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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics

College of Arts and Sciences

Web Page: http://www.fsu.edu/~modlang/

Chair: Mark Pietralunga; Associate Chair (Graduate Studies): Leushuis; Associate Chair (Undergraduate Studies): Romanchuk; Professors: Boutin, Fernandez, Galeano, Munro, Pietralunga, Poey, Sharpe, Walters; Associate Professors: Alvarez, Cappuccio, Efimov, Gomariz, Gonzalez, Howard, Lan, Leeser, Leushuis, Maier-Katkin, Reglero, Romanchuk, Soldat-Jaffe, Sunderman, Valisa, Wakamiya, Wang, Weber (Christian), Zanini-Cordi; Assistant Professors: Lee, Muntendam, Murray-Roman, Stilerman, Treacy, Weber (Alina); Teaching Faculty III: Feng, Lababid, Schlenoff; Teaching Faculty II: Brandl, Osborn; Teaching Faculty I: Brudenell, Guiterrez; Assistant Lecturer: Barakat, Prantil; Assistant Teaching: Prosper

The department offers graduate and undergraduate students unique opportunities for language and culture study. From language classes in a variety of languages, to degree programs in areas including French, German, Italian, Slavic, and Spanish; the department prepares students for a variety of educational and future career opportunities. The teaching and research expertise of the Department’s faculty reflects the commitment to FSU’s undergraduate and graduate students and to academic excellence. The Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics has been offering graduate work in French and Spanish since 1917. During the 1950s, master’s programs were initiated in German and Slavic (Russian), as well as Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) programs, first in Spanish, then in French. The master’s program in Italian studies was inaugurated in 1999. Graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts (MA) are available in French, German, Italian Studies, Slavic languages and literature (emphasis on Russian), and Spanish. Programs leading to the PhD degree are offered in French and Spanish.

Winthrop-King Institute for Contemporary French and Francophone Studies: Supported by a generous bequest from the late Mrs. Ada Belle Winthrop-King, Florida State University’s Winthrop-King Institute for Contemporary French and Francophone Studies is a center for interdisciplinary scholarship on France and the French-speaking world. Through its program of distinguished guest speakers, visiting professors and conferences, together with undergraduate and graduate awards, the Institute offers outstanding opportunities for students, scholars and researchers who share the passion of Mrs. Winthrop-King for France, its civilization and language, and the wider French-speaking world. Through the Institute undergraduate and graduate scholarships are also available for study and research abroad.

Admission Requirements

The following items are required for applying to any one of the Department’s graduate programs: a) the University graduate application (see https://admissions.fsu.edu/gradapp); b) the Modern Languages and Linguistics Graduate Application Form (see the Department’s Web site above); c) a statement of purpose (in English); d) a writing sample written in the target language of the program for which the candidate is applying; e) three letters of recommendation; f) GRE scores (verbal and quantitative) including for international students. Average Verbal Reasoning scores for applicants the Department has accepted in the last five years have been around 155 on the new score scale; g) GPA of 3.0 or higher as an upper division student; h) TOEFL scores (for international students whose native language is not English); i) two hardcopies of transcripts from all colleges/universities which you have attended and/or from which you received a degree. The official departmental deadline for applications for a regular fall admission is January 15. The department does not grant Spring semester admissions. For further practical details on graduate studies in the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics, including the availability of funding, please see the departmental Graduate Studies Handbook available on the Department’s Web site “Graduate Studies” portal.

College Requirements

Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the “College of Arts and Sciences” chapter of this Graduate Bulletin.

Requirements for the Master of Arts (MA) in French

Master of Arts (MA) in French Literature

Requirements for the MA in French Literature include coursework, comprehensive examinations and a twenty to thirty page research paper. A minimum of thirty-two semester hours in graduate courses (including minor, if any) must be earned and at least twenty-one of these must be taken for a letter grade. The MA degree program normally takes two years but may be completed in as little as one year.

Required courses include Old French, and one course in each century. Francophone literature can be substituted for any century course. In choosing their courses, students should be advised that many currently advertised positions require knowledge of critical theory and Francophone literature. Courses are not offered as exam preparation; rather, coursework provides the basis for the student to further synthesize and expand their knowledge during exam preparation.

Master’s Comprehensive Examination: will take place in the third and/or second to last week of the Fall or Spring semester and is based on courses taken by the candidate and on an MA reading list. In the minor field, if any, the questions will be on coursework only. The student will take a total of four comprehensive exams (not including an exam in a minor field, if any), each lasting a maximum of four hours, covering three main periods: 1) Medieval/Renaissance, 2) seventeenth to eighteenth century, 3) nineteenth to twentieth century. Three of the exams must be written in French; one must be written in English. The student will choose one of these areas as the area of specialization. Only in this area will the student take two exams, covering both sub-fields of the area and write his/her research paper in the primary field of interest within that area. If any part of the written examination is considered marginal by any member of the committee, an oral exam may be required. The oral exam will be scheduled approximately one week after the written portion.

Please see the departmental Graduate Studies Handbook available on the Department’s Web site “Graduate Studies” portal for further details.

Master of Arts (MA) in French with a Concentration in Contemporary French and Francophone Studies

Requirements for the MA in French with a Concentration in French and Francophone Studies include coursework, comprehensive examinations and a twenty to thirty-page research paper. A minimum of thirty-two semester hours in graduate courses (including minor, if any) must be earned and at least twenty-one of these must be taken for a letter grade. The program normally takes two years but may be completed in as little as one year.

Required courses include twenty-one credit hours (seven courses) in French. At least twelve credit hours (four courses) must be chosen from among those offered in twentieth century or Francophone Studies, with a further nine credit hours (three courses) chosen from among other courses in French. In choosing other French courses, students are advised to consider the benefits of courses such as Critical Theory.

Master’s Comprehensive Exam: The student will take a total of four comprehensive exams in French (plus an additional exam on the minor field, if any), each lasting a maximum of four hours, and a will write a twenty to thirty-page research paper on an aspect of contemporary French and Francophone studies. Three of the exams must be written in French; one must be written in English. The four ( or five) exams are structured as follows: 1) on two contemporary French Francophone courses (four hours); 2) on two other contemporary French and Francophone courses (four hours); 3) on two other French courses (four hours); 4) on any other French course(s) (up to four hours); 5) (only for students taking a minor) on the minor field (up to four hours) If any part of the written examination is considered marginal by any member of the committee, an oral exam may be required. The oral exam will be scheduled approximately one week after the written portion.

Please see the departmental Graduate Studies Handbook available on the Department’s Web site “Graduate Studies” portal for further details.

Requirements for the Master of Arts (MA) in German

MA in German Thesis Program

A minimum of thirty semester hours of credit in graduate courses, including minor, if any, a minimum of six hours of thesis credit, and a minimum of two of these must be in the final semester. At least eighteen of the total of thirty hours must be taken on a letter grade basis. The student must constitute an MA Supervisory Committee made up of the student’s major professor, one minor professor (if any), and two other faculty members. All of those must hold Graduate Faculty Status. The composition of the Supervisory Committee must be communicated to the Graduate Program Coordinator or to the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies for registration with the Graduate School no later than the second week of classes in the semester that the student intends to graduate. The student must also enroll in GEW 5971, Thesis and submit a thesis to the Supervisory Committee that reveals independent investigation and knowledge of the methods of scholarship within the major field. The student must register for GEW 8976, Thesis Defense in the semester the defense is to take place. The thesis must be submitted to the Supervisory Committee at least ten days before the oral defense of the thesis. The initial version of the thesis must also be submitted to the Graduate School’s Manuscript Clearance Advisor by the Initial Format Submission Deadline of the semester they intend to graduate (check “GradSpace”). The thesis must be submitted to the Supervisory Committee at least ten days before the oral defense of the thesis, which must be no less than one week prior to the date set for submitting the thesis to Graduate Studies. After approval by the oral examination committee, the student should submit the final version of the thesis electronically (the so-called “ETD” format) to the Graduate School’s Manuscript Clearance Advisor by the Final Manuscript Submission and Forms Deadline of the semester in which they intend to graduate (check “GradSpace”).

MA in German Course Program

A minimum of thirty-two semester hours of credit in graduate courses (including minor, if any), at least twenty-one of which must be taken on a letter grade basis.

