those seeking preventative healthcare.

PAS 6490. Family Medicine Clerkship (6). Prerequisite: PAS 6941. This clerkship is designed to provide the physician assistant student with a six week supervised clinical practice experience (SCPE) in Family Medicine under the direct supervision of a qualified preceptor. Students provide care to patient populations across the lifespan that present with acute and chronic conditions as well as those seeking guidance on preventative healthcare.

PAS 6491. Geriatric Medicine Clerkship (3). Prerequisite: PAS 6941. This clerkship is designed to provide the physician assistant student with a four week supervised clinical practice experience (SCPE) in Geriatric Medicine. Students work with a qualified preceptor in a practice that emphasizes the geriatric patient. Attention is placed on characteristics of aging, end of life care, assisted living, nursing care, elder abuse, health promotion and maintenance as well as obstacles to care commonly encountered in the geriatric population.

PAS 6492r. Behavioral and Mental Health Clerkship (5). Prerequisite: PAS 6941. This clerkship is designed to provide the physician assistant student with a six week supervised clinical practice experience (SCPE) in Behavioral and Mental Health setting under the direct supervision of a qualified preceptor. Students develop a solid foundation in the fundamentals of the evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, and appropriate referral of patients with mental health disorders.

PAS 6505. Women’s Health (2). Prerequisites: PAS 5010, PAS 5020, PAS 5030, and PAS 5034. This course introduces the student to the principles of women’s health. Students build on the knowledge obtained during the clinical medicine course series and continue to develop their critical thinking skills and learn to identify and manage common medical and surgical conditions that affect the female patient.

PAS 6591. Women’s Health Clerkship (5). Prerequisite: 6941. This rotation is designed to provide the physician assistant student with a four week supervised clinical practice experience (SCPE) in Women’s Health. Students work with a qualified preceptor in a clinical setting with an emphasis in women’s health providing care to patient populations across the lifespan that present with acute and chronic conditions as well as those seeking preventative healthcare in gynecology and obstetrics.

PAS 6605. Emergency Medicine (3). Prerequisites: PAS 5010, PAS 5020, PAS 5030, and PAS 5034. This course introduces the student to the principles of emergency medicine. Students continue to develop their critical thinking skills and learn to identify and manage common medical and surgical conditions that present to the emergency department.

PAS 6876r. Emergency Medicine Clerkship (3). Prerequisite: PAS 6941. This rotation is designed to provide the physician assistant with a four week supervised clinical practice experience (SCPE) in Emergency Medicine. Students work with a qualified preceptor in an emergency department setting providing care to patient populations across the lifespan that present with acute and chronic conditions as well as those seeking preventative healthcare.

PAS 6941. Transition to Clinical Practice (4). Prerequisites: PAS 5010, PAS 5020, PAS 5030, and PAS 5034. This course guides the physician assistant student through their transition from the classroom to the clinic. Emphasis is placed on the assessment, diagnosis and the practical application of therapeutics to patient-centered clinical practice.

PAS 6945. Elective Clerkship (3). Prerequisite: PAS 6941. This clerkship is designed to provide the physician assistant student with a four week supervised clinical practice experience (SCPE) in a specialty selected by the student. Students work with a qualified preceptor in the selected specialty and provide care to specific patient populations that present with acute and/or chronic conditions.

Fourth Year Electives

In the fourth year of study, the program offers a wide variety of electives to help students develop skills in their specific areas of study and practice. Electives are available in the fields of family medicine, geriatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry, surgery and others. For a complete and current list of fourth-year electives, please visit our Web site at http://med.fsu.edu/index.cfm?page=medicalEducation.syllabi.