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Florida State University
2016-2017 General Bulletin - Undergraduate Edition

Undergraduate Degree Requirements

Degrees Offered

Florida State University confers at the bachelor's level the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education, Bachelor of Social Work, and the Bachelor of Science degrees, the requirements for which are described in detail below. Students may find requirements for all graduate degrees (master's, specialist, professional, and doctoral) in the Graduate Bulletin.

Students pursuing a baccalaureate degree at Florida State University must meet a number of state- and University-wide degree requirements as they progress through their course of studies. In general, freshman and sophomore students in most majors emphasize work in a broad-based liberal arts curriculum, described below as Liberal Studies for the 21st Century, and in consultation with their advisors select a major concentration. By the end of the sophomore year, all students should have completed at least half of the General Education portion of the Liberal Studies for the 21st Century program, including the English Composition and Quantitative and Logical Thinking requirements.

At about the end of the sophomore year (fifty-two degree hours), students formally select a major and request acceptance by the college in which the major is taught. Students transferring into the University with an Associate of Arts (AA) degree from a Florida public community college or university, or transferring fifty-two or more semester hours of credit, are eligible to be admitted directly into the college of their choice provided they meet minimum requirements for the major selected.

Students at the junior and senior level complete the requirements of their chosen major and often of a minor field. They may also have to fulfill additional requirements specific to their college and/or certification requirements to engage in a particular profession for which their undergraduate major is preparatory.

Understanding these degree requirements is crucial to the smooth progression to graduation. Students are encouraged to consult with their academic advisors regularly throughout their undergraduate years to ensure that they are making appropriate progress toward their degree and to consult their academic deans' offices, Advising First, and the Office of the University Registrar for assistance and clarification of degree requirements.

Baccalaureate Degree Requirements: An Overview

Florida State University will confer the bachelor's degree when the following conditions have been met. Restrictions may be found under 'Transfer Credit' in the "Academic Regulations and Procedures" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Statewide General Education Core

The State of Florida Statute 1007.25 regarding General Education was revised in 2012 and again in 2013 to "improve articulation and reduce excess hours" for students entering the State University System (SUS) and Florida College System (FCS). Information on the statute, the implementation process, and the decisions made is posted on the official Web site at http://www.fldoe.org/policy/articulation/general-edu-core-course-options.stml.

The Statewide General Education Core requirements apply to students initially entering the SUS or FCS in the 2015-2016 academic year and thereafter. Fifteen (three credit hours from each category) of the thirty-six General Education credits must be earned from the five Statewide General Education Core requirement categories (at FSU, these are: English Composition, Quantitative and Logical Thinking, History/Social Sciences, Humanities/Cultural Practice/Ethics/Social Responsibility, and Natural Sciences). All SUS and FCS institutions must accept these courses for transfer credit, but no institution must offer all courses.

Liberal Studies for the 21st Century and Preeminence Coursework

Liberal Studies for the 21st Century provides an educational foundation for FSU graduates to thrive intellectually, professionally and as citizens. Liberal Studies thus offers a transformative experience, helping FSU students to become:

  • critical analyzers of quantitative and logical claims (Quantitative and Logical Thinking Area)
  • clear, creative, and convincing communicators; and critical readers (English Composition Area)
  • critical appraisers of theories and the facts that support them (Social Sciences, History, and Natural Science Areas)
  • ethically engaged and socially responsible citizens (Ethics and Social Responsibility Area)
  • thoughtful patrons of and participants in cultural practices (Humanities and Cultural Practice Area)
  • lifelong and independent learners (Scholarship-in-Practice)
  • interdisciplinary and flexible thinkers (E-Series: Engage, Explore, Envision)

The Preeminence Bill SB 1076 allows FSU to require students who matriculate under this Bulletin to complete up to six credits of coursework unique to FSU in all undergraduate programs that cannot be earned through any acceleration mechanism.

Note: The following students are exempt from the preeminence courses: (1) students who have completed an articulated AA degree while in high school and (2) students who first enter the University with twelve or more semester hours of college credit from a regionally accredited college, university or comparable institution after graduation from high school. In our continued efforts to improve the educational experience for all undergraduate students and to address the needs of the 21st Century FSU graduate, Florida State University has developed courses in the E-Series: Engage, Explore, Envision, in which students consider broad and persistent questions from multiple perspectives.

General Education Requirements/Liberal Studies for the 21st Century

Satisfactory completion (a minimum adjusted grade point average of 2.0 on all courses used for General Education) of thirty-six semester hours of Florida State University's General Education courses within the Liberal Studies for the 21st Century program, as follows:

  • English Composition: Students must complete a total of six semester hours in this area, three of which must be chosen from the Statewide Core list (ENC 1101). The additional hours must be earned through ENC 2135 Research, Genre, and Context (or an approved 2000-level composition course with an ENC prefix). Students must earn a "C–" or higher in these courses.
  • Quantitative and Logical Thinking: Students must complete a total of six semester hours in this area, of which at least three semester hours must be chosen from the Statewide Core list. Students must earn a "C–" or higher in these courses.
  • History/Social Sciences: Students must complete at least six semester hours in the combined area of History and Social Sciences of which three semester hours must be chosen from the Statewide Core list. Students must have at least one History and one Social Sciences course.
  • Humanities and Cultural Practice/Ethics and Social Responsibility: Students must complete at least six semester hours in the combined area of Humanities and Cultural Practice and Ethics and Social Responsibility, of which at least three semester hours must be chosen from the combined Statewide Core requirement list for Humanities. Students must complete at least one Humanities/Cultural Practice course and one Ethics and Social Responsibility course.
  • Natural Sciences: Students must complete six semester hours in this area, of which at least three semester hours must be chosen from the Statewide Core requirement list. Note: All students must complete at least one laboratory Science course as a graduation requirement (see below).
  • Liberal Studies General Education Electives: Students must complete a minimum of six hours of Liberal Studies electives. Electives may be selected from the lists of approved Scholarship-in-Practice, History, Humanities, Ethics, Social Sciences or Natural Science courses with the following limitations: only three credits (in addition to the required six credits) may be taken from the combined area of History/Social Sciences. In addition, only three credits (in addition to the required six credits) may be taken within the Natural Science area. Also, only three hours of 1000/2000/3000-level Scholarship-in-Practice courses that have no other General Education designation may be counted as a Liberal Studies elective. Scholarship-in-Practice (SIP) courses at the 4000-level do not count toward the thirty-six hours required for Liberal Studies General Education.
  • E-Series (Engage, Explore, Envision): Students must complete at least one General Education course that, in addition to the relevant area designation, is also designated as a three-credit E-Series course. A grade of "C–"or higher is required to meet the E-series writing requirement.

Students are required to complete (or be exempted from with credit): a minimum of six semester hours of Quantitative and Logical Thinking coursework and six semester hours of English Composition, six to nine semester hours in History/Social Sciences, three to nine semester hours in Humanities and Cultural Practice, three semester hours in Ethics and Social Responsibility, and six semester hours in Natural Sciences (with a laboratory to be required for graduation). One three-credit course drawn from the above areas must also carry an E-Series designation, and three additional credits must be taken in an approved college-level writing course.

Graduation Requirements/Liberal Studies for the 21st Century

  1. Satisfactory completion of University-wide graduation requirements as follows:
    • "W" State-Mandated Writing: in addition to the six credits required for English Composition, students must complete two three-credit courses that meet State mandates for college-level writing. Students may complete this requirement by completing either two E-Series course or and E-series course and one approved "W" course. Courses must be completed with a grade of "C-" or higher to satisfy the State-mandated writing requirement.
    • Scholarship in Practice: Prior to graduation, students must complete two courses of this type, each with a different course prefix. Students may complete one of the two courses required in this area by taking an approved course in the "Formative Experience" area. These courses include FSU Study Abroad offerings, and other approved international experiences, or select internships. Scholarship-in-Practice courses must be completed with a letter grade of "C–" or higher (with the exception of approved Formative Experiences, in which students must earn a "C–" or an "S" for applicable courses that offer S/U grading).
    • Diversity Requirement: Students must complete at least one Cross-Cultural Diversity course (X) and one Diversity in Western Culture course (Y). Both Diversity courses must be completed with a grade of "C–" or higher.
    • Laboratory Science Requirement: Students must complete at least one laboratory Science course with a grade of "C–" or higher.
    • Oral Communication Requirement: Students must complete at least one course designated as meeting the Oral Communication Requirement with a grade of "C–" or higher or an "S" (in an S/U course).
    • Computer Competency Requirement: Students must complete at least one course designated as meeting the Computer Competency Requirement with a grade of "C–" or higher.
    • Upper-Division Writing Requirement: Students must complete at least three credit hours designated as meeting the Upper-Division Writing Requirement with a grade of "C–" or higher.
  2. Satisfactory completion of major requirements in a chosen degree program, including additional requirements set by the college offering the degree. The student's degree program will appear on the baccalaureate diploma. If a student satisfies all requirements for two degrees, including admission, prerequisite, core, etc., both degree programs may appear on the diploma. A list of degree programs is available in the "Academic Degree and Certificate Programs" chapter of this General Bulletin. Major names are not printed on University diplomas.
  3. A minimum adjusted grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on all coursework taken at Florida State University and an overall 2.0 average on all college-level work attempted.
  4. Successful completion of a minimum of one hundred twenty unduplicated semester hours.
  5. Completion of at least forty-five semester hours in courses numbered 3000 and above, thirty of which need to be taken at this University.
  6. Completion of the last thirty semester hours and half of the major course semester hours in residence at this University. In cases of emergency, a maximum of six hours of the final thirty semester hours may be completed by correspondence or residence at another accredited senior institution with the approval of the academic dean. College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) credit earned may be applied to the final thirty hour requirement provided that the student has earned at least thirty semester hours credit at Florida State University.

    Note: Active-duty service members may complete university academic residency requirements and stated requirements in specific courses of study such as majors, at any time while enrolled. Reservists and National Guardsmen on active duty are covered in the same manner. Please contact your academic advisor and the FSU Student Veterans Center to coordinate active duty residency waivers.