Master’s Comprehensive Examination: will be on the courses taken in the MA Program. Questions will be specific in nature, will normally be of the essay type, and will be written in a period of eight hours (normally in two periods of four hours on consecutive days). An oral examination, approximately one week after the written portion, is required when the student has failed one or more sections of the written examination.

MA in German Studies Thesis Program (only)

The German Division also offers an MA in German Studies. This degree requires a thesis (see regulations above under MA in German - Thesis Program). The courses are determined in consultation with the major professor.

Reading Portfolio

Each candidate for an MA in German or German Studies must complete the reading list. Each student will compile a portfolio based on readings selected in consultation with the major professor. This portfolio must be completed before the degree is awarded.

Please see the departmental Graduate Studies Handbook available on the Department’s Web site “Graduate Studies” portal for further details.

Requirements for the Master of Arts (MA) in Italian Studies

The MA in Italian studies is an interdisciplinary program with core courses in Italian correlated with graduate courses from related area(s) of interest. Related areas might include: Art, Art History, Classics, Communications, Economics, English, Film, History, Humanities, Interior Design, International Affairs, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, Theatre, Urban and Regional Planning.

The student must complete a minimum of thirty-two semester hours of coursework. At least twenty-one of these hours must be taken on a letter-grade basis. The core courses in Italian will include three semester credit hours in Italian Culture and Civilization (ITA 5505), and six semester hours of credit in Italian literature or language courses at the 5000 level or above.

Master’s Comprehensive Examination: is based on courses taken by the candidate and additional individualized readings prepared in collaboration with specific professors. In the minor or related field(s), questions will be on coursework only. Members of the examining committee will be appointed by the division coordinator. MA examination questions are expected to elicit substantive critical essays. Questions will be written within a period of eight hours (normally in two periods of four hours on consecutive days). An oral examination, approximately one week after the written portion, is required when the candidate has failed one or more sections of the written examination.

Please see the departmental Graduate Studies Handbook available on the Department’s Web site “Graduate Studies” portal for further details.

Requirements for the Master of Arts (MA) in Russian (Slavic)

Two types of master’s degree programs are available, the thesis-type and the course-type. The thesis-type program requires a minimum of thirty semester hours including at least six hours of thesis credit and either Introduction to Critical Theory (FOW 5025) or Introduction to Theories of SLA (LIN 5932). At least eighteen of these hours must be taken on a letter-grade basis. In the course-type program a minimum of thirty-two semester hours is required. At least twenty-one of these hours must be taken on a letter-grade basis.

Master’s Comprehensive Examination: in the thesis-type program, the student must successfully complete an oral comprehensive examination. In the course-type program, the student must successfully complete a comprehensive examination consisting of both written and oral portions. The comprehensive is designed as a field examination. The written exam will cover the courses an individual student has taken. The oral examination covers the same fields as the written examination. For students who have written a thesis as part of their program, the oral examination also constitutes the thesis defense.

MA Thesis: students who choose the thesis-type program need to take their MA Comprehensive Examination as described above. The student must constitute an MA Supervisory Committee made up of the student’s major professor, one minor professor (if any), and two other faculty members. All of those must hold Graduate Faculty Status. The composition of the Supervisory Committee must be communicated to the Graduate Program Coordinator or to the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies for registration with the Graduate School no later than the second week of classes in the semester that the student intends to graduate. The student must also enroll in SLL 5971, Thesis and submit a thesis to the Supervisory Committee that reveals independent investigation and knowledge of the methods of scholarship within the major field. The student must register for SLL 8976, Thesis Defense in the semester the defense is to take place. The thesis must be submitted to the Supervisory Committee at least ten days before the oral defense of the thesis. The initial version of the thesis must also be submitted to the Graduate School’s Manuscript Clearance Advisor by the Initial Format Submission Deadline of the semester they intend to graduate (check “GradSpace”). After approval by the oral examining committee, the student should submit the final version of the thesis electronically (the so-called “ETD” format) to the Graduate School’s Manuscript Clearance Advisor by the Final Manuscript Submission and Forms Deadline of the semester in which they intend to graduate (check “GradSpace”).

Please see the departmental Graduate Studies Handbook available on the Department’s Web site “Graduate Studies” portal for further details.

Requirements for the Master of Arts (MA) in Spanish

For the MA in Spanish, students may choose either a thesis-type program or a course-type program. For the thesis-type program, the student must complete a minimum of thirty semester hours of credit including thesis credit. At least eighteen of these hours must be taken on a letter-grade basis (A, B, C). The minimum/maximum number of thesis hours for completion of a master’s degree shall be six hours. For the course-type program, the student must complete a minimum of thirty-two semester hours of coursework. At least twenty-one of these hours must be taken on a letter-grade basis (A, B, C). For both thesis and course-type MA in Spanish, students may choose from three tracks for specialization: 1) Iberian and Latin American Literatures and Cultures; 2) Linguistics; and 3) Linguistics and Literature. Regardless of specialization, all students must complete LIN 5744 Introduction to Language, Language Learning, and Language Instruction (3) during the Fall semester of their first year. Upon recommendation by the graduate advisor, graduate students may be required to take SPN 5900, Advanced Spanish Composition and Translation (3), which will not count toward the course-area requirement but will count toward the hour requirements for graduation. No graduate credit can be transferred from another school to count toward the MA degree at FSU. In general, undergraduate courses taken at FSU will not apply toward graduate credit. However, on approval by the minor professor (see below Master Comprehensive Examination), some courses at the 4000-level (no more than six semester hours) may be counted toward the minor field of the MA degree.

Specialization in Iberian and Latin American Literatures and Cultures

Students pursuing the track in Iberian and Latin American Literatures and Cultures must complete a minimum course requirement of five courses in various areas. At least two of these courses must be in Iberian Literatures and Cultures (from different time periods, such as Medieval Literature, Golden Age, 18th and 19th Centuries, and 20th and 21st Centuries) and two in Latin American Literatures and Cultures (from different time periods, such as Colonial, 19th Century, and 20th and 21st Centuries). Courses corresponding to each area can be found on the Spanish program’s Web site. In addition, all students must complete SPW 6806, Research Methods and Bibliography in Literary and Cultural Studies (3).

Specialization in Hispanic Linguistics

Students pursuing the track in Hispanic Linguistics must complete a minimum course requirement of five courses in various areas. At least two of these courses must be in Formal Linguistics (in areas such as Spanish Phonetics / Phonology, Morphology, Spanish Syntax, and History of the Spanish Language) and two in Applied Linguistics (in areas such as Psycholinguistics, Second Language Acquisition, and Sociolinguistics). Courses corresponding to each area can be found on the Spanish program’s Web site. In addition, all students must complete LIN 5932, Quantitative Research Methods in Language Studies (3).

Specialization in Language and Literature

Students pursuing the track in Language and Literature must complete a minimum course requirement of five courses in various areas. At least one course must be in Iberian Literatures and Cultures, one in Latin American, one in Formal Linguistics, and one in Applied. In addition, all students must complete either SPW 6806, Research Methods and Bibliography in Literary and Cultural Studies (3), or LIN 5932, Quantitative Research Methods in Language Studies (3).

Minor Field of Study

If the student elects to have a minor within the department, nine semester hours must be earned in courses in this minor field. Current minors include Amazonian Studies, Luso-Brazilian Studies, Second Language Studies, among others. A minor outside the department will be in addition to the required coursework in Spanish/Modern Languages; specific details will be coordinated with the particular department.

Master’s Comprehensive Examination (for both thesis-type and course-type program)

The examination in the Literatures and Cultures areas is based on the MA reading lists; in Linguistics the examination is based on reading lists prepared in consultation with the examining professor(s). The Examination Panel will be composed of Spanish and Portuguese program faculty members from the corresponding areas with Graduate Faculty Status, as well as the minor professor (if any) who must also hold Graduate Faculty Status. The Comprehensive Examination will cover three areas from the areas listed above for each specialization. Each area will be covered in one exam. Students in the specialization in Iberian and Latin American Literatures and Cultures must take at least one exam in Iberian and one exam in Latin American literature and cultures. Similarly, students in the specialization in Hispanic Linguistics must take at least one exam in Formal and one exam in Applied. Students in the specialization in Linguistics and Literature must take at least one exam in Linguistics and one exam in Literature. For students choosing to do a minor, it is the student’s responsibility to find a professor from the minor area who will prepare and grade the exam for that area. If the student elects to have a minor within the department, that area exam replaces one area exam so that the student will take the regular total of three exams. However, if the student elects to have a minor outside of the department, that area exam will be in addition to the three exams (the student takes a total of four exams). If the student does not pass one area on the MA examination, upon request the student will be reexamined on that area during a later regular examination period. If the student does not pass two or more areas, the entire examination must be retaken at a subsequent regular examination period. In the event all areas are not passed after the second examination, the student is no longer eligible to be in the program.

