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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

School of Teacher Education

College of Education

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu

Director: Sherry A. Southerland; Professors: Foorman, Hanline, Jones, Lewis, Southerland; Associate Professors: Clark, Guerette, Jakubowski, Kim, Myers; Assistant Professors: Andrews-Larson, Boggs, Dennis, Ivy, Kisa, Jaber, Root, Papi, Steacy, Tekkumru-Kisa, Whalon, Whitacre; Teaching Faculty III: A. Davis, Rios (Panama City), Underwood; Teaching Faculty II: Damelio, Daniel; Teaching Faculty I: Ballard, Imperial, Taylor, Tenore; Professors Emeriti: Clark, N. Davis, Dawson, Denmark, Gallard, Green, G. Jones, Kirby, Lynch-Brown, Mills, Oseroff, Palmer, Piazza, Platt, Schluck, Scott, Tait, Wheatley, Wolfgang

The School of Teacher Education is committed to high-quality personnel preparation programs, service to the state of Florida, and research in early childhood and elementary education, secondary education, reading/language arts, special education, and related areas. The School strives to provide programs of excellence serving undergraduates, graduates, and advanced graduates by teaching, advising, and providing professional role models. Our goal is to prepare educational leaders who will contribute to the betterment of a pluralistic, global society in the context of the state of Florida’s needs for an educated, global-minded citizenry.

The mission is accomplished by:

  • implementing personnel preparation programs that are comprehensive and that prepare practitioners to implement state-of-the-art research-based practices
  • conducting high-quality research in authentic settings
  • translating research to practice through service to the profession at the local, state, and national levels

Program requirements for state-approved Educator Preparation programs are subject to revision based on changes in Section 1004.04, Florida Statutes, Public Accountability and State Approval for Educator Preparation Programs and State Board of Education Rule 6A-5.066, Approval of Educator Preparation Programs.

Curriculum And Instruction Degree Program

The Curriculum and Instruction degree program reflects the interdependent nature of contemporary professional education in which subject content and research questions transcend single areas of concentration and demand interdisciplinary collaboration. Graduates earning a Curriculum and Instruction degree possess a dual benefit – they retain an individual content major on their transcript (e.g., Elementary Education, English Education) and attain a Curriculum and Instruction designation on both their diploma and transcript. Finally, graduates earning a degree in Curriculum and Instruction will possess a rigorous degree structure consistent with the needs of a contemporary College of Education.

Master of Science Degree in Curriculum and Instruction (thirty-two to thirty-six hours)

Coursework for the master’s degree is comprised of core program elements and a major field of study. The core program elements are:

  • Curriculum (three hours). This element addresses critical issues of PK-12 curriculum. A broad range of scope, sequence, and integration issues would include: 1) The historical, philosophical, psychological, and social foundations upon which curriculum is constructed; 2) The development and use of national and state standards; and 3) Applications in contemporary design (aims, goals, implementation, and assessment alternatives).
  • Teaching and Learning (three hours). This element addresses considerations and decisions addressing the needs of learners, selection of teaching methods, and the social interactions necessary to enhance the quality of the learning environment. Tenets of learning theory applied as best practice (e.g., Universal Design for Learning, Response to Intervention, et al.) would be represented in this core element.
  • Instructional Technology (three hours). This element addresses considerations, decisions, and critical issues relevant to enhancing instructional effectiveness and efficiency through the use of Web tools, social media and immersive environments, productivity tools, project-based learning, et al. Consideration is also given to effective online/asynchronous teaching and learning best practices.
  • Research and Scholarship (three to six hours). This element broadly addresses the interpretation, use, and conduct of research. Master’s candidates will design studies, collect relevant information in a field-based environment, and interpret results that lead to instructional improvement and enhanced student achievement. Candidates specifically interested in continuing studies at the doctoral level will, in addition, complete EDF 5481 (Methods of Educational Research; three hours).
  • Major Field of Study (eighteen to twenty-one hours). Permits the degree candidate to obtain depth in an individual specialty area. Students can select to complete their Masters of Science degree completely online.

Your advisor and/or advisory committee will help you to select courses to meet both the core program elements and field of study.

Note: Select Curriculum and Instruction majors do allow for students to pursue teacher certification while in the Masters of Science degree program. However, not all majors provide for this option. If offered, this option will require additional coursework.

Master of Science Degree in Curriculum and Instruction (online program, thirty-three hours)

The online Master’s Degree in Curriculum and Instruction (C & I) is designed for beginning and experienced teachers and other educators who are deeply committed to perfecting their instructional effectiveness and becoming teacher leaders in their local settings. The program assists educators in better understanding and addressing:

  • the needs of the diverse students they serve;
  • the dynamic policy environment represented by new state and local standards; and
  • research-based instructional approaches and supports that are available to teachers in the 21st century.

Educators in the program will use their teaching context as sites to explore the ideas, techniques, technology and approaches introduced in the program to determine their local effectiveness. Participation in the program will require educators to be committed to honing their knowledge of students, content, and standards. This will be accomplished by having educators to reflect on and examine their own knowledge, abilities, and educational effectiveness through the use of data collected from their practice interpreted using the theoretical and methodological tools introduced in the program. The online C & I master’s allows educators to specialize in an area of study through offering a number of majors: Elementary Education, English Education, Foreign and Second Language, Mathematics Education, Science Education, Special Education.

The target audience for this program is practicing teachers and other educators intent on enhancing their teaching effectiveness and/or becoming teacher leaders as well as teachers in need of continuing education credit. Participation in the program will require that the educator has access to students in some sort of instructional capacity (formal or informal). The seven core courses will ask the teacher learners to apply the techniques, tools and approaches explored in the courses in their work with students. The culminating event in the capstone course will require that the teacher learners use the theoretical tools introduced in the program to describe and reflect on video recordings and teacher/student work products drawn from their teaching practice. The program can be completed completely online; although in some specializations, face-to-face options may be available. Online core courses are designed to accommodate teachers’ varied work schedules.

Coursework for the online master’s degree is comprised of seven core courses and four courses that include electives or courses within the major. The core courses include:

EDG 5339, Making Sense of Data to Inform Instruction

EDG 5345, Using Assessments in the PK-12 Classroom to Differentiated Instruction

EDG 5709, Culturally Responsive Teaching

EDG 5209, Teachers as Informed Curriculum Decision Makers

EME 5050, Teaching with Technology

EDG 5XXX, Analyzing and Refining Teaching

EEX 5089, Adaptations and Accommodation for Learners with Disabilities

Majors are available in Elementary Education, English Education, Mathematics Education, Science Education and Special Education. The academic advisor and/or advisor committee will help students to select courses satisfy the core program elements, major courses, and elective requirements.

Students can complete this Master of Science degree completely online.

Specialist Degree in Curriculum and Instruction (minimum thirty to thirty-eight hours)

Coursework for the specialist degree is comprised of core program elements that accompany a major that reflects an individual area of expertise/interest. The core program elements are:

  • Interdepartmental Core (nine hours) in the areas of Curriculum Theory (three hours), Learning Theory (three hours), and Policy Studies (three hours). This element represents an opportunity to gain insights from department faculty external to the School of Teacher Education. Completion of this core simultaneously provides curriculum and instruction specialist candidates with a more comprehensive view of professional education theory and best practices.
  • Seminars (minimum two hours). This element includes a minimum of two curriculum and instruction seminars. Topics might include: action research, grant writing, online teaching/learning, program evaluation, etc.
  • Research Methods Core (minimum twelve hours). A minimum of twelve semester hours of graduate courses must be completed in the research methods core. The student must demonstrate knowledge and competence with basic descriptive and inferential statistics and various qualitative methods of educational research.
  • Major Field of Study (minimum fifteen hours). Permits the degree candidate to obtain depth in an individual specialty area.

The advisor and/or advisory committee will help select courses to meet both the core program elements and field of study.

Doctoral Degree in Curriculum and Instruction (minimum sixty-five hours)

Coursework for the doctoral degree is comprised of core program elements that accompany a major that reflects an individual area of expertise/interest. The core program elements are:

  • Interdepartmental Core (nine hours) in the areas of Curriculum Theory (three hours), Learning Theory (three hours), and Policy Studies (three hours). This element represents an opportunity to gain insights from department faculty external to the School of Teacher Education. Completion of this core simultaneously provides curriculum and instruction doctoral candidates with a more comprehensive view of professional education theory and best practices.
  • Seminars (minimum two hours). This element includes a minimum of two curriculum and instruction seminars. Topics might include: academic and professional identity, critiquing educational research, grant writing, etc.
  • Research Methods Core (minimum twelve hours). A minimum of twelve semester hours of graduate courses must be completed in the research methods core. The student must demonstrate knowledge and competence with basic descriptive and inferential statistics and various methods of educational research.
  • Dissertation Research (minimum twenty-four hours). The minimum number of dissertation hours for completion of a doctoral degree is twenty-four semester hours.
  • Major Field of Study (minimum fifteen hours). Permits the degree candidate to obtain depth in an individual specialty area.

The advisor and/or advisory committee will help select courses to meet both the core program elements and field of study.

The following program, majors and degree levels are offered by the School of Teacher Education:

Program:

  • Curriculum and Instruction (C&I)

Majors:

  • Early Childhood Education M,S,D
  • Elementary Education BS/MS combined, M,S,D
  • English Education BS/MS combined, M,S,D
  • Foreign and Second Language Education M,S,D
  • Mathematics Education M, S, D
  • Mathematics Teaching M
  • Reading Education/Language Arts M,S,D
  • Science Education M,S,D
  • Social Science Education BS/MS combined, M,S,D
  • Special Education
  • Special Education BS/MS combined, M,S,D
  • Special Education M, S, D
  • Special Education Studies M (online/distance learning)
  • Visual Disabilities BS/MS combined M, S

Admission Standards

Students considered for admission to graduate programs in Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) must present a 3.0 grade point average (GPA) for upper-division undergraduate coursework and a minimum GRE score determined by the department. All applicants to C&I programs must submit an official GRE score as part of the admission process. Individual majors may have additional requirements for admission. Students should consult the School of Teacher Education for details regarding specific majors. The School of Teacher Education is committed to increasing the proportion of teacher candidates who have historically been underrepresented among Florida’s public school teachers, and applicants representing such groups will be considered for exceptions to the general and major admissions criteria.

Educator Preparation Programs

All students planning to pursue an educator preparation program at Florida State University must be formally admitted to Educator Preparation. Admission to Educator Preparation is administered by the Dean of the College of Education and assigned to the Office of Academic Services and Intern Support (OASIS), 2301 Stone Building.

Application for admission to Educator Preparation is distinct from admission to an upper-division college or program and is a required step for graduation and certification.

Professional Behaviors and Dispositions

While enrolled in an educator preparation program, the student is expected to demonstrate behaviors and dispositions that conform to the “Code of Ethics” (State Board of Education Rule 6B-1.00, FAC) and the “Principles of Professional Conduct in Florida” (State Board of Education Rule 6B-1.006, FAC). The programs reserve the right to refuse or discontinue enrollment of any student who violates these expectations or, in the judgment of a majority of the program faculty, does not meet the program standards.

Section 1004.04, Florida Statutes, Public Accountability and State Approval for Teacher Preparation Programs, State Board of Education Rules 6A-4.0021 and 6A-5.066 require that all students seeking admission to undergraduate teacher education programs at Florida State University meet the following requirements prior to entering the program:

Have at least a 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale) GPA on all college work attempted; and

Have a grade of “C–” or better in each required general education English and general education mathematics course; and

Take and achieve a passing score on all sections of the General Knowledge portion of the Florida Teacher Certification Examination.

Prior to entering the upper-division major, students must have completed the state of Florida Common Course Prerequisites, which include: a) EDF 1005 and, b) up to fifteen semester hours of general program prerequisites specified by each degree program (see degree program sections for specific prerequisites). FSU-Teach majors entering science or mathematics teacher preparation programs are exempt from the three-hour Education Common Course Prerequisite requirement, EDF 1005.

Per policy adopted by the Florida State University Professional Education Advisory Council, students seeking readmission to a teacher education program shall be responsible for meeting the most current course, clinical, and certification requirements set out by that program; readmitted students in these programs will not be ‘grandfathered’ under the educator preparation requirements in effect at the time of original admission to the major.

Common prerequisites and admission criteria for state-approved teacher preparation programs are subject to revision based on changes in Section 1004.04, Florida Statutes, State Public Accountability and State Approval for Teacher Preparation Programs, Board of Education Rule 6A-4.0021, Florida Teacher Certification Examinations, and State Board of Education Rule 6A-5.066, Approval of Educator Preparation Programs.

