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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences

College of Human Sciences

Web Page: http://www.chs.fsu.edu/

Chair and Professor: Ray; Professors: Arjmandi, Delp, Hickner, Ilich-Ernst, Moffatt, Panton, Ray, Sathe; Associate Professors: Figueroa, Kim, Ormsbee; Assistant Professor: Evanson, Hwang, Rao, Salazar; Dietetic Internship Director: Spicer; DPD Director: Farrell; Program Director, Institute of Sports Sciences and Medicine: Ray; Teaching Faculty III: Farrell, Garber, Kasper, Sehgal, Spicer; Teaching Faculty I: Maier; Courtesy Faculty: Blasco, Burkhart, Conti, Daggy, Florian, Ghosh, Haney, Johnson, Lima, Rahnama; Professors Emeriti: Abood, Dorsey, Dupont, Haymes, Hsieh, Toole

The Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences is in a unique position nationwide to provide graduate coursework and research opportunities in human nutrition and food science, as well as in exercise physiology, including sports sciences. The combination of these respective areas of concentration within a single department facilitates integrative studies between diet and physical activity in the maintenance of health and the prevention and/or treatment of chronic diseases, as well as studies on the quality and safety of food.

Two master’s programs are offered in the department: 1) Nutrition and Food Science with an emphasis in nutrition science, food science, and nutrition education and health promotion; 2) Exercise Physiology with majors in exercise physiology, sports nutrition, and sports sciences. Thesis and non-thesis options are available for the master’s programs.

The department also has a dietetic internship program which, in conjunction with the master’s degree in Nutrition and Food Science, provides a post-baccalaureate route for students to become eligible to take the Registration Examination for dietitians. Students applying for the internship program must have completed the Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) requirements.

At the doctoral level there are two degree programs leading to a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in: 1) Human Sciences with concentration in either human nutrition or food science; and 2) Exercise Physiology. These doctoral programs are designed to enable students to achieve competency in a specialized area of nutrition, food science, or exercise physiology and to become independent researchers with a career in academia, industry, government, or other health-related fields.

Ongoing research in the department includes basic, clinical, and applied studies linking exercise, nutrition, food, and lifestyle modifications. Examples include:

  1. Obesity-related in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies
  2. Age-associated investigations in areas of osteoporosis, sarcopenia, osteoarthritis, atherosclerosis, cancer, hypertension, and diabetes
  3. Nutrition education and lifestyle modification interventions
  4. Food science-related lines of research, e.g., food safety, food allergy, and food quality.
  5. Functional foods in health and disease
  6. Sports sciences and medicine including injury prevention, treatment, and athletic performance enhancement

The department houses the Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging (CAENRA). This Center addresses major issues affecting the aging population in an attempt to uncover some of the underlying mechanisms of aging and discovering alternative/adjunctive approaches to halt the progression of chronic diseases and/or improve their health.

Research Facilities

Our facility has a Sirrus clinical analyzer, which can employ multiple biochemical tests to measure multiple samples at one time; two dual x-ray absorptiometry (iDXA) used for our bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition studies; an electrocardiography machine (ECG) for heart rhythms; and multiple-metabolic measurement machines to assess maximal oxygen consumption, metabolic rate and respiratory exchange ratio. The department also has a fluorescent microscope, high-speed refrigerated centrifuge, texture analyzer, and a micro-computed tomography 3D scanner (micro-CT) for bone analysis.

The Applied Electrophysiology Exercise Laboratories investigate the underlying mechanisms that affect cardiac and arterial smooth muscle physiology under normal and pathological conditions using animal models. Techniques include PCR, Western blotting, surface biotinylation, calcium imaging, electrophysiology, and pressurized artery myography.