MA Thesis

Students who choose the thesis-type program need to take their Master’s Comprehensive Examination as described above. For the thesis, the student needs to constitute an MA Supervisory Committee made up of a major professor, two other faculty members from the Division of Spanish and Portuguese, and the minor professor (if any). The composition of the Supervisory Committee must be communicated to the Graduate Program Coordinator or to the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies for registration with the Graduate School no later than the second week of classes in the semester that the student intends to graduate. All members of the Supervisory Committee must hold Graduate Faculty Status. A prospectus of the thesis must be approved by the Supervisory Committee before registering for SPW 5971, Thesis. It is the responsibility of the major professor to supervise the preparation of the prospectus and the thesis. A copy of this prospectus, bearing the signatures of all committee members, must be submitted by the student for inclusion in the student’s folder. The student must register for SPW 8976, Thesis Defense in the semester the defense is to take place. Copies of the thesis must be submitted to the Supervisory Committee at least two weeks before the Oral Defense of the thesis. The initial version of the thesis must also be submitted to the Graduate School’s Manuscript Clearance Advisor by the Initial Format Submission Deadline of the semester they intend to graduate (check “GradSpace”). After approval by the oral examining committee, the student should submit the final version of the thesis electronically (the so-called “ETD” format) to the Graduate School’s Manuscript Clearance Advisor by the Final Manuscript Submission and Forms Deadline of the semester in which they intend to graduate (check “GradSpace”).

Please see the departmental Graduate Studies Handbook available on the Department’s Web site “Graduate Studies” portal for further details.

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in French

The Doctor of Philosophy in French is a research degree designed to foster mastery of the language together with advanced knowledge and analytical and critical skills in appropriate areas of French and Francophone studies. The student is expected to become familiar with past and current achievements in the field and demonstrate the ability for original scholarly research.

Course requirements: A minimum of three academic years of graduate study (at least sixty semester hours) beyond the baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) is normally required in the doctoral program. Credits acquired at the master’s level count towards this. On progressing beyond the master’s level, candidates for a PhD in French will be expected to take ten three-credit courses and thereby fulfill requirements in three categories, consisting of four, four, and two courses respectively as follows: a major/minor category that will consist of four courses, a Distribution category (see below) that will also consist of four courses, and two courses in an unrelated field that will serve as an Elective category. Although students will be required to adhere to the four-four-two pattern in fulfilling the requirements, there is considerable flexibility in the exact choice of courses. Some courses may help to fulfill requirements in more than one category (e.g. both the “major/minor” and “Distribution” categories), thus enabling students to take additional courses in areas of particular interest to them while remaining within the ten-course total overall. Course selection will be made by the student in consultation with the major advisor and the program’s graduate advisor.

Major/minor requirements: In fulfilling these requirements, students will typically take two to three courses in the major and one to two courses in the minor.

Distribution requirements: Students will be required to take four courses across the fields represented by the French faculty. Specifically, students will be required to take two pre-1800 courses, and two post-1800 courses, to be determined in consultation with the major advisor and the graduate advisor. Courses taken to satisfy the distribution requirement can also be counted toward the major or minor. By the same token, additional courses could be taken in the major/minor or distribution fields while respecting the ten-course total overall.

Unrelated Field (Electives): based on the overlapping four-four-two distribution system, two of the student’s courses will be in unrelated fields, hence electives. In choosing electives students should keep in mind the need for intellectual coherence. No more than two courses can be taken outside of the department, and all courses in the first semester must be taken within the department. If acceptable to the Graduate Advisor, some courses on the 4000-level in both the major and minor field may be counted as graduate credit toward the PhD degree provided no comparable 5000-level course is available. No more than six semester hours of 4000-level courses in French may be counted towards the degree and no more than six semester hours of 4000-level courses may be taken in the minor field without the permission of the Graduate Advisor. The doctoral student is expected to include two 6000-level courses.

Please see the departmental Graduate Studies Handbook available on the Department’s Web site “Graduate Studies” portal for further details.

Language Requirement: prior to the Doctoral Preliminary Examination, the student must demonstrate reading knowledge in one language other than French and English which is germane to the research in the student’s proposed specialty area. The language is determined in consultation with the Graduate Advisor and the major professor. The requirement can be satisfied 1) by passing the Reading Knowledge Examination offered for several languages by the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics (such as SPA 5069, GER 5069, etc.); or 2) by completing a 2200-level course in that language with a grade of B or better; or 3) through documentary evidence of the candidate’s personal experience in and exposure to the language, for instance by having accomplished a period of work in the language, or by having resided during a substantial period in a country where the language is widely used. In the latter case, the Graduate Advisor and major professor determine whether the evidence is sufficient or if further assessment of competence is needed, and of what nature. Courses taken in high school do not satisfy the requirement. The language requirement must be satisfied before taking the Preliminary Examination.

Doctoral Supervisory Committee: five faculty members constitute the preferred minimum, four faculty members the required minimum. The Supervisory Committee shall include the major professor, minor professor and a University Representative, who may also be the minor professor, and an additional two or three other faculty members from the French faculty. All of the minimum constituency of the Supervisory Committee must hold Graduate Faculty Status and three of them - major Professor, Representative of the Graduate Faculty, as well as one other member - must hold Doctoral Directive Status. The University Representative must be a tenured professor. The Graduate Advisor will approve the composition of the student’s proposed Supervisory Committee and forward the list to the Graduate Program Coordinator or to the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies who will register the committee with the Graduate School. The definite composition of the Supervisory Committee has to be communicated to the Graduate School no later than the second week of classes in the semester that the student intends to graduate.

Doctoral Preliminary Examination: is prepared by the Supervisory Committee in coordination with the Major Professor. The Doctoral Preliminary Examination will take place in the third or second to last week of the Spring semester. It will consist of four essay-style questions each to be answered in an in-class written exam taking place in a four-hour time slot on four separate days during the course of one week. The four questions will be: 1) on the dissertation topic (in the major area); 2) on the minor area; 3) on the unrelated field; and finally 4) on a subject satisfying the distribution requirement or, if this has already been satisfied, a further question on the major area or a question on another field in which the student has taken courses. If any one question of the written examination is considered unsatisfactory by any member of the committee, an oral exam may be required to reexamine the student in that area. If the student does not pass two or more questions, the entire written examination must be retaken at least four months after the original examination. In the event all questions are not passed after the second examination, the student is no longer eligible to be in the program. All requirements for the doctorate must be completed within five calendar years from the time the student passes the Preliminary Examination or the exam must be repeated. The formal status of candidate for the doctoral degree (the so-called “ABD” status) is granted after the student has passed the Doctoral Preliminary Exam and an “admission to candidacy” form has been filed with the Office of the University Registrar (please see the Graduate Program Coordinator for this form). No student can register for dissertation hours prior to the point in the semester in which the preliminary examination was passed. After completion of the “admission to candidacy” process, a student may retroactively add dissertation hours for that semester, but only if the preliminary examination was passed by the end of the seventh week of the semester. A minimum lapse of at least six months between achieving “admission to candidacy” and the granting of the PhD degree is required.

Prospectus of Dissertation: after completing the Preliminary Examination but no later than the end of the semester following the Preliminary Examination, the candidate must submit an acceptable Prospectus of Dissertation to the Supervisory Committee and orally defend the prospectus. The Committee members must receive the prospectus two weeks in advance of the oral defense of the prospectus. A copy of the Prospectus bearing the approval signatures of all the members of the committee must be submitted by the student for inclusion in the student’s file. If the student does not successfully defend the prospectus the first time, he/she will have on semester probationary period to re-defend the prospectus before termination from the program.

Please see the departmental Graduate Studies Handbook available on the Department’s Web site “Graduate Studies” portal for further details.

Dissertation: the doctoral Dissertation must be on a topic connected with the major field and must constitute a significant research contribution to knowledge. The candidate must register for FRW 6980r, Dissertation during each term in which he or she works substantially with the Supervisory Committee or uses the research facilities of Florida State University (minimum of two dissertation hours per term). The student must be registered for at least two semester hours of dissertation during the term in which the defense is held. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours of FRW 6980r for credit is required. There is no fixed limit for the maximum. In case the dissertation research concerns human subjects, the student must include a copy of the IRB (Institutional Review Board) Approval Letter and sample copies of any Informed Consent Forms in the appendices of his/her manuscript. For more information see “GradSpace” (or “Grad School - Faculty/Staff”).