  7. Students who have entered a university in the State of Florida, Division of Colleges and Universities, with fewer than sixty hours of credit in the Fall of 1976 or any time thereafter are required to earn at least nine hours prior to graduation by attendance in one or more Summer terms at one of the State University System institutions. The University President may waive the application of this rule in cases of unusual hardship to the individual. Students wishing waivers submit written requests giving the details of their hardships through their academic deans to the Vice President for Faculty Development and Advancement. Prior to 2011, students who had earned nine semester hours of credit through approved acceleration methods (AP, IB, CLEP, and approved dual enrollment courses) were exempt from the Summer residency requirement. Effective 2011, this exemption is no longer available.
  8. Satisfaction of the foreign-language admissions requirement by having two sequential units of the same foreign language in high school, or eight semester hours of the same foreign language in college, or documented equivalent proficiency.
  9. Successful completion of coursework constituting the student's program of studies, minor, honors thesis, or certification examination does not guarantee the awarding of the baccalaureate degree. Faculty judgment of the academic performance of the student is inherent in the educational process in determining whether the awarding of the baccalaureate degree or admission into a higher level degree program is warranted.

Note: For the purpose of establishing residency, the various Summer sessions are considered one semester.

Following is a full discussion of state- and University-wide degree requirements at the undergraduate level. Requirements specific to a particular college may be found in the section of this General Bulletin describing that college. Major and minor requirements may be found under the appropriate department in the departmental listings.

State Mandated Academic Learning Compacts (SMALCs)

The State Board of Governors has directed each university to develop Academic Learning Compacts for every baccalaureate degree program. A State University System Academic Learning Compact (SMALC) identifies for each academic bachelor's program what students will learn by the end of a program and how knowledge is measured above and beyond course grades.

A SMALC must pinpoint the core learning expectations in the areas of communication, critical thinking skills, and content/discipline knowledge and skills. Additionally, it must identify the corresponding assessments used to determine how well the student has assimilated the articulated expectations.

Successful performance related to the State Mandated Academic Learning Compacts specific to your degree is a requirement for graduation.

Visit http://learningforlife.fsu.edu/smalcs/plearningcompact.cfm to view the current version of the SMALCs for your degree. Simply select your major and detailed information is provided. You may also obtain information pertaining to SMALCs by contacting the academic departments.

Division of Undergraduate Studies

Dean: Karen Laughlin Associate Deans: Gregory Beaumont, Sara Hamon, Bruce Janasiewicz, Annette Schwabe Assistant Deans: Craig Filar, Nikki Raimondi

The Division of Undergraduate Studies is responsible for the supervision and monitoring of state- and University-wide degree requirements as well as University-wide academic support offices. Overseen by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, the division includes the Office of Undergraduate Studies (the academic home of most freshmen and sophomores), Advising First, the Center for Academic Retention and Enhancement (CARE), the University Honors Program, Transfer and Information Services, the Academic Center for Excellence (ACE), the Office of National Fellowships, and the Center for Undergraduate Research and Academic Engagement. For further information on these academic support offices see 'Honors Program' in the "University Honors Program and Honor Societies" chapter and 'Advising First', the 'Center for Academic Retention and Enhancement', 'Center for Undergraduate Research and Academic Engagement', and 'Transfer and Information Services' in the "Academic Advising and Support Services" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Freshmen and sophomores have their programs and coursework supervised by the Office of Undergraduate Studies. Exceptions to this placement are students accepted into the College of Music, College of Motion Picture Arts, or into the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) program in theatre or dance. Students in these majors are advised and supervised directly within their own schools or departments. The Office of Undergraduate Studies is the dean's office that administers the academic and advisement program, regardless of intended major, for all other freshman and sophomore students.

Academic Policies Related to Liberal Studies for the 21st Century

The General Education requirements must be met by completion of appropriate coursework or by combination of coursework and credit by examination within the limits set below:

  1. Credit by Examination. A maximum of thirty semester hours of credit earned through examination may be applied to the General Education requirements.
  2. Coursework. An overall 2.0 average or higher is required for coursework used to satisfy the General Education requirements.
  3. To satisfy State mandates and University-wide requirements, students must also earn a grade of "C–" or higher in each of the courses used to fulfill the General Education requirements in Quantitative and Logical Thinking, English Composition, and two approved courses that require college-level writing. Students can meet this writing requirement by completing either two E-Series courses or one E-Series course and one approved State-Mandated Writing course. Students with an AA degree or General Education Statement from a Florida public university, state college, community college, or other colleges with which Florida State University maintains an official articulation agreement are exempt from the state-mandates for college-level writing.
  4. Courses listed as "directed individual study" (DIS), "senior honors thesis," or "senior seminar" cannot apply to the General Education requirements.
  5. No courses taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis may apply to the Liberal Studies requirement, with the exception that a single course that counts as a designated "Formative Experience" (e.g. study abroad, designated internships, and approved faculty-supervised research experiences) may be awarded an S/U grade.
  6. A student who transfers to Florida State University from a Florida public community/state college or other articulated institution will be deemed to have satisfied the University's General Education requirement if all General Education requirements stipulated by the community/state college or other articulated institution have been met and the student's transcript has been so marked.
  7. If a course taken at FSU was approved for Liberal Studies credit at the time a course is completed, it will count for Liberal Studies credit, even if the course was not listed as a Liberal Studies course in the General Bulletin under which the student entered.

Courses for the General Education requirements within the Liberal Studies in the 21st Century program shall be selected from the following five substantive areas: Quantitative and Logical Thinking; English Composition; History/Social Sciences; Humanities and Cultural Practice/Ethics and Social Responsibility; and Natural Science.

Students should check departmental curriculum listings to determine prerequisites and potential course duplications prior to taking courses. In addition, students may search for current Liberal Studies listings here: http://liberalstudies.fsu.edu. Finally, it is important to note that designations and approved courses may change periodically. An up-to-date listing of designations can be found on the Liberal Studies Web site and all appropriate designations are indicated in the course syllabus for individual courses.

Note: Some students will be required to take preparatory coursework prior to enrollment in Quantitative and Logical Thinking and/or English Composition courses. See 'Required Preparatory Courses' in the "Academic Regulations and Procedures" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Symbol Legend

  • IFS Course prefix denotes a course that belongs to the three credit E-series: Engage, Explore, Envision designation
  • C Stands for combined lecture and laboratory
  • L Stands for laboratory
  • r Stands for "repeatable" and indicates that the course may be taken more than once
  • x Denotes a course that meets the Cross-Cultural Diversity requirements
  • y Denotes a course that meets the Diversity in Western Culture requirements
  • # Indicates that the course has a credit limit and only one of these courses will earn credit towards meeting the Liberal Studies requirements
  • s Denotes a course that meets the Scholarship-in-Practice requirements
  • w Denotes a course that meets the State-Mandated Writing requirement

General Education/Liberal Studies for the 21st Century

Courses within the Liberal Studies curriculum are listed below by area. These lists are subject to change. For the most recent list of courses, see the Liberal Studies Web site at: http://liberalstudies.fsu.edu.

Quantitative and Logical Thinking

Students must complete (or be exempted from with credit) a total of at least six semester hours in Quantitative and Logical Thinking, of which at least three semester hours must be chosen from the Statewide General Education Core for mathematics (see Statewide Core requirement list). Of those six required hours, three of those credit hours must be in the Department of Mathematics and three additional credit hours must be from a list approved by the Faculty Senate and maintained by the Office of Undergraduate Studies. Students must complete their first Quantitative and Logical Thinking course by the time they have attempted thirty hours, which includes any credit hours earned through acceleration (i.e., AP, IB, Dual Enrollment, etc.). Students must complete or be registered for their second Quantitative and Logical Thinking course by the time they have attempted forty hours. All six semester hours of the Quantitative and Logical Thinking General Education requirement should be completed by the time the student earns fifty-two hours. All courses used to satisfy this requirement must be completed with a grade of "C–" or higher.

All incoming freshman students who intend to register for Analytic Trigonometry (MAC 1114), Pre-Calculus Algebra (MAC 1140), Calculus with Analytical Geometry I (MAC 2311), Calculus with Analytical Geometry II (MAC 2312), or Calculus for Business (MAC 2233) as their first mathematics course at FSU (in their first semester or subsequent semesters) will be required to take the ALEKS placement exam, regardless of SAT/ACT scores, AP/IB/AICE/CLEP scores, or incoming credit. Detailed information about taking the ALEKS placement exam can be found on the Department of Mathematics Web site: http://www.math.fsu.edu/~bellenot/ALEKS/.

Statewide Core Courses:

MAC 1105 College Algebra (3)

MAC 2311 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (4)

MGF 1106 Mathematics for Liberal Arts I (3)

MGF 1107 Topics in Practical Finite Mathematics (3)

STA 2023 Fundamental Business Statistics (3)

Note: Any student who successfully completes a mathematics course for which one of the General Education Core course options in mathematics is an immediate prerequisite shall be considered to have completed the Statewide Core mathematics requirement.

Additional Quantitative and Logical Thinking Coursework

IFS 2084 Understanding Uncertainty: Games of Skill and Chance (3)

IFS 3130 Making the Argument: Symbolic Logic and the Forms of Good Reasoning (3)

IFS 1057 Computational Thinking (3)

MAC 1114 Analytic Trigonometry (2)

MAC 1140 Precalculus Algebra (3)

MAC 1147 Precalculus Algebra/Trigonometry (5)

MAC 2233 Calculus for Business (3)

MAC 2312 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (4)

MAC 2313 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (5)

PHI 2100 Reasoning and Critical Thinking (3)

STA 1013 Statistics through Example (3)

STA 1220s In My Opinion: Introduction to Designing, Conducting and Analyzing Surveys (3)

STA 2122 Introduction to Applied Statistics (3)

STA 2171 Statistics for Biology (4)

English Composition

Students must complete (or be exempted from with credit) a total of at least six semester hours in English Composition, which shall include ENC 1011 (which meets the Statewide Core requirement) and ENC 2135. All students shall complete the required English Composition courses by the time they have attempted thirty credit hours, which includes any credit hours earned through acceleration (i.e., AP, IB, Dual Enrollment, etc.) or must show an appropriate exemption, as approved by the Faculty Senate, from six semester hours of English Composition courses. The second required course in the English Composition sequence, ENC 2135, provides students a foundation for upper-division writing in the major as well as essential competencies for careers in all fields. Both courses used to satisfy this requirement must be completed with a grade of "C–" or higher.

Statewide Core Course:

ENC 1101 Freshman Composition and Rhetoric (3)

Note: Any student who successfully completes a course with an ENC prefix for which ENC 1101 is an immediate prerequisite shall be considered to have completed the Statewide Core communication requirement.

Additional English Composition Coursework

ENC 2135 Research, Genre, and Context (3)

History/Social Sciences

Students must complete between six and nine semester hours in the combined area of History and Social Sciences (at least one History and one Social Sciences), of which at least three semester hours will be chosen from the combined Statewide Core requirement list.