The Cardiovascular Laboratories are equipped with a Finometer beat-to-beat blood pressure and a hemodynamic monitoring system; Sphygmocor for pulse wave velocity, aortic blood pressure, and augmentation index (arterial stiffness); Hoklanson Plethysmography System to non-invasively measure both limb arterial and venous blood flow; Biopac MP100 Data Collection System with ECG and hand grip attachments; impedance cardiography for stroke volume and cardiac output; WinCPRS software to estimate power spectrum density of heart rate/blood pressure variability and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity; Electronic tilt table to evaluate cardiovascular responses to orthostatic stress; and ambulatory blood-pressure monitors.

The Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging (CAENRA) focuses on developing unique exercise and nutritional interventions for the amelioration of chronic diseases and functional declines that occur in aging with the intent to enhance quality of life and longevity.

Exercise Physiology Laboratories are for studying human performance, exercise metabolism, cardiovascular and muscle physiology. The two Exercise Physiology Laboratories are equipped for teaching and research related to the human response to exercise. These Laboratories contain computerized systems for the measurement of oxygen uptake, blood lactate and blood gas analyzers, an environmental chamber and a DEXA unit in addition to various equipment for biochemical assessments.

There is a resistance training area equipped with MedX™ machines; these machines focus on all major muscle groups. Resistance machines include back extension, row, chest press, leg extension, leg curls, leg press, triceps pushdown, biceps curl, overhead press, and abdominal crunch. There is also a Biodex™ isokinetic machine for testing and training. For those research studies utilizing aerobic exercise as means for intervention, the exercise laboratory also has several cycle ergometers and treadmills, as well as Wingate cycle ergometers that can be used for anaerobic testing and an environmental chamber that can be used to manipulate temperature, wind chill, and humidity. There are also two whole body vibration Powerplate machines.

The Institute of Sports Sciences and Medicine houses a state of the art Human Performance Laboratory designed for testing competitive athletes of all ages. The laboratory provides an opportunity for investigators to conduct multidisciplinary research in human and athletic performance, including the prevention and treatment of athletic injuries.

Muscle Research Laboratory is equipped to study molecular and cellular adaptations of skeletal muscle to various stimuli and environments such as exercise, nutrition, aging, and muscle wasting diseases or conditions in humans and animals. Techniques include RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, etc.

The Nutrition and Food Science laboratories are equipped with spectrophotometers, various electrophoresis systems, automated microplate reader and washer, freeze dryers, chromatographic systems, micro DSC, immunochemistry equipment, and food-analysis equipment. Faculty and students also have access to a cell culture facility for in vitro experiments and molecular imaging for protein and mRNA visualization. Furthermore, our department and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory collaborate, giving us access to advanced magnetic-resonance imaging techniques.

The department has also added two certified Biological Safety Level 2 laboratories that are available for food safety experiments as well as biological specimens.

Scholarships and Fellowships

In addition to graduate teaching and research assistantships, students have the opportunity to apply for several scholarships including: 1) the Anne Marie Erdman Scholarship with preference given to international students; 2) Roberts Harris Fellowship for minority applicants with concentration in nutrition and food science; 3) the Wayne King Scholarship with preference given to minority students; 4) the Lavina Laybold Scholarship is intended to provide assistance to a graduate of the FSU dietetics program who continues his/her studies at FSU in the combined master’s/dietetic internship track; 5) the Pao-Sen Chi Memorial Scholarship which gives preference to those with demonstrated financial need; and 6) the Jean Reutlinger and Lillian Munn Scholarship which is awarded to students engaged in research and teaching. These scholarships are awarded annually. Graduate students also have the opportunity to apply for numerous scholarships/fellowships at both the College and the University levels.

Master of Science (MS) in Nutrition and Food

Areas of specialization include:

  1. Food science (+DI option)
  2. Nutrition science (+DI option)
  3. Nutrition education and health promotion (+DI option)

Thesis (thirty-five semester hours minimum) and non-thesis (thirty-five semester hours minimum) programs are both available. In addition to meeting University admission requirements, admission to the nutrition and food science graduate programs requires a GPA of 3.0 and minimum Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores of 600 on the Quantitative Reasoning section and 450 on the Verbal Reasoning section. On the Revised GRE, applicants need a minimum of 150 on the Quantitative Reasoning section and a minimum of 150 on the Verbal Reasoning section. Students are expected to have background supporting courses in food and nutrition, general and organic chemistry, elementary biochemistry, metabolism, microbiology, and anatomy/physiology.