Oral Defense of Dissertation: the student must register for FRW 8985, Dissertation Defense in the semester the defense is to take place. Copies of the dissertation with an abstract of 350 words must be submitted to the Supervisory Committee at least four weeks before the Oral Defense of the thesis. Responsibility for suggesting the date, time, and place of the oral defense of the dissertation rests with the major professor. Further requirements for the oral defense, as well as the submission of the dissertation to the Graduate School’s Manuscript Clearance Adviser, are entirely those imposed by the Graduate School. Please check “GradSpace” for further details. The date, time, and place of the Oral Defense of Dissertation must be announced by memo from the major professor at least two weeks in advance to the Supervisory Committee, the Candidate, the Coordinator and the Advisory Board, the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies, the Chair of the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics, the Dean of the College, and the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Please see the departmental Graduate Studies Handbook available on the Department’s Web site “Graduate Studies” portal for further details.

Requirements for the Doctoral Program in Spanish

A minimum of thirty semester hours of graduate credit in Spanish and/or approved related fields beyond the MA degree at or above the 5000 level is normally required in the doctoral program. The two tracks for specialization are: A) Iberian and Latin American Literatures and Cultures, 1) Early, 2) Modern, 3) Contemporary, B) Language and Linguistics, a) Formal Linguistics, b) Applied Linguistics, c) Second Language Acquisition.

Minimum area requirements for students in the Iberian and Latin American Literatures and Cultures track are: twelve hours in the major area, six in the secondary area, three in the remaining area, and nine for electives.

Minimum area requirements for students in the Language and Linguistics track are: six hours in Linguistic Theory; three in Applied Linguistics (sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, etc.); six in Second Language Acquisition; six in Research Methods and Statistics, and nine for electives.

All coursework should be arranged with the Graduate Advisor or, after the first year at the latest, with the major professor. Courses taken for the MA degree may be used to satisfy this distribution requirement. Permission from the Spanish and Portuguese program is required to use courses taken for the BA to satisfy this requirement. All PhD candidates are also required to take: LIN 5932 Quantitative Research Methods in SLA (3) (only for linguistics specialists); LIN 5744 Introduction to Language, Language Learning, and Language Instruction (3); FOW 5025 Critical Theory and Its Applications to Non-English Literatures (3) (only for literature specialists).

These courses should be taken as early in the student’s program as possible and must be taken before the Preliminary Examination. After students have earned the MA degree in Spanish or thirty semester hours of graduate credit in Spanish, they must spend on the Florida State University campus a period of continuous enrollment of at least twenty-four graduate semester hours of credit in any period of twelve consecutive months.

PhD students may choose to have a minor or a certificate, usually another foreign language or literature, linguistics, Latin American Studies, education, history, etc. If students choose to have a minor or certificate, approximately one-fourth of the courses will be in the minor field. This area will be an additional exam in the Preliminary Examination.

Language requirement: the language requirement for the doctoral degree consists of reading knowledge in two languages other than Spanish and English which are germane to research in the student’s proposed specialty area (one language if the language is not a Romance language, such as Russian or Chinese, and the student demonstrates advanced proficiency as indicated by coursework or a degree). The student’s Supervisory Committee determines which languages are germane. The requirement can be satisfied by 1) passing the reading knowledge examination offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics (FRE 5069, GER 5069, etc.) or 2) completing a 2200-level course with a grade of “B” or better. Courses taken in high school do not satisfy the requirement. The language requirement must be satisfied before taking the Preliminary Examination.

Doctoral Supervisory Committee: the Supervisory Committee will consist of a minimum of four members with Graduate Faculty Status. It will consist of the major professor and at least two members of the Spanish graduate faculty, plus a University Representative who must be a tenured professor, and the minor professor (if any). The University Representative may also be the minor professor. Any other members of the Committee will be chosen from the Spanish faculty and must have Graduate Faculty Status. The committee must include a representative from each area in which the student is to be examined on the Preliminary Examination. The Graduate Advisor will approve the composition of the student’s proposed Supervisory Committee and forward the list to the Graduate Program Coordinator or to the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies who will register the committee with the Graduate School. The composition of the Supervisory Committee has to be communicated to the Graduate School no later than the second week of classes in the semester that the student intends to graduate.

Doctoral Preliminary Examination: before taking the preliminary examination, the student must have a Major Professor and Supervisory Committee, an approved Program of Studies form, have completed the language requirement, and have taken any required courses (see above).

The PhD examination in Iberian and Latin American Literatures and Cultures will consist of three sections. Two parts will be from the following areas of specialization: Early, Modern, and Contemporary. The third part of the examination will be on the student’s dissertation topic. In consultation with the major professor, the student will create a substantive reading list for the dissertation area. The examination questions, based on this reading list, will relate generally to the dissertation topic. If the student has a minor or certificate area and wishes an examination in that area, it is the student’s responsibility to find a professor from that area who will prepare and grade the questions. The minor area or certificate examination will be in addition to the three examinations required in Spanish. The exam format is to be determined by the Major Professor and will either be an in-class written exam or a take-home written exam. The in-class exam is a twelve-hour examination consisting of four hours on three separate days during the course of one week. Questions will be specific in nature and may include identifications, essays, problem-solving questions, etc. The use of a dictionary is not permitted during the in-class exam. Each take-home exam will be completed over the course of a week (seven days). All three take-home exams must be taken within a one month period. If any part of the written examination is considered marginal by any member of the committee, an oral exam may be required. Moreover, if the student does not pass one area on the written examination, the student will be reexamined in that area upon request. If the student does not pass two or more areas, the entire written examination must be retaken at least four months after the original examination. In the event all areas are not passed after the second examination, the student is no longer eligible to be in the program.

The PhD examination in the Language and Linguistics track will consist of three sections to be determined in consultation with the major professor. Possible areas include: Formal Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Second Language Acquisition, and Dissertation Topic. The examination questions will be based on reading lists and coursework. The exam format is to be determined by the major professor and will either be an in-class written exam or a take-home written exam. The in-class exam is a twelve-hour examination consisting of four hours on three separate days during the course of a week. Questions will be specific in nature and may include identifications, essays, problem-solving questions, etc. The use of a dictionary is not permitted during the in-class exam. Each take-home exam will be completed over the course of a week (seven days). All three take-home exams must be taken within a one month period. If any part of the written examination is considered marginal by any member of the committee, an oral exam may be required. Moreover, if the student does not pass one area on the written examination, the student will be reexamined in that area upon request. If the student does not pass two or more areas, the entire examination must be retaken at least four months after the original examination. In the event all areas are not passed after the second examination, the student is no longer eligible to be in the program. All requirements for the doctorate must be completed within five calendar years from the time the student passes the Preliminary Examination or the exam must be repeated. The formal status of candidate for the doctoral degree (the so-called “ABD” status) is granted after the student has passed the written and oral portions of the Preliminary Examination and an “admission to candidacy” form has been filed in with the Office of the University Registrar (please see the Graduate Program Coordinator for this issue). No student can register for dissertation hours prior to the point in the semester in which the preliminary examination was passed. After completion of the “admission to candidacy” process, a student may retroactively add dissertation hours for that semester, but only if the preliminary examination was passed by the end of the seventh week of the semester. A minimum lapse of at least six months between achieving “admission to candidacy” and the granting of the PhD degree is required.

Prospectus of Dissertation: after completing the Preliminary Examination but no later than by the end of the semester following the Preliminary Examination, the candidate must submit an acceptable Prospectus of Dissertation to the Supervisory Committee and orally defend the prospectus. The committee members must receive the prospectus two weeks in advance of the oral defense. A copy of this Prospectus bearing the approval signatures of all the members of the committee must be submitted by the student for inclusion in the student’s file. If the student does not successfully defend the prospectus the first time, he/ she will have one semester probationary period to re-defend the prospectus before termination from the program.