Early Childhood Education

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/curriculum-and-instruction/early-childhood-education-m-s-d

The Early Childhood Education major offers graduate coursework leading to master’s, specialist, and doctoral degrees in Curriculum and Instruction. The primary goal of the Early Childhood program is to prepare professionals to work in various early childhood settings including prekindergarten programs, early childhood centers, and Pre-K to grade three in public and private schools.

Master’s Degree

The Master of Science (MS) curricula in Early Childhood Education is designed for individuals aspiring to be master classroom teachers of children, birth to age eight (or grade three) in public and private schools, early childhood centers, or similar educational institutions. This program is also for those who have an interest in becoming center directors, curriculum leaders of schools and districts, or educational consultants. The master’s degree is also attractive to prospective doctoral candidates in education who are seeking an interdisciplinary program of studies for a master’s degree.

Curricula

Three types of programs are offered: 1) For students who are already certified teachers, thirty-three semester hours and a comprehensive exam or thesis are required. Coursework includes a core minimum of nine semester hours focusing on the early childhood curriculum, early childhood research, and instructional technology; twenty-one to twenty-two semester hours in early childhood education content; and three semester hours in teaching and learning. Students may write a thesis that will substitute for up to six semester hours of coursework; 2) For students who do not have early childhood certification, a program similar to 1 (above) but with a core of classes focusing on teaching methods. A comprehensive examination is also required for this track. Coursework includes a core minimum of nine semester hours focusing on the early childhood curriculum, early childhood research, and instructional technology; twenty-four to twenty-seven semester hours in early childhood methods courses; and three semester hours in teaching and learning. Students in this track also have the option of taking three hours of supervised teaching. Although this track is not an initial certification programs, graduates are eligible to apply for the Florida Department of Education’s Temporary Certificate so that they can begin teaching full time. 3) The third track is for those interested in early childhood special education. Designed for those already certified to teach, this program includes classes in early childhood special education as well as early childhood education. Students have the option of including courses for the Pre-Kindergarten Disabilities Endorsement (twelve credits) or the Infant/Toddler Developmental Specialist Certificate (nine credits). Coursework includes a core minimum of nine semester hours focusing on the early childhood curriculum, early childhood research, and instructional technology; nine to twelve hours in early childhood special education, and twelve to fifteen semester hours in early childhood education content.

Specialist Degree

The Specialist in Education and Doctor of Philosophy degree programs are designed to prepare individuals for leadership roles in early childhood education (i.e. infancy, preschool, kindergarten, and primary education). Some examples of the broad range of professional roles available to those pursuing these advanced degrees include serving as college or university faculty, staff specialists in public or private school systems, and in governmental or professional organizations.

Curricula

For the specialist degree, each student’s committee, based on the curricular needs and career focus of the student individually designs a thirty-six semester hour program of studies. Areas of concentration typically include developmental learning, integrated curriculum, or early childhood content and pedagogy. Students are encouraged to write a thesis in lieu of a comprehensive exam, which may substitute for up to six hours of coursework.

Doctoral Degree

The doctoral program is individually planned in conjunction with the major professor and the student’s supervisory committee with coursework emphasis in the following areas: research, theory base for childhood education, evaluation, curriculum, instruction, special field experience, practicum, and directed research. Doctoral studies in Early Childhood Education prepare individuals for leadership positions in colleges and universities, local school districts, in-service teacher education for school districts, state departments of education, state and federal government, and educational research and development centers. Since completing a doctoral major in Early Childhood Education requires an intensive commitment, students are encouraged to pursue doctoral study on a full-time basis. Qualified applicants are eligible for financial support, teaching assistantships, tuition waivers, student housing, and consulting opportunities for teacher education centers. A limited number of fellowships and scholarships from the college and University are also available on a competitive basis.

Curricula

The program of study leading to a Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Early Childhood Education requires a minimum of forty-eight semester hours of coursework, twenty-four semester hours of dissertation credit, and satisfactory completion of a qualifying exam, preliminary exam, prospectus defense, and oral defense of the dissertation. The coursework includes a nine semester-hour core of interdepartmental courses; two one-hour Curriculum and Instruction seminars; fifteen semester hours in research design and qualitative and quantitative research methods; and fifteen semester hours of early childhood education content. Students study key research in their selected field of study, practice appropriate inquiry methods, and demonstrate the capacity to carry out independent scholarly investigation.

Elementary Education

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/curriculum-and-instruction/elementary-education-m-s-d

The primary goal of the Elementary Education program is to prepare professionals who work at various levels of instruction, including the primary, intermediate, and middle school grades; in-service teacher education; curriculum development; and college and university teacher education. Coursework and field experiences prepare graduates with specializations appropriate for educating children, grades K through early middle school. Elementary education graduate work includes curricula leading to the master’s, specialist, and doctoral degrees.

Program faculty bring an interdisciplinary focus to inquiry in elementary education and have expertise in curriculum theory, developmental learning, integrated learning, teacher cognition, school improvement, teacher education, classroom organization, multicultural learning, and technology education. Subject area content and pedagogy are also integral to the program with specializations in language arts, mathematics, reading, science, and social studies teaching and learning.

Master’s Degree

The Master of Science (MS) curricula in Elementary Education are designed for individuals aspiring to be master classroom teachers for elementary and middle school grades, curriculum leaders of schools and districts, or educational consultants. The master’s degree is also attractive to prospective doctoral candidates in education who are seeking an interdisciplinary program of studies for a master’s degree.

Curricula

Two types of programs are offered: 1) For students who are already certified teachers, thirty-two to thirty-three semester hours and a comprehensive exam or thesis are required. Coursework includes a core minimum of nine semester hours focusing on elementary curriculum, teaching, and learning; twenty-one to twenty-two semester hours in content specializations with at least nine hours in a focal area; and three semester hours in educational foundations. Students may write a thesis that will substitute for up to six semester hours of coursework; 2) For students seeking initial certification in elementary education, an extended degree program of fifty-one to fifty-two semester hours, currently including ten semester hours of supervised teaching and internship, is offered. To complete this program, students must also meet state requirements to be admitted to teacher education, described in the “College of Education” chapter of this Graduate Bulletin.

Specialist Degree

The Specialist in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Elementary Education is an advanced degree to prepare individuals for leadership in elementary education programs as master teachers, curriculum specialists, in-service teacher educators, and consultants for public or private educational organizations as well as state and federal government. Typically, this degree is sought as a terminal degree in the field.

Curricula

For the specialist degree, each student’s committee designs a thirty-two semester hour program of studies beyond the master’s degree, based on the curricular needs and career focus of the individual student. Areas of concentration typically include developmental learning, integrated curriculum, subject area content and pedagogy, elementary and middle school improvement, or technology education. Students are encouraged to write a thesis in lieu of a comprehensive exam, which may substitute for up to six hours of coursework.

Doctoral Degree

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Elementary Education emphasizes theory and research in Elementary Education drawn from the disciplines of anthropology, sociology, philosophy, psychology, and the humanities. Doctoral studies in Elementary Education prepare individuals for leadership positions in colleges and universities, local school districts, in-service teacher education for school districts, state departments of education, state and federal government, and educational research and development centers. Since completing a doctoral major in Elementary Education requires an intensive commitment, students are encouraged to pursue doctoral study on a full-time basis. Qualified applicants are eligible for financial support, teaching assistantships, tuition waivers, student housing, and consulting opportunities for teacher education centers. A limited number of fellowships and scholarships from the college and University are also available on a competitive basis.

Curricula

The program of study leading to a Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Elementary Education requires a minimum of forty-eight semester hours of coursework, twenty-four semester hours of dissertation credit, and satisfactory completion of a qualifying exam, preliminary exam, and oral defense of the dissertation. The coursework includes a nine semester-hour core of doctoral courses in elementary education; a fourteen to eighteen semester hour core in research design and qualitative and quantitative methods; and other coursework specializations to meet the student’s professional and academic goals. Such areas may include specific subject areas in teacher education, evaluation, policy, sociology, economics, or institutional research.

English Education

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/curriculum-and-instruction/english-education-m-s-d

Master’s Degree

Combined Bachelor and Master Of Science (BS/MS) Degree Program

The three-year combined degree program in English education results in a Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in English education being awarded simultaneously. This program requires coursework in English, English education, teaching English as a second language, reading, and professional education. After meeting state of Florida common program prerequisites, and passing the Florida Teacher Certification Exam General Knowledge test (required for program admission) students in English education must complete a minimum of fifteen semester hours of English coursework. All upper-division English coursework must be taken at the 3000/4000 level. Courses must include those that focus specifically on these areas: minority American literature, American literature, multicultural literature, Shakespeare, British literature, linguistics, and advanced composition. Students should see an advisor in English education for specific courses satisfying these requirements.

For a complete list of English education combined degree program coursework, please go to: http://undergrad1.its.fsu.edu/academic_guide/guide-display.php?program=english-education.

All candidates also are required to take TSL 4080 and 4081. When taken in conjunction with the courses listed at the above URL, students become eligible for the state ESOL endorsement in teaching English as a second language.

Six semester hours of upper division professional education courses are required (as explained in the “College of Education” section of this General Bulletin). Students must complete all required coursework before being admitted to student teaching. Students are encouraged to student teach in the local area (Area I) or in the other areas supported by the College of Education.

In addition to meeting the College of Education criteria for admission to Educator Preparation, students must meet the following standards in order to student teach: 1) have a “C+” or above in all courses required for the major; 2) maintain an overall ‘all college’ GPA of 2.5 or higher; 3) Passing score on all required subtests of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam (The FTCE General Knowledge Test; The FTCE Professional Education Test, and the FTCE Subject Area Exam in English 6-12). For more information on these exams, go to the Florida Department of Education; and 4) approval by the English education faculty.

Students must meet all of these criteria in order to be eligible to student teach.

Specialist Program

The specialist in education degree is available to experienced teachers already holding a master’s degree. Thirty semester hours beyond the master’s degree are required, including work in professional education, English, educational research, and correlated fields. Program details will be decided upon by candidates in consultation with their supervisory committee. All candidates must pass a comprehensive examination at the completion of coursework.

Doctoral Degree

The English Education major at the doctoral level is designed to prepare candidates for positions in teacher education, supervision, and research. Applicants usually will hold a master’s degree in English, English Education, or in a closely related discipline such as theatre, classics, or humanities. Applicants will be certified teachers with a minimum of three years of successful secondary school teaching experience.

Each doctoral candidate’s work will be supervised by a committee of at least four members representing English Education and other appropriate faculties. Additional members from other faculties may participate as the nature of the student’s research demands. Students must identify the members of their advisory committee and complete a program of studies form no later than the second semester of coursework.

Students must pass a written qualifying examination during the second semester of coursework. A written and oral comprehensive examination (also referred to as the “preliminary examination”) must be passed after completing coursework and before presenting a prospectus of a dissertation. A dissertation must be written and defended in an oral examination.

Sixty-four semester hours of coursework following admission to the program are required (including hours presented for the master’s degree), depending upon faculty evaluation of graduate work already completed. Students must also complete a minimum of twenty-four dissertation hours after passing the preliminary examination.

Research Tool

At least twelve semester hours of coursework in methods of research and inquiry will be included in the doctoral student’s program. All students will take EDF 5400, Basic Descriptive and Inferential Statistics (4). Students may then pursue a quantitative option, which would include EDF 5481, Methods of Educational Research (3), and at least one additional statistics course; or a qualitative option, which would be one course approved by their major professor. The qualitative option is recommended as more appropriate for research in teaching and learning language. Students who wish to use questionnaire or survey instruments in their dissertation research must complete a course specifically designed with those goals as a focus. This course must be approved by the student’s major professor.

A minimum of thirty semester hours of English courses should be completed at the graduate level, including courses taken in a master’s program. It is recommended that the student’s selection of English courses should include work in the following areas: literary criticism or critical theory, bibliography and research, and modern rhetoric or composition theory.

With the approval of an advisor, a student may elect to enroll for directed individual study, supervised research, supervised teaching, or for any special topics courses that may be offered.

Foreign and Second Language Education

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/curriculum-and-instruction/foreign-and-second-language-education-m-s-d

Curricula in Foreign and Second Language Education lead to the Master of Science (MS), the Specialist in Education (EdS), and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Curriculum and Instruction. International applicants must provide evidence of a passing TOEFL score: 80 on the Internet-based test and 550 on the paper-based version; MELAB minimum score: 77. Native English-speaking (US domestic) applicants shall hold an earned baccalaureate degree. International applicants (with a native language other than English) shall be admitted on the basis of their proficiency in the native language.

In the Foreign and Second Language Education program, students will have the opportunity to participate in research and investigate issues such as those related to language pedagogy and curricula, second language acquisition, the development of articulated foreign and second language programs, cultural aspects of language acquisition, and other issues related to multilingualism/multiculturalism.