For the dietetic internship, students must first be admitted to the master’s program in nutrition and food science. In addition, the individual must submit verification that the Didactic Program in Dietetics requirements for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics have been met. A selection committee makes the final recommendation for acceptance into the program.

Courses which must be completed by each master’s student in nutrition and food science are: HUN 5802, HUN 6930, FOS/HUN 5930 (two semester hours minimum), HUN 6940, statistics, and a course taken outside of the student’s area of specialization. Other courses are required depending upon the area of specialization. Thesis students must take HUN 5971 (six to nine semester hours) and are required to write a prospectus and a thesis. Non-thesis master’s students must register for HUN 5906, Directed Individual Study, or HUN 8945, Supervised Field Experience (three semester hours), while working on a special project or practicum which has been approved by their major professor, advisory committee, department chair, and academic dean. The remainder of the program is based on the discretion of the committee and the student’s area of professional interest. Analytical chemistry is desirable for some specializations.

Master of Science (MS) in Exercise Physiology

Students in Exercise Physiology are offered majors in exercise physiology, sports nutrition, or sports sciences.

Both thesis (thirty-seven semester hours) and non-thesis (forty-five semester hours) programs are offered. Admission to the exercise physiology program requires a GPA of 3.0 and minimum scores of 600 on the Quantitative Reasoning section and 450 on the Verbal Reasoning section on the old GRE scoring system. On the Revised GRE, applicants need a minimum of 150 on the Quantitative Reasoning section and a minimum of 150 on the Verbal Reasoning section. Students are expected to have background supporting courses in human nutrition, general chemistry, anatomy/physiology, and exercise physiology.

Core courses required for a major in exercise physiology are: APK 5111C, PET 5553, PET 6930, HUN 5802, HUN/PET 5930 (two semester hours minimum), statistics, PET 5367, HUN 6940; and two or three additional elective courses. For the thesis option, the student must also take HUN 5906 (two semester hours), HUN 5971 (six to nine semester hours), and an additional elective (three semester hours). For the non-thesis option, the remaining requirements include HUN 5906 (two semester hours), APK 8945r (nine semester hours), and additional electives (nine semester hours).

Core courses required for a major in sports nutrition include: APK 5111C, HUN 5802, PET 6930, HUN/PET 5930 (two semester hours), PET 5367, PET 5553, HUN 5242, HUN 5243, HUN 5938, HUN 6940, statistics, and at least two additional electives (six semester hours). For the thesis option, students must also take HUN 5971 (six semester hours). For the non-thesis option, the remaining requirements include a total of nine practical/applied semester hours in HUN 5906, APK 8945r, or a combination of the two.

Courses required for a major in sports sciences include: PET 5389, PET 5751, PET 5653, and PET 5412. Other required courses are FAD 5934, CHD 5915, APK 5111C, PET 5367, and an elective from departmental courses. For the thesis option, the student must take HUN 5971 (nine semester hours) and HUN 5930 (three semester hours). The non-thesis course is PET 5945 (twelve semester hours).

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Programs

The Doctor of Philosophy in human sciences includes food science and human nutrition as areas of concentration, while the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in exercise physiology.

In addition to meeting the University’s requirements for graduate admission, admission to all doctoral programs requires a GPA of 3.0 and minimum scores of 600 on the Quantitative Reasoning section and 450 on the Verbal Reasoning section on the old GRE scoring system. On the Revised GRE, applicants need a minimum of 150 on the Quantitative Reasoning section and a minimum of 150 on the Verbal Reasoning section. A curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, and a letter of intent describing research interests are also required. It is requested that doctoral students participate in a departmental interview. An accelerated master’s program is available.