Dissertation: the Dissertation must be on a Hispanic topic and must constitute a significant research contribution to knowledge. The student must register for two hours of SPN 6980, Dissertation every term in which he/she uses the resources of FSU. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours of SPN 6980 credit is required. In case the dissertation research concerns human subjects, the student must include a copy of the IRB (Institutional Review Board) Approval Letter and sample copies of any Informed Consent Forms in the appendices of his/her manuscript. For more information see “GradSpace” (or “Grad School - Faculty/Staff”).

Oral Defense of Dissertation: the student must register for SPW 8985, Dissertation Defense in the semester the defense is to take place. Copies of the dissertation with an abstract of 350 words must be submitted to the Supervisory Committee at least four weeks before the Oral Defense of the thesis. Responsibility for suggesting the date, time, and place of the oral defense of the dissertation rests with the major professor. Further requirements for the oral defense, as well as the submission of the dissertation to the Graduate School’s Manuscript Clearance Adviser, are entirely those imposed by the Graduate School. Please check “GradSpace” for further details.

Please see the departmental Graduate Studies Handbook available on the Department’s Web site “Graduate Studies” portal for further details.

Definition of Prefixes

CHI—Chinese

FOL—Foreign Languages

FOT—Foreign Language (In Translation)

FOW—Foreign Languages, Comparative Literature (Writings)

FRE—French Language

FRT—French Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

FRW—French Literature (Writings)

GER—German

GET—German Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

GEW—German Literature (Writings)

HUM—Humanities

ITA—Italian Language

ITW—Italian Literature (Writings)

JPN—Japanese

LIN—Linguistics

POR—Portuguese Language

POW—Portuguese Literature (Writings)

RUS—Russian Language

RUT—Russian Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

RUW—Russian Literature (Writings)

SEC—Serbo-Croatian Language

SLL—Slavic Languages

SPN—Spanish Language

SPW—Spanish Literature (Writings)

Graduate Courses

NOTE: For the most current information on course numbers, prefixes, titles, and content, please always check the departmental Web site at http://www.fsu.edu/~modlang or the Registrar’s Course-Lookup at http://apps.oti.fsu.edu/RegistrarCourseLookup/SearchForm.

Chinese

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

Note: Graduate students must obtain permission of the Chinese coordinator and associate chair for graduate studies to take these courses for credit.

CHI 4503. Readings in Chinese History (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course introduces a sketch of Chinese history. Students are taught to read the text in Chinese so they can expand their vocabulary to include those words necessary to understand Chinese culture and tradition.

CHI 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHI 4930r. Special Topics (3). Prerequisite: Divisional permission. This course allows students to study literary topics of a special kind, depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

Graduate Courses

CHI 5505r. Reading in Chinese Literature (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course is to help those students whose interest is focused on literature. Students may choose a particular author from either ancient or modern time and do a thorough analysis of his or her works. Students may also choose a certain field or period and do extensive reading in that field or period. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHI 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

CHI 5910r. Supervised Research in Chinese (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

CHI 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

French

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

Note: *Graduate students must obtain permission of the French coordinator and associate chair for graduate studies to take these courses for credit.

French Language

FRE 4410.* Advanced Conversation (3). This course is about oral expression, listening skills, and vocabulary acquisition in French with a variety of domains, using contemporary materials.

FRE 4422.* Advanced Grammar and Composition (3). Prerequisite: FRE 3421 or equivalent. This course, intended for students with a thorough grounding in French grammar, aims at developing writing and speaking ability through the reading of a variety of sophisticated French prose works and the compositions of essays based on these model texts.

FRE 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRE 4930r.* Special Topics (3). Prerequisite: Divisional coordinator permission. This course allows students to study literary topics of a special kind, depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

French and Francophone Literatures, Cultures and Civilizations

FRW 4420.* Medieval and Renaissance Literature (3). Prerequisite: FRW 3100. This course is an introduction to the poetry and prose of the medieval and early-modern periods. Emphasis is on the themes of love and friendship.

FRW 4433.* 17th- and 18th-Century Literature (3). Prerequisite: FRW 3100 or FRW 3101. This course surveys major works in the areas of theater, philosophy, and prose fiction. Special attention is given to the possible meanings of concepts such as Classicism and Enlightenment.

FRW 4460.* 19th-Century Literature (3). Prerequisite: FRW 3101. This course focuses on major themes and issues in 19th-century literature and culture.

FRW 4480.* 20th-Century Literature (3). Prerequisite: FRW 3101. This course is a survey of the major works (novel, theater, poetry) and movements of 20th-century French literature.

FRW 4761r. Studies in Francophone Literatures and Cultures (3). Prerequisite: FRW 3100 or FRW 3101. This course is an examination of selected aspects of cultural forms (books, film, music, etc.) associated with one or more French-speaking region located outside France, including North Africa, West Africa, the Antilles, Quebec, Indo-china, and French-speaking islands in the Indian and Pacific oceans. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRW 4770r.* Francophone Caribbean/African Cultures (3). Prerequisite: FRW 3101. This course examines the literature of Africa and the Caribbean written in French with an emphasis on Negritude and/or Creolite. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Graduate Courses

French and Francophone Language and Culture

FRE 5060. Graduate Reading Knowledge in French (3). (S/U grade only). This course is designed to present structures of the French language and vocabulary to prepare graduate students majoring in other disciplines to read learned journals, books, and monographs written in French useful for the student’s research in humanities, natural or social sciences.

FRE 5069r. Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only). This course is a translation examination to ascertain the student’s ability to read research materials written in French. Use of translation software is prohibited.

FRE 5456. Stylistics (3). This course is a systematic study of the stylistics and idiomatic differences between French and English, designed to improve writing skills.

FRE 5505r. French and Francophone Cultures (3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course covers developments in France and in the wider Francophone (French-speaking) world since the Second World War. The course explores the institutions of the Fifth Republic, the evolution of ideas since May 1968, and the emergence of new artistic movements in France. The course also examines the rise of Francophone cultures in the former colonies in Africa, the Caribbean, and elsewhere. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRE 5535. Post-Colonial Cultures in France (3). This course examines the new cultural practices being forged in France by writers, filmmakers and musicians mixing elements from African, Caribbean, French, American and other sources. It is taught in French.

FRE 5755. Old French (3). In this course, the primary objectives are to acquire a reading knowledge of the language and to learn basic concepts concerning its structure and development.

FRE 5756. Readings in Old French Language (3). Prerequisite: FRE 5755. This course is a diachronic study of short works written in Old French. The goal is to introduce students to major genres and authors and to increase their reading knowledge of the language.

FRE 5900r. Studies in French Language and Literature (3). This course varies in content as student’s needs are addressed. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

FRE 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

FRE 6925r. Tutorial in Professional Issues (0–2). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: FRE 5940 or instructor permission. This tutorial is an advanced professional preparation course to acquaint students with issues in their academic discipline. A maximum of three semester hours may count toward the degree. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

French Literature in Translation

FRT 5555. Immigration and National Identity in France (3). This interdisciplinary course examines the ways in which immigration and ethnicity have been reshaping the contours of contemporary French society and culture. It is taught in English.

French and Francophone Literatures, Cultures and Civilizations

FRW 5315. Classical Theatre of the 17th Century (3). This course concentrates on selected works by Racine, Corneille, and Moliere. Each play is analyzed both separately and in relation to other dramas studied. Also, the plays are situated within the social and intellectual context of the seventeenth century.

FRW 5415. Old French Literature I (3). Prerequisite: FRE 5755. Recommended prerequisite: FRE 5756. This course is a study of works in Old French organized around a specific topic.

FRW 5419r. Studies in Medieval French Literature: Figure or Genre (3). Prerequisite: FRE 5755. Recommended prerequisite: FRE 5756. This course is a study of a major medieval author or genre. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRW 5586r.* Studies in 16th-Century Literature: Figure or Movement (3). This course is a study of the prose other than Rabelais and Montaigne alternates with an examination of the theater and poetry of the period. If interest warrants, a single author such as Marguerite de Navarre may be treated in depth. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRW 5587r.* Studies in 17th-Century Literature: Figure or Movement (3). This course focuses on a major figure (e.g., Pascal) or intellectual-religious movement (e.g., Jansenism) or a genre (e.g., novel, poetry), depending on the semester. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRW 5588r.* Studies in 18th-Century Literature: Figure or Movement (3). In this course, material alternates between preromanticism and enlightenment. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRW 5595r. Studies in 19th-Century French Literature (3). This course is a critical or thematic approach to the literature and culture of 19th-Century France. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours as content varies.

