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Florida State University
2013-2014 General Bulletin - Undergraduate Edition

Undergraduate Degree Requirements

Degrees Offered

Florida State University confers at the bachelor’s level the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education, Bachelor of Social Work, and the Bachelor of Science degrees, the requirements for which are described in detail below. Students may find requirements for all graduate degrees (master’s, specialist, professional, and doctoral) in the Graduate Bulletin.

Students pursuing a baccalaureate degree at Florida State University must meet a number of state- and University-wide degree requirements as they progress through their course of studies. In general, freshman and sophomore students in most majors emphasize work in a broad-based liberal arts curriculum, described below as the Liberal Studies Program, and in consultation with their advisers select a major concentration. By the end of the sophomore year, all students should have completed at least half of the Liberal Studies Program, including the composition and computation requirements in Areas I and II.

At about the end of the sophomore year, students formally select a major and request acceptance by the college in which the major is taught. Students transferring into the University with an Associate in Arts (AA) degree from a Florida public community college or university, or transferring fifty-two or more semester hours of credit, are eligible to be admitted directly into the college of their choice provided they meet minimum requirements for the major selected.

Students at the junior and senior level complete the requirements of their chosen major and often of a minor field. They may also have to fulfill additional requirements specific to their college and/or certification requirements to engage in a particular profession for which their undergraduate major is preparatory.

Understanding these degree requirements is crucial to the smooth progression to graduation. Students are encouraged to consult with their academic advisers regularly throughout their undergraduate years to ensure that they are making appropriate progress toward their degree and to consult their academic deans’ offices, Advising First, StudentsFirst Advising, and the Office of the University Registrar for assistance and clarification of degree requirements.

Baccalaureate Degree Requirements: An Overview

Florida State University will confer the bachelor’s degree when the following conditions have been met. Restrictions may be found under ‘Transfer Credit’ in the “Academic Regulations and Procedures” chapter of this General Bulletin.

General Requirements

  1. Satisfactory completion (a minimum adjusted grade point average of 2.0 on all courses used for liberal studies) of Florida State University’s Liberal Studies Program, thirty-six semester hours, as follows:
    • Area I. Computation (six semester hours)
    • Area II. English Composition (six semester hours)
    • Area III. History/Social Science (six to twelve semester hours)
    • Area IV. Humanities/Fine Arts (five to eleven semester hours)
    • Area V. Natural Science (seven semester hours)
    • For details, please see ‘The Liberal Studies Program’ of this chapter.
  2. Satisfactory completion of state and University-wide mandates requiring specific coursework in writing and computation. Students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in the use of spoken and written English in all of their courses.
  3. Satisfactory completion of major requirements in a chosen degree program, including additional requirements set by the college offering the degree. The student’s degree program will appear on the baccalaureate diploma. If a student satisfies all requirements for two degrees, including admission, prerequisite, core, etc., both degree programs may appear on the diploma. A list of degree programs is available in the “Academic Degree and Certificate Programs” chapter of this General Bulletin. Major names are not printed on university diplomas.
  4. A minimum adjusted grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on all coursework taken at Florida State University and an overall 2.0 average on all college-level work attempted.
  5. Successful completion of a minimum of one hundred twenty unduplicated semester hours, only two hours of which may be in physical education activity courses.
  6. Completion of at least forty-five semester hours in courses numbered 3000 and above, thirty of which need to be taken at this University.
  7. Completion of the last thirty semester hours and half of the major course semester hours, in residence at this University. In cases of emergency, a maximum of six hours of the final thirty semester hours may be completed by correspondence or residence at another accredited senior institution with the approval of the academic dean. College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) credit earned may be applied to the final thirty hour requirement provided that the student has earned at least thirty semester hours credit at Florida State University.
  8. Students who have entered a university in the State of Florida, Division of Colleges and Universities, with fewer than sixty hours of credit in the fall of 1976 or any time thereafter are required to earn at least nine hours prior to graduation by attendance in one or more Summer terms at one of the State University System institutions. The University President may waive the application of this rule in cases of unusual hardship to the individual. Students wishing waivers submit written requests giving the details of their hardships through their academic deans to the Vice President for Faculty Development and Advancement. Prior to 2011, students who had earned nine semester hours of credit through approved acceleration methods (AP, IB, CLEP, and approved dual enrollment courses) were exempt from the summer residency requirement. Effective 2011, this exemption is no longer available.
  9. Satisfaction of the foreign-language admissions requirement by having two sequential units of the same foreign language in high school, or eight semester hours of the same foreign language in college, or documented equivalent proficiency
  10. Successful completion of coursework constituting the student’s program of studies, minor, honors thesis, or certification examination does not guarantee the awarding of the baccalaureate degree. Faculty judgment of the academic performance of the student is inherent in the educational process in determining whether the awarding of the baccalaureate degree or admission into a higher level degree program is warranted.