Master’s Degree

The thirty-seven-hour master’s program in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Foreign and Second Language Education is sequenced over one calendar year. Within the major there are two tracks: one in Foreign and Second Language Education (FSLE) and one in Foreign and Second Language Educational Research. Both tracks share a common core of courses. The course of study consists of three general areas: Area I, core education requirements; Area II, pedagogy courses specific to the subject area; and, Area III, content-specific courses appropriate for each of the two tracks. To complete a master’s degree, students may elect to write and defend a thesis or take comprehensive exams in their final semester.

Specialist Program

The specialist in education is an advanced master’s degree. Applicants to the EdS program should already hold a master’s degree in an area of Foreign and Second Language Education or related field. The purpose of this program would be to expand the applicant’s skills and knowledge in his/her current area of preparation or to extend skills and knowledge to another area of Foreign and Second Language Education. Program details will be decided upon by candidates in consultation with their supervisory committee comprised of a major professor and at least two other members. All candidates must pass a comprehensive examination at the completion of coursework. As part of this program, the student may elect to write a thesis or complete supervised research, pass comprehensive exams or defend a portfolio or final project.

Doctoral Program

The doctoral program (PhD) in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Foreign and Second Language Education is a comprehensive program designed to prepare students to serve as teacher leaders, college instructors, as well as curriculum specialists, state testing specialists and textbook company representatives. Doctoral program graduates are specifically prepared to become university professors, researchers and leaders in the field. The program consists of preparing individuals in core areas: curriculum theory, learning theory, policy studies, research methods, and curriculum and instruction. Degree candidates will be required to pass a qualifying examination at the end of their first year in residence and a preliminary examination at the completion of the program of study (prior to writing and defending a prospectus of proposed research to be conducted for the dissertation). Official programs of studies are constructed individually between doctoral students and their advisors.

Mathematics Education

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/curriculum-and-instruction/mathematics-education-m-s-d

Curricula for the major in Mathematics Education are offered which lead to the Master of Science (MS), the Specialist in Education (EdS), and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Curriculum and Instruction. Graduate curricula have been designed to meet the needs and professional goals of those preparing for various roles in mathematics education. Opportunities exist for graduate students to participate in major research projects that are setting new directions and further research for K-20 mathematics teaching and learning. Research among the faculty in mathematics education has focused on teacher education, mathematics curriculum, history of mathematics, undergraduate mathematics, and K-20 student learning.

Admissions

All degree levels require a minimum 3.0 upper-division grade point average (GPA) in previous work, GRE score (writing score required for PhD), letters of recommendation, and a writing sample and/or written response to a prompt. Applicants for the EdS and PhD with a major in mathematics education will be expected to complete at least eighteen hours of graduate mathematics if not already taken for a previous degree. For MS degree applicants, grades of “B” or higher in mathematics courses beyond the Calculus sequence are recommended.

Master’s Degree

A program of study for the Mathematics Education major at the Master’s level is designed based on student goals and degree elements. Degree elements include curriculum (three hours), teaching and learning (three hours), instructional technology (three hours), research and scholarship (three to six hours), and the major field of study (eighteen to twenty-one hours). To complete a master’s degree, students may take either the thesis or non-thesis option. In the thesis option, students must take a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of coursework and six semester hours of thesis. Students will defend their thesis in an oral examination conducted by their supervisory committee. Students taking the non-thesis option must take a minimum of thirty-two semester hours of coursework. These students have options for demonstrating successful completion of the program. During the first year in their program, students will select a supervisory committee consisting of a major professor and at least two additional members. The program of studies is planned with the student’s supervisory committee to meet the specific needs and goals of the student while addressing the degree elements.

Specialist Program

The Specialist in Education degree is available to experienced teachers already holding a master’s degree. Thirty-eight semester hours beyond the master’s degree are required, with courses in curriculum theory (three hours), learning theory (three hours), policy studies (three hours), seminars (two hours), research methods core (twelve hours), and the major (fifteen hours). Program details will be decided upon by candidates in consultation with their supervisory committee comprised of a major professor and at least two other members. All candidates must pass a comprehensive examination at the completion of coursework.

Doctoral Program

Curriculum for the PhD in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Mathematics Education is intended to prepare graduates for work in mathematics teacher education and mathematics education research. Tracks for those interested in undergraduate mathematics education, secondary mathematics education, and middle grades mathematics education are available. A handbook for the PhD in Curriculum and Instruction provides specific information on milestones and expectations and is available from graduate faculty within the School of Teacher Education.

In general, four years will be required to complete coursework for the PhD. Depending on program faculty evaluation of graduate work already completed, a program of study is reviewed and approved by the student’s supervisory committee. The coursework in mathematics education is divided into core and elective requirements. In exceptional circumstances the core requirements for the major can be varied by satisfactorily completing other courses in mathematics education that are deemed more appropriate for the student’s career goals. Such variations must be approved by the major professor and supervisory committee.

The curriculum for this major reflects the degree elements required in the PhD: interdepartmental core courses (nine hours), research methods (minimum twelve hours), departmental seminars (minimum two hours), mathematics education major or related courses (minimum fifteen hours), and dissertation (minimum twenty-four hours). Courses satisfying these elements are recommended by the faculty advisors. Additional courses may be required based on previous graduate coursework. Students are required to enroll for a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of dissertation credit. A student may enroll in dissertation hours after passing the preliminary examination. A prospectus is prepared and formally defended prior to conducting the doctoral research study.

Students are required to pass a diagnostic exam (which includes a written and oral component) before the end of the first year in the program.. The objective of the diagnostic is to appraise the student’s research aptitude and readiness to continue pursuing a doctoral degree and to facilitate advising in the development of the student’s program of study. As part of this process, an advisory committee is established, a major professor is determined, and a program of study is planned.

Upon completion of formal coursework, a preliminary examination is taken. To be eligible to take the preliminary examination, the student must: 1) register for MAE 8964; 2) have an overall GPA of 3.0 for all graduate work completed; 3) have an approved program of study; 4) have successfully passed the diagnostic exam; 5) have completed the research element; and, 6) provide evidence of scholarship. The Preliminary Examination includes both an oral and written component. The written component is selected from the following: (1) an extensive literature review, (2) a solo-authored manuscript submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal, (3) a grant proposal for a research study, or (4) a comprehensive examination based upon questions from the supervisory committee. If a student selects to do a research study, then the prospectus must include a comprehensive literature review. Any written selection will include an oral defense component.

Prior to collecting data for the dissertation, candidates must successfully defend their written prospectus to their supervisory committee. The dissertation prospectus is prepared in consultation with the major professor and advisory committee. A formal defense will be scheduled at which the candidate will orally present the research plan. Once a signed copy of the prospectus has been filed with the College of Education, the dissertation research may then begin. The minimum time between having a prospectus approved by the academic dean and the dissertation defense is four months.

A student becomes a candidate for the Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction by passing the preliminary examination and may register for dissertation credit. When the committee determines the student is ready to defend the dissertation, a defense is scheduled. The candidate must provide a complete copy of the dissertation to committee members one month prior to the examination. In the semester in which the candidates expect to graduate, they must register for MAE 8985, Dissertation Defense (0).

Reading and Language Arts

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/curriculum-and-instruction/reading-educationlanguage-arts-m-s-d

The primary goal of Reading Education and Language Arts is to prepare professionals to work at various levels of instruction, early reading and writing development, K–12 school literacy, postsecondary reading programs, and adult literacy programs, as well as the preparation of college and university teacher educators in the area of literacy.

Graduate Curricula

Reading Education and Language Arts is a graduate major leading to one of three degrees in Curriculum and Instruction: Master of Science (MS), Specialist in Education (EdS), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD).

Master’s Degree

The Master of Science (MS) degree is an advanced practitioner degree that offers a selection of courses in reading and language arts. These courses include the study of language, literature, and communication processes of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students become proficient in these areas and use this knowledge in their classroom instruction and assessment. The master’s degree program is designed for persons aspiring to be master classroom teachers, reading specialists, resource teachers, and reading and language arts consultants.

Curricula

The specialization in Reading Education and Language Arts leading to the master’s degree requires thirty-three semester hours of coursework, including a core of five required reading certification courses and six additional courses to fulfill the master’s degree. Students should work closely with an advisor to develop a program of study that meets the required elements of the degree.

Specialist Degree

The specialist degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Reading Education and Language Arts is designed to meet advanced certification requirements and to prepare individuals for leadership roles in reading and language arts programs. Students who pursue this major choose from the same curricular options as those in the master’s program but combine these courses with others available in the College and University. Students aspiring to be reading and language arts specialists study current theory and research and ways of applying this knowledge in clinical or field-based projects, public schools, community literacy programs, and state departments of education. Each program of study is tailored to the student’s experience and professional aims. As part of this program, the student may elect to write a thesis or complete six semester hours of supervised research.

Curricula

The program of study leading to the specialist in education degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Reading Education requires a minimum of thirty-three semester hours of coursework including from fifteen to eighteen semester hours in reading and language arts, an internship in an agency concerned with literacy education, and a course in methods of educational research. A thesis on a topic within reading and language arts is also required.

Doctoral Degree

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Reading Education emphasizes scholarly work in theoretical disciplines such as psychology, linguistics, sociology, or anthropology. From a disciplinary perspective, students select a content specialization such as reading theory, comprehension, children’s literature, written composition, or adult literacy and address it from the standpoint of teaching and learning, development, or policymaking. Students study key research in the selected field of study, practice appropriate inquiry methods, and demonstrate the capacity to carry out independent scholarly investigation. The program is designed for persons aspiring to be college professors, scholars, researchers, or educational policymakers.

Curricula

The program of study leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Reading Education requires forty-eight to fifty-eight semester hours of coursework and twenty-four semester hours of dissertation credit. The coursework includes research design and methods courses, foundation courses, a required core of twelve semester hours, and selection of one of the following curricular strands: reading theories and processes, clinical studies in reading and language arts, reading in the secondary school curriculum, adult literacy, children’s literature, language and writing, or integrated curriculum studies in language arts.

Science Education

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/curriculum-and-instruction/science-education-m-s-d

Curricula in science education lead to the Master of Science (MS), Specialist in Education (EdS), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees in Curriculum and Instruction.

Graduate curricula are designed to meet the needs and professional goals of those preparing for leadership roles in science education. Graduate students have many opportunities to participate in ongoing research and development, in conjunction with program faculty members, in addition to their thesis or dissertation research. Recent research activities have how teacher beliefs shape students’ access to three-dimensional science learning, the role of emotions in science learning, and teachers’ use of cognitively demanding tasks.

Master’s Degree

Curricula

To complete the master’s degree requires the successful completion of a thesis, portfolio or comprehensive examination and successful completion of a minimum of thirty-three semester hours of coursework with a graduate GPA of 3.0. The program of study is planned with the student’s major professor and supervisory committee to meet the specific needs and goals of the student. Information regarding sample programs may be obtained from the science education faculty or through the science education Web site. Students defend their thesis or portfolio in an oral examination conducted by the supervisory committee that they have formed.

Specialist in Education

Curricula

A minimum of thirty semester hours of coursework with a GPA of 3.0 and successful completion of a thesis, portfolio or comprehensive examination is required. The program of study is planned with the student’s major professor and supervisory committee to meet the specific needs and goals of the student. Information regarding sample programs may be obtained from the science education office or through the science education homepage. Students defend their thesis or portfolio in an oral examination conducted by the supervisory committee that they have formed.

Doctoral Degree

Curricula

Each candidate plans a program of studies tailored individually with a major professor and supervisory committee, but all programs include the following components: interdepartmental core (nine hours minimum); introductory seminars (two hours); science education (twenty-one hours minimum); dissertation in science education (twenty-four semester hours minimum); research methods (twenty semester hours minimum).

Post-baccalaureate study, including relevant courses completed in the master’s degree, may be used to meet the curricular requirements. However, all candidates must complete at least forty-five semester hours of graduate study in residence at Florida State University; thirty-six of these semester hours must be in science and science education.

Candidates are required to pass a qualifying examination at the end of their first year in residence. When the candidate has six or fewer hours of coursework to complete, the preliminary examination which covers the program of studies may be taken.

Students will complete a dissertation that is directly related to substantive questions in science education. Students must enroll for a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of dissertation credit. Prior to collecting data for the dissertation, candidates must successfully defend their written prospectus to their supervisory committee. When the dissertation is completed, the candidate defends it in an oral examination conducted by the supervisory committee. Students actively writing their dissertation must enroll for a minimum of two semester hours of dissertation credit each semester they are writing.

The coursework in science education is divided into core and elective requirements. In exceptional circumstances the core requirements can be varied by satisfactorily completing other courses in science education that are deemed more appropriate for the student’s career goals. Such variations must be approved by the major professor and supervisory committee.