FRW 5598r. Studies in 20th-Century Pre-War (1900–1940) French Literature: Figure or Movement and/or Genre (3). In this course, authors and movements such as the following are considered: Paul Claudel, Paul Valery, Andre Gide, Marcel Proust, Alain-Fournier, Surrealism, “Unanimisme,” Francois Mauriac, Jean Giono, Georges Bernanos, Jean Giraudoux, Roger Martin du Gard, Antoine de Saint-Exupery, Guillaume Apollinaire, etc. Works studied include novels, plays and poetry. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRW 5599r. Studies in 20th-Century Post-War (1940 to the present) French Literature: Figure or Movement and/or Genre (3). This course covers post-WWII literary movements in the novel, theatre and poetry. Authors studied include Michel Butor, Albert Casmus, Samuel Beckett, Jean Cocteau, Henri Michaux, and others. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRW 5765r. Studies in Francophone Literatures and Cultures (3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course is an examination of selected aspects of cultural forms (books, film, music, etc.) associated with one or more French-speaking region located outside France, including North Africa, West Africa, the Antilles, Quebec, Indochina, and French-speaking islands in the Indian and Pacific oceans. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRW 5775r. Francophone Caribbean/African Cultures (3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course examines the literature of Africa and the Caribbean written in French with an emphasis on Negritude and/or Creolite. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRW 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

FRW 5910r. Supervised Research in French (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

FRW 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

FRW 6938r. Graduate Seminar in French Literature (3). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

FRW 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only). A minimum of twenty-four semester hours is required for the PhD.

FRW 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

FRW 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

FRW 8976. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

FRW 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

General Foreign Language Courses

FOL 5934r. Problems and Studies in Modern Languages and Literature (3).

FOT 5805. Translation Theory and Practice (3). In this course, students analyze and engage with theories and practice of translation. Enrollment limited to graduate students.

FOW 5025. Critical Theory and Its Application to Non-English Literatures (3). This course introduces graduate students to critical theories and their application to non-English literary texts. Members of the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics and invited faculty from other University departments team teach.

FOW 5595. Transnational Literature (3). This course considers contemporary literature and film in the context of recent economic, social, and cultural debates about globalization. Readings and discussions are in English.

FOW 6907r. Directed Readings (1–6). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Instructor or major professor permission. This course is for master and doctoral students in the Department of Modern Languages needing to fulfill credit hours that are not part of the regular course requirements, or of DIS and/or Research hours offered in their respective programs. To be used for instance for MA and PhD Prelim exam preparation.

HUM 5938r. Interdisciplinary Topics (3). This course provides students from any discipline with an integrated interdisciplinary learning experience. The course is taught by instructors from at least two different departments and/or colleges. Topics vary. May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

German

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

Note: *Graduate students must obtain permission of the German coordinator and associate chair for graduate studies to take these courses for credit.

GER 4420.* Advanced Composition (3). Prerequisite: Two 3000-level GER courses or instructor permission. In this course, the objective is to gain the ability to write with a developed personal style in German on intellectually demanding topics, including commentary on literature. Near mastery of German grammar is a prerequisite. The course is conducted in German.

GER 4480.* Modern German of the News Media (3). Prerequisite: Two 3000-level GER courses or instructor permission. This course is an advanced-level skills course. Discussion of current events and mass media in German-speaking countries and work with authentic texts (newspapers and audio-visual material).

GER 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GET 4800.* Translation German-English/English-German (3). Prerequisite: GER 3400 or instructor permission. This course is an advanced-level skills course. Translating a variety of texts that illustrate important distinctions between German and English grammar, syntax, vocabulary, etc.

GEW 4591r.* Studies in an Author or Theme (3). Prerequisites: Two 3000-level courses or instructor permission. This course offers the opportunity to study either a single author in-depth or to follow a specific theme that may extend over a brief period or over centuries. Course material may include non-literary textual and audio-visual material. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GEW 4592r.* Studies in a Period or Movement (3). Prerequisites: Two 3000-level courses or instructor permission. This course concentrates on a specific literary movement such as Romanticism, Realism, Expressionism, or on a period such as the Baroque, the Enlightenment, or the Weimar period. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GEW 4930r. Special Topics (3). Prerequisites: Two 3000-level courses or instructor permission. In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake study in areas outside the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

Graduate Courses

German Language

GER 5060. Graduate Reading Knowledge in German (3). (S/U grade only). This course is designed to present structures of the German language and vocabulary to prepare graduate students majoring in other disciplines to read learned journals, books, and monographs written in German useful to the student’s research in humanities, natural or social sciences.

GER 5069r. Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only). This translation examination is to ascertain the student’s ability to read research materials written in German. Use of translation software is prohibited.

GER 5425. Essay Workshop (3). For this course, the objective is the ability to write in German at a level that approximates native use of the language for advanced cultural discourse in general and literary commentary in particular. The workshop setting is designed for collaborative learning through discussions of various styles in existing texts, for the purposes both of recognizing stylistic properties of different types of texts and of selecting styles for the student’s own uses, and through collective critiques of the fellow student’s writings. The course is conducted in German.

GER 5906r. Studies in German Language and Literature (3). In this course, the topic is determined by student and the faculty member directing the project. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GER 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

GER 6925r. Tutorial in Professional Issues (0–2). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: GER 5940 or instructor permission. This course offers advanced professional preparation to acquaint students with issues of concern in their academic discipline. A maximum of three hours may count toward the degree. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

German Literature (Writings)

GEW 5208r. Studies in a Genre (3). This course is a study of German literature through generic approaches.

GEW 5595r. Studies in a Theme (3). This course offers the opportunity to follow a specific theme that may extend over a brief period or over centuries. Course material is often supplemented by audio visuals. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GEW 5596r. Studies in an Author or Movement (3). In this course, either the works of an individual author or a number of authors composing a specific movement are read. Course materials are frequently supplemented with films, videos, and recordings. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GEW 5597r. Studies in a Period: Special Topics (3). In this course, an understanding of a certain period or movement investigated is determined by the student’s needs and by faculty expertise. May be repeated provided the course materials are different from previous materials presented under the course title. Examples of period literatures are 17th century and Post World War II literature in a comprehensive approach. Examples of movement literatures are Romanticism and Expressionism, literatures that are concurrent with other types of literature at a given time period. The course is conducted in German. Verbal participation (class discussion and/or reports) and written participation (examination and/or term paper) are required. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GEW 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GEW 5915r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

GEW 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

GEW 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

GEW 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

German Literature in Translation

GET 5135. German Literature in Translation (3).

GET 5525r.* German Cinema (3). This course studies the contextual and stylistic features of German cinema from its classical period in the 1920s to the recent New German Cinema of the 1970s. Focus is on methods of film analysis and film criticism. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GET 5588r. Studies in a Theme (3). This course offers students the opportunity to study a recurring theme in German literature and culture (e.g., the Faust theme). The course may be structured around a specific interest of the teacher on topical issues and concerns. May be taken by students not majoring in German who read assigned materials in translation. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Italian

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

Note: *Graduate students must obtain permission from the Italian coordinator and associate chair for graduate studies to take these courses for credit.

Italian Language

ITA 4410.* Advanced Italian Conversation (3). Prerequisites: ITA 2240. This course is designed to develop fluency in conversation skills at the fourth-year level by means of extensive vocabulary building and practice.

ITA 4450.* Advanced Italian Composition and Style (3). Prerequisite: ITA 3421 or equivalent. This course stresses the morphological and syntactical order of Italian by means of extensive drill in controlled and free composition.

ITA 4500.* Italian Culture and Civilization (3). Prerequisites: ITA 3100 and ITA 3101, or equivalent. This course surveys Italian culture and civilization and provides a historical perspective to aspects of Italian society.

ITA 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). For this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

ITA 4930r. Special Topics (3). Prerequisite: Divisional coordinator permission. This course allows students to study literary topics of a special kind, depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ITA 4935r. Honors Work (3). This course may be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours, three hours of which may be applied to the requirements for the major with permission of the department. All honors work is directed by the students’ honors committee.

Italian Literature (Writings)

ITW 4400.* Renaissance Literature (3). Prerequisites: ITW 3100 and ITW 3101, or equivalent. This course offers selected readings and discussions of the literature of the Italian Renaissance including such figures as Alberti, Lorenzo deMedici, Poliziano, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Ariosto, and Tasso.