Statewide Core Course in History:

AMH 2020 A History of the United States Since 1877 (3)

Statewide Core Courses in Social Sciences:

ANT 2000x Introduction to Anthropology (3)

ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)

POS 1041 American Government: National (3)

PSY 2012 General Psychology (3)

SYG 1000 Introductory Sociology (3)

History

AMH 2010w The History of the United States to 1877 (3)

AMH 2091yw The African-American Experience in the United States (3)

AMH 2095yw American Indians in the United States (3)

AMH 2096yw Black Women in America (3)

AMH 2097yw Nationality, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

AMH 2583y The Seminoles and the Southeastern Indians (3)

ANT 3141x World Prehistory (3)

ASH 1044xw Middle Eastern History and Civilization (3)

ASH 3100xw History of Asia (3)

ASH 3230rs Middle East Survey: An Interdisciplinary and Introductory Course (3–6)

CLA 2010sxw Peoples of the Roman World (3)

CLA 2110sw Debates about the Past: Greek Civilization, History and Culture (3)

CLA 2123sw Debates about the Past: Roman Civilization, History and Culture (3)

CLT 2049 Medical Terminology (3)

EUH 2000w Ancient and Medieval Civilizations (3)

EUH 3205xw 19th-Century Europe (3)

EUH 3530w England, the Empire and the Commonwealth (3)

HIS 2050sw The Historian's Craft (3)

HIS 2370s Interpreting Native America (3)

HIS 3464yw History of Science (3)

HIS 3491yw Medicine and Society (3)

HIS 3505 Perspectives on Science and Mathematics (3)

IFS 2005 Defining Moments and Identities: From the Persian Wars to September 11th (3)

IFS 2006 Citizenship and Debate: Models from the Ancient World (3)

IFS 2010 The American GI in War and Peace in World War II (3)

IFS 2011 Empire and Revolution in Cold War Latin America (3)

IFS 2019x Heretics, Rebels and Militants in the Islamic World (3)

IFS 2026 Environment and Society (3)

IFS 2035 (Re)Imagining Florida: From Spanish Colonialism to Today (3)

IFS 2042 Fight the Power: Protesting with Song in America: 20th Century versus 21st Century (3)

IFS 2045 Making Chief Osceola (3)

IFS 2101 Cultures of Medicine (3)

IFS 2116s Digital Microhistory Lab (3)

IFS 3018y Ancient Sexualities and Modern Sexual Politics (3)

IFS 3093 Terrorism in Historical Perspective (3)

IFS 3112 Guns, Drugs, and Slaves: The History of Trafficking in the Modern World (3)

LAH 1093xw Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History (3)

MUH 3211w Survey of Music History–Antiquity to 1750 (3)

MUH 3212 Survey of Music History–1750 to Present (3)

REL 2121y Religion in the United States (3)

REL 3128r Topics in Religion in the Americas (3)

REL 3155 Psychology in American Religious History (3)

REL 3160 Religion and Science (3)

WOH 1023xw The Modern World to 1815 (3)

WOH 1030xw The Modern World Since 1815 (3)

WOH 2202 Mortal Combat: Eurasian Worlds of War Since 1200 (3)

Social Sciences

ANT 2410x Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

ANT 2416x Childhood Around the World (3)

ANT 3212x Peoples of the World (3)

CCJ 2020 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)

CCJ 3011 Criminology (3)

CCJ 4662 Minorities, Crime, and Social Policy (3)

CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics (3)

ECO 2000 Introduction to Economics (3)

ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics (3)

FAD 2230 Family Relationships: A Life Span Development Approach (3)

GEA 1000x World Geography (3)

GEA 4405y Latin America (3)

GEO 1330 Environmental Science (3)

GEO 1400x Human Geography (3)

GEO 4421x Cultural Geography (3)

IFS 2003r Sexual Health in the Modern World (3)

IFS 2004 The Hunger Games Trilogy: Collective Action and Social Movements (3)

IFS 2012 Sustainable Society (3)

IFS 2014 Information Literacy and Society (3)

IFS 2029s Dead Cities (3)

IFS 2034 The Boundaries Between Us: Exploring Racial Inequality in the U.S. (3)

IFS 2036s Language, Body, Mind and World (3)

IFS 2056y Gendered Bodies over the Life Course (3)

IFS 2060 21st Century Literacies (3)

IFS 2070x Thinking Beyond Ourselves: Global Perspectives (3)

IFS 2071 Relationship Status: It's Complicated–Understanding and Influencing Intimate Relationships (3)

IFS 2074 Communication and Dance (3)

IFS 2077y Great Britain? Geography, Imperialism, Industry, and Culture (3)

IFS 2080 Glaciers, Geysers, and Glades: Exploring U.S. National Parks (3)

IFS 2114 Public Opinion and American Democracy (3)

IFS 2115 Making Good Decisions: How to Get the Most Out of Your Money and Life (3)

IFS 2118 Is Google Making Us Stupid? The Unintended Consequences of Information Technology (3)

IFS 2121 Why is Good Politics Not Good Economics? (3)

IFS 3016y Examining the Educational Achievement Gap (3)

IFS 3024 Sociology of Hip Hop Culture (3)

IFS 3090x Global Conflicts: Analysis and Resolution (3)

IFS 3095 Boomers and Millennials: Changing Generations (3)

IFS 3111 Becoming and Being Leaders: Motivating Self and Others (3)

LIS 3103 Information and Society (3)

SYD 2740sy Sociology of Law and Hispanics (3)

SYD 3800y Sociology of Sex and Gender (3)

SYD 4700y Race and Minority Group Relations (3)

SYG 2010y Social Problems (3)

SYO 3100 Families and Social Change (3)

SYO 3200y Sociology of Religion (3)

URS 1006 World Cities: Quality of Life (3)

Humanities and Cultural Practice/Ethics and Social Responsibility

Students must complete between six and twelve semester hours in the combined area of Humanities/Cultural Practices and Ethics/Social Responsibility, of which at least three semester hours must be chosen from the combined Statewide Core requirement list for Humanities. Students must complete at least one Humanities/Cultural Practice Course and one Ethics/Social Responsibility course.

Statewide Core Courses in the Humanities and Cultural Practice:

ARH 2000 Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision (3)

LIT 2000 Introduction to Literature (3)

HUM 2020 The Art of Being Human: Examining the Human Condition Through Literature, Art and Film (3)

MUL 2010 Music Literature, Listening, and Understanding (3)

THE 2000y Introduction to Theatre (3)

Statewide Core Courses in Ethics and Social Responsibility (See additional Ethics options below):

PHI 2010 Introduction to Philosophy (3)

Humanities and Cultural Practice:

AML 3311w Major Figures in American Literature (3)

ARH 2050w History and Criticism of Art I (3)

ARH 2051w History and Criticism of Art II (3)

ARH 2090sxw Great Discoveries in World Archaeology (3)

ART 2003Csw Contemporary Art Scholarship and Practice (3)

CHT 3123rx Pre-Modern Chinese Literature and Culture (3)

CHT 3124rx Modern Chinese Literature (3)

CHT 3391rx Chinese Cinema and Culture (3)

CHT 3392rx Writing Women in Pre-Modern China (3)

CLA 3500s Sports in Antiquity: Olympians, Gladiators, and Superstars (3)

CLT 2049 Medical Terminology (3)

CLT 3370sw Classical Mythology (3)

CLT 3378sxw Ancient Mythology, East and West (3)

CLT 3510syw The Ancient World in Film (3)

DAN 2100sw Dance Appreciation (3)

# DAN 3144xw Cultural Perspectives on Dance (3)

or

# DAN 3145w Classical Perspectives on Dance (3)

DAN 3185yw African-American Perspectives on Dance (3)

FIL 2001s Introduction to Cinema Studies: Analysis and Practice (3)

FRT 3520rx French and Francophone Cinema (3)

FRT 3561yw French Women Writers (3)

GET 3130yw Masterpieces of German Literature in Translation: 19th and 20th Centuries (3)

GET 3524ry German Cinema (3)

HUM 2210sw Humanities: Pre-History to Late Antiquity (3)

HUM 2235sw Humanities: From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment (3)

HUM 2250sw Humanities: 18th-Century Romanticism to Postmodernism (3)

HUM 3321syw Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th-Century Culture (3)

IFS 2013sx Reality and Illusion in World Cinema (3)

IFS 2015 Creative Inquiry (3)

IFS 2023y Popular Music in Literature (3)

IFS 2025 Making Babies, Making Families: Adoption and Surrogacy in Literature, Film, and Public Debate (3)

IFS 2027s Animation and Identity (3)

IFS 2028sy Child and Youth Media Cultures in the U.S. (3)

IFS 2030 Reading, Writing, and Speaking in the Digital Age (3)

IFS 2031x Who is Human? Culture, Gender and Human Rights (3)

IFS 2032 Theory and Practice of the Encounter (3)

IFS 2038 From Ballet to Beyonce: Gender and the Body in Dance and Pop Culture (3)

IFS 2039 Noah's Flood Through the Ages (3)

IFS 2046 The Role of the Public Intellectual (3)

IFS 2047 Philosophy and Film (3)

IFS 2049x Third World Cinema (3)

IFS 2052x Global Perspectives: Communication (3)

IFS 2057 Seeing Sound, Hearing Pictures: The Interaction of Music and Photography (3)

IFS 2059x Music and International Human Rights (3)

IFS 2061 Visualizing Music: Representing Music Through Images (3)

IFS 2064 Art Music in Contemporary Society (3)

IFS 2065 Human Nature: Modern and Contemporary Perspectives (3)

IFS 2066 Museums: Three Promises for Humanity (3)

IFS 2067 Writing/s about Music (3)

IFS 2068 Understanding America: Hemingway in a World of Discredited Values and Traditions (3)

IFS 2072y A Social History of America's Popular Music (3)

IFS 2073sx Music in the World (3)

IFS 2079y Fantasy Girls: Philosophical Examinations of Women and Girls in Fantasy and Science Fiction (3)

IFS 2083 Language Birth, Language Death (3)

IFS 2085 To Work, Learn, or Play? The Role of the Child in British Fiction 1830-1914 (3)

IFS 2086 Dangerous Liaisons: Rape Myths and Violence in Literature, the Arts and Music (3)

IFS 2096y Female Friendship Alliances in Shakespeare (3)

IFS 2100sy Music and Film (3)

IFS 2102 From Page to Screen: The Arts and Politics of Adaptation (3)

IFS 2103 Documentary Film, History, Theory, and Practice (3)

IFS 2120 Apocalypse: The End of the World in the Arts (3)

IFS 2122x The Tourist Trap: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (3)

IFS 3008x Cinema Gone Global (3)

IFS 3009x Through an Arabic Lens: The Intersection of Film and Culture (3)

IFS 3017 Technologies of Memory from Ancient Greece to Today (3)

IFS 3043x German Society Through Film: The Legacy of Nazi Crimes Against Humanity (3)

IFS 3050x India Through Bollywood Film (3)

IFS 3054 Robots, Monsters, Avatars: Technology and the (Post-)Human Condition (3)

IFS 3055 Science Fiction, Dystopia, Fate, and the Problem of Evil (3)

IFS 3091x The Culture in the Cuisine: The Food of Italy (3)

IFS 3107sy Lions and Tiger and Bears, Oh My! Multicultural Dimensions of American Cinema (3)

IFS 3113 Responses to the Holocaust (3)

IFS 3123 The Reel Middle Ages: Medieval Literature and Film (3)

IFS 3129s Art and the Environment (3)

ITT 3430yw Masterpieces of Italian Literature and Culture in Translation (3)

ITT 3500yw Italian Culture and Civilization: From Origins to the Age of Romanticism (3)

ITT 3501yw Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present (3)

ITT 3520yw The Italian-American Experience in Literature and Film (3)

ITT 3523yw Italian Cinema (3)

LIT 3383yw Women in Literature (3)

LIT 3438r Literature and Medicine (3)

MUH 2019y Modern Popular Music (3)

MUH 2051x Music in World Cultures (3)

MUH 2512x Music in World Cultures (2). (For music majors.)