Social Science Education

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/curriculum-and-instruction/social-science-education-m-s-d

The purpose of the graduate major is to prepare professionals in the field of Social Science Education. The program offers the following degrees in the areas of Social Science Education:

  1. A post-certification master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Social Science Education
  2. A master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Social Science Teaching that requires a portfolio for graduation
  3. A PhD in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Social Science Education

Post-Certification Master Instruction with a Major in Social Science Education in Social Science Education

This major is a three-year program that starts with the undergraduate junior year and culminates at the end of the third year with the conferral of a bachelor’s and master’s degree with initial Florida DOE certification in K-12 Social Science Education. See the Undergraduate Bulletin for more details.

Master’s Degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a Major in Social Science Education

The Master of Science in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Social Science Education requires a minimum of thirty-three semester hours. The program is most appropriate for individuals who are already certified in social science education and wish to update or increase their knowledge of the field or who plan to proceed to doctoral studies. While not an initial teacher certification program, this degree program provides opportunities for students to develop leadership and research skills, as well as expand knowledge in a student-selected areas of social science education.

PhD in Curriculum and Instruction with a Major in Social Science Education

The doctoral program (PhD) in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Social Science Education is a comprehensive program designed to prepare individuals to serve in academic and leadership roles in the field. Each candidate plans a program of studies tailored individually with a major professor and supervisory committee. The coursework in social science education is divided into core and elective requirements, culminating in the completion of a dissertation in a selected area of specialization.

Special Education

Web Page: http://education.fsu.edu/degrees-and-programs/curriculum-and-instruction/special-education-m-s-d

The purpose of the Special Education graduate major is to prepare professionals to respond to the unique needs of children, youth, and adults with disabilities. The program offers master’s degrees in the areas of Special Education (for traditional graduate students), Special Education Teaching (for initial certification students; three-year Jr/Sr/MS program), and Visual Disabilities; an education specialist (EdS) degree; and a PhD in Special Education.

Master’s Degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a Major in Special Education

Special Education Teaching

This major is a three-year program that starts with the undergraduate junior year and culminates at the end of the third year with the conferral of a bachelor’s and master’s degree with initial Florida DOE certification in K-12 Special Education Teaching with ESOL endorsement. Students in the program select a specialization area from the following: autism spectrum disorders, early childhood special education, high incidence disabilities.

Special Education—MS Degree in Curriculum and Instruction

The Master of Science in Special Education requires a minimum of thirty-three semester hours. The program is most appropriate for individuals who are already certified in an area of special or general education or for individuals wishing to update or increase their knowledge of special education. While not a teacher certification program, the Master of Science in Special Education program provides opportunities for students to develop leadership and research skills, as well as expand knowledge in a student-selected area of special education. Students select a specialization area from autism spectrum disorders, early childhood special education, and high incidence disabilities.

Special Education Studies – Distance Learning Degree

The Master of Science in Special Education Studies is designed for practicing teachers who wish to expand and/or update their knowledge of special education and/or to increase their ability to teach learners who experience disabilities. It is appropriate for individuals with degrees or teacher certification in special education, early childhood, elementary education, or middle or high school education. This program is not designed to meet teacher certification requirements for any state. The program is a minimum of thirty-three semester hours and provides for specialization in early childhood special education, severe disabilities, and high incidence disabilities. All coursework is completed online.

Master’s Degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a Major in Special Education

Visual Disabilities

This major is designed as a leadership program with emphasis in two areas of specialization: classroom teaching and orientation and mobility. Applicants who do not have an undergraduate degree in visual disabilities or do not hold Florida teacher certification in visual disabilities but plan to work with children must take prerequisites that are essential to the understanding of the field. In addition to coursework, students are required to engage in practical experiences as part of their program. The program of study and the length of the program is based upon the applicant’s prior academic preparation and interests.

Specialist in Education Program (EdS)—Special Education, Visual Disabilities

The specialist in education is an advanced master’s degree with admission requirements identical to the master’s degree. Applicants to the EdS program should already hold a master’s degree in an area of special education or related field. The purpose of this program would be to expand the applicant’s skills and knowledge in his/her current area of preparation or to extend skills and knowledge to another area of special education.

Doctoral Programs in Curriculum and Instruction with a Major in Special Education

The doctoral program (PhD) in Curriculum and Instruction with a major in Special Education is a comprehensive program designed to prepare selected individuals to serve in leadership roles in the education of individuals with disabilities (including visual impairment). The program consists of preparing individuals in three core areas: administration, university teaching, and research. Each student is expected to develop minimum knowledge and skills in each of the three core areas, although the student can emphasize one of the three.

Individuals interested in the doctoral degree program should contact the graduate coordinator to request a booklet that explains admission requirements, course of study, financial assistance available, and research interests of the graduate faculty.

Definition of Prefixes

CGS—Computer General Studies

EAP—English as a Second Language for Academic Purposes

EBD—Education: Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

EDE—Education: Elementary

EDF—Education: Foundations and Policy Studies

EDG—Education: General

EDS—Education Supervision

EEC—Education: Early Childhood

EEX—Education: Exceptional Child-Core Competencies

ELD—Education: Specific Learning Disabilities

EME—Education: Technology and Media

EMR—Education: Mental Retardation

EVI—Education: Visually Impaired-Blind

FLE—Foreign Language Education

IDS—Interdisciplinary Studies

LAE—Language Arts and English Education

LIN—Linguistics

LIS—Library and Information Studies

MAE—Mathematics Education

RED—Reading Education

SCE—Science Education

SMT—Science or Mathematics Teaching

SSE—Social Studies Education

TSL—Teaching English as a Second Language

Graduate Courses

CGS 5112. Using Computer Graphics as an Instructional Tool (3). Prerequisites: CGS 2160 and MAS 2103. Corequisite: COP 3001 or instructor permission. This course is designed to help teachers of mathematics make a more effective use of computer graphics in their teaching of mathematics. Topics in construction of three dimensional graphics and computer aided design are included. Particular attention is given to visualization.

CGS 5113. Using Computer Simulation as an Instructional Tool (3). Prerequisite: CGS 5112 or instructor permission. This course is designed to help teachers of mathematics use computer simulation as an effective instructional tool in the teaching of mathematics. Particular attention is given to microworlds.

EAP 5835. Academic Spoken English for ITAs (3). (S/U grade only). This course is designed to help international teaching assistants improve their spoken English and develop communication and teaching skills necessary in a North American university classroom. The course focuses on both communication of field-specific content as well as interaction with university students. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EAP 5838r. English Pronunciation for International Teaching Assistants (3). (S/U grade only). This course is designed to help non-native English speakers improve pronunciation skills in order to become more competent and confident speakers of English; it provides learners with an understanding of the phonetic and phonemic structure of English and includes extensive speaking and listening practice. The course helps students develop an awareness of specific pronunciation features of North American English consonant and vowel sounds. Features of English rhythm and stress patterns are also analyzed and practiced. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EAP 5845r. Academic Writing for International Graduate Students (3). (S/U grade only). This course is designed to help international graduate students develop the skills they need to become successful writers in their academic careers. The course covers strategies to organize and develop ideas, navigate word and grammar choices particular to academic written English, avoid plagiarism and properly use citation and reference styles. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EAP 5860. Advanced English Practice for International Educators (3). (S/U grade only). This is an orally based individualized course in English as a second language, designed to provide practice in diagnosed problem areas.

EBD 5223. Advanced Study of Emotional Disturbance (3). This course covers the theoretical and practical issues and instructional strategies for the emotionally disturbed.

EBD 5320. Precision Teaching Methods for Emotional Disturbances (3). This course covers techniques for using direct, daily, and continuous measurement in the assessment and instruction of youth with academic and emotional/behavioral problems.

EBD 5941. Practicum in Emotional Disturbance/Learning Disability (3). This course provides observation and participation with LD/ED children in public and private settings.

EDE 5225. The Elementary School, K–6 (3). This course examines foundations for establishing an elementary school program, including the nature of knowledge, social issues, child development, and content development.

EDE 5227. The Integrated Curriculum in the Elementary and Middle School (3). This course analyzes the reasons for integrating the curriculum and teaches how to implement an integrated approach in the elementary and middle schools.

EDE 5266r. Current Issues and Trends in Elementary Education (3). This course is designed for students to perform a critical analysis of a number of issues and trends important to the public elementary school. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EDE 5324. Promoting Thinking in the Elementary School (3). This course is an analysis of thinking processes of elementary-aged children and interventions to enhance thinking. Special emphasis given to critical thinking, creative thinking, moral thinking, problem solving, and decision making.

EDE 5327. Differentiating Instruction (3). This course is for students seeking alternatives to regular certification. The course provides the essential elements needed to differentiate instruction for diverse learners. Topics include flexible grouping, instructional and curricular accommodations, using assessment to inform instruction and implementing tiers of intervention.

EDE 5346. Technology in Elementary and Middle School (3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. This course is designed to help professional teachers use technology for the development of higher-order thinking. Emphasis is given to current trends and issues in technology, such as Hypermedia and Internet. Teachers develop plans for their own classes that are consistent with recommendations for school improvement.

EDE 5511. Organization for Classroom Instruction in the Elementary School (3). This course is an analysis and critique of current organizational patterns related to teaching in the elementary school.

EDE 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

EDE 5910r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

EDE 5931r. Special Topics in Elementary and Middle School Education (3). This course provides in-depth examination of topics related to elementary and middle school education. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. May be repeated in the same semester.

EDE 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

EDE 5941. Internship in Elementary Teaching (9–12). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: SCE 5215. This culminating internship provides teacher candidates the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the state-approved teacher preparation standards in a classroom setting, focusing on the areas of planning, instructional delivery, assessment, professional growth, and ethical behavior.

EDE 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

EDE 5973r. Specialist in Education Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only).

EDE 6805. Perspectives of Teacher Professional Development (3). This course is for advanced graduate students preparing for leadership positions associated with professional development of teachers at pre-service, induction, and in-service levels. Model programs are viewed from historical, sociological, psychological, philosophical, and anthropological perspectives.

EDE 6935r. Doctoral Seminar in Elementary Education (3). (S/U grade only). This seminar was developed to explore a variety of topics related to childhood education, curriculum, teacher education, and other areas relevant to professional preparation and thought. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EDE 6937. Advanced Research Seminar in Elementary Education (3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisites: EDF 5400; EDF 5402; and EDF 5481 or equivalent. This seminar is to assist students to master tasks required for a prospectus of a dissertation.

EDE 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

EDE 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

EDE 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

EDE 8968r. Specialist in Education Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

EDE 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

EDE 8978r. Specialist in Education Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

EDE 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

EDF 5498. Single Case Design Research for Educators (3). Prerequisite: EDF 5481 or equivalent. This course prepares students for conducting teacher action research using single case research designs (SCRD) in educational settings. Salient features of SCRD and the advantages and disadvantages of this research methodology are discussed. Students build competence in creating and analyzing high quality single case design studies to investigate the effectiveness of instructional interventions.

EDF 5885. Education in the Arab World (3). This course examines the development of Arab education focusing on curriculum and problems of learning and instruction. Patterns of language teaching and multiculturalism are carefully described and analyzed.

EDF 5887. Multicultural Education (3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course offers an introduction to the history and philosophy of educational policies and practices that respond to the realities of cultural diversity in the United States and abroad.

EDF 5892r. The Design of National Curricula in Developing Countries (3). This course utilizes concepts and methods of the social and behavioral sciences in preparing a scheme for systematically revising a country’s curriculum with attention to current problems. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EDF 5920r. Colloquium, Bilingual/Bicultural Education (1). In this course, current topics and developments in multilingual/multicultural education. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EDF 5921r. Special Language and Culture Colloquium (2). This course examines the development of theories of curriculum, instruction, and evaluation for multilingual/multicultural education. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

EDG 5073. Foundations of Blended and Online Learning and Teaching K-12 (3). This course aims to provide instruction to the field of blended and online learning and teaching in K-12 environments through presenting a glossary of fundamental terms, key concepts, and best practices based on national standards for development of online teachers and teaching. Learners explore e-learning, theories, tools, advantages and disadvantages of blended and online learning, and critical success factors for effective implementation of the practices. They practice beginning to incorporate what they are learning and applying it to their own instruction.

EDG 5074. Pedagogy of Blended and Online Learning and Teaching K-12 (3). This course contributes to and improves the skills of K-12 teachers, school leaders, and other educational personnel to successfully incorporate blended instruction in their classrooms, as well as those who teach in online environments. The course introduces the concept of digital pedagogy–art, craft, principles, and methods of instruction in blended and online K-12 learning environments to engage modern learners and provide the best learning experiences for diverse students.