ITW 4440r.* 18th- and 19th-Century Literature (3). Prerequisites: ITW 3100 and ITW 3101, or equivalent. This course offers readings and discussions of figures and movements of the 18th and 19th centuries including Goldoni, Alfieri, Foscolo, Manzoni, Leopardi, and Verga. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ITW 4480.* 20th-Century Literature (3). Prerequisites: ITW 3100 and ITW 3101, or equivalent. This course offers readings and discussions of figures and movements in 20th century Italian literature.

ITW 4481.* Readings in Contemporary Italian Prose (3). Prerequisites: ITW 3100 and ITW 3101, or equivalent. This course offers readings and discussions of works of contemporary Italian writers.

Graduate Courses

Italian Language

ITA 5060. Graduate Reading Knowledge in Italian (3). (S/U grade only). This course is designed to present structures of the Italian language and vocabulary to prepare graduate students majoring in other disciplines to read learned journals, books, and monographs written in Italian useful for the student’s research in humanities, natural or social sciences.

ITA 5069r. Reading Knowledge Examination (0). This translation examination is to ascertain the student’s ability to read research materials written in Italian. Use of translation software is prohibited.

ITA 5455r. Advanced Italian Composition and Style (3). Prerequisite: Advanced standing. This course stresses the morphological and syntactical order of Italian by means of extensive drills in controlled and free composition. Theme writing at the advanced level. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ITA 5505r. Italian Culture and Civilization (3). Prerequisite: Advanced standing. This course surveys Italian culture and civilization and provides a historical perspective to aspects of Italian society. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ITA 5900r. Studies in Italian Language and Literature (3). Prerequisite: Fourth-year level language and/or literature courses. This course provides specialized study of topics, figures, and movements. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ITA 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

ITA 6925r. Tutorial in Professional Issues (0–2). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: ITA 5940 or instructor permission. This tutorial is an advanced professional preparation course to acquaint students with issues in their academic discipline. A maximum of three semester hours may count toward the degree. May repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ITA 8966. Master’s Comprehensive Exam (0). (P/F grade only.) This examination is based on the Modern Language Association reading lists and represents the five areas of specialization.

Italian Literature (Writings)

ITW 5415r. Italian Renaissance Literature (3). Prerequisite: Advanced standing. This course offers selected readings and discussions of the literature of the Italian Renaissance including such figures as Alberti, Lorenzo de Medici, Poliziano, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Ariosto, and Tasso.

ITW 5445r. 18th- and 19th-Century Italian Literature (3). Prerequisite: Advanced standing. This course offers advanced readings and discussions of the figures and movements of the 18th and 19th centuries, including Goldoni, Alfieri, Foscolo, Manzoni, Leopardi, and Verga. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ITW 5485r. 20th-Century Italian Literature (3). Prerequisite: Advanced standing. This course offers advanced readings and discussions of figures and movements in 20th-century Italian literature, including Moravia, Svevo, Pirandello, Silone, and others. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ITW 5486r. Readings in Contemporary Italian Prose (3). Prerequisite: Advanced standing. This course offers advanced readings and discussions of the works of contemporary Italian writers, including Pavese, Cassola, Sciascia, Berto, Ginzburg, Tomasi di Lampedusa, Buzzati, Vittorini, and Vigano. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ITW 5705r. The Trecento Writers (3). Prerequisite: Advanced standing. This course offers an advanced study of the Trecento writers: Dante, Petrarca, Boccaccio and others. Advanced readings and discussions are available in both English and Italian. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ITW 5905r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ITW 5910r. Supervised Research in Italian (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

Japanese

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

Note: *Graduate students must obtain permission of the Japanese coordinator and associate chair for graduate studies in order to take these courses for credit.

JPN 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

JPN 4930r. Special Topics (3). Prerequisite: Divisional coordinator permission. This course allows students to study literary topics of a special kind, depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

Graduate Courses

JPN 5900r. Studies in Japanese Language and Literature (3). Prerequisite: JPN 3230 or equivalent. This course is designed to introduce advanced Japanese syntax and to expose students to graded materials in the humanities and social sciences. The primary objective is to help students to gain a good insight into the intricacies of the Japanese language and culture and to develop adequate translation skills. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

JPN 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

JPN 5915r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

JPN 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

Linguistics

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

Note: *Graduate students must obtain permission of the linguistics coordinator and associate chair for graduate studies to take these courses for credit.

LIN 4030. Introduction to Historical Linguistics (3). This course is designed to familiarize students with the world language families, notion of relatedness, sound correspondence, comparative method, internal reconstruction, and the reconstruction of the Proto-Indo-European languages. Several theories of sound change are also discussed.

LIN 4040. Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics (3). This course attempts to develop an understanding of the organization of language, to provide tools and techniques for describing language data, and to examine various models of linguistic description. May count toward the major in Slavic (Russian) and Spanish.

LIN 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LIN 4930r. Topics in Linguistics (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake study in areas outside the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a minimum of twelve semester hours. May be repeated within the same semester.

Graduate Courses

LIN 5035. Historical/Comparative Linguistics (3). This course parallels in breadth, but not in depth, the reading and other assigned outside work of the undergraduate course involving sound change, possible causes of sound change, several different theories of sound change, and other controversial problems.

LIN 5045. Descriptive Linguistics (3). This course parallels in breadth, but not in depth, the reading and other assigned work of the undergraduate course concerned with the scientific study of human language, analytic methods, and models of linguistic description.

LIN 5510. Transformational Grammar (3). This course covers, in addition to the fundamentals of transformational grammar, more current developments in linguistic theory, such as X-bar syntax, Government and Binding, Relational Grammar, etc.

LIN 5744. Introduction to Language, Language Learning, and Language Instruction (3). This course provides an overview to the nature of language and how languages are learned. Furthermore, using insights from second language acquisition, the course explores current approaches to communicative, task-based language instruction.

LIN 5908r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

LIN 5910r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

LIN 5932r. Topics in Linguistics (3). In this course, different topics are selected to suit the needs and interests of students. A special effort is made to select topics related to current theoretical and practical issues. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

Portuguese (Brazilian)

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

POR 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

POR 4930r. Special Topics (3). Prerequisite: Divisional coordinator permission. This course allows students to study literary, cultural, or linguistic topics of a special kind, depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

Graduate Courses

POR 5069r. Graduate Reading Knowledge Examination: Portuguese (0). (S/U grade only). This course consists of a translation examination to ascertain the student’s ability to read research materials written in Portuguese. Use of translation software is prohibited.

POR 5930r. Studies in Portuguese (Brazilian) Language and Literature (3). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

POR 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

POW 5905r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

POW 5910r. Supervised Research in Portuguese (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

Russian

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

Note: *Graduate students must obtain permission of the Slavic coordinator and associate chair for graduate studies to take these courses for credit.

RUS 4410r.* Advanced Russian Conversation and Composition (3–6). Prerequisite: RUS 3400. This course focuses on the styles and levels of oral expression on a wide range of topics. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

RUS 4421.* Advanced Russian Grammar and Composition (3). Prerequisite: RUS 3420. This course focuses on the practical application of advanced language skills.

RUS 4780.* Phonetics (3). Prerequisite: RUS 2220 or instructor permission. This course provides an understanding of the phonetic and phonemic structure of Russian with extensive oral practice.

RUS 4840.* History of the Russian Literary Language (3). Prerequisite: RUS 3400. This course studies the development of the phonological and grammatical systems from the earliest records to the present.

RUS 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

RUS 4930r. Special Topics (3). May be repeated to a total of twelve semester hours. Only three semester hours taken in any Summer session count towards the major.

RUS 4935r. Honors Thesis (1–6). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours, three hours of which may be applied to the requirements for the major with permission of the department. All honors work is directed by the student’s honors committee.

RUW 4470r. Modern Russian Literature (3). Prerequisites: RUW 3100 and RUW 3101, or equivalent. This course studies the great works of major Russian writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, encompassing study of specific movements such as Romanticism, Realism, Modernism and Socialist Realism. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

Graduate Courses

Russian Language

RUS 5069r. Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only). This course is a translation examination to ascertain the student’s ability to read research materials written in Russian. Use of translation software is prohibited.

RUS 5415r. Graduate Russian Conversation and Comprehension (3). (S/U grade only). This course consists of extensive conversation and comprehension practice on contemporary themes. May be repeated once for credit to a maximum of six semester hours. Not open to native speakers of Russian.

RUS 5845. History of the Russian Language and Reading of Old Russian Texts (3). This course focuses on the development of the phonological and grammatical systems from the earliest written records to the present.