The PhD program in human sciences with areas of emphasis in nutrition and food sciences is a competency-based research degree; this degree has no total hour requirement; however, the student must advance to mastery in the field of specialization. An area of emphasis (nine to twelve semester hours) outside the Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences department is required. The committee member from the area of emphasis should be consulted by the student in selecting these courses. All courses are subject to approval by the student’s committee. Specific course requirements for all doctoral students with a concentration in food science or human nutrition are: FOS/HUN 6930 (must enroll each semester for one semester hour), HUN 6248/5938 (six semester hours minimum), and HUN 6940 (three semester hours). The research tool requirement for both areas of concentration must be met by including in the program of studies not less than six semester hours of coursework in statistics or specialized methods.

Admission to candidacy is dependent upon passage of the preliminary examination. After passing the preliminary examination, the student may then enroll in HUN 6980, Dissertation (twenty-four semester hours).

Doctoral students should have at least one manuscript submitted for publication prior to their dissertation defense.

Specific course requirements for PhD in exercise physiology are PET 6365, PET 6368, PET 6386, PET 5367, PET 6930, PET 6931 (one semester hour per semester enrolled), HUN 6906 (three semester hours), HUN 6911 (S/U), EDF 5401, EDF 5402, BMS 6511, HUN 6940 (three semester hours), and selected electives (nine semester hours minimum).

The research tool requirement, preliminary examination, and manuscript expectation are the same as previously discussed for the PhD in human sciences with a concentration in human nutrition and food sciences or the PhD in exercise physiology.

Definition of Prefixes

APK—Applied Kinesiology

DIE—Dietetics

FOS—Food Science

FSS—Food Service Systems

HSC—Health Sciences

HUN—Human Nutrition

PET—Physical Education Theory

Graduate Courses

APK 5111C. Advanced Exercise Physiology (3). This course studies the physiological effects of acute and chronic physical exercise.

APK 8945r. Exercise Physiology Internship (1–9). (S/U grade only). Prerequisites: APK 5111C, PET 5553, and instructor permission. This course consists of supervised field experience in applied exercise physiology with emphasis on corporate and adult fitness, cardiac rehabilitation, or hospital based wellness programs. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

DIE 5248. Advanced Medical Nutrition Therapy (3). Corequisites: Admitted to Dietetics Internship Program (needs Internship Director’s permission to enroll). This course offers a presentation and discussion of current topics in the field of dietetics and health care, including discussion of novel concepts and applications in dietetics. Methods in nutritional assessment are reviewed. Also, core competencies expected of entry-level dietitians are reviewed and completed.

DIE 5935. Current Topics in Dietetics (3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: DIE 5248. Corequisite: Admission to dietetics internship program. (Requires Internship Director’s permission to enroll.) This course offers a presentation and discussion of current topics in the field of dietetics and health care; dissemination and discussion of novel concepts and application in the practice of dietetics; review of methods in nutritional assessment; and review and completion of core competencies expected of entry-level dietitians.

FOS 5205. Food Safety and Quality (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201, FOS 3026, or departmental approval. The course covers topics such as food spoilage, food poisoning, food-borne pathogens, food laws and regulations, as well as HACCP and risk management. Emphasis is placed on current issues related to the safety and quality of food.

FOS 5424. Food Preservation (3). Prerequisites: Biochemistry and microbiology. Fundamental considerations in the preservation of foods by freezing, canning, dehydration, ionizing radiations, etc.

FOS 5930r. Seminar in Food and Nutrition Science (1). This course consists of student and faculty presentations on research and developments in food science and nutrition. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

FOS 5936. Selected Topics in Food Science and Technology (3). Prerequisites: FOS 4114; biochemistry. Investigation of current research related to selected topics in food science and technology.

FOS 6351C. Physical and Chemical Techniques in Food and Nutrition (3). Prerequisite: HUN 5802L; analytical chemistry recommended. Experimental approach to food and nutrition research may involve the study of foods, humans, or animal models and a variety of specialized instruments.

