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2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

School of Theatre

College of Fine Arts

Web Page: http://theatre.fsu.edu/

Chair: C. Cameron Jackson; Professors: Chappell, Dahl, Jordan, Muscha; Associate Professors: Coleman, Cooper, Gelabert, Hale, Lickson, Malaev-Babel, Osborne, Ossowski, Salata; Assistant Professors: Al-Saber, Lile; Faculty Administrator: Leaming; Specialized Faculty: Delorey, Eginton, Jackson; Burt Reynolds Eminent Scholar Chair in Theatre: TBA; Hoffman Eminent Scholar Chair in Theater: TBA; Professor Emeritus: Fallon

The School of Theatre is one of the largest and most comprehensive theatre-training programs in the United States. The first program in Florida to hold such distinction, the school is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Theatre and is a founding member of the University/Resident Theatre Association. At Florida State University, actors, directors, designers, technicians, managers, teachers, and scholars learn by working with gifted faculty in a professionally oriented school environment. In realizing its educational mission, the school contributes to the cultural life of the University, the Tallahassee and Sarasota communities, and the state by creating an array of productions reflecting the full range of dramatic literature. From Shakespeare to Chekhov to Rogers and Hammerstein to world premieres, performances give audiences and participating students the opportunity to share the unique experience of the living theatrical event. Classroom experiences are enriched by the challenge of faculty, students, and visiting artists working side-by-side to create fine theatre.

The School of Theatre’s graduate FSU/Asolo Conservatory for Actor Training is located in Sarasota at the Florida State University Center for the Performing Arts. This exemplary Master of Fine Arts (MFA) program in acting is operated in conjunction with the Asolo Theatre Company, a LORT professional theatre. The conservatory and the Asolo Theatre Company are both housed in a beautiful facility, which features a 500-seat proscenium theatre, a 160-seat proscenium theatre, dance studios, classrooms, and rehearsal spaces.

In addition to its degree programs, the School of Theatre has created the Theatre Academy of London, an extraordinary, year-round curriculum in London for select theatre majors. The emphasis of the program is on classical theatre training and includes theatre-going, backstage tours, classes with leading theatre artists, special internships and performance opportunities. Students earn a full semester of academic credit while participating in a program that will make a real difference in their lives as students, artists, and human beings. Graduate credit is available by special request.

Degrees Offered

The Master of Arts/Master of Science (MA/MS) degrees offer a blend of academic courses and production training on an advanced level. The Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree provides training to achieve professional-level competencies in acting, directing, costume design, technical production, or theatre management. The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in theatre is a research degree that indicates the perfection of individual skills in theatre scholarship, production, and education.

The School of Theatre is a fully accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Theatre, and its degree requirements are in accordance with the latest published regulations of that association.

Retention Standards

The School of Theatre reserves the right to refuse admission or terminate enrollment at any time if a student fails to maintain the standards of the program.

Facilities

There are six performance spaces available for the production of plays. All include rehearsal space. They are: the Mainstage Theatre in the Fine Arts Building in Tallahassee; Augusta Conradi Studio Theatre, in the Williams Building in Tallahassee; The Lab Theatre in Tallahassee; the Fine Arts Annex Theatre in the Fine Arts Annex in Tallahassee; and Mertz and Cook Theatres in the Florida State University Center for the Performing Arts and FSU/Asolo Conservatory Theatre in Sarasota, Florida.

The Mainstage Theatre in the Fine Arts Building is a proscenium theatre with continental seating for 500 patrons. Stage equipment includes a turntable, a counterweight system, hydraulic orchestra pit, a computer lightboard, a four-channel sound system, light and sound shops, two large-group dressing rooms, and two private dressing rooms.

The Studio, or Augusta Conradi Theatre, is a proscenium house and seats 183 patrons. The stage equipment includes a rope system, a preset lightboard, a single channel sound system, a light and sound control booth, green room, two group dressing rooms, and a small scene shop. The auditorium is used as a lecture classroom and demonstration laboratory by the School of Theatre.

The Lab is located at 502 South Copeland Street. The Lab is flexible theatre space used in proscenium, thrust, arena, and open configurations. There is a variable seating capacity depending on each production’s staging requirements. There is a lighting grid, and portable sound and lighting equipment is utilized. Subscription-season productions are mounted in the Lab Theatre each year. In addition, the space is used for student development and productions. There is an accompanying rehearsal hall next door.