MUH 3053yw American Roots Music (3)

MUL 2110 Survey of Music Literature (2)

MUT 1005s The Art of Songwriting (3)

MUT 2116s Music Theory III (3)

MUT 2117 Music Theory IV (3)

REL 1300xw Introduction to World Religions (3)

REL 2210yw Introduction to the Old Testament (3)

REL 2240yw Introduction to the New Testament (3)

REL 2315x Religions of South Asia (3)

REL 2350x Religions of East Asia (3)

REL 3112w Religion and 20th Century Fantasy Literature (3)

REL 3142 Religion, the Self, and Society (3)

REL 3145xw Gender and Religion (3)

REL 3209s The Dead Sea Scrolls (3)

REL 3224 The Hebrew Prophet (3)

REL 3293r Topics in Biblical Studies (3)

REL 3333x Ramayana in Indian Culture and Beyond (3)

REL 3337x Goddesses, Women, and Power in Hinduism (3)

REL 3340x The Buddhist Tradition (3)

REL 3345x Chan/Zen Buddhism (3)

REL 3351x Japanese Religions (3)

REL 3358x Tibetan and Himalayan Religions (3)

REL 3363y Islamic Traditions (3)

REL 3367y Islamic Traditions II: Islam up to the Modern World (3)

REL 3370x Religion in Africa (3)

REL 3505w The Christian Tradition (3)

REL 3541s American Protestant Thought in Historical Context (3)

REL 3607yw The Jewish Tradition (3)

REL 3935rx Topics in Buddhism (3)

REL 3936r Special Topics in Religion (1-3)

RUT 3514y Russian Folklore and Fairy Tales (3)

RUT 3523ry Russian Cinema (3)

SLL 3510x The Slavic Vampire (3)

SPT 3130xw Latin American Literature in Translation (3)

SPT 3391rx Hispanic Cinema (3)

SPT 3503x Introduction to Hispanic Culture Analysis (3)

THE 3214sw World Theatre History II (3)

Ethics and Social Responsibility:

HPS 3320yw Screening the Scientific Life: Cinema and the Cultural Image of Science (3)

IFS 2007 Need and Greed (Is Money the Root of All Evil?) (3)

IFS 2021 Social Responsibility (Rhetorically Speaking) (3)

IFS 2022x When Culture and Business Collide: Communication in an International Context (3)

IFS 2041 Information Ethics for the 21st Century (3)

IFS 2048 World Without God? (3)

IFS 2049x Third World Cinema (3)

IFS 2051 Questioning What We Know: Teaching and Learning Mathematics and Science in the 21st Century (3)

IFS 2059x Music and Human International Rights (3)

IFS 2078 Communication Matters: Personal Responsibility in Public Speaking (3)

IFS 2086 Dangerous Liaisons: Rape Myths and Violence in Literature, the Arts, and Music (3)

IFS 2106 Know Thyself: A Philosophical Investigation of Self-Knowledge (3)

IFS 3033s Media, Culture, and the Environment (3)

IFS 3043x German Society through Film: The Legacy of Nazi Crimes Against Humanity (3)

IFS 3054 Robots, Monsters, Avatars: Technology and the (Post-) Human Condition (3)

IFS 3069 Just Torture (3)

LIT 3438r Literature and Medicine (3)

PAD 3003 Public Administration in American Society (3)

PHI 2620 Environmental Ethics (3)

PHI 2630 Ethical Issues and Life Choices (3)

PHI 2635yw Bioethics (3)

PHM 2121y Philosophy of Race, Class and Gender (3)

PHM 2300x Introduction to Political Philosophy (3)

REL 3170xw Religious Ethics and Moral Problems (3)

REL 3171r Topics in Ethics (3)

REL 3180s Religion and Bioethics (3)

REL 3431 Critics of Religion (3)

Natural Science

Students must complete a minimum of six semester hours, of which at least three semester hours must be chosen from the Statewide Core requirement list. One of the courses must be accompanied by a corresponding laboratory.

Statewide Core Courses in the Natural Sciences:

AST 1002 Planets, Stars, and Galaxies (3)

BSC 1005 General Biology for Nonmajors (3)

BSC 2010 Biological Science I (3). (For science majors.)

BSC 2085 Anatomy and Physiology I (3)

CHM 1020C Chemistry for Liberal Studies (4)

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I (3). (For science majors.)

ESC 1000 Introductory Earth Science (3)

EVR 1001 Introduction to Environmental Science (3)

PHY 1020 Physics and Technology for Future Presidents (3)

PHY 2048C General Physics A (5). (For science majors.)

PHY 2053C College Physics A (4). (For science majors.)

Note: Any student who successfully completes a Natural Science course for which one of the General Education core course options in Natural Science is an immediate prerequisite shall be considered to have completed the Natural Science Core requirement. The immediate prerequisite must be in the same subject area for the course to count and the subject area is determined according to the institution or SCNS catalog.

Natural Science

ANT 2100 Introduction to Archaeology (3)

ANT 2301 Evolution of Human Sexuality (3)

ANT 2511 Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Prehistory (3)

ANT 2511L Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Prehistory Laboratory (3)

ANT4468 Bones, Bodies and Disease (3)

AST 1002L Planets, Starts and Galaxies Laboratory (1)

BSC 1005L General Biology Laboratory for Nonmajors (1)

BSC 2010L Biological Science I Laboratory (1). (For science majors.)

BSC 2011s Biological Science II (3). (For science majors.) [Note: Only Scholarship-in-Practice if taken with BSC 2011L]

BSC 2011Ls Biological Science II Lab (1). (For science majors.) [Note: Only Scholarship-in-Practice if taken with BSC 2011]

BSC 2085L Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory (1)

CHM 1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory (1). (For science majors.)

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II (3)

CHM 1046L General Chemistry II Laboratory (1)

CHM 1050 Honors General Chemistry I (3). (For science majors.)

CHM 1050L Honors General Chemistry I Laboratory (1). (For science majors.)

CHM 1051 Honors General Chemistry II (3). (For science majors.)

CHM 1051L Honors General Chemistry II Laboratory (2). (For science majors.)

CLA 2810sxw Ancient Science for Non-Science Majors (3)

EVR 1001L Environmental Science Laboratory (1)

GLY 1000 Dynamic Earth (3)

GLY 1000L Dynamic Earth Laboratory (1)

GLY 1030 Environmental Issues in Geology (3)

GLY 1102 Dinosaurs and Disasters on an Evolving Earth (3)

GLY 2010C Physical Geology (4). (For science majors.)

HUN 1201 The Science of Nutrition (3)

IFS 2040 Putting Science into Action: Field Methods in Plant Ecology (3)

IFS 2058 An Apple a Day: Natural Science Honors Seminar (3)

IFS 2081 Busting Common Biological Myths (3)

IFS 2082 The Ecology of Food (3)

IFS 2087 Trilobites to T. Rex: History of Life on Earth (3)

IFS 2088 Sustainable Food and Water: Soil, Animals, Vegetables, and Grain (3)

IFS 2104 Thinking about Language: How Cognition and Language Interact (3)

IFS 2105 Evolution, Medicine and Evidence (3)

IFS 2117 Genetics in Society (3)

IFS 2119 Biotechnology: Impact of Life and Science on Society (3)

IFS 3044 Living Green, Theory to Action (3)

IFS 3092 Broken Clocks and Disrupted Sleep: Impacts of Technology (3)

ISC 2003 Global Change: Its Scientific and Human Dimensions (3)

ISC 3523C Research Methods (3)

MET 1010 Introduction to the Atmosphere (3)

OCE 1001 Elementary Oceanography (3)

PHY 1020L Physics and Technology for Future Presidents Laboratory (1)

PSB 2000 Introduction to Brain and Behavior (3)

SPA 2001 Introduction to Communication Sciences and Disorders (3)

Note: Certain restrictions exist regarding the allotment of course credit for the chemistry and geology courses listed above. Students should refer to the course descriptions of each department for specific credit information before registering for these courses. Also, this list is subject to change. Please see http://liberalstudies.fsu.edu for an up-to-date list.

E-Series: Engage, Explore, Envision

Students must complete at least three semester hours of E-Series courses as part of their thirty-six General Education semester hours. This course will fall into one of the core General Education and/or Scholarship-in-Practice areas. To fulfill the college-level writing requirement, students must earn a grade of at least a "C–" in the course, and also earn at least a "C–" average on the required writing assignments. If the student does not earn a "C–" average or higher on the required writing assignments, the student will not earn an overall grade of "C–" or higher in the course, no matter how well the student performs in the remaining portion of the course.

Three credit courses with a course prefix of IFS are E-Series courses; see the course lists for the areas above.

State-Mandated Writing- "W"

To satisfy the State writing mandates, students must complete two approved three-credit college-level writing courses beyond the six hours required for English Composition. Students may satisfy this requirement by completing either two E-Series courses or an E-Series course and one "W" course. Transfer students who entered the University without having completed the General Education requirements elsewhere or who have not completed an articulated AA degree must complete two approved "W" courses. To fulfill the college-level writing requirement, students must earn a grade of at least a "C–" in the course, and also earn at least a "C–" average on the required writing assignments. If a student does not earn a "C–" average or higher on the required writing assignments, the student will not earn an overall grade of "C–" or higher in the course, no matter how well the student performs in the remaining portion of the course. Students with an AA degree or General Education Statement from a Florida public university, state college, community college, or other colleges with which Florida State University maintains an official articulation agreement are exempt from the state-mandates for college-level writing.