EDG 5075. Technologies for Blended and Online Learning and Teaching K-12 (3). Prerequisite: EDG 5073 or EDG 5074. This course offers opportunities for participants to explore technologies, strategies, and tools to enhance learning, teaching, assessment, and communication in blended and online learning environments in K-12 schools. It is guided by National Standards for Quality Online Teaching (NACOL, 2010), National Educational Technology Plan 2010, and other national standards. Participants learn and practice effective e-learning techniques and technologies appropriate for various ages, learner characteristics, and content areas, as well as focus assignments on their own areas of teaching interest and expertise.

EDG 5076. Issues, Trends, and Practices in Blended and Online Learning and Teaching K-12 (3). Prerequisites: EDG 5073, EDG 5074, and EDG 5075. This course offers opportunities for participants to use their skills and knowledge for K-12 learners in blended and online environments and demonstrate their practical application for design, development, and delivery of their blended or online course to their classmates, by using various technologies and principles of digital pedagogy. Students also explore, analyze, and reflect upon the latest national and international trends related to developing online initiatives.

EDG 5206. Teachers and Curriculum Development (3). This course explores the challenges of curricular design from the institutional role of the teacher and analyzes how a teacher can become an effective contributor in curricular deliberation within the settings of schools and school districts.

EDG 5208. Foundations of Teaching (3). This course is for master’s students seeking alternative or regular certification who do not have an undergraduate degree in a teaching field. This course provides the essential elements needed to succeed in a classroom.

EDG 5246. Moral Education (3). This course is designed for masters and doctoral students to expose and discuss controversial topics related to moral education. Course topics include hate crimes, racial issues, gun control, character-values-moral education, and tolerance. This class examines historical, theoretical, and practical issues and applications pertaining to moral education.

EDG 5339. Making Sense of Data to Inform Instruction (3). This course is designed to support educators in exploring the concepts underlying the use of data to inform instructional strategies. The course provides an understanding of accountability systems and the wide range of data collection tools, and supports the development of educators’ skills in basic data analysis procedures, data interpretation, and application of these interpretations to shape instructional practice in classrooms and other educational settings.

EDG 5342. Analyzing and Refining Teaching (3). Prerequisites: EDG 5209, EDG 5339, EDG 5345, EDG 5709, and EME 5050. This course assists teachers in identifying their own theoretical framework for instruction and using this framework to closely examine their own practice through the use of data collected from that practice. The course is designed to support teachers’ synthesis of the theories, techniques, technology, and approaches introduced throughout the program into a coherent theoretical framework to be used to refine teachers’ instructional practice.

EDG 5345. Using Assessments in the PK-12 Classroom to Differentiate Instruction (3). The course explores the wide range of formats (e.g., diagnostic, formative, and summative) of useful classroom assessments utilized across a variety of academic disciplines, grade levels, and student abilities. Focus is on how these assessment tools can inform learners’ cognitive resources and instructional practices that can be used to differentiate instruction.

EDG 5709. Culturally Responsive Teaching for Equitable Instruction (3). This course addresses culturally responsive teaching and how it can be used to improve the academic performance of culturally and linguistically diverse learners including those living in poverty as well as those with differing family structures.

EDG 6008. Academic and Professional Identity (1). (S/U grade only). This course examines current issues related to the acculturation of doctoral students and the formation of their academic and professional identities. For doctoral students, their ‘academic’ professional identity is situated within the higher education academic community and plays an integral role in their well-being and productivity.

EDG 6015. Grant Writing for Educational Research (3). This course provides participants with the knowledge and skills to prepare competitive education-related grant applications to government and private sources.

EDG 6221. Curricular Theory (3). This course focuses on theoretical concepts underlying significant curricular developments past and present; model development in curricular theory.

EDG 6369. Critiquing Educational Research (1). (S/U grade only). This course provides participants with the knowledge and skills to critique and synthesize empirical research relative to teacher education and student learning. Standards developed by education professional organizations and governmental entities will be utilized.

EDG 6964r. Doctoral Diagnostic Examination (0). (P/F grade only.) This diagnostic examination is taken after a doctoral student has completed or is in the process of completing eighteen credit hours of coursework. The exam is an assessment used to appraise the student’s research aptitude and readiness to continue pursuing a doctoral degree.

EDS 5356. Supervision of Associate Teaching (3). (S/U grade only). This course focuses on the function of public schools in teacher education programs, basic knowledge and skills needed by classroom teachers to become effective supervising teachers. Emphasis given to the Florida Performance Measurement System/Beginning Teacher Program. Practical laboratory experience included.

EEC 5263. Thematic Curriculum and Direct Instruction for Young Children (3). This is one of three courses designed to provide theory/research bases for the development of curriculum and practices for educating children ages 3 years to grade 3. The course focuses on thematic curriculum and direct instruction.

EEC 5269. Curriculum and Play for Young Children (3). This is one of a three-course series designed to provide theory/research bases for the development of appropriate curriculum and practices for educating children ages 3 years to grade 3. The course focuses on active learning through play.

EEC 5305. Methods and Experiences with Young Children and Families (3). This course provides direct experiences in working with young children and families and requires seminar attendance and field placement with young children.

EEC 5405. Teachers and Parents: Partners in Education (3). This course focuses on the effects of parental involvement on children’s educational development and achievements; designing/implementing strategies for enhancing parent-teacher partnership in education.

EEC 5525. Children’s Centers (3). This course allows students to investigate the basic principles involved in establishing and operating centers for the young child.

EEC 5605. Techniques of Classroom Management and Child Study (3). This course identifies and analyzes theories, programs, and essential components in classroom management. Explores techniques for classroom teachers to use in developing a child study with emphasis on educational implications.

EEC 5615. Issues and Trends in Early Childhood Education (3). This course identifies issues and trends in the area of early childhood education and addresses possible causes and relationships.

EEC 5665. Historical and Theoretical Bases of Early Childhood Education (3). This course compares, analyzes, and synthesizes the different philosophical and psychological theories that form the foundation of early childhood education programs and practices. It also studies the historical events that influenced the direction and nature of the care and education of young children.

EEC 5671. Research in Early Childhood Education (3). This course comprehensively investigates the field through surveying, delineating, searching, and synthesizing research in early childhood education.

EEC 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

EEC 5911r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

EEC 5935r. Special Topics in Early Childhood Education (1-3). This course provides an in-depth examination of topics related to early childhood. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EEC 5942r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

EEC 5944. Student Teaching in Early Childhood Education (6–10). (S/U grade only).

EEC 5947. Field Laboratory Internship (1–8). (S/U grade only).

EEC 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

EEC 5973r. Specialist in Education Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only).

EEC 6516. Educational Environments for Infants and Toddlers (3). This course updates research in first years of life to kinds of environment and learning experiences which promote and ensure optimum development.

EEC 6672. Theory and Research in Young Children’s Play Curriculum (3). Prerequisite: EEC 5269 or instructor permission. Seminar on the advanced study of young children’s play and curriculum.

EEC 6932. Doctoral Seminar in Early Childhood Education (2). (S/U grade only).

EEC 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

EEC 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

EEC 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

EEC 8968r. Specialist in Education Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

EEC 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

EEC 8978r. Specialist in Education Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

EEC 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

EEX 5017. Typical and Atypical Early Development (3). This course focuses on typical and atypical development in the early years (birth through 8 years). Particular attention is paid to factors influencing development and the impact of disabilities and biomedical risk factors on learning, development, and behavior. Recent research and its implication for evidence-based practices is a major component of the course.

EEX 5078. Teaching High Risk Adolescents in Alternative Settings (3). This course examines teaching in alternative settings (e.g., alternative schools, juvenile justice facilities, therapeutic residential treatment centers). Students learn how to (a) overcome the barriers and capitalize on the facilitation factors to providing effective instruction in these settings, (b) identify and plan lessons incorporating evidence based instruction for high risk adolescents, and (c) collaborate with personnel in both the alternative and regular educational settings to support students.

EEX 5087. Middle and Secondary Curriculum for Learners with Disabilities (3). This course assists participants to develop curricular planning skills for middle and high school students with disabilities. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based instructional strategies appropriate for teaching middle and high school students receiving special education services.

EEX 5089. Adaptations and Accommodations for Learners with Disabilities (3). This course provides information regarding adaptations and supports that enhance the education of children and youth with learning and behavior challenges. Emphasis is placed on procedures that adapt the general education curriculum.

EEX 5095. Teaching Learners with Autism Spectrum Disorder (1). This course provides a comprehensive overview of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The impact the characteristics of ASD have on student participation and learning in the general education curriculum, and adaptations to enhance and support learning while emphasizing individual goals and objectives are addressed.

EEX 5210. Assessment and Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual Disability (3). This course provides students with an understanding of the core features associated with and diagnostic criteria used to identify autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID). Students learn a transdisciplinary framework for the assessment process, and develop the skills necessary to identify, design, and administer assessments used to build appropriate, assessment-driven educational plans.

EEX 5225. Assessment of Students with Disabilities (3). This course provides students with competency in the assessment of students with disabilities. In addition to exploring issues related to assessment, the course focuses on the administration and interpretation of formal instruments and informal assessment procedures.

EEX 5234. Development and Assessment of Individuals with Severe Cognitive Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorder (3). This course examines the knowledge and skills necessary to understand the effects of severe cognitive disabilities (SCD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) on development and learning. Participants learn to assess academic and functional achievement of individuals with SCD and ASD in a variety of areas that impact academic and functional outcomes for these individuals.

EEX 5235. Instructional Environments: Ethical, Legal, Safety, and Classroom Management Considerations (3). This course is designed to provide participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to organize the physical, social, and instructional environment of a classroom that includes a heterogeneous group of learners.

EEX 5237. Methods for Teaching Students with Low Incidence Disabilities (3). This course offers an overview of curriculum and instructional needs of students with low incidence disabilities.

EEX 5239. Assessment and Methods in Early Childhood Special Education (3). Prerequisite: EEX 5017. This course focuses on the formal and informal evaluation techniques and individualized instruction for young children with disabilities.

EEX 5246. Mathematics for Students with Disabilities (3). This course equips teachers to address the needs of learners with high incidence disabilities in grades K-12 when teaching mathematics skills. Methods and techniques learned are appropriate for a variety of classroom settings.

EEX 5248. Positive Behavior Support (3). This course provides participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop, implement, and evaluate the impact of positive behavior supports in keeping with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1997.

EEX 5258. Advanced Reading Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3). This course examines methods for assessing and teaching reading skills to individuals with disabilities.

EEX 5259. Literacy for Learners with Disabilities (3). This course introduces the major reading components of scientifically-based reading research as applied to learners with disabilities: phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Additional topics include models of typical and atypical reading development and principles and practices of differentiated instruction.

EEX 5267. Differentiating Mathematics Instruction in Middle and High School (1). This course provides an overview of the purpose and rationale for differentiated instruction in middle and high school mathematics classes. Classroom strategies for differentiating mathematics and ways to relate to initial assessments (diagnostic) and assessment for learning (formative) to these strategies are examined.

EEX 5285r. Seminar in Transition (3). This course addresses the range of postsecondary education, transitional services, employment training programs and community living and recreation available to adults with disabilities. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

EEX 5286. Preparing Individuals for Transition (3). This course focuses on planning and implementing appropriate transitional services for youths with disabilities in the public schools.

EEX 5298. Teaching Students with Autism (3). This course provides class participants with the knowledge needed to develop effective communication, social, and language assessment and intervention for individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

EEX 5456. Program Development for Young Children with Disabilities (3). This course focuses on issues related to providing comprehensive services to young children with disabilities.

EEX 5466. Universal Design for Learning (1). This course examines Universal Design for Learning (UDL) as a framework for addressing the educational needs of K-12 learners. Elements of UDL to be discussed include teaching content in multiple formats so that all students can access it, providing students with various ways to demonstrate their learning, and stimulating students’ interests and motivation for learning in a variety of ways.

EEX 5615. Nonviolent Crisis Intervention (1). This course provides class participants with skills in non-physical methods for preventing or managing disruptive behavior, including positive behavior support (PBS) at the tertiary level. In addition, the course includes the study of crisis prevention methods including restraint positions, transport techniques and team strategies. Students who successfully complete the course are eligible for a two-year Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI) blue card that validates their completion of the Nonviolent Crisis Intervention training program.

EEX 5704. Early Childhood and Elementary Education Curriculum for Special Educators (3). This course provides special educators with knowledge of general early childhood and elementary curriculum. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based supports, modifications, and accommodations to allow the child with disabilities to access the general education curriculum.

EEX 5708. Teaming with Families, Schools and Community (3). This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to collaborate and team with professionals from a variety of disciplines in the schools and other community agencies, to include family members in the collaboration process, and to support families of children with disabilities throughout the life cycle.