The Fine Arts Annex Theatre, located at 117 Fine Arts Annex, is a small proscenium space with flexible seating. The room is used as a classroom space, rehearsal space, and as a performance space for student productions.

Master of Arts/Master of Science

The Master of Arts/Master of Science (MA/MS) program in theatre at Florida State University offers students the opportunity to work with outstanding faculty in a flexible curriculum that combines scholarship and production work. Classes at the graduate level are small, enabling students to have direct contact with professors, contribute extensively in discussion, and do significant projects, reports, and papers.

The MA/MS program has been designed for both students who desire a foundation for the PhD, and are interested in teaching at the secondary school or junior college level, or for those students desiring a general graduate theatre education but are uncertain about pursuing the MFA or the PhD.

The MA is recommended for students who may wish to pursue a PhD, while the MS program is intended for the working theatre educator. The MA provides the option of writing a thesis, and has a foreign language requirement.

In addition, the MS for Theatre Educators is a three-summer program designed with working theatre educators in mind. Students enrolled in this program take coursework in performance, technical theatre, design, literature, and history.

Admission

Admission to the MA/MS program in the School of Theatre is based upon the following criteria: undergraduate GPA, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores, three letters of recommendation, a scholarly writing sample, and a statement of purpose. Any exemption from these requirements must be requested in writing from the Director of Graduate Theatre Studies and the Associate Dean for Academic and Students Services of the School of Theatre.

Master of Fine Arts

The Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree is a course of study leading to a terminal artistic degree in theatre arts. The objective of the program is to provide students with competencies appropriate to the needs of professional theatres in America; only secondarily does this program prepare teachers. The goals of the program are to 1) ensure opportunities for mastering the application of theory and skills by practicing a professional specialization; 2) encourage on-the-job training in actual working conditions; and, 3) provide a general background in theatre history and practice.

Admission

Students admitted to an MFA program must meet the University admission policies for graduate studies, must have a baccalaureate degree in theatre or its equivalent from an accredited institution, and must offer evidence of a high degree of creative ability in their area of specialization.

Residency

A student must be enrolled full-time in graduate study for a minimum of four semesters. A minimum of sixty semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree is required for completion of the MFA degree. However, there are no maximum limits to the time required. It is considered normal to take three school years to complete the program because of the time necessary for information, insights, and crafts to become integrated sufficiently into a student’s practice to demonstrate mastery and maturity in artistry and skill.

Practicum Program

The unique feature of the course of study toward the MFA at Florida State University is the practicum program. Practicum acknowledges the legitimacy of unique artistic production-oriented work not affiliated with classroom coursework. The practicum program allows students and their advisors to plan and execute an individualized track to meet students’ particular needs and desires. The specific content of each practicum is determined in advance and entered on the student’s progress check list. This contractual agreement is evaluated by the MFA faculty each semester.

Review

A faculty committee meets with each student every regular semester to evaluate the student’s progress. Individual program advisors report on their students in terms of attitude, class work, production assignments, projects, artistic growth, conduct, and professional potential. Any faculty members who have worked with MFA students may submit relevant information. The results of the review are part of the student’s file.

Internship

Internships provide students with the opportunity to gain experience in their particular field by working under the supervision of recognized professionals. Resident internships must be arranged with the student’s program director. The student is responsible for providing progress reports and a full evaluation from the internship supervisor before grades can be assigned. Internships may be arranged to a maximum of thirty semester hours.

Specialization in Acting

The MFA acting program is located in Sarasota at the FSU/Asolo Conservatory for Professional Actor Training in conjunction with the Asolo Repertory Theatre Company. Students are offered a conservatory approach which emphasizes the acquisition of skills appropriate to repertory ensemble. The three-year curriculum includes daily intensive training in voice, speech, dialects, movement, and dance, as well as scene study, text analysis, and period styles. Upon graduation and at any time within the following five years, all MFAs are eligible for membership in the Actor’s Equity Association.

Specialization in Directing

The mission of the program is to provide students with training in the process and practice of directing. The program is designed to give students the skills they will need to continue their own development and growth as directors in professional theatre. The curriculum provides a careful balance of academic classes, studio work, and production experience.