Approved "W" Courses

AFA 2000w Introduction to the African-American Experience (3)

AFA 3103w Theory and Dynamics of Racism and Oppression (3)

AMH 2010w The History of the United States to 1877 (3)

AMH 2091yw The African-American Experience in the United States (3)

AMH 2095wy American Indians in the United States (3)

AMH 2096yw Black Women in America (3)

AMH 2097yw Nationality, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

AML 2010w American Authors to 1875 (3)

AML 2600w Introduction to African-American Literature (3)

AML 3041w American Authors Since 1875 (3)

AML 3311w Major Figures in American Literature (3)

AML 3630w Latino/a Literature in English (3)

AML 3682w American Multi-Ethnic Literature (3)

ARH 2050w History and Criticism of Art I (3)

ARH 2051w History and Criticism of Art II (3)

ARH 2090sxw Great Discoveries in World Archaeology (3)

ARH 3130w Survey of Greek Art and Archaeology (3)

ARH 3150w Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy (3)

ART 2003Csw Contemporary Art Scholarship and Practice (3)

ASH 1044xw Middle Eastern History and Civilization (3)

ASH 3100w History of Asia (3)

CLA 2010sxw Peoples of the Roman World (3)

CLA 2110sw Debates about the Past: Greek Civilization, History, and Culture (3)

CLA 2123sw Debates about the Past: Roman Civilization, History, and Culture (3)

CLA 2810sxw Ancient Science for Non-Science Majors (3)

CLA 3501w Gender and Society in Ancient Greece (3)

CLA 3502w Women, Children, and Slaves in Ancient Rome: The Roman Family (3)

CLT 3370sw Classical Mythology (3)

CLT 3378sxw Ancient Mythology, East and West (3)

CLT 3510syw The Ancient World in Film (3)

DAN 2100sw Dance Appreciation (3)

DAN 3144xw Cultural Perspectives on Dance (3)

DAN 3145w Classical Perspectives on Dance (3)

DAN 3185yw African-American Perspectives on Dance (3)

ENG 3310w Film Genres (3)

ENL 2012w British Authors: Beginning to 1790 (3)

ENL 2022w British Authors: Early Romantics to the Present (3)

ENL 3334w Introduction to Shakespeare (3)

EUH 2000w Ancient and Medieval Civilizations (3)

EUH 3205xw 19th-Century Europe (3)

EUH 3530w England, the Empire and Commonwealth (3)

FOW 3240 Literature and Sexuality (3)

FRT 3561yw French Women Writers (3)

GET 3130yw Masterpieces of German Literature in Translation: 19th and 20th Centuries (3)

HIS 2050sw The Historian's Craft (3)

HIS 3464yw History of Science (3)

HIS 3491yw Medicine and Society (3)

HPS 3320yw Screening the Scientific Life: Cinema and the Cultural Image of Science (3)

HUM 2210sw Humanities: Pre-History to Late Antiquity (3)

HUM 2235sw Humanities: From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment (3)

HUM 2250sw Humanities: 18th-Century Romanticism to Postmodernism (3)

HUM 3321syw Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th-Century Culture (3)

ITT 3430yw Masterpieces of Italian Literature and Culture in Translation (3)

ITT 3500yw Italian Culture and Civilization: From Origins to the Age of Romanticism (3)

ITT 3501yw Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present (3)

ITT 3520yw The Italian-American Experience in Literature and Film (3)

ITT 3523yw Italian Cinema (3)

JPT 3391rxw Japanese Film and Culture (3)

LAH 1093xw Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History (3)

LIT 2010w Introduction to Fiction (3)

LIT 2020w Introduction to Short Story (3)

LIT 2030w Introduction to Poetry (3)

LIT 2081w Contemporary Literature (3)

LIT 2230w Introduction to Global Literature in English (3)

LIT 3043w Modern Drama (3)

LIT 3383yw Women in Literature (3)

MUH 2012w Music in Western Culture, 19th and 20th Centuries (3)

MUH 3053yw American Roots Music (3)

MUH 3211w Survey of Music History-Antiquity to 1750 (3)

PHI 2635yw Bioethics (3)

PHM 3020w Philosophy of Sex (3)

REL 1300xw Introduction to World Religions (3)

REL 2121yw Religion in the United States (3)

REL 2210yw Introduction to the Old Testament (3)

REL 2240yw Introduction to the New Testament (3)

REL 3112w Religion and 20th Century Fantasy Literature (3)

REL 3145xw Gender and Religion (3)

REL 3170xw Religious Ethics and Moral Problems (3)

REL 3431w Critics of Religion (3)

REL 3505w The Christian Tradition (3)

REL 3607yw The Jewish Tradition (3)

RUT 3110w Russian Literature in English Translation (3)

SPT 3130xw Latin American Literature in Translation (3)

THE 3214w World Theatre History II (3)

WOH 1023xw The Modern World to 1815 (3)

WOH 1030xw The Modern World Since 1815 (3)

WST 3251yw Women in Western Culture: Images and Realities (3)

How Transfer Credit Applies to the Liberal Studies for the 21st Century Program

The Office of Undergraduate Studies evaluates transfer credits as they apply to the courses within the General Education and State-Mandated Writing requirements of the Liberal Studies for the 21st Century program. Students with the AA degree or General Education Statement from a Florida public university, state college, community college, or other colleges with which Florida State University maintains an official articulation agreement are exempted from the General Education and State-Mandated Writing courses within the Liberal Studies for the 21st Century program. However, these transfer students must take other courses to meet FSU graduation requirements as specified in this chapter of the General Bulletin.

Scholarship in Practice

Students must complete two Scholarship-in-Practice courses, with the following exceptions: students who have completed an AA degree from an articulated institution or who have transferred with sixty or more credit hours will only be required to complete one Scholarship-in-Practice course. Scholarship-in-Practice courses at any level may count to meet the graduation requirement, but 4000-level Scholarship-in-Practice courses may not count toward the General Education requirement. Scholarship-in-Practice courses without any other Liberal Studies General Education designation (e.g. History, Natural Science, etc.) may count towards the thirty-six hours of General Education credit as Liberal Studies electives. Students may only count one Formative Experience toward their Scholarship-in-Practice requirement. Scholarship-in-Practice courses must be completed with a letter grade of "C–" or higher (or with a grade of "S" for courses that only offer S/U grading) prior to the receipt of the baccalaureate degree.

ADV 3823rs Advertising Team II (3)

ARE 4930rs Introduction to Arts Administration (3)

ARH 2090sxw Great Discoveries in World Archaeology (3)

ARH 4800rs Methods of Art History and Criticism (3)

ART 2003Cs Contemporary Art Scholarship and Practice (3)

ART 4851s Graduating BA Course (3)

ART 4970s BFA Thesis Project and Exhibition (3)

ASH 3230rs Middle East Survey: An Interdisciplinary and Introductory Course (3)

BSC 2011s Biological Science II (3). (For science majors.) [Note: Only Scholarship-in-Practice if taken with BSC 2011L]

BSC 2011Ls Biological Science II Lab (1). (For science majors.) [Note: Only Scholarship-in-Practice if taken with BSC 2011]

CLA 2010sxw Peoples of the Roman World (3)

CLA 2110sw Debates About Past: Greek Civilization, History and Culture (3)

CLA 2123sw Debates About Past: Roman Civilization, History and Culture (3)

CLA 2810sxw Ancient Science for Non-Science Majors (3)

CLA 3500sw Sports in Antiquity: Olympians, Gladiators, and Superstars (3)

CLT 3370sw Classical Mythology (3)

CLT 3378sxw Ancient Mythology, East and West (3)

CLT 3510syw The Ancient World in Film (3)

COM 2740s Contemporary Issues in Communication (3)

COM 4905rs Directed Individual Study (1–3)

COM 4909rs Honors Work (1–6)

COM 4941rs Application of Instructional Methods (0–3)

COM 4945rs Communication Internship (1–12)

CRW 3753s Writing Florida (3)

DAN 2100sw Dance Appreciation (3)

ENG 4910s Research in Renaissance Literature (3)

FIL 2001s Introduction to Cinema Studies: Analysis and Practice (3)

HIS 2050sw The Historian's Craft (3)

HIS 2370s Interpreting Native America (3)

HIS 4164s Digital History (3)

HIS 4935s Senior Seminar (3)

HUM 2210sw Humanities: Pre-History to Late Antiquity (3)

HUM 2235sw Humanities: From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment (3)

HUM 2250sw Humanities:18th–Century Romanticism to Postmodernism (3)

HUM 3321syw Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th–Century Culture (3)

IFS 2013sx Reality and Illusion in World Cinema (3)

IFS 2020sy The Blindness Experience (3)

IFS 2027s Animation and Identity (3)

IFS 2028sy Child and Youth Media Cultures in the U.S. (3)

IFS 2029s Dead Cities (3)

IFS 2036s Language, Body, Mind and World (3)

IFS 2063s Creating Experiences (3)

IFS 2073sx Music in the World (3)

IFS 2075s Foundations of Research and Inquiry (3)

IFS 2076s The Lean Machine: The 21st Century Entrepreneur (3)

IFS 2097s Exploring Emerging Technologies (3)

IFS 2098s Global Engagement (1)

IFS 2100sy Music and Film (3)

IFS 2116s Digital Microhistory Lab (3)

IFS 3033s Media, Culture, and the Environment (3)

IFS 3037s Empowering Health Consumers in the eHealth Era (3)

IFS 3107sy Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh My! Multicultural Dimensions of American Cinema (3)

IFS 3108s Technical Communication in the Information Age (3)

IFS 3109s Exploring the World of Sports (3)

IFS 3124s Business Case Analysis and Solution Development (3)

IFS 3129s Art and the Environment (3)

ISM 4545s Data Analytics and Mining for Business (3)

LDR 2101s Leadership Theory and Practice (3)

LDR 2160s Peer Leadership (3)

LDR 2162s Leadership in Groups and Communities (3)

LDR 2163s Emerging Leaders (3)

LDR 2213sx Leadership for Social Justice (3)

LDR 2290s Leadership and Sustainability in Action (3)

LDR 2560s Leadership in Film (3)

LDR 3215s Leadership and Change (3)

LDR 3263s Leadership Experience (3)

LDR 4105s Leadership and Complexity (3)

LDR 4404s Student Affairs Leadership (3)

LIS 4940rs Internship in Information Technology (1–6)

MUE 4940s Internship in Music (12)

MUO 4006rs Music Theatre Workshop (2)

MUT 1005s The Art of Songwriting (3)

MUT 2116s Music Theory III (3)

MUT 3574s Popular Music Analysis (3)

PHY 3802Ls Intermediate Laboratory (2)

PSY 3213Cs Research Methods in Psychology with Laboratory (4)

PUR 4940rs Public Relations Internships (1-12)

REL 3180s Religion and Bioethics (3)

REL 3209s The Dead Sea Scrolls (3)

REL 3541s American Protestant Thought in Historical Context (3)

REL 4044s What is Religion? What is Religious Studies? (3)

REL 4335s Modern Hinduism (3)

SLS 3717 Peer Tutoring (1)

SPA 4056s Clinical Methods (3)

STA 1220s In My Opinion: Introduction to Designing, Conducting and Analyzing Surveys (3)

STA 3064s Introduction to Statistical Modeling with SAS (3)

SYD 2740sy Sociology of Law and Hispanic (3)

THE 3214sw World Theatre History II (3)

Note that this list is subject to change. Please see http://liberalstudies.fsu.edu for an up-to-date list.