FOS 6930r. Seminar in Food and Nutrition Science (1). Doctoral student presentations concerning research in the food sciences. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

HSC 5603. Models of Health Behavior (3). Psycho-social and environmental factors influencing various health behavior patterns are presented.

HUN 5242. Carbohydrates, Fats, and Proteins (3). Prerequisite: Biochemistry or HUN 3224. Metabolism, physiological action, and interrelationships of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids.

HUN 5243. Vitamins and Minerals (3). Prerequisite: Biochemistry or HUN 3225. Biochemical functions, physiological actions, and metabolism of the vitamins and minerals. Fundamental concepts underlying human nutrition.

HUN 5297. Eating Disorders, Body Image, and Healthy Weight Maintenance (3). This course presents current science based information about nutrition, dieting, eating disorders, and body image.

HUN 5802. Research Design and Methodology (2). Basic research terminology, principles and techniques in movement science, nutrition and food science including library materials and writing techniques.

HUN 5802L. Research Design and Methodology Laboratory (1). Prerequisite: Chemistry. Laboratory techniques in the areas of physiology, biochemistry as related to nutrition and metabolism, exercise physiology, and food science.

HUN 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–9). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

HUN 5910r. Supervised Research (1–3). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

HUN 5930r. Food and Nutrition Seminar (1–4). Doctoral student presentations concerning research in the nutritional sciences. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

HUN 5938r. Special Topics in Nutrition (3). Readings and discussion in special areas such as nutrition in aging, energy metabolism and obesity, and world food problems. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

HUN 5971r. Thesis (3–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

HUN 6248r. Advances in Nutrition and Food Science (3–12). Prerequisites: HUN 5242, HUN 5243, and FOS 5936. Current topics in proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, minerals, or vitamins. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

HUN 6906r. Directed Individual Study (1–9). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

HUN 6911r. Supervised Research (3–5). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

HUN 6930r. Food and Nutrition Seminar (1). Doctoral student presentations concerning research in the nutritional sciences.

HUN 6940r. Supervised Teaching (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

HUN 6980r. Dissertation (2–12). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

HUN 8945r. Supervised Field Experience (1–12). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Instructor permission, DIE 5248, HUN 5242, and HUN 5243. Supervised experience in applied dietetics. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours in a two-year period to meet CADE requirements for the dietetics internship.

HUN 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

HUN 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

HUN 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

HUN 8985r. Dissertation Defense Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

PET 5052. Motor Memory (3). Deals with behavioral theories, models, and related research on motor memory. Analyses made of the research evidence related to encoding, capacity, forgetting, storage mechanisms, control processes, organization, and error scores. Offered alternate years.

PET 5077. Physical Dimensions of Aging (4). The course deals with the quality of life, individual differences as we age, physical decline of physiological systems (cardiovascular, muscular, joints, bone, neuromuscular), health, exercise, and well-being, and the pathology of aging. Course assists students in developing an understanding of the physical aspects of aging to apply to setting such as physical therapy, sports medicine, and health and fitness programs in hospitals and retirement communities.

PET 5367. Nutrition and Exercise Performance (3). Immediate and long term effects of nutrition on exercise performance. Effects of acute and chronic exercise on nutrient requirements.

PET 5389. Strength Program Development for Competitive Athletes and Sport (3). Prerequisite: Admitted to the Sports Sciences Major of the MS in Exercise Science or instructor permission. This course explores the scientific basis and development of sports related fitness. Emphasis on muscle strength, endurance, speed, power, agility, and flexibility in competitive athletes. Various styles of programming and the methods used to elicit specific adaptations are emphasized. This course meets specific guidelines and competencies for strength and conditioning professionals.