Specialization in Costume Design

The mission of the program is to provide students with training in the process and practice of costume design. The program is designed to give students skills needed to continue their own growth as costume designers in American theatre. Students graduate with an in-depth knowledge of all aspects of costume design for the stage. Design work in opera, dance, and film is also explored. Costume technology is stressed as well, including skills in millinery, fabric modification, costume crafts, and patterning. Each MFA costume design student will design from three to six productions. Design work in dance and film is also available on occasion. Opportunities to teach are also available.

Specialization in Technical Production

The technical production’s mission is to train students in the process and practice of technical design, technical management, and production management. The program is designed to provide new and strengthen existing skills and aid the student’s growth as a technical director or production manager in professional or educational theatre. Organization and management and technical skills such as rigging, welding, hydraulics, pneumatics, advanced woodworking, and motion control will be covered in detail. Structural analysis and design for the stage is emphasized. Each MFA technical production candidate will have technical direction or assistant technical direction responsibilities for at least three productions. Teaching opportunities also are available.

Specialization in Theatre Management

The mission of the theatre management program is to help enhance the professional management of theatre and arts organizations in America by developing future theatre managers. Students are provided with practical training and hands-on experience in the process and practice of managing theatre and arts organizations. Our goal is to give students an in-depth knowledge of all aspects of producing theatre, as well as an understanding of management principles, personnel, finance, marketing and fundraising management and working knowledge of computer applications in arts management.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

The PhD is a generalist program in theatre studies with opportunities for specialization. A rigorous course of study, the PhD program operates within an active performance-oriented school, nationally recognized as one of the leading theatre-training schools.

There are three types of requirements for the doctoral degree:

  • Formal coursework
  • Comprehensive examinations
  • Dissertation

The doctoral degree in theatre studies prepares students to become:

  • Scholars in theatre history, criticism, literature, and theory
  • Dramaturgs in a professional or academic environment
  • Publishable critical writers
  • Experienced teachers on a university level

Classes at the doctoral level are small and intensive, enabling doctoral student to have close interaction with the faculty. Doctoral students also contribute extensively to the intellectual environment of the program and the School of Theatre as teaching or research assistants.

Requirements

The doctoral program normally requires at least four years of full-time study beyond the master’s degree, two years of coursework, a year for comprehensive exams and dissertation prospectus writing, and at least a year for the dissertation. At least one year must be spent in full-time residence (defined as twenty-four semester hours within any twelve-month period once a student has reached thirty graduate semester hours or a master’s degree.)

The doctoral curriculum requires seventy semester hours beyond the master’s degree (forty-six semester hours of coursework and at least twenty-four dissertation hours.) For students on assistantship, nine hours per semester constitutes a full-time load. Students who are not funded and those on fellowship must register for twelve hours per semester.

Admissions

Admission to the doctoral program is based on Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) scores, academic record, professional background, statement of purpose, letters of recommendation, and a critical-scholarly writing sample. The highest-rated applicants are often interviewed in person or by telephone. The faculty then determines whether an applicant can be admitted, placed on a waiting list, or declined.

Definition of Prefixes

THE—Theatre Studies and General Resources

TPA—Theatre Production and Administration

TPP—Theatre Performance and Performance Training

Graduate Courses

THE 5065. Disability and Representation (3). This course comprises an advanced introduction that surveys how the arts and popular culture (including literature, fine arts, performance, advertising, documentary film, and video) have both reflected and contributed to attitudes and public policy concerning people with disabilities. The course takes a disability-studies approach, which considers the social and cultural aspects of disability.

THE 5084r. Theatre Problems (3). In this course, topics change each semester depending upon instructor. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

THE 5120. Advanced Theatre History I: Classical and Medieval (3). This course examines the origins of theatre: Classical Greece and Rome; Japanese Kabuki/Noh/Bunrak; Medieval Europe.

THE 5130. Advanced Theatre History II: Renaissance and 18th Century (3). In this course, topics include Neoclassicism, Elizabethan/Jacobean, Spanish Gold Age, Restoration, Decline of Neoclassicism, and Germany.

THE 5160. Advanced Theatre History III: 19th and 20th Centuries (3). In this course, topics include Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism, and Postcolonialism.

THE 5238. History of African-American Drama (3). This course is a survey of the history of African-Americans in the American theatre from the African Grove Theatre to the present, and of playwrights from William Wells Brown to August Wilson.

THE 5246. Musical Theatre History I (3). This course traces the development of the musical from its European origins to 1943. Students establish familiarity with a wide range of the repertoire of the earlier musical theatre.