Formative Experiences

Students may complete one of their two Scholarship-in-Practice requirements by participating in a faculty-assessed hands-on learning experience. Faculty-supervised internships, all study abroad programs run through FSU International Programs, other approved international study experiences, and approved faculty-supervised research (e.g., UROP and Honors in the Major Theses) or field experiences may meet this requirement. A Formative Experience may count for one course of the two-course Scholarship-in-Practice requirement, although only the actual credit hours of the Formative Experience will count towards the thirty-six total hours of General Education.

Diversity Requirement

Culture may be described in its broadest sense as all socially patterned, symbolically mediated, learned behavior among humans. It covers everything from technology to aesthetic judgments. Students who would be truly educated must have an appreciation of the interrelatedness of and the diversity within cultural traditions on a regional and global scale. They must also recognize that issues of culture are not limited to the societal level, but include race, class, and gender.

The diversity requirement recognizes and reflects the full range of human groupings and cultural perspectives as well as the complex relationships among them. Its role is to enhance students' self-understanding and their understanding of the contemporary cultural context, a context characterized by a rich diversity of cultures and experiences in which the Western European intellectual tradition figures as one among many.

To satisfy this requirement, students will be required to take one course from each of the two categories described below. All students are required to complete at least one "x" and one "y" course, with the following exceptions: students who have completed an AA degree from an articulated institution or who have transferred with sixty or more credit hours post-high school are only required to complete one Diversity course (either "x" or "y").

The diversity requirement must be completed with the grade of "C–" or higher prior to the receipt of the baccalaureate degree.

Cross-Cultural Diversity (X) Courses

ANT 2000x Introduction to Anthropology (3)

ANT 2410x Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

ANT 2416x Childhood Around the World (3)

ANT 3141x World Prehistory (3)

ANT 3212x Peoples of the World (3)

ANT 3610x Language and Culture (3)

ANT 4241x Anthropology of Religion (3)

ARH 2090sx Great Discoveries in World Archaeology (3)

ARH 3515x History of African Art (3)

ARH 4372x Spanish Colonial Art: The Hapsburg Period, 1492/1506–1700 (3)

ARH 4882x Visual Cultures of the African Diaspora (3)

ASH 1044xw Middle Eastern History and Civilization (3)

ASH 3100xw History of Asia (3)

ASH 3382x The History of the U.S. and East Asia: 1850 to the Present (3)

CHT 3123rx Pre-Modern Chinese Literature and Culture (3)

CHT 3124rx Modern Chinese Literature (3)

CHT 3301rx Chinese Folklore: Myths, Legends, and Fairy Tales (3)

CHT 3391rx Chinese Cinema and Culture (3)

CHT 3392rx Writing Women in Pre-Modern China (3)

CHT 3501rx Chinese Civilization (3-6)

CLA 2010sxw Peoples of the Roman World (3)

CLA 2810sxw Ancient Science for Non-Science Majors (3)

CLT 3378sxw Ancient Mythology, East and West (3)

DAN 3144xw Cultural Perspectives on Dance (3)

EUH 3205x 19th–Century Europe (3)

FRT 3520rx French and Francophone Cinema (3)

GEA 1000x World Geography (3)

GEO 1400x Human Geography (3)

GEO 4421x Cultural Geography (3)

HFT 2060x Coffee, Tea and International Culture (3)

HFT 2061x Ales, Lagers and International Culture (3)

HFT 2062x International Wine and Culture (3)

HFT 2063x Distilled Spirits and International Culture (3)

HFT 2890x International Food and Culture (3)

HUN 2125x Food and Society (3)

IFS 2013sx Reality and Illusion in World Cinema (3)

IFS 2019x Heretics, Rebels and Militants in the Islamic World (3)

IFS 2022x When Culture and Business Collide: Communication in an International Context (3)

IFS 2031x Who is Human? Culture, Gender and Human Rights (3)

IFS 2049x Third World Cinema (3)

IFS 2052x Global Perspectives: Communication (3)

IFS 2059x Music and International Human Rights (3)

IFS 2070x Thinking Beyond Ourselves: Global Perspectives (3)

IFS 2073sx Music in the World (3)

IFS 2122x The Tourist Trap: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (3)

IFS 3008x Cinema Gone Global (3)

IFS 3009x Through an Arabic Lens: The Intersection of Film and Culture (3)

IFS 3043x German Society Through Film: The Legacy of Nazi Crimes Against Humanity (3)

IFS 3050x India Through Bollywood Film (3)

IFS 3090x Global Conflicts: Analysis and Resolution (3)

IFS 3091x The Culture is in the Cuisine: The Food of Italy (3)

JPT 3391rxw Japanese Film and Culture (3)

JPT 3511rx Japanese Popular Culture (3)

LAH 1093xw Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History (3)

LDR 2213sx Leadership for Social Justice (3)

MUH 2051x Music in World Cultures (3)

MUH 2512x Music in World Cultures (2). (For music majors.)

PHM 2300x Introduction to Political Philosophy (3)

REL 1300xw Introduction to World Religions (3)

REL 2315x Religions of South Asia (3)

REL 2350x Religions of East Asia (3)

REL 3145xw Gender and Religion (3)

REL 3170xw Religious Ethics and Moral Problems (3)

REL 3333x Ramayana in Indian Culture and Beyond (3)

REL 3337x Goddesses, Women, and Power in Hinduism (3)

REL 3340x The Buddhist Tradition (3)

REL 3345x Chan/Zen Buddhism (3)

REL 3351x Japanese Religions (3)

REL 3358x Tibetan and Himalayan Religions (3)

REL 3370x Religion in Africa (3)

REL 3935rx Topics in Buddhism (3)

SLL 3500x Slavic Culture and Civilization (3)

SLL 3510x The Slavic Vampire (3)

SPT 3130xw Latin American Literature in Translation (3)

SPT 3391rx Hispanic Cinema (3)

SPT 3503x Introduction to Hispanic Cultural Analysis (3)

WOH 1023xw The Modern World to 1815 (3)

WOH 1030xw The Modern World Since 1815 (3)

Diversity in Western Culture (Y) Courses

AFA 1003y Diversity and Justice (1)

AMH 2091yw The African–American Experience in the United States (3)

AMH 2095yw American Indians in the United States (3)

AMH 2096yw Black Women in America (3)

AMH 2097yw Nationality, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

AMH 2583y The Seminoles and the Southeastern Indians (3)

ANT 3451y Race: Biology and Culture (3)

ARH 4413y Spanish Colonial Art: The Bourbon Period; 1700–1821/1898

ASL 2510y Deaf Culture (3)

CLT 3510syw The Ancient World in Film (3)

DAN 3185yw African-American Perspectives on Dance (3)

FRT 3561yw French Women Writers (3)

GEA 4405y Latin America (3)

GET 3130yw Masterpieces of German Literature in Translation: 19th and 20th Centuries (3)

GET 3524ry German Cinema (3)

HFT 2080y International Protocol on Western Behavior and Service Standards (3)

HIS 3464yw History of Science (3)

HIS 3491yw Medicine and Society (3)

HPS 3320yw Screening the Scientific Life: Cinema and the Cultural Image of Science (3)

HUM 3321yw Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th-Century Culture (3)

IFS 2020sy The Blindness Experience (3)

IFS 2023y Popular Music in Literature (3)

IFS 2028sy Child and Youth Media Cultures in the U.S. (3)

IFS 2056y Gendered Bodies over the Life Course (3)

IFS 2072y A Social History of America's Popular Music (3)

IFS 2077y Great Britain? Geography, Imperialism, Industry and Culture (3)

IFS 2079y Fantasy Girls: Philosophical Examination of Women and Girls in Fantasy and Science Fiction (3)

IFS 2096y Female Friendship Alliances in Shakespeare (3)

IFS 2100sy Music and Film (3)

IFS 3016y Examining the Educational Achievement Gap (3)

IFS 3018y Ancient Sexualities and Modern Sexual Politics (3)

IFS 3107sy Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh My! Multicultural Dimensions of American Cinema (3)

ITT 3430yw Masterpieces of Italian Literature and Culture in Translation (3)

ITT 3500yw Italian Culture and Civilization: From Origins to the Age of Romanticism (3)

ITT 3501yw Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present (3)

ITT 3520yw The Italian–American Experience in Literature and Film (3)

ITT 3523yw Italian Cinema (3)

LAH 1093xw Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History (3)

LIT 3383yw Women in Literature (3)

MUH 2019y Modern Popular Music (3)

MUH 3053yw American Roots Music (3)

NSP 3185y Multicultural Factors and Health (3)

PHI 2635yw Bioethics (3)

PHM 2121y Philosophy of Race, Class, and Gender (3)

REL 2121yw Religion in the United States (3)

REL 2210yw Introduction to the Old Testament (3)

REL 2240yw Introduction to the New Testament (3)

REL 3363y Islamic Traditions (3)

REL 3367y Islamic Traditions II: Islam up to the Modern World (3)

REL 3607yw The Jewish Tradition (3)

RUT 3505y Russian Culture and Civilization (3)

RUT 3514y Russian Folklore and Fairy Tales (3)

RUT 3523ry Russian Cinema (3)

SOW 4620y Diversity and Social Justice (3)

SYD 2740sy Sociology of Law and Hispanics (3)

SYD 3800y Sociology of Sex and Gender (3)

SYD 4700y Race and Minority Group Relations (3)

SYG 2010y Social Problems (3)

SYO 3200y Sociology of Religion (3)

THE 2000y Introduction to Theatre (3)

THE 4433y Gender, Race and Performance (3)

WST 3251yw Women in Western Culture: Images and Realities (3)

Oral Communication Competency

Competence in oral communication is indicated by demonstrating the ability to transmit clearly ideas and information orally in a way that is appropriate to the topic, purpose, and audience. It also involves demonstrating the ability to discuss ideas clearly with others, to hear and respond to questions, and to assess critical response appropriately.