EEX 5740. Cognitive and Social Implications of Maltreatment of Students with Exceptional Needs (3). This course focuses on the topic of child maltreatment and its impact on students with disabilities.

EEX 5765. Introduction to Special Education Technology (3). This course introduces the way technology (specifically computers) is used with special education students.

EEX 5767. Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Learners with Autism Spectrum Disorder (3). This course provides students with knowledge of evidenced-based practices in facilitating communication and learning of children and youth with complex communication needs including those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental disabilities in school settings.

EEX 5774. Collaborative Transition and Career Planning for Students with Severe or Profound Disabilities (3). This course teaches the planning and implementation of appropriate transition services for students with severe and profound disabilities in the schools at the secondary and post-secondary levels.

EEX 5835. Practicum with Learners with High Incidence Disabilities (3). This course provides experience developing, implementing, and evaluating functional and academic intervention programs for K-12 learners with high incidence disabilities. Additional content includes designing, implementing, and evaluating large and small group activities; evaluating learning environments; and working with a team of professionals and instructional assistants.

EEX 5836r. Practicum with Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Severe Intellectual Disabilities (1–3). This course provides participants with experience developing, implementing, and assessing intervention programs for learners identified as having autism spectrum disorder. May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

EEX 5841r. Field Laboratory Internship (1–12). (S/U grade only). This is a practicum course covering specific areas of in-depth field experiences in special education. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours. Offered Fall and Spring semesters only.

EEX 5863r. Supervised Teaching (1–4). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

EEX 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours. Not offered Summer term.

EEX 5911r. Supervised Research (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

EEX 5920. Pre-Student Teaching Seminar (1). (S/U grade only). This course prepares students for student teaching. Paperwork requirements, as well as professional behavior and ethics, are covered.

EEX 5931r. Special Topics in Special Education (1–3). This course is an investigation of a variety of topics in special education. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EEX 5940r. Practicum in Early Childhood Special Education (3). This practicum gives experience working with atypical infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and their families. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

EEX 5943r. Practicum in Transition (3). In this practicum, students are given an opportunity to directly apply their skills in one of several transitional programs in the schools or the community. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EEX 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours are required.

EEX 5973r. Specialist in Education Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours are required.

EEX 6301r. Seminar: Research Problems in Special Education (1). (S/U grade only). This seminar focuses on current research topics drawn from broad areas associated with special education. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

EEX 6341. Critical Review of Special Education Research (3). This course is an analysis and synthesis of research areas relating to exceptional individuals.

EEX 6342. Seminar: Readings in Education, Training, and Treatment of Exceptional Individuals (3). This course is a comprehensive study of special education literature in a variety of areas.

EEX 6426. Research and Practices in Special Education Personnel Development (3). This course is a study of professional preparation of individuals serving exceptional individuals.

EEX 6931r. Seminar in Early Childhood/Special Education (3).

EEX 6935r. Doctoral Seminar in Special Topics (1–3). (S/U grade only). This course is an investigation of a variety of topics in special education. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EEX 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

EEX 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

EEX 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

EEX 8968r. Specialist in Education Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

EEX 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

EEX 8978r. Specialist in Education Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

EEX 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

ELD 5140. Advanced Study of Learning Disabilities (3). This course focuses on comparison of strategies, methods, and materials for teaching LD students and their philosophical bases are studied. Particular attention is given to various applied and theoretical models.

EME 5050. Teaching and Technology (3). This course is designed to address current technology research and learning theory, instructional design and product development, information access and delivery issues, and pragmatic ideas for integrating educational technology in the classroom. Emphasis is on applying technology applications as an effective tool in teaching and learning.

EMR 5235. Teaching the Student with Profound Disabilities (3). This course provides course participants with the knowledge and skills to implement and evaluate intervention for students with profound disabilities. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based practices that support access to the general education curriculum and functional skill development.

EMR 5803. Advanced Practicum in Mental Disabilities (3). This course provides experience in developing, implementing and evaluating individualized educational programs for learners identified as having severe mental disability.

EVI 5019. Foundations of Rehabilitation Teaching of the Blind (3). This course presents an overview of the rehabilitation teaching profession and provides practical experience in the basic procedures of rehabilitation teaching. Students develop and apply assessment tools, training plans, and evaluation instruments within an andragogical model.

EVI 5131. Teaching Deaf-Blind/Multisensory Impaired Individuals (3). This course teaches students skills and knowledge to teach deaf-blind/multisensory impaired individuals.

EVI 5221. Applied Methods of Orientation and Mobility (3). Prerequisites: EVI 4121, EVI 4220, and EVI 4314 or EVI 5316. This course explores the methods and strategies for teaching independent travel techniques to learners with visual impairments. The course presents and discusses methods, strategies, and information related to the teaching of independent travel skills. Emphasis is on travel within indoor environments.

EVI 5222. Advanced Orientation and Mobility (3). Prerequisites: EVI 4121, EVI 4220, EVI 4314 or EVI 5316, and EVI 5221. This course covers methods in general navigation and environmental awareness for learners with visual impairments. Travel skills and techniques are gained while working under simulated conditions in various environments, through the use of existing sensory modalities and appropriate mobility techniques. Emphasis is on travel within the outdoor environment.

EVI 5226. Developmentally Appropriate Orientation and Mobility (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course provides the student with knowledge identifying developmentally appropriate orientation and mobility skills for young children ages birth to five. In addition, the students are able to assess and plan for orientation and mobility interventions for this age group.

EVI 5227. Teaching Orientation and Mobility to Individuals with Unique Health Considerations (3). Prerequisites: EVI 4220, EVI 5221, and EVI 5226. Corequisite: EVI 5222. This course teaches future orientation and mobility specialists unique and creative strategies for teaching the alternate skills that are necessary for individuals who are blind and have additional disabilities to be safe, efficient travelers. The course also emphasizes how to apply critical thinking and problem solving to conditions not covered specifically in this course that may arise in one’s practice as a professional in the field of visual impairment.

EVI 5255. Methods of Independent Living of the Blind (3). This course is designed to teach students techniques of daily living for persons with vision loss, methods of writing lesson plans for the adaptive techniques, and opportunities to teach the skills learned in class.

EVI 5315. Teaching Communication Skills to Visually Impaired Adults (3). This course has a threefold purpose. Students develop skills in reading, writing and teaching Braille to adults. Students learn adaptive techniques of communication in money management, handwriting, use of tape recorders, and management of print materials. The third area addressed in this course trains students to assess the communication needs of individuals with low vision, in order to work with them more effectively.

EVI 5316. Low Vision (3). Prerequisite: EVI 4121 or equivalent. This course prepares prospective teachers of students with low visual impairments, orientation and mobility specialists, and rehabilitation teachers for facilitating the visual functioning of individuals with low vision. Students learn the basics of optics and how to conduct functional vision evaluations, to modify environments, and to teach the effective use of low vision devices.

EVI 5318. Special Methods of Working with Preschoolers with Visual Impairments (3). Prerequisites: EVI 4011 and EVI 4121. In this course, participants develop the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively provide intervention services to the families of infants, toddlers and preschoolers with visual impairments. Activities center on conducting assessments, working with families, and designing and implementing interventions.

EVI 5319. Communication and Emergent Literacy for Young Children with Visual Impairments (3). Prerequisites: Instructor permission. This course offers the knowledge of communication and emergent literacy for young children (birth to age five) who are visually impaired or have other disabilities. The course prepares students to assess and plan for communication, language development, and literacy interventions for this age group.

EVI 5325. Technology for Individuals with Visual Impairment (3). This course is designed to acquaint students with a variety of electronic hardware and software alternatives that are utilized by individuals with visual impairments to access information in school, home and vocational environments. This course includes lecture, demonstration, peer-teaching and hands-on activities.

EVI 5332. Social and Vocational Implications of Recreation and Leisure for Visually Impaired (3). This course is designed to demonstrate the physical, psychological, social, and vocational purposes of recreation and leisure activities within education and rehabilitation programs for persons with visual impairments.

EVI 5346. Aging and Vision Loss (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course explores the physical and psychosocial issues encountered by aging adults with severe vision impairment and examines strategies for living with a visual impairment in a changing/aging body in a world designed for sighted and younger people. The course incorporates fundamental principles of gerontology, health, and rehabilitation of the older adult with issues related to visual impairment. In addition, each student is asked to enhance his or her knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions about vision loss and aging people with visual impairments.

EVI 5355. Issues of Blindness in Society (3). This course examines the many issues related to being blind in a society predicated on the presumption that people can use vision to manage societal demands. The losses unique to visual impairment are explored and students are provided instructional strategies to assist individuals in living with visual impairment in a world designed for sighted people.

EVI 5931r. Seminar in Visual Disabilities (3). This seminar covers current topics in the field of visual disabilities. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

EVI 5935. Studies in Research on Individuals with Visual Impairment (3). This course is designed to familiarize students with the published literature related to providing services to individuals with visual impairments and to furnish students with a basic knowledge of the purposes of research in this field, common design strategies, research and analysis tools used, and methods for analyzing the quality of published research.

EVI 5942. Student Teaching in Visual Disabilities (12). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: EVI 4230 or equivalent. In this course, student teachers teach students with visual disabilities for one semester within a public school or residential school setting, full-time and under supervision of an experienced and certified teacher of students with visual impairments.

EVI 5943. Practicum in Orientation and Mobility (2). Prerequisites: EVI 4220 and EVI 5222. This course provides students in the program of Orientation and Mobility with fieldwork experience observing and teaching students/clients with visual disabilities. Practicum students are exposed to a wide range of teaching experiences under the direct supervision of an experienced O & M instructor. To facilitate the learning process, the student is provided an opportunity to observe and teach in different areas, including a variety of simple as well as advanced O & M skills, with a variety of students/clients.

EVI 5944. Practicum with Students Who are Deaf-Blind (1–3). Prerequisite: EVI 5131. This course provides participants with experiences with learners identified as having dual sensory disabilities or deafblindness. The practicum provides experiences in developing, implementing and evaluating individualized educational programs, as well as experiences working with a team of professionals, paraprofessionals and family members/guardians. May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

EVI 5945r. Internship in Orientation and Mobility (3–12). (S/U grade only). Prerequisites: EVI 4220, EVI 5221, EVI 5222, and EVI 5943. In this course, student instructors teach orientation and mobility skills in public school, residential school, and rehabilitation settings for a minimum of 300 service hours to students with visual disabilities. They do so full-time and while under the supervision of an experienced, certified orientation and mobility specialist.

EVI 5946r. Internship in Rehabilitation Teaching of Adults with Visual Disabilities (3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisites: EVI 5019 and EVI 5255. In this course, interns teach rehabilitation skills within a federal, state, or private not-for-profit agency to adults with visual disabilities. They do so under the supervision of an experienced, Certified Vision Rehabilitation Therapist (CVRT).

FLE 5908r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FLE 5915r. Supervised Research (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

IDS 5347. Infant and Toddler Typical and Atypical Development (3). This course provides participants with knowledge of typical and atypical development from birth to 3 years of age, with particular attention paid to the impact of disabilities and risk factors on development.

IDS 5348. Family-Centered Early Intervention (3). This course provides participants with the skills to collaboratively develop, implement, and assess family-centered early intervention services that are provided within natural environments. Emphasis is placed on providing developmentally appropriate, evidence-based intervention for infants and toddlers with disabilities, developmental delays, or risk conditions within the context of their families.

IDS 5349. Infant/Toddler and Family Assessment (3). This course provides participants with knowledge of the processes of assessing infant and toddler development and family functioning in order to develop meaningful intervention programs within natural environments.

LAE 5064. Reader Response to Literature: Research and Practice (3). This course focuses on concepts of nature of literature, relevant developments in literary studies, theory and criticism, strategies of promoting student response to literary works.

LAE 5297r. Teachers as Writers (3–6). This course is designed for practicing preK-16 teachers who are interested in improving their own writing abilities so as to be better able to do the same for the students with whom they work. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LAE 5319. Teaching Oral and Written Expression in the Elementary School (3). This course focuses on observation, instruction, and evaluation of oral and written language in the elementary language arts classroom.

LAE 5336. Applied Linguistics for Teachers of English (3). This course is designed to enhance student knowledge of how we perceive and use language. Topics covered include: the history of English as a language, the ways we produce spoken language (physically, instinctually, and intellectually), the ways that language is represented in popular culture, and the arguments and justifications given regarding popular and traditional approaches to teaching language and grammar.