THE 5247. Musical Theatre History II (3). This course focuses on the development of the American musical, in its cultural, theatrical and social context, from 1943 to the present. The course also explores the elements of musical theatre and the various ways these elements are used in different types of musicals.

THE 5265r. Historic Costume II (3). Prerequisite: THE 4260. This course is an advanced study of selected periods of costume history and its relationship to the theatrical costume. The time periods covered include both western and nonwestern dress. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

THE 5273r. Seminar: Selected Topics in History of Performance (Acting and Directing) (3). Prerequisite: Two undergraduate theatre history courses or instructor permission. This course focuses on selected topics in the history of acting and directing from the ancient Greeks to the present day. The course also includes investigation resulting in some form of report. May be repeated once for credit as content varies to a maximum of six semester hours.

THE 5287. History of Architecture and Decor (3). This course is an examination of principal periods of architectural development and interior design from Ancient Egypt through the Art Deco movement in the 1930’s.

THE 5302. Contemporary U.S. Theatre (3). Prerequisites: THE 3213 and THE 4304. This course focuses on contemporary U.S. theatre and performance, including traditional theatre and experimental types of performance. Students, read, analyze, and research theatre in the canon and outside of it. The course culminates in an original performance.

THE 5317r. Seminar: Selected Topics in Dramatic Literature and Dramatic Theory (3). Prerequisite: Two undergraduate theatre history courses or instructor permission. This course focuses on selected topics relating to dramatic literature and theatrical theory for intensive investigation resulting in some form of report. May be repeated once for credit as content varies to a maximum of six semester hours.

THE 5437. Gender, Race, and Performance (3). This course is an advanced introduction to the contemporary theories and practices regarding the performances of race and gender upon the stage and in everyday life. The course also utilizes feminist theories of performance, students read playtext written by women of color, by white women, and by one African-American male.

THE 5439. African Theatre and Performance (3). This course examines the cultural and political complexities of selected countries of sub-Saharan Africa through an exploration of pre-colonial performance traditions, written plays, and contemporary popular culture,

THE 5486. Graduate Dramaturgy (3). This course is an introduction to the principles of dramaturgy, including preparation of a dramaturgical protocol, preparation of scripts for production, and research into background, biography and thematic issues of a play script.

THE 5765. Performance I for Theatre Educators (3). This course instructs secondary education faculty in the crafts of acting and directing through a variety of practical exercises. At completion, students should be able to demonstrate the skills and abilities to guide their own students in the basics of acting and directing.

THE 5770. Theatre History and Literature I for Theatre Educators (3). This course explores the staging practices and dramatic literature of classical Greece and Rome, medieval Europe, the Renaissance, 18th-century Europe, and classical Japan. The course emphasizes the realization of the plays in performance in both historical and modern contexts.

THE 5771. Theatre History and Literature II for Theatre Educators (3). This course explores the staging practices and dramatic literature from the 18th-century to the present. Specific units include romanticism, melodrama and popular culture, the rise of realism, avant-garde theatre movements, the musical, European and American innovations 1960s–1990s, and contemporary dramatic theory.

THE 5772. Theatre History and Literature III for Theatre Educators (3). This course works to familiarize the students with a wide range of contemporary plays and situate the plays in the sociopolitical contexts in which they were produced. Although plays from various world cultures are read, the course emphasizes multicultural dramatic literature of the United States.

THE 5905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

THE 5910. Theatre Bibliography and Research (3). This basic graduate course introduces students to library resources, methods, and the reporting of research in theatre.

THE 5916r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three hours may apply to the master’s degree.

THE 5918r. Theatre Tutorial (1–3). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Graduate students in theatre only. This course consists of selected topics in theatre. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

THE 5925r. Writing Workshop (1–3). (S/U grade only). This course is intended for graduate students to analyze and critique papers for publication and conference presentations. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

THE 5940r. Internship in Theatre (2–12). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Consent of appropriate committee. This course consists of a resident internship in an approved professional theatre shop or enrichment center. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

THE 5943r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course includes faculty visits and observes student teaching in theatre. May be repeated to a maximum of five semester hours. A maximum of three semester hours may apply to the master’s degree.

THE 5971r. Thesis (3–6). (S/U grade only). A minimum of six semester hours required.

THE 5973r. Creative Thesis (3–6). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. A minimum of six semester hours is required. MFA candidates only.

THE 6531. Methods of Theatre Criticism (3). This course is a study of major genres of theatrical criticism with focus on twentieth-century movements. The seminar is designed to aid not only dissertation analyses but also performance criticism and production work.