A student will satisfy the requirement for competency in oral communication in either of two ways:

  1. Petition to have prior demonstration of oral communication competency accepted in place of an approved Florida State University course. Students may petition their baccalaureate dean to have prior demonstrations of oral communication competency accepted in place of a course at Florida State University. Acceptable substitutes may include but not be limited to:
    1. Passing with a "C–" or higher a course in public speaking or argumentation in another college or university (including community college); or
    2. Verified successful participation for at least one semester in a forensic or debate program in community college, college, or university in which a student's debating skill or the creation of an original speech is judged competitively (e.g., Forensics, Moot Court, Debate Team, World Affairs); or
    3. One year experience in a competitively-selected leadership position in a university-directed, university-sponsored organization with a substantive speaking commitment (e.g., FIG Leaders, University Ambassadors, Orientation Leaders). Administrative positions in fraternities, sororities, or student government do not meet this standard.

    The need for specific oral communication skills (such as formal lecture/presentation, interviewing skills, or group dynamics) will vary from discipline to discipline, and while a minimum level of oral competency is required, means of assessing such competency must remain flexible. Thus, several courses will be identified as including basic tests of oral competency, and students passing these courses with a grade of "S" (in S/U courses) or "C–" or higher (in letter graded courses) will automatically be assumed to have completed the requirement.

  2. Earn a grade of "S" (in an S/U course) or "C–" or higher (in a letter graded course) in a course which has been approved by the Undergraduate Policy Committee for oral communication competence credit:
    1. Earn a grade of "S" (in an S/U course) or "C–" or higher (in a letter graded course) in a course for one to three semester hours in the major or minor that has been certified by the Undergraduate Policy Committee (UPC) as meeting the standards for oral communication competency; or
    2. Earn a grade of "C–" or higher in one of the following courses: SPC 1017, Fundamentals of Speech, or SPC 2608, Public Speaking.

    Regardless of the vehicle, to complete the oral communication competency the student must demonstrate the ability to:

  3. Generate an original oral message that clearly presents ideas and/or information;
  4. Make effective use of both vocal and physical delivery in the presentation;
  5. Adapt the presentation to the particular audience; and
  6. Be receptive to questions and/or criticism.

Because speaking experience must focus on generating "an original oral message" courses that emphasize the interpretation or performance of literature do not satisfy this requirement.

Currently Certified Courses:

BSC 3402L Experimental Biology Laboratory (3)

BSC 4945 Undergraduate Supervised Teaching (1)

CGN 4800 Pre-Senior Design and Professional Issues (2)

and

CGN 4802 Senior Design Project (3)

Note: Both courses must be taken to satisfy the requirement.

CIS 4250 Ethics and Computer Science (3)

CJL 4565 Courts and Social Policy (3)

CLA 2110s Debates about the Past: Greek Civilization, History and Culture (3)

CLA 2123s Debates about the Past: Roman Civilization, History and Culture (3)

COM 2080 Online Communication and Presence (3)

COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions (3)

ECH 2050 Engineering Communications (2)

EDG 4410 Classroom Management and Legal Issues (3)

EEL 4911C Senior Design Project I (3)

EIN 3010 Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Tools (3)

EML 4551C Senior Design Project I (3)

and

EML 4552C Senior Design Project II (3)

Note: Both courses must be taken to satisfy the requirement.

ENL 4336 Orality and Poetics: Shakespeare's Sonnets (3)

FIL 2090r Professional Communication (1)

FRE 4410 Advanced Conversation (3)

GEB 3213 Business Communications (3)

GER 3400 Composition and Conversation (3)

HIS 4065 Public History Theory and Methods (3)

IFS 2021 Social Responsibility (Rhetorically Speaking) (3)

IFS 2030 Reading, Writing, and Speaking in the Digital Age (3)

IFS 2078 Communication Matters: Personal Responsibility in Public Speaking (3)

ITA 4410 Advanced Italian Conversation (3)

JPN 3250 Practical Skills in Japanese Communication (3)

MET 3940r Weathercasting (1)

MSL 4301 Leadership & Management (3)

MUE 3491 Communication Skills for the Musician: Choral (2)

and

MUE 3495r Music Education Laboratory: Choral (1)

Note: Both courses must be taken to satisfy the requirement.

MUE 3493 Communication Skills for the Musician: Instrumental (2)

and

MUE 3496r Music Education Laboratory: Instrumental (1)

Note: Both courses must be taken to satisfy the requirement.

MUY 4402 Music Therapy: Methods and Practicum II (3)

NSP 4546 Substance Abuse: Effects on Health, Family, Profession (3)

NUR 3076 Communication in Health Care (3)

PHY 3091 Communication in Physics (2)

REL 4044s What Is Religion? What Is Religious Studies? (3)

SMT 4664 Project-Based Instruction (FSU-Teach) (3)

SOW 3350 Interviewing and Recording in Social Work (3)

SPC 1017 Fundamentals of Speech (3)

SPC 2067 Communication for Arts and Design (3)

SPC 2608 Public Speaking (3)

SPC 4620 Strategic Speech Making (3)

THE 2020 Introduction to Theatre for Majors (3)

Science Lab Requirement

Students must complete one semester hour of Natural Science lab as a graduation requirement. Students will demonstrate the ability to apply scientific principles in designing and conducting experiments, and interpret evidence. Lab courses are designated by the suffix "L" appended to the course number. Students will typically take this course concurrently with the associated course (e.g., students will enroll in both BSC1005 and BSC 1005L). The Natural Science lab Requirement must be completed with a grade of "C–" or higher.

Upper-Division Writing Requirement

Skill in professional writing is critical to the long-term success of all FSU graduates. As such, all students will be required to demonstrate competency in professional writing by completing three credit hours of approved upper-division coursework that includes a substantial writing component. This coursework may be completed outside or within a student's major course of study and may include Honors in the Major Theses credit. The Upper-Division Writing requirement must be completed with a grade of "C–" or higher. Note: Students must complete an Upper-Division Writing course in addition to the courses used to satisfy the State-mandated English Composition requirements.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. The computer competency requirement may be satisfied in one of two ways:

  1. Earn a grade of "C–" or higher in a course(s) that has been approved by the Undergraduate Policy Committee for computer skills competency in the major
  2. Have a prior course, passed with a grade of "C–" or higher, certified by the student's major department as equivalent to the courses approved for computer skills competency in the major

The specific computer competency skills needed vary from discipline to discipline, and while a minimum level of competency is required, means of assessing such competency must remain flexible. Thus, associated with each major is a required course(s) that provides instruction in the discipline-specific computer skills, and students passing this course(s) with a grade of "C–" or higher will be considered to have completed the requirement. The list of required courses for each major will include at least one course flagged as satisfying the computer skills requirement. Students should check with their major department to identify the course(s) designated by the department as satisfying the computer skills competency in the major.

Through the vehicle used to satisfy the computer competency requirement, students must demonstrate

  • Competent use of a discipline-useful software package
  • The ability to perform simple transactions using the Web/Internet

College-Level Communication and Computation Competencies

The State mandates and University-wide requirements for minimum communication and computation skills satisfy State mandates (Board Regulation 6.017) and must be followed by students in Florida public institutions of higher education. The statewide graduation requirements of these rules follow.

State Mandates and University-wide Requirements

Procedures. Students will satisfy the requirements of this rule by completing, with a grade of "C–" or higher in each course, the General Education requirements in Quantitative and Logical Thinking, English Composition, and two other approved courses that require college-level writing for a total of six additional writing credits. Specifically, a student may take either two E-Series courses or one E-Series course plus a course on the list of approved State-Mandated Writing courses to satisfy two of the required courses in college-level writing. These requirements must be completed prior to receipt of an Associate of Arts degree from Florida State University.

Exemptions, Waivers, and Advanced Placement. A student shall be allowed to at least partially satisfy the computation requirement through exemption in one of the following ways:

  1. By scoring appropriately on an examination administered on campus by the Department of Mathematics
  2. By satisfying College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) requirements in mathematics for post admission exemptions of coursework

Any student who has satisfied CLEP requirements in mathematics and whose high school transcript shows successful completion of higher mathematics coursework, including college algebra, trigonometry, and calculus, shall be certified as having satisfied the State's computation requirement, though the student may still be required to complete the Quantitative and Logical Thinking requirement for General Education.

An Advanced Placement calculus score of 3 or higher will satisfy the second computation course requirement.

A student may also be allowed to satisfy the English component through the following method:

  1. For Advanced Placement (AP) scores of 3 on either English Language and Composition or English Literature and Composition a student will be awarded three semester hours of credit for ENC 1101. A score of 4 or 5 on a single exam earns the student three semester hours of credit for General Education and three semester hours of elective credit in English Composition. Students will still be required to take ENC 2135 (or an approved 2000-level ENC composition course) to fulfill the FSU requirement.

Transfer Credits or Correspondence Credits. Students transferring to Florida State University who have been certified by Florida State University as having completed the AA degree from a Florida public university, state college, community college, or other college with which Florida State University maintains an official articulation agreement are deemed to have satisfied the State mandates and Florida State University's General Education requirements.

Students transferring from other institutions that come under the provision of these state mandates, but who have not received the AA degree will be deemed to have satisfied the State mandates for General Education if the previous institution indicates, by notation on the transcript or by some other form of written certification, that the student has satisfied these State mandates before leaving that institution. Students who meet the above transfer requirements will be required to complete all graduation requirements as described above, with the following exceptions: transfer students have earned sixty or more credit hours will only be required to take one Scholarship-in-Practice course and one Diversity course (either an "x" or "y") at FSU.

Transferring students who do not fall into either of the above categories will be required to satisfy Florida State University's plan for State mandates and University-wide requirements, with the exception that all transfers students will be exempted from FSU's E-series requirement. In addition, students who transfer sixty or more hours will be required to take only one Scholarship-in-Practice course and to complete either an "x" or a "y" course, but not both.