PET 5412. Professional Practices for the Sports Scientist (3). Prerequisite: Admitted to the Sports Sciences Major of the MS in Exercise Science. This course explores fundamentals of sports sciences organizational, administrative, and management practices. Topics include facility organization, risk management, professional ethics, budgeting, staffing, personal advancement, and career development. This course meets specific guidelines and competencies for strength and conditioning professionals.

PET 5553. Cardiorespiratory and Anthropometric Evaluation and Development of Exercise Programs (3). Prerequisite: APK 5111C. This course is designed to examine techniques of cardiovascular, respiratory, and anthropometrical evaluation with a particular emphasis on aerobic capacity and body composition and to design, implement, and administer exercise programs for developing physical fitness.

PET 5653. Cardiovascular Program Development for Competitive Athletes and Sport (3). Prerequisite: Admitted to the Sports Sciences Major of the MS in Exercise Science or instructor permission. This course is a concentrated study of the assessment, evaluation, and design of cardiovascular program development for the competitive athlete including those with selected medical conditions or concerns. This course meets specific guidelines and competencies for strength and conditioning professionals.

PET 5751. Sports Fitness Testing and Evaluation for Competitive Athletes and Sport (3). Prerequisite: Admitted to the Sports Sciences Major of the MS in Exercise Science or instructor permission. This course includes development of knowledge, skills, and abilities in selecting, administering, and evaluating sports related fitness tests for competitive athletes. This course meets specific guidelines and competencies for strength and conditioning professionals.

PET 5930r. Seminar in Movement Sciences (1). Involves a number of student and faculty presentations concerning research and developments in exercise physiology, motor learning/control, and the movement sciences. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

PET 5945r. Sports Sciences Practicum (3). Prerequisite: Admitted to the Sports Sciences Major of the Master of Science Degree in Exercise Science. This course is comprised of supervised practicum experiences in a sports science setting. Emphasis is on developing skills and abilities of a strength and conditioning specialist through practical application of knowledge from previous or current coursework, while learning new related principles or concepts. May be repeated to a maximum of fifteen semester hours.

PET 6317. Skeletal Muscle Structure and Function (4). Prerequisite: APK 3110C or equivalent level of exercise physiology course. This course covers the study of the morphology and physiology of skeletal muscle which includes adaptations that occur in response to physical activity, disuse and aging.

PET 6365. Exercise and the Cardiorespiratory System (4). Prerequisite: Advanced exercise physiology. A study of the cardio-respiratory system during exercise and the adjustments within the system to exercise training and other stressors.

PET 6368. Metabolic Responses to Exercise (3). Consideration of the processes involved in the production and utilization of energy in exercise and the effects of training.

PET 6386. Environmental Aspects of Exercise (3). Focuses on the effects of temperature, altitude, and air pollution on exercise performance. Offered alternate years.

PET 6387. Endocrinology in Health and Exercise (3). Prerequisite: APK 5111C or equivalent level of Exercise Physiology course. This course is an in-depth examination of the physiological principles and mechanisms of endocrinology as related to exercise and overall health. Students gain an understanding of the endocrine organs, hormone classifications, and detailed mechanisms of action for selected hormones. The influence of exercise and disease on acute and chronic human endocrine function is investigated. In addition, the role of chemical mediators and nutrition in coordinating the function of the endocrine system is investigated.

PET 6388. Exercise and Disease (3). Prerequisite: APK 3110C. This course in exercise and chronic diseases is designed to provide students with an understanding of recent advances in exercise physiology for clinical populations. Specific topics addressed include pathophysiology of disease process, clinical considerations, and exercise rehabilitation in clinical populations. Particular emphasis is placed on the acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise in healthy older individuals and in patients with diabetes, obesity, coronary heart disease, chronic heart failure, hypertension, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease.

PET 6930r. Seminar in Movement Sciences (1). Doctoral student presentations concerning current research and developments in exercise physiology, and motor learning/control.

PET 6931r. Advanced Topics (1–4). Integration of facts, principles, and theories into a practical philosophy in the area of specialization of instructor teaching the course any given semester. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

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