THE 6980r. Dissertation (1–12). (S/U grade only).

THE 8963r. MFA Qualifying Examination (0). (P/F grade only.) This course is to be taken within the first five semesters of residency and shows that the student is qualified to continue the program successfully. The course form varies with discipline and skills being demonstrated. May be repeated with consent of program director.

THE 8964r. Preliminary Doctoral Exam (0). (P/F grade only.) This course is to be taken after the student has registered for or already taken a minimum of forty-eight hours.

THE 8966r. Master’s Comprehensive Examination (0). (P/F grade only.) This course is normally taken the last semester of coursework.

THE 8976r. Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.)

THE 8978. Defense MFA Degree (0). (P/F grade only.) The form of this course varies and may include portfolio review or vita presentation. The course is to be taken during one of the last two semesters of residency.

THE 8985r. Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.) This course is taken on completion of dissertation and within five years of passing preliminary examinations.

TPA 5015. Stage Machinery Design and Construction (3). This course is a skills-development course covering the process of designing and building mechanical effects for the stage. Areas to be studied include basic physics, hydraulics and pneumatics, electro-mechanics, and control systems, as well as a systematic approach to machinery design. This study leads to the public presentation of a fully realized, practical final project.

TPA 5016. Model Making (3). This course acquaints students with current model building techniques and systems. Students gain experience in constructing most of the elements commonly associated with models such as doors, windows, textures, fences, trees, and props.

TPA 5025. Lighting Design I (3). This course acquaints students with the design process and the various tools by which lighting designers research and express their art. The course includes script analysis, producing light plots, and basic drafting.

TPA 5026. Lighting Design II (3). This course is an overview of the lighting design process for a variety of spaces from concept to finished product. Emphasis is on script analysis. Content includes instruction in the creation and use of paperwork, as well as practical aspects of lighting for both proscenium and non-prescenium venues.

TPA 5027. Lighting Design III (3). This course encompasses lighting design for a variety of production styles such as musicals, opera, dance, comedy and tragedy.

TPA 5028. Lighting Design IV (3). This course consists of intensive study in research, process, script interpretation and design presentation. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and professional conduct.

TPA 5029. Lighting Design V (3). This course centers on non-theatrical lighting, including tours, industrials and architectural, as well as cross-over areas of projection, sound and video. Emphasis is on how the implementation of this technology affects design approaches.

TPA 5042r. Advanced Costume Design for the Stage (3). This course is an advanced exploration into the costume design process for the theatre, including researching, script analysis, design problems, and the costume designer’s role throughout the production process. May be repeated once when content varies to a maximum of six semester hours.

TPA 5047. Advanced Costume Rendering (3). Prerequisites: TPA 4040 and TPA 4071. This course is an advanced exploration and analysis of the skills needed in rendering, with a specific focus on costume rendering techniques. The course also discusses the figure, fabric textures, drapery of clothing, garment characteristics and period styles.

TPA 5062. Scene Design: Theory and Practice (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course includes advanced projects; emphasis on multiple scene productions, model building, rendering, and working drawings; execution of complex productions such as musicals and opera.

TPA 5065. Principles of Scene Design (3). The course explores the techniques and processes of design for the theatre. This includes the development of a dramatic concept, groundplan and final drawings.

TPA 5067r. Scenic Design III (3). This course is for advanced design students to combine all the fundamental design elements together to form complete designs, termed “The Bid Package.” May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

TPA 5069r. Scenic Design IV (3). This course is for advanced design students and is a flexible course designed to be tailored to develop the individual needs of students such that they can be prepared for the professional market. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

TPA 5079. Scene Painting (3). This course investigates the principles and techniques of traditional two-dimensional scenic art.

TPA 5080r. MFA Practicum in Design for the Stage (2–15). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. In this course emphasis is on scenic, costume, and lighting design for the stage. May be repeated to a maximum of sixty semester hours.

TPA 5086. Life Drawing for Designers (3). This course explores the problems of figure drawing as they relate specifically to the theatrical designer using live, nude, and draped models.

TPA 5089. Selected Topics in Advanced Technical Theatre (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course studies topics such as painting scenery for the stage, handling of various paint media, effects of lighting on colors. The course involves intensive study of master draftsmen and artists and ways of imitating artistic styles on stage.