Courses taken by correspondence will be treated in the same manner as courses accepted for transfer.

Progression to Upper Division

For progression to upper-division status at Florida State University, a student must meet the following minimum requirements:

  1. Completion of at least fifty-two semester hours of college credit
  2. Achievement of a minimum adjusted GPA of 2.0 on all work attempted at Florida State University

    Note: Some degree programs require a higher GPA for admission to upper-division status.

  3. Students who began college work prior to October 15, 1982 must complete a minimum of one-half of the required semester hours from the required General Education curriculum, including English Composition and undergraduate mathematics (computation).
  4. Students who began their college-level work on or after October 15, 1982 and prior to Summer C semester 2015 must complete a minimum of one-half of the required semester hours from the General Education curriculum, including the completion of State mandates and University-wide requirements for specific coursework in writing and computation. A minimum grade of "C-" is required in each of the courses used to fulfill the General Education requirements in Quantitative and Logical Thinking and English Composition.
  5. Students who began their college-level work on or after the start of Summer C semester 2015 must complete a minimum of one-half of the required semester hours from the General education curriculum, including the completion of all State mandated computation coursework and the two required English composition courses (ENC 1101 and ENC 2135). A minimum grade of "C–" is required in each of the courses used to fulfill the General Education requirements in Quantitative and Logical Thinking and English Composition.
  6. Acceptance by a college for admission to a degree program

Transfer from a lower-division major advisement program to an upper-division degree program is completed by the student's baccalaureate dean after the student has declared a choice and has been declared eligible for transfer under the above requirements. Transfer from undergraduate studies directly into a baccalaureate degree program is accomplished between the Office of Undergraduate Studies and the appropriate baccalaureate dean under the same conditions.

All transfer students admitted to the University who do not meet the above requirements for admission to an upper-division degree program (except those students majoring in music, dance, or the BFA in theatre) and who have fewer than fifty-two semester hours of transferable credit will be assigned to the Division of Undergraduate Studies. Students with fifty-two or more semester hours of transferable credit will be assigned to the lower-division major advisement program under the appropriate baccalaureate dean unless they request assignment to the Division of Undergraduate Studies. Students requesting assignment to Undergraduate Studies must do so through the undergraduate admissions office at least one month prior to registration. All students, including transfer students, must have met the requirements for transfer from the Division of Undergraduate Studies by the time they have attempted a total of seventy-five semester hours of college work.

Transfer Among Colleges for Upper-Division Students

For an upper-division student to change colleges within the University, the student must meet the following requirements:

  1. Obtain a signed approval form from the dean of the college to which the student wishes to transfer.
  2. Obtain an approval signature on that form from the dean of the college from which the student wishes to transfer.
  3. Personally submit the original copy of the approved change form to the Office of the University Registrar.

The Associate of Arts

The Associate of Arts (AA) degree may be granted through the Division of Undergraduate Studies to students who have completed sixty semester hours with an adjusted GPA of 2.0 or higher at Florida State University and an overall 2.0 GPA on all college work attempted. A minimum of twenty of the last thirty semester hours of work must be earned in residence. Successful completion of the General Education portion of the Liberal Studies for the 21st Century program with a 2.0 GPA or higher is required for the AA degree. Students beginning their college program January 1983 or later must also meet state mandates and University-wide requirements for specific coursework in writing and computation.

Students cannot apply for both an Associate of Arts degree and a bachelor's degree to be awarded in the same semester. Also, the Associate of Arts degree cannot be awarded once a bachelor's degree has been conferred.

The awarding of the AA degree from Florida State University does not alter the calculation of the cumulative GPA at Florida State University. Certification for the AA degree in no way affects the requirements of individual colleges for the completion of the major/minor for a baccalaureate degree.

Students interested in receiving the AA degree and who are completing or have completed all the requirements listed above must officially apply at the Office of Undergraduate Studies.

Educator Preparation

Students planning to enroll in an Educator Preparation program at Florida State University must: (1) complete all University Liberal Studies requirements; (2) take and pass the General Knowledge portion of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam (FTCE); and (3) acquire a passing score on the Professional Knowledge and Subject Area tests of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam (FTCE) prior to the final term internship and graduation. Students must also complete: (1) specified degree prerequisites referred to in the appropriate program chapters of this General Bulletin; (2) specific admission criteria described in the "Admissions" and "College of Education" chapters of this General Bulletin; and (3) the "General Requirements" described earlier in this chapter of the General Bulletin.

Students must consult with an advisor to determine how to simultaneously satisfy Florida State University's Liberal Studies requirements and the teacher preparation general education core curriculum requirements.

The Baccalaureate Degree

Florida State University's general requirements for all baccalaureate degrees (bachelor's degrees) are listed at the beginning of this chapter under "General Requirements."

Graduation Checks

All undergraduate students complete the online request for a University graduation check from the Office of the University Registrar, no later than the time the student has earned ninety semester hours of credit or two terms prior to the planned graduated date. Students will be prompted with an e-mail notification to request the graduation check if they have not already done so.

Request for a graduation check of major requirements must be made to the student's academic dean one term prior to graduation. If a graduation check has not been requested by the time the student reaches one-hundred semester hours (hours earned plus current enrollment to equal 100), a stop will be placed on the student's future registration.

Application for Graduation

Application for a degree must be made by the date stated in the academic calendar in this General Bulletin during the term in which the student expects to graduate. Students can apply for graduation online through the Apply for Graduation link under Course Quicklinks on the myFSU portal (http://my.fsu.edu) If the student is unable to graduate at the end of the term for which application was made, he/she must reapply for the degree no later than the deadline for the next term in which he/she expects to graduate. Students with 160 or more earned hours may be placed on the graduation list by the University. Students in this category who are added to the graduation list will be notified by the Office of the University Registrar and provided detailed information as to their options at that time.

The Bachelor of Arts Degree

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree requires all the general criteria listed at the beginning of this section, and

  1. Completion of a classical or modern foreign language through the 2000 level (2200 or equivalent course)
  2. Nine semester hours in the fields of humanities and history, in addition to the General Education and the world language requirement; Courses may be selected from the following colleges, and departments: College of Fine Arts; College of Music; College of Communication and Information (not including work in communication disorders or information), and the departments of Classics; English; History; Modern Languages and Linguistics; Philosophy; or Religion in the College of Arts and Sciences.

The Bachelor of Science Degree

The Bachelor of Science (BS) degree requires all the general criteria listed at the beginning of this section.

Second Baccalaureates and Second Majors

Students should note that there is a difference between a second major and a second baccalaureate degree.

Students may receive a second baccalaureate degree provided that: (1) the requirements for each major/minor as well as individual college requirements for both the first and the second degrees are satisfied; and (2) thirty semester hours in residence are completed, in addition to the hours required for the first degree. The additional thirty semester hours must be completed in residence after the completion of the first degree. Hours earned by the student during the completion of the first baccalaureate degree, over and above those extra credit hours actually required for the first degree, may not be included in the thirty semester hours. There are no Liberal Studies requirements for the second degree.

To obtain a second major, one must meet all requirements of the college of the primary major but only the major requirements of the secondary major. For information about the second major see 'Second Majors and Academic Regulations' in the "Academic Regulations and Procedures" chapter of this General Bulletin.

University policy prohibits the awarding of more than one degree from a specific degree program due to the overlap of core requirements of that degree program. Students should seek guidance from their advisors or their college when choosing to pursue a double major or dual degree. This policy applies to both current and readmitted students.

Dual degrees and double majors must be declared by the end of the semester in which a student will earn ninety cumulative credit hours toward their degree program at Florida State University. In special circumstances, students may petition their primary academic dean for an exception. If a dual degree or double major is declared, but not completed, the student will not be eligible for a refund of excess credit charges accrued while working on their dual degree or double major.

Degrees of Distinction

Three degrees of distinction are granted to all native graduating students based on all college-level work attempted (excluding physical education activity courses) and including the term's work in which baccalaureate degree requirements are completed:

  • Cum Laude for an overall average of 3.500
  • Magna Cum Laude for an overall average of 3.700
  • Summa Cum Laude for an overall average of 3.900

Degrees with distinction are granted to transfer students who meet all three of the following requirements:

  1. The student must complete at this University at least forty semester hours of letter-graded work, including the final term's work.
  2. The student must have the required minimum grade point average for each distinction level on all work taken at this University.
  3. The student must have the required overall grade point average on all work attempted, including any transfer credit excluding any physical education activity courses or vocational courses, regardless of how many years have elapsed since the credit was earned. Transfer credit cannot raise a student's Florida State University grade point average. Therefore, if the transfer grade point average is higher that the Florida State grade point average, the level of distinction will be based on the Florida State grade point average.

Graduation "With Honors"

Students who complete and successfully defend an upper-division honors thesis or equivalent honors projects (as defined by individual departments offering honors in the major) will graduate with the designation "With Honors." Students may graduate with one of the three degrees of distinction described above and "With Honors." The "University Honors Program and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin fully describes the Honors in the Major Program.

Policy for Awarding Degrees

Florida State University helps students meet their academic goals by monitoring academic progress toward their degree.

If an undergraduate student has completed his or her respective degree requirements, the Academic Dean of the student's program confirms this, and the student is eligible to be awarded the degree, the University reserves the right to award the degree. Once the degree is awarded, the student must be readmitted to Florida State University in order to enroll in any courses.

Students pursuing double majors or dual degrees must formally notify their academic dean of their intent. Undergraduate students pursuing dual degrees in different disciplines must obtain formal approval of their academic dean, following established University procedures for such approvals.

Should the University invoke its prerogative to award a degree once a student has completed all stated degree requirements, the student may appeal this decision. If the student can demonstrate that continued enrollment is necessary to achieve his or her academic goals, the appeal may be granted. Reasons such as, but not limited to, desire to continue financial aid, participate in student activities, and access student services do not constitute legitimate reasons for appeal.

Any undergraduate student who wishes to appeal for continued enrollment, thereby postponing graduation, must submit a written request to the student's academic dean no later than ten class days after being notified that the University is invoking its right to award the degree. This appeal will be reviewed by a committee composed of the student's primary academic dean, the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, and the University Registrar. The committee must find evidence to support the student's claim of a legitimate academic need in order to grant permission to continue taking courses.

Once a degree has been awarded, all coursework leading to that degree is considered final and not subject to change. "Incomplete" grade changes or any other grade changes should be submitted prior to the posting of the degree. Grade changes or withdrawals for coursework that applies to the awarded degree may be considered only in cases of documented University error or in cases where the courses in question are documented as applying to a degree that is still in progress.