LAE 5347r. Teaching Writing, PK-16 (3–6). This course is designed for practicing preK-16 teachers who are interested in improving their effectiveness as teachers of writing. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LAE 5348. Teaching Multiliteracies (3). This course is designed to address the field of new literacy studies and identifies how emerging understandings of literacy can support the development of literacy practices in academic settings. Students examine the attributes of multiliterate learners and focus on how to develop those attributes through a variety of academic and popular culture texts.

LAE 5349. Language and Literacy Development through Storytelling/Storywriting (3). This course covers the theoretical underpinnings related to the storytelling process and educational benefits of storytelling/storywriting. The course focuses on storytelling as an excellent vehicle for promoting and integrating the language processes of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the classroom setting. Digital storytelling (technology integration) strategies are included.

LAE 5364. A Survey of British Literature for English Teachers (3). This course provides those seeking a graduate English-education degree with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the scope of British literature. Participants explore historical, political, and social events that influenced the creation of literature from the Anglo-Saxon era to the present post-modern period.

LAE 5368r. Classroom Management and Methods of Planning and Instruction in Secondary English (3–6). This course offers a careful consideration of the role of the secondary-school teacher of English, paying special attention to effective classroom management, planning for instruction, and assessment of student learning. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LAE 5385. A Survey of American Literature for English Teachers (3). This course is designed for secondary English teachers in need of developing content knowledge. The primary focus is on reading a variety of literary works suitable for teaching grades six through twelve.

LAE 5415. Investigation in Children’s Literature (3). This course is a review of the various areas of children’s literature, recent trends in children’s books, and research related to curriculum, reading interests, student’s responses to literature, and development of taste in literature. Literature appropriate for children from birth to age fourteen is required reading.

LAE 5515. Language and Literacy Assessment (3). This course explores conventional and alternative forms of language and literacy assessment. Provides practice doing portfolio and performance assessments.

LAE 5637r. Problems and Trends in English Education (3–6). This course examines the history of English as a school subject; current developments, issues, and research in the teaching of English.

LAE 5645. Pedagogy and Popular Culture (3). This course is designed to address current trends and texts in digital popular culture, and how popular culture affects students, teachers, 21st century literacies, and lesson planning.

LAE 5696. Participatory Culture in Literacy and Learning (3). This course explores the characteristics of participatory culture and the ways people can utilize these characteristics in education to enhance literacy and learning. Additionally, the course examines the cultural and social practices of collaboration, appropriation, and recirculation utilized in new media environments.

LAE 5736. Written Composition in the Secondary School: Theory and Research (3). This course focuses on rhetorical and psychological approaches to the writing process; prewriting, invention, and revision; problems of the basic writer; evaluation of writing and writing skills; current research.

LAE 5738. Linguistic Research in Language Education (3). This course overviews the contributions of multiple disciplines to the study of language, literacy, and schooling.

LAE 5748r. Teacher Action Research: Studies in Teaching Writing I (3–6). This course is designed for practicing preK-16 teachers who are interested in designing and implementing a research study of their own classroom instruction so as to improve the writing of their students. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LAE 5749r. Teacher Action Research: Studies in Teaching Writing II (3–6). This course is designed for practicing preK-16 teachers who are interested in analyzing their instruction so as to improve their students’ writing abilities. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LAE 5865. Teaching Media Literacy (3). This course is designed to address the field of media literacy and equip practicing teachers with the knowledge and pedagogies needed to promote media literacy. Students are provided with tools to cultivate their own literacy as well as to teach for media literacy, which supports other literacies, learning, and digital citizenship.

LAE 5908r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

LAE 5915r. Supervised Research (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

LAE 5931r. Special Topics in Elementary Language and Literature (1–3). This course examines in-depth issues related to elementary education curriculum in language and literature. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

LAE 5932r. Special Topics in English Education (1–3). This course is an investigation of topics of current concern to English teachers, supervisors, and teacher trainers. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

LAE 5940r. Field Laboratory Internship (1–8). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

LAE 5945r. Supervised Teaching (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

LAE 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). Minimum six semester hours required.

LAE 5973r. Specialist in Education Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). Minimum six semester hours required.

LAE 6746. Theory and Research in Language Education (3). This advanced course in language education considers the psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic bases of language and the various methods for studying language; reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

LAE 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

LAE 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

LAE 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

LAE 8968r. Specialist in Education Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

LAE 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

LAE 8978r. Specialist in Education Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

LAE 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

LIN 5706. Psycholinguistic Perspectives on Language Acquisition and Development (3). This course more deeply explores research issues and theories in language processing and acquisition with special emphasis on second language phenomena. Special topics are provided for students to investigate individually and in small groups.

LIN 5908r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours.

LIN 5910r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

LIN 5932r. Topics in Linguistics (3). In this course, different topics are selected to suit the needs and interests of students. A special effort is made to select topics related to current theoretical and practical issues. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

LIS 5566. Multicultural Literature and Information Resources for Children and Young Adults (3). This course identifies and evaluates multicultural literature and information resources for children and young adults in relation to ethnicity and culture of ethnic minorities in the United States. Students locate, access, read, evaluate, and develop strategies to use multicultural literature and other resources to meet information needs of children and young adults.

LIS 5567. International Literature for Children and Young Adults (3). This course provides graduate students an opportunity to read and evaluate literature for children and young adults from an international perspective, that is, literature originating in a nation other than the United States.

MAE 5146. School Mathematics Curriculum (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course establishes a theoretical perspective and then major curriculum projects are examined and critiqued. Reform movements are considered in light of historical events and the current social climate.

MAE 5175. Teaching Community College Mathematics (3). Prerequisites: Graduate standing and MAC 2313; or instructor permission. This course provides a foundation in the teaching and learning of community college mathematics courses including introductory mathematics, introductory algebra, college algebra, trigonometry, calculus, and statistics. Topics include investigations into the conceptual nature of mathematics and applications in the community college mathematics curriculum.

MAE 5318. The Topics and Teaching of Elementary School Mathematics (3). Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate degree program in Elementary Education or special permission. This course provides in-depth examination of topics related to mathematics learning, mathematics teaching strategies, and mathematics curriculum development in elementary school mathematics.

MAE 5337. Seminar on the Teaching of Algebra (2).

MAE 5338. Seminar on the Teaching of Geometry (2).

MAE 5641r. Special Topics in Mathematics Education (2–3). This course covers innovative topics or specific assistance related to classroom topics in the teaching of mathematics. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

MAE 5655. Computers in Mathematics Education (3). Prerequisites: CGS 2160 and six semester hours of 2000-level or above mathematics. This course is a study of methods and techniques for using the computer in mathematics education and/or precollege mathematics classroom instruction.

MAE 5658. Using Technology in the Teaching of Mathematics (3). Prerequisite: One course in computers/technology or instructor permission. This course explores the uses of various technologies in mathematics classes, demonstrated through hands-on activities and experiences.

MAE 5690. Ethnomathematics (3). This course addresses the theoretical, practical, and research components that demonstrate the cultural bases of mathematics education. Mathematical activities from diverse cultures are shared and linguistic difficulties in math are discussed.

MAE 5691. Mathematics Learning and Teaching (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course introduces students to those theories of learning that have been historically influential, or which have the potential to be currently influential, in the learning and teaching of mathematics.

MAE 5795. Seminar on Research in Mathematics Education (2).

MAE 5865. Using History in the Teaching of Mathematics (3). This course examines the historical origins and evolution of key mathematics concepts. Topics are chosen from number systems, numeration, computation, number theory, algebra, geometry, analytic geometry, and calculus.

MAE 5908r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

MAE 5915r. Supervised Research (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

MAE 5942r. Field Laboratory Internship (1–8). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

MAE 5946r. Supervised Teaching (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

MAE 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). This course has a minimum of six semester hours required.

MAE 5973r. Specialist in Education Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). For this course a minimum of six semester hours required.

MAE 6148. Curriculum in Mathematics Education (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to develop an initial theoretical framework in which to analyze mathematics curricula from a philosophical and psychological basis.

MAE 6797. Advanced Seminar on Research in Mathematics Education (4). Prerequisite: MAE 5795 or instructor permission. This course is an in-depth study of research in mathematics education. It covers development of research models for the investigation of specific types of research problems in mathematics education.

MAE 6938r. Doctoral Seminar in Mathematics Education (1–3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. In-depth study of a topic in this field. Course topics currently include learning teacher education and curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

MAE 6939. Seminar in Mathematics Teacher Education (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course examines issues in mathematics teacher education at both the pre-service and in-service levels from theoretical and practical perspectives.

MAE 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

MAE 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

MAE 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

MAE 8968r. Specialist in Education Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

MAE 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

MAE 8978r. Specialist in Education Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

MAE 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

RED 5109. The Development and Assessment of Emergent Reading and Writing (3). This course reviews the beginning stages of literacy and ways adults can foster a child’s development.

RED 5147. Foundations of Developmental Reading (3). Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate degree program in the School of Teacher Education. This course helps classroom teachers, reading specialists, and other educators seek answers to some of the problems related to reading needs of children of varying abilities.

RED 5337. Literacy Across the Content Areas (3). This course applies the reading process to the secondary school curriculum. Diagnostic procedures and instructional strategies useful in developing school reading programs.

RED 5385. Teaching Reading to Adult Illiterates (3). This course applies the reading process to ABE curriculum. Provides practitioners, administrators, and researchers with theoretical knowledge related to whole language and literacy education. Practicum included.

RED 5546. Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities (3). Recommended prerequisite: RED 5147. This course reviews various types of reading problems and techniques for diagnosing these problems. This course also studies a variety of model diagnostic cases.

RED 5548. Correction of Reading Disabilities (3). Prerequisite: RED 4510 or RED 5147. This course provides teachers, reading specialists, and other educators with theoretical knowledge and expertise related to current procedures and instructional strategies for correcting reading disabilities.

RED 5646. Trends and Issues in Reading (3). Prerequisite: RED 4510 or RED 5147. This course is an exploration of current issues and recent trends in the teaching of reading with emphasis on developmental aspects, present practices, and implications of research in reading.

RED 5695. Policy Issues in Reading (3). Federal educational policy has targeted reading achievement through initiatives such as Reading Excellence, Reading First, Early Reading First, and the response-to-intervention approach of the Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004. This course examines the role of reading research in these initiatives and discusses the challenges and potential solutions to implementing these policy initiatives in schools.

RED 5744. Using Literacy Research to Inform Practice (3). This course explores the most current research on what comprises effective literacy instruction, what it means for how we teach, and how to use emerging research to ensure that classroom instruction is as effective as it can be, so that all children have the opportunity to become proficient readers and experience academic success.

RED 5865. Leadership Practicum in Reading and Language Arts (3). This practicum is designed to provide individualized practicum experiences in educational agencies for advanced graduate students in reading and language arts.

RED 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

RED 5911r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree.

RED 5945r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree.

RED 5947. Seminar and Practicum in Reading and Language Arts (3). (S/U grade only). This course is designed to provide field-based experience in public setting in conjunction with an on-campus seminar. Core readings are discussed.

RED 5971r. Thesis (3–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

RED 5973r. Specialist in Education Thesis (3–6). (S/U grade only).

RED 6747. Theory and Research in Reading (3). Prerequisite: RED 5147. This course helps students develop a broad knowledge of the research in reading and the ability to critically analyze and interpret studies in the field of reading.

RED 6938r. Doctoral Seminar in Reading and Language Arts (1–3). (S/U grade only). This course provides doctoral students with knowledge and awareness of the professional environment within which they practice. The resources of the University, professional organizations, professional skills such as grantsmanship and publication, and trends and issues in the field are considered. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

RED 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

RED 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

RED 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

RED 8968r. Specialist in Education Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

RED 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

RED 8978r. Specialist in Education Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

RED 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

SCE 5140. Curriculum in Science Education (3). This course provides opportunities for students to develop both a practical and theoretical basis to analyze science curricula. The course focuses on the utilization of philosophical and psychological foundations to analyze current curriculum materials available for science classes.

SCE 5147. Perspectives on Learning in Science Education (3). Prerequisite: SCE 5947. Corequisites: SCE 5336 and SCE 5945. This course examines different learning theories or perspectives that influence how science curricula, technology-enhanced environments, and instructional strategies are conceptualized, designed, implemented, and studied.

SCE 5215. Conceptual Learning in Elementary School Science (3). This course provides opportunities to acquire knowledge and skills related to planning and implementing a science program for elementary school children.

SCE 5225. Conceptual Learning in Middle School Science (3). This course provides opportunities to acquire knowledge and skills related to teaching and learning science in middle school grades. The course investigates the emotional and psychological needs of adolescent pupils in relationship to the middle school science curriculum.

SCE 5331. Management and Planning in Science Teaching (3). Prerequisites: Admission to the program, SCE 5336, SCE 5340, SCE 5895, and SCE 5947. Corequisite: SCE 5942. This course provides support and guidance to science-education graduate students who are currently interning.