TPA 5098. Theatrical Design for Theatre Educators (3). This course is a study of the principles and elements of design and how they are applied to scenery, costume and lighting design.

TPA 5203. Drafting (3). This course familiarizes the theatrical design student with the drafting principles and accepted practices of theatrical design and technology. Projects include isometric and orthographic projection, shop drawings, rear elevations, sections, ground plans, and drop point perspective.

TPA 5207. Technical Direction (3). This seminar addresses the technical management techniques and graphic presentation skills required of the technical director in a variety of situations.

TPA 5213. Stage Rigging (3). This studio course introduces the equipment, materials, and the standard professional techniques required for safe and efficient stage rigging utilizing both hemp and counterweight rigging systems.

TPA 5235r. Selected Topics in Stage Costuming and Make-Up Technology (3). Prerequisites: THE 4260; TPA 3230C, and TPA 3248, or instructor permission. This course is an in-depth exploration and practice of techniques and methods of construction and execution of solutions to advanced problems in costuming and make-up technology. May be repeated once with new content to a maximum of six semester hours.

TPA 5236. Advanced Costume Crafts (3). This course offers a further exploration of various advanced costume craft techniques and materials. Topics include mechanical moveable parts, electrical lightpacks, and fog packs. Each class research project must address the proper fit, comfort, movement, weight, and sight considerations needed for successful theatrical craft apparel.

TPA 5237r. Selected Topics in Costume Design for the Stage (3). Prerequisite: TPA 4040 or instructor permission. This course explores the conventions, practices, techniques, and aesthetics of designing for stage productions with lectures, discussion, and execution of designs. May be repeated once with new content to a maximum of six semester hours.

TPA 5242. Advanced Stage Costume Millinery Techniques (3). This course is an advanced exploration of various millinery techniques. The course includes the blocked, constructed buckram, straw, and wire frame headdress, with a special emphasis on millinery patterning from both renderings and historical research.

TPA 5243. Advanced Period Draping and Fitting Techniques (3). Prerequisites: TPA 5287 and THE 5265 or instructor permission. This course includes advanced practice in costume patterning for theatre with an emphasis on draping and drafting historically based garments for women and men. Projects include period garment research and measuring, sizing, fitting and grading techniques to accommodate actual performers’ measurements and stage movement requirements.

TPA 5245. Fabric Modification for Stage Costume (3). This course focuses on advanced techniques of two-and-three-dimensional fabric modification techniques as they relate to theatrical costumes. Techniques covered include dyes, painting mediums, printing processes (including airbrush and silkscreen), sewing and off-loom techniques.

TPA 5247. Advanced Stage Wigs and Specialty Makeup (3). This course is an advanced study examining makeup, hair and wig styles in various historical periods and cultures. Students acquire practical experience in constructing and styling wigs for the stage and in designing various period hair and makeup styles. Projects reflect refinement of skills in wig making and styling techniques used in professional theatres.

TPA 5278. Electricity and Electronics for the Stage (3).

TPA 5280r. MFA Practicum in Technical Theatre (2–15). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course gives students the opportunity to develop methods and skills consistent with professional practice in the execution of scenery and properties for theatre. May be repeated to a maximum of sixty semester hours.

TPA 5284. Technical Production (3). This course examines the production process from play selection through set design, set load in, run of show, load out, and post-modern analysis. Focus is on the various and linear aspects of production, including the management and planning of the budgeting, pre-construction, construction, run of show, and strike.

TPA 5285. Technical Production and Management (3). Prerequisite: TPA 5207 or instructor permission. This course provides students with more advanced knowledge and skills as a professional technical director. The course focuses on planning and management skills and topics include shop procedures, production and construction calendars, manpower, space usage, and establishing priorities.

TPA 5286r. Selected Topics in Technical Theatre (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course discusses the acquiring of skills necessary to solve problems in technical theatre production such as microcomputers, hydraulics, rigging, tool maintenance, welding, or plastics. May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

TPA 5287. Advanced Costume Patterning (3). Prerequisite: TPA 4239 or instructor permission. This course enables students to develop skills consistent with professional methods of creating patterns for stage costumes for women and men, including measuring, sizing, and fitting on individual body shapes and sizes. Patterning methods include drafting, flat pattern and draping techniques used in creating historically based costumes.

TPA 5306. Structural Design for the Stage II (3). This course is a continuation of the concepts and material covered in TPA 5310 (Structural Design for the Stage I).