RUS 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

RUS 6925r. Tutorial in Professional Issues (0–2). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: RUS 5940 or instructor permission. This advanced professional preparation course serves to acquaint students with issues in their academic discipline. A maximum of three semester hours may count toward the degree. Course may be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

Russian Literature in Translation

RUT 5115. Seminar: Russian Literature in English Translation (3). This course focuses on classics of Russian 19th- and 20th-century prose. No Russian required.

Russian Literature (Writings)

RUW 5335. Russian Poetry (3). This course studies the development of poetry, the major writers, and their representative works.

RUW 5375. Russian Short Story (3). This course studies the development of the short story in the 19th and 20th centuries, the major writers, and their representative works.

RUW 5559r. Seminar in 19th-Century Russian Literature (3). This course studies the development of Russian literature through its golden age and of the representative works of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Goncharov, Leskov, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

RUW 5579. Modern Russian Literature (3). This course studies the development of 20th-century literature from Modernism through the Soviet period to the glasnost era.

RUW 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

RUW 5910r. Supervised Research in Russian (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

RUW 5930r. Special Topics (3). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

Serbo-Croatian

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

Note: *Graduate students must obtain permission of the Slavic coordinator and associate chair for graduate studies to take these courses for credit.

SEC 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). This course allows students to arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Graduate Courses

SEC 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

SEC 5910r. Supervised Research in Serbo-Croatian (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

Slavic

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

Note: *Graduate students must obtain permission of the Slavic coordinator and associate chair for graduate studies to take these courses for credit.

SLL 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). This course allows students to arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Graduate Courses

SLL 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

SLL 5915r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). For this course, a maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

SLL 5971r. Thesis (3–6). (S/U grade only). This course requires a minimum of six semester hours.

SLL 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

SLL 8976. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

Spanish

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

Note: *Graduate students must obtain permission from the Spanish coordinator and the associate chair for graduate studies in order to take these courses for credit.

SPN 4420.* Advanced Spanish Composition and Translation (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400. This course stresses composition in Spanish with less emphasis on translation from Spanish into English. For students with prior knowledge of essential points of Spanish grammar.

SPN 4780.* Spanish Phonetics (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400, or SPN 3350. This course involves training in the production of acceptable speech sounds in Spanish and a knowledge of when to use those sounds (allophonic distribution). The class meets both in the classroom and in the language laboratory. The nonnative speaker can profit most from this course.

SPN 4930r.* Studies in Hispanic Language and Literature (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400 or instructor permission. May be repeated when content varies to a maximum of six semester hours.

SPN 4935r. Honors Work (3). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours, three hours of which may be applied to the requirements for the major with permission of the department. All honors work is directed by the student’s honors committee.

SPW 4190r.* Special Topics in Hispanic Languages and Literature (3). Prerequisite: One 3000-level course. This course consists of variable topics chosen from Spanish language movements, periods, figures, and problems. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Graduate Courses

Spanish Language

SPN 5060r. Graduate Reading Knowledge in Spanish (3). (S/U grade only). This course is designed to present structures of the Spanish language and vocabulary to prepare graduate students majoring in other disciplines to read journals, books, and monographs written in Spanish useful to the student’s research. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours.

SPN 5069r. Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only). This course is a translation examination to ascertain the student’s ability to read research materials written in Spanish. Use of translation software is prohibited.

SPN 5795. Phonology of Spanish (3). Prerequisite: A working knowledge of spoken Spanish. This course introduces the student to articulatory phonetics and the theory of Spanish phonology as a set of phonological rules determining allophonic distribution. Entails partial analysis of various dialects of Spanish during class and an assignment to make an analysis of the Spanish of some native speakers dialect.

SPN 5805. Spanish Morphology and Syntax (3). Prerequisite: A working knowledge of Spanish. This course deals with syntactical and morphological rules based on early transformational grammar. Rules are tested in class discussion, and attempts are made to analyze prose and poetry according to the rules. Students make a syntactical analysis of one or more literary works, or parts of works, of their choice.

SPN 5845. History of the Spanish Language (3). This course is a study of the various phonetic, lexical, and syntactic changes that led to the development of modern Spanish from Classical Latin through vulgar Latin, old Spanish, and Renaissance Spanish, including the changes undergone by American Spanish.

SPN 5900r. Studies in Hispanic Language and Literature (3). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

SPN 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

SPN 6925r. Tutorial in Professional Issues (0–2). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: SPN 5940 or instructor permission. This course is an advanced professional preparation course to acquaint students with issues in their academic discipline. A maximum of three semester hours may count toward the degree. May repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

Spanish Literature (Writings)

SPW 5195r. Studies in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures (3). This course focuses on specific literary and cultural topics in the field of Hispanic Studies from any region or period of the Spanish-speaking world. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

SPW 5216. Spanish Golden Age Prose (3). This course includes reading and discussion of the great prose works from La Celestina to El Criticón. All Golden Age prose on the Spanish division graduate reading lists, with the exception of Cervantes’ works, are covered.

SPW 5275r. Spanish 20th-Century Novel (3). This course focuses on the Spanish novel from the Generation of 1898 through the Post Civil War period. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

SPW 5315. Spanish Golden Age Theatre (3). This course consists of reading and discussion of representative comedias from Spain’s Golden Age.

SPW 5337. Spanish Poetry to 1700 (3). This course is an intensive survey of Spain’s lyric poetry from the jarchas through Góngora and Quevedo.

SPW 5338r. Spanish Poetry from 1700 to the Present (3). This course emphasizes close readings of poetic texts and major literary and artistic trends from Romanticism through the contemporary era. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

SPW 5356. Spanish American Poetry (3). This course is a study of the major tendencies and representative poets from the sixteenth century to the Modernist period.

SPW 5357. Contemporary Spanish American Poetry (3). This course is a comprehensive study of the major trends, figures, and schools of Spanish American poetry since Modernismo.

SPW 5365. Spanish American Prose: Nonfiction (3). This course studies the major tendencies and representative nonfictional prose writers up to the Contemporary period.

SPW 5385. Early and Modern Spanish American Prose Fiction (to 1927) (3). This course studies the major tendencies and representatives of prose fiction up to the Modernistas and Mundonovista novel and short story.

SPW 5386. Contemporary Spanish American Prose Fiction (since 1927) (3). This course is a comprehensive overview of Spanish American prose since the advent of Jorge Luis Borges’ short stories and the genres of the novel and short story, covering trends from the avant-garde to neo-realism, neo-naturalism, cosmopolitanism, and sociopolitical content.

SPW 5405. Medieval and Early Renaissance Spanish Literature (3). This course is an examination of the major genres of the period together with readings of some secondary works. Topics for the course include epics and ballads, Clerecia literature, courtly lyric, Alfonsine works, and early drama.

SPW 5486. Contemporary Spanish Women Writers (3). This course is designed to introduce the student to the works of 20th-century Spanish women writers and the critical attention they have received.

SPW 5496. Spanish-American Women Writers (3). This course is a study of Spanish-American women writers, focusing on prose fiction, non-fiction and/or drama. Supplementary readings are taken from critical and theoretical works.

SPW 5606. Cervantes (3). This course is an individual survey of Cervantes’ literary works, especially Don Quixote.

SPW 5757. 20th-Century Mexican Prose (3). This course analyzes the novels, stories, and essays of the outstanding writers of 20th-century Mexico.

SPW 5908r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

SPW 5910r. Supervised Research in Spanish (1–5). (S/U grade only). For this course, a maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

SPW 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). For this course, a minimum of six semester hours is required.

SPW 6806. Research, Criticism and Professional Issues (3). (S/U grade only). This course is designed to prepare graduate students for professional research in the field of literary studies. The course includes a survey of references and research tools, readings and discussion on appropriate research techniques, critical theory, and familiarity with current professional issues for students and scholars in Hispanic studies.

SPW 6934r. Topics in Hispanic Language and Literature (3). This course is designed to cover topics not otherwise available in the curriculum. Topics vary and a particular topic is announced at least one semester in advance. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

SPW 6939r. Seminar on a Spanish American Author (3). This course is an in-depth study of the life and works of a major Spanish American author. The subject of this seminar varies from year to year. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

SPW 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only). For this course, a minimum of twenty-four semester hours is required for the PhD.

SPW 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

SPW 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

SPW 8976. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

SPW 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY:

see Biological Science