SCE 5332. Methods for Teaching Science in Secondary Schools (3). This course provides an opportunity for prospective secondary-science educators to learn more about learning, teaching, curriculum development, and assessment in science. Requires thirty hours of field work in a local secondary school.

SCE 5336. Instructional Strategies that Promote Learning in Science (3). Corequisite: SCE 5945. This course examines several different instructional, metacognitive, and assessment strategies that have been shown to foster students’ understanding and retention of key science concepts.

SCE 5340. Teaching and Learning Science (3). This course provides opportunities for students to examine predominant psychological models of human cognition, the evolving nature of science knowledge, and the role of the teacher in assisting students to learn science with understanding.

SCE 5545. Teaching Science in Diverse Classrooms (3). This course examines the implications of “science for all,” with a particular emphasis on the interactions of students’ culture and culture of science. This examination is followed by a description of instructional congruence and its role in helping all students move toward scientific literacy. The course culminates with the identification of practices that allow for cultural congruence and the application of these practices in the design and enactment of an instructionally congruent unit of science teaching.

SCE 5642. Science Teaching and Education Policy (3). This course assists pre-service and in-service science teachers in understanding the issues associated with science education and policy from a historical and futuristic perspective.

SCE 5740. Research Methods in Science Education (3). This course is a comprehensive survey of research methodology used in studying science education. Students develop skills in interpreting both qualitative and quantitative studies, with particular emphasis placed on qualitative methodologies.

SCE 5745. Statistical Applications to Science Teaching (3). This course provides science teachers with a basic understanding of statistical procedures used in educational research, scientific studies, and reform documents. The course focuses on producing and critiquing statistical-graphing displays and on applying statistical procedures to classroom teaching and school data to enhance the understanding of scientific and educational research.

SCE 5836C. Teaching Earth and Space Science (3). This course includes traditional discipline categories of geology, meteorology, astronomy, and oceanography. The course utilizes National Science Education standards to organize subject matter, which is the focus of this pedagogical course.

SCE 5895. Disciplinary Engagement in Science (3). This course examines the nature of scientific knowledge and how the particular actions involved in scientific inquiry influence the characteristics of the knowledge it produces. The course also examines the role of the nature of science knowledge in a broader scientific literacy with an explanation of how to support students in constructing that knowledge.

SCE 5905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

SCE 5910r. Supervised Research (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

SCE 5921r. Colloquium (1). (S/U grade only). This course discusses current trends in science teaching. Enrollment limited to master’s or doctoral students in science or science education. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

SCE 5935r. Special Problems in the Teaching of Secondary School Science (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

SCE 5942. Internship for Graduate Students (1–10). (S/U grade only).

SCE 5943r. Field Laboratory Internship (1–8). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of sixteen semester hours.

SCE 5945. Initial Practicum in the Teaching and Learning of Science (3). Corequisite: SCE 5336. This field-based course provides students with an opportunity to study the teaching and learning that takes place in an actual classroom.

SCE 5946r. Supervised Teaching (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

SCE 5947. Final Practicum in the Teaching and Learning of Science (3). Prerequisites: SCE 5336 and SCE 5945. This field-based course provides students with an opportunity to study the teaching and learning that takes place in an actual classroom.

SCE 5949r. Field Lab Internship (1–3). This course assists teachers in updating and improving content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and pedagogical content knowledge with structured guidance by faculty. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

SCE 5954. Portfolio Defense (0). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Completion of all master’s degree coursework. This course is a master’s portfolio defense. Portfolio must be submitted in the first month of classes in the semester of graduation.

SCE 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

SCE 5973r. Specialist in Education Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

SCE 6345r. Teaching and Learning Science (3). This course enables graduate students to develop an understanding of psychological models and how they apply to teaching and learning of school science.

SCE 6351. Curriculum Design in Science (3). This course provides opportunities to learn and apply the principles of curriculum design, implementation, and evaluation in science. The course emphasizes analysis of implemented science curricula in terms of philosophical and psychological models, the roles of teachers and students and external forces.

SCE 6395. Science Teacher Education (3). This course investigates sources of teacher knowledge and explores strategies for improving science teacher performance. Common approaches to staff development are studied and analyzed and innovative approaches are developed and evaluated in terms of theory and research on teaching.

SCE 6761r. Research, Recent Developments, and Current Issues in Science Education (3–5). May be repeated to a maximum of ten semester hours.

SCE 6922r. Colloquium in Science Education (1). (S/U grade only). This course consists of analyses of theory, policy, and research which have implications for science and science education at the local, state, national, and international levels. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

SCE 6938r. Advanced Seminar in Science Education (2). This course consists of a sequence of four courses for doctoral students in science education. The courses are: researchable questions in science education; professional writing; current policy issues in science education; and a review of literature in science education. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

SCE 6980r. Doctoral Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

SCE 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

SCE 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

SCE 8968r. Specialist in Education Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

SCE 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

SCE 8978r. Specialist in Education Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

SCE 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

SMT 5305. Classroom Interactions (3). This course is centered around a close examination of the interplay between teachers, students, and content, and how such interactions enable students to develop deep conceptual understanding in science and mathematics.

SSE 5195. Developing a Global Perspective (3). Prerequisites: EDG 5208 and SSE 5367. This course examines theory and practice in global education and its integration into curriculum and pedagogy in social sciences and social studies education. The course evaluates major issues and controversies embedded in the field, and enables students to critique scholarship, and propose ideas for integrating global perspectives in instruction.

SSE 5365r. Problems of Teaching Social Studies in Secondary School and Junior College (1–3). This course focuses on the identification of problems, their investigation, and application of findings to instruction. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

SSE 5367. Fundamentals in Teaching Social Studies (3). Pre- or corequisite: EDG 5208. This course explores the rationale for social science instruction and examines traditional social science instructional methods.

SSE 5382. Seminar in Global and Multicultural Education (3). This course examines the similarities, differences, and perceived competing orientations of the historical developments of the global and multicultural education movements in social studies education since the second half of the 20th century. The course analyzes the rationale, purpose, goals, and implementation difficulties and controversies surrounding both fields, while offering conceptual frameworks and theories of global and multicultural education. Pre-service teachers enrolled in this course become conversant in seminal readings and contributions by leading scholars in global and multicultural education.

SSE 5386. Goals and Methods for the Teaching of History (3). This course is a survey of the major approaches to the study of history linked to the goals of history instruction in general education, with attention to various methods for teaching history.

SSE 5391. Teaching Global Issues (3). This course examines prevalent global issues in the United States and foreign countries using the pedagogy in social sciences and social studies education. The course evaluates major issues and controversies embedded in the field, and enables students to critique scholarship, and propose ideas for integrating global perspectives in instruction.

SSE 5615. Problems in Teaching Elementary School Social Studies (3). This course identifies problems, their investigation, and application of findings to instruction.

SSE 5665. Inquiry in Teaching Social Studies (3). Prerequisites: EDG 5208 and SSE 5367. This course provides theory and practice in discovery, problem solving, and inquiry teaching of social science.

SSE 5675. Seminar in Civic Education (3). This seminar focuses on both historical and contemporary research pertaining to civic education. Students conduct research on civic education as it pertains to the teaching of history and the social sciences.

SCE 5895. Disciplinary Engagement in Science (3). This course examines the nature of scientific knowledge and how the particular actions involved in scientific inquiry influence the characteristics of the knowledge it produces. The course also examines the role of the nature of science knowledge in a broader scientific literacy with an explanation of how to support students in constructing that knowledge.

SSE 5907r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

SSE 5915r. Supervised Research (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

SSE 5937r. Special Topics in Social Science Education (3). This course is an analysis of selected topics in social science education. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of nine semester hours.

SSE 5943. Field Laboratory Internship (1–8). (S/U grade only). Prerequisites: EDG 5208 and SSE 5367.

SSE 5946r. Supervised Teaching (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

SSE 5947. Internship for Graduate Students (1–10). (S/U grade only).

SSE 5971r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

SSE 5973r. Specialist in Education Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

SSE 6931. Doctoral Seminar in Social Science Education (3). This course is a critical review of research in social science education in preparation for the dissertation prospectus. Issues of epistemology and research methodology are carefully analyzed and discussed.

SSE 6933. History of Social Studies/Social Science Education (3). This course is an historical examination of the search for a curriculum rationale, adequate content, appropriate scope and sequence, and effective instructional practice in social studies/social science education, grades K–12.

SSE 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

SSE 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

SSE 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

SSE 8968r. Specialist in Education Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

SSE 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

SSE 8978r. Specialist in Education Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

SSE 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

TSL 4945r. Associate Teaching in English as a Second Language (2–10). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of ten semester hours. (Advanced Undergraduate Course)

TSL 5005. Methodologies for Teaching Foreign and Second Languages (4). This course is designed to meet the needs of those teaching second languages abroad and pre-service teachers in K-12 foreign/second language education by developing an understanding of current theories of language learning through exploration of relevant research. Opportunities are provided for students to use the theoretical base in the design of classroom lessons.

TSL 5142. Development of Foreign/Second Language Curriculum and Materials (3). This course begins with a review of L2 learning stages and of contemporary curricular designs that pertain to teaching foreign/second languages. Students learn to analyze existing curricula, materials and technology, and participate in the process of developing original units and materials.

TSL 5250. Applied Linguistics in Foreign/Second Language Teaching (3). This course addresses the major areas of linguistics including phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, acquisition, language socialization and variation. Students are expected to relate these to cross-linguistic issues in classrooms and provide ways to assist L2 learners in reading and language arts.

TSL 5325. English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Instruction in the Content Areas (3). This course is designed to prepare non-ESOL teachers to instruct English language learners in public school content areas (i.e., science, math, social studies) and non-content areas (i.e., physical education, art). Emphasis is on language-sensitive instructional planning and delivery, adaptation of instructional materials for enhanced comprehension, testing and placement of students, and cross-cultural awareness. It satisfies the teacher certification requirements for content area teachers. It is not part of the ESOL Endorsement required of primary language providers.

TSL 5377. Reading in Foreign Language Instruction (3). This course takes place against a backdrop of current theories, issues, and research in first and second language reading. In this course, students select from a range of reading approaches to develop reading units and activities for specific kinds of learners, including those with low literacy and L2 proficiency.

TSL 5440. Foreign/Second Language Testing and Evaluation (3). This course acquaints students with principles of second language assessment at the classroom and program levels and standardized testing. This course informs students of general principles of second language test construction and administration, including traditional and nontraditional assessments, and provides practical experiences in preparing valid items and analyzing tests.

TSL 5525. Crosscultural Communication for Foreign/Second Language Teachers (3). This course provides the foreign/second language educator with information related to crosscultural communication. Students explore the relationship between language and culture and focus on methods for fostering understanding between different cultural and subcultural groups. Educators gain understanding in major theories related to sociolinguistics and related implications for teaching a multilingual, multicultural student body.

TSL 5640. Seminar: Research in Second Language Learning and Teaching (3). This course is a comprehensive overview of second language learning and learners. Additionally, students examine the major theories and concepts associated with second language acquisition in naturalistic, classroom, and laboratory settings.

TSL 5660. Introduction to Second Language Acquisition (3). In this course, students will explore key theories, debates, and controversies within the field of Second Language Acquisition through reading and critically evaluating relevant research.

TSL 5908r. Directed Individualized Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

TSL 5915r. Supervised Research (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

TSL 5930r. Seminar: Current Issues in Teaching TSL (1–3). Prerequisite: TSL 5005. This seminar is designed to be taken at the end of a student’s program of study. It focuses on contemporary issues in teaching ESL/EFL important to one’s professional understanding and participation in the field. The course is repeatable when different topics are listed for consideration. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

TSL 5931r. Seminar: Special Topics in Applied Linguistics (2–3). This course addresses any topic relevant to the broader field of multilingual/multicultural education and may be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

TSL 5940r. Field Laboratory Internship (1–8). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

TSL 5947r. Supervised Teaching (1–4). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours.

TSL 5972r. Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours is required.

TSL 5974r. Specialist in Education Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only).

TSL 6641. Research Issues and Designs in Second Language Education (3). This course provides doctoral students with opportunities to become familiar with major issues in research in the field, to develop skills in the critical reading of research in several areas (L2 learning, teaching, policy, assessment, curriculum) and to begin extensive reading in their own areas of interest.

TSL 6665. Instructed Second Language Acquisition (3). Prerequisite: TSL 5000. This course is an introduction to the methods, findings, and theoretical issues in research on instructed second acquisition, with a focus on contemporary research and perspectives.

TSL 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

TSL 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

TSL 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

TSL 8968r. Specialist in Education Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.)

TSL 8976r. Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

TSL 8978r. Specialist in Education Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

TSL 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

Note: Courses are subject to modification.