TPA 5310. Structural Design for the Stage I (3). This course helps students develop the skills and techniques necessary for the safe design and construction of stage scenery through the study and application of static engineering, physical science and material strength using pre-calculus mathematics.

TPA 5315. Physics of Stage Machinery (3). This course examines the fundamentals of physics and Newton’s Laws as they relate to stage machinery. The course discusses the application of these dynamics for prediction and understanding of motion of stage wagons, turntables or lifts and emphasizes the practical use of motors, winches, turntables, lifts and other stage mechanisms.

TPA 5335. Costume Design for Dance (3). This course is an advanced exploration into the costume design process as it relates to different dance venues, including modern, ballet and music theatre. Rendering techniques and dance apparel are examined.

TPA 5336. Costume Design for Film and Television (3). This course concentrates on costume design for film and television. In the course, students generate designs for a variety of projects, research work of working film and television, and understand the costume design process for film, television and related fields.

TPA 5347. Software for Technical Theatre (3). This course covers the use of Microsoft Excel and AutoCad as a communication tool in theatre. No prior computer drafting is required. Experience in hand drafting is highly recommended. Throughout the class, a combination of paper and practical assignments is used.

TPA 5355. Lighting Software for Theatre (3). This course is an overview in the primary light design and visualization software programs. No prior knowledge of computer-aided design is necessary although significant individual work is required.

TPA 5356. Computer Rendering for Costume Designers (3). Prerequisite: TPA 5047. This course explores various computer rendering techniques for the costume designer and enables the student to develop an understanding of computer presentation programs and digital portfolios.

TPA 5385. Technical Production for Theatre Educators (3). This course provides instruction for secondary education faculty in all areas of technical theatre production. In the course, students should come away with the ability to train their own students in all aspects of technical theatre, as well as the ability to support productions they oversee.

TPA 5386. Advanced Technical Production for Theatre Educators (3). This course instructs secondary education faculty in advanced areas of technical theatre production. Students come away with the ability to train their own students in all aspects of technical theatre as well as the ability to support productions they oversee. In addition, persons taking this course learn to advise their students in the preparation of portfolios used to apply for BFA programs in theatre.

TPA 5402. Business Communications in the Arts (3-12). This course explores the myriad ways in which leaders in the arts communicate through press writing, public relations, and business documentation for arts organizations. Topics include: writing, media relations, business proposals and responses, documentation for financial support, and controlling the public image.

TPA 5405. Principles of Theatre Management (3). This course provides students with an overview of the management concepts and practices of American theatre, especially as they apply to non-profit community and educational theatre organizations.

TPA 5408. Business and Legal Issues in the Arts (3). Prerequisite: TPA 4400 or instructor permission. This course provides an overview of what is required to start up and operate an arts organization, as well as developing skills in budgeting, forecasting, fiscal management, contract negotiating and working with unions, personnel management, policy development, board relations, and organizational leadership.

TPA 5409. Audience Development and Arts Marketing (3). Prerequisite: TPA 4400 or instructor permission. This course provides an overview of marketing and development for arts organizations. This course specifically develops skills in strategic marketing planning, budgeting, media planning, graphics and layout concepts, writing from a marketing and sales perspective and public relations.

TPA 5410. Strategic Governance in the Arts (3). This course looks at how boards of directors govern arts organizations and the operation of the dynamics between management and the boards. Topics include: strategic planning, Gantt charting, board/executive relationships, artistic leadership, incorporating, working with governmental agencies, touring, licensing, and scheduling.

TPA 5425. Fiscal Management and Economics in the Arts (3). This course offers introductory and advanced principles of fiscal management and economics for not-for-profit arts organizations. In-depth analysis covers areas such as microeconomics; advocacy for public support of the arts; understanding of finance, accounting and bookkeeping terms and concepts; and financial statements.

TPA 5470r. MFA Practicum in Management (2–15). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course gives students the opportunity to experience the range of possibilities with the profession from box office and publicity to Fine Arts Council and foundation programs. May be repeated to a maximum of sixty semester hours.

TPA 5471. Leadership and Organizational Management in Arts (3). This course provides an overview of effective leadership practices in the arts. The course also allows students to attain knowledge and skills needed to manage complex organizations and to coordinate effectively and manage personnel in an arts organization.

TPA 5905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

TPA 5930r. Select Topics in Management (3). This course is designed to help the student develop a comprehensive understanding of skills and practices in different areas of theatre management and to develop research and presentation skills. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

TPA 5931r. Selected Topics in Stage Design (3). This course is an exploration and practice of advanced/specialized techniques and methods of designing for the stage.

TPA 5940r. MFA Internship in Technical Theatre, Stage Design, and Management (2–15). Prerequisites: Completion of sixty semester hours in regular MFA specialization and consent of appropriate committee. This course is a resident internship in an approved professional theatre, shop, or enrichment center. May be repeated to a maximum of thirty semester hours.

TPA 5941r. MFA Practicum in Costume Technology (1-6). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course allows students to develop skills consistent with professional practice in the execution of advanced costume technology projects, including but not limited to: interpreting costume designs for patterning and constructing period garments or costume crafts items, dyeing or painting and creating fabric modification techniques, constructing millinery, or styling, ventilating or constructing wigs or specialty makeup needs for the stage. May be repeated to a maximum of fifteen semester hours.

TPP 5145r. Acting Techniques I (3). This course is designed to provide actors with practical means of facilitating their creative process. The basic principles of organic inner technique are applied to improvisational exercises, character development and scene work. The higher spheres of the actor’s creativity are approached via psychophysical breath and imagination techniques. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

TPP 5146r. ClassicalPerformance Styles (3–6). This course introduces the work of the classical actor. It includes development of imaginative and technical facilities as applied to ancient Greek repertory. The course ends with an introduction to Shakespeare. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

TPP 5158. Performance II for Theatre Educators (3). This course expands development of theatrical exercises, scene study and rehearsal skills. Text is drawn from contemporary American plays.

TPP 5284r. MFA Practicum in Acting (1–15). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course involves conservatory study in professional actor training in conjunction with the Asolo State Theatre in Sarasota. May be repeated to a maximum of sixty semester hours.

TPP 5355. Performance III for Theatre Educators (3). This course allows the development and strengthening of directing skills for working theatre educators. Concentrated work in direction of scenes and monologues is used.

TPP 5380r. MFA Practicum in Directing (2–15). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course gives students an opportunity to work in production as stage manager, assistant director, and director of Studio Theatre and Mainstage productions. May be repeated to a maximum of sixty semester hours.

TPP 5381–5384. Problems in Directing (three hours each). Prerequisites: TPP 4310, TPP 4311; and/or instructor permission. These courses are advanced directing scene work for the specialist.

TPP 5515r. Movement I (3). This course explores and expands the actor’s movement choices and his ability to express himself non-verbally; emphasis on developing a strong, expressive dramatic imagination. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

TPP 5516r. Movement II (3). This course emphasizes the creation of the physical characteristics of a role by combining first-year movement analysis with basic acting process. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

TPP 5651. Advanced Play Analysis (2). Prerequisite: TPP 5656 and instructor permission. This course is an in-depth analysis of representative play scripts to enable realization in production.

TPP 5656r. Advanced Play Analysis for Actors (3). This course is intended to provide actors with the tools for careful script analysis. Aristotelian, Elizabethan, Brechtian, and postmodern dramaturgical techniques are examined in order to identify methods for achieving a deep and objective reading of any given text. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

TPP 5715r. Voice I (3). This course delves fully into Fitzmaurice Voicework: destructuring to release breath, creative impulses, and the voice; and restructuring which allows the actor to bring breath and impulse work skillfully onto the stage. The speech work for this class includes training of the articulators, speech production, IPA, and mastery of the standard American dialect. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

TPP 5716r. Voice II (3). This course concentrates on language structure analysis, scansion, and scoring a text. Dialect training (spoken and transcription) is studied with emphasis on the in-depth process of learning dialects. Advanced work on vocal production gives the actor a fully expressive, skillful vocal instrument on stage. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

TPP 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

TPP 5940r. MFA Internship in Theatre Performance (2–15). (S/U grade only). Prerequisites: Completion of sixty hours in regular MFA specialization and consent of appropriate committee. This course is a resident internship in an approved professional theatre, shop, or enrichment center. May be repeated to a maximum of thirty semester hours.

THEATRE PERFORMANCE AND TRAINING:

see Theatre

THEATRE PRODUCTION AND ADMINISTRATION:

see Theatre

TOPOLOGY AND GEOMETRY:

see Mathematics

TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC ENGINEERING:

see Civil and Environmental Engineering

TRANSPORTATION PLANNING:

see Urban and Regional Planning