Note: For the purpose of establishing residency, the various Summer sessions are considered one semester.

Following is a full discussion of state- and University-wide degree requirements at the undergraduate level. Requirements specific to a particular college may be found in the section of this General Bulletin describing that college. Major and minor requirements may be found under the appropriate department in the departmental listings.

State Mandated Academic Learning Compacts (SMALCs)

The State Board of Governors has directed each university to develop Academic Learning Compacts for every baccalaureate degree program. A State University System Academic Learning Compact (SMALC) identifies for each academic bachelor’s program what students will learn by the end of a program and how knowledge is measured above and beyond course grades.

A SMALC must pinpoint the core learning expectations in the areas of communication, critical thinking skills, and content/discipline knowledge and skills. Additionally, it must identify the corresponding assessments used to determine how well the student has assimilated the articulated expectations.

Successful performance related to the State Mandated Academic Learning Compacts specific to your degree is a requirement for graduation.

Visit http://learningforlife.fsu.edu/smalcs/plearningcompact.cfm to view the current version of the SMALCs for your degree. Simply select your major and detailed information is provided. You may also obtain information pertaining to SMALCs by contacting the academic departments.

Division of Undergraduate Studies

Dean: Karen Laughlin
Associate Deans: Gregory Beaumont, Bruce Janasiewicz
Assistant Dean: Sara Hamon, Nicole Raimondi

The Division of Undergraduate Studies is responsible for the supervision and monitoring of all state- and University-wide degree requirements as well as University-wide academic support offices. Overseen by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, the division includes the Office of Undergraduate Studies (the academic home of most freshmen and sophomores), Advising First, the Center for Academic Retention and Enhancement (CARE), the University Honors Program, Transfer and Information Services, the Academic Center for Excellence (ACE), the Office of National Fellowships, and the Office of Undergraduate Research. For further information on these academic support offices see ‘Honors Program’ in the “University Honors Program and Honor Societies” chapter and ‘Advising First’, the ‘Center for Academic Retention and Enhancement’, ‘Office of Undergraduate Research’, and ‘Transfer and Information Services’ in the “Academic Advising and Support Services” chapter of this General Bulletin.

Freshmen and sophomores have their programs and coursework supervised by the Office of Undergraduate Studies. Exceptions to this placement are students accepted into the College of Music; College of Motion Picture Arts; or into the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) program in theatre or dance. Students in these performance majors are advised and supervised directly within their own schools or departments. The Office of Undergraduate Studies is the dean’s office that administers the academic and advisement program, regardless of intended major, for all other freshman and sophomore students.

The Liberal Studies Program

As one of its primary goals, a university education should foster in the student a spirit of free inquiry into humane values, while developing the mind as an instrument of analysis and synthesis. Essential to the student’s quest for knowledge and to responsible participation in society is an understanding of one’s self and of the natural and social environment. The Liberal Studies Program is intended, therefore, to provide a perspective on the qualities, accomplishments, and aspirations of human beings, the past and present civilizations they have created, and the natural and technological world they inhabit. The Liberal Studies Program, designed to ensure breadth in the student’s academic experience, while at the same time affording flexibility in satisfying requirements, may be extended throughout the undergraduate years with the exception of Areas I and II. The five areas of liberal studies provide students with essential competencies and introduce the student to broad areas of knowledge.

Students are required to complete (or be exempted from with credit) a minimum of six semester hours of mathematics and six semester hours of English composition, six to twelve semester hours in social science/history, five to eleven semester hours in humanities/fine arts, and seven semester hours in natural science (one course must be accompanied by a scheduled laboratory) for a total of thirty-six semester hours.

Liberal Studies Requirements

The liberal studies requirements must be met by completion of appropriate coursework or by combination of coursework and credit by examination within the limits set below:

  1. Credit by Examination. A maximum of thirty semester hours of credit earned through examination may be applied to the liberal studies requirements.
  2. Coursework. An overall 2.0 average or better is required for coursework used to satisfy the liberal studies requirements.
  3. To satisfy state mandates and University-wide requirements, students must also earn a grade of “C–” or better in each of the courses used to fulfill the liberal studies requirements in Area I (computation), Area II (English composition), and four more liberal studies courses designated by the Undergraduate Policy Committee as requiring 3,000 words of writing (courses indicated with a “W”).
  4. Courses listed as “directed individual study” (DIS), “senior honors thesis,” or “senior seminar” cannot apply to the Liberal Studies Program.
  5. No course may be applied to more than one area of the program.
  6. No courses taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis may apply to the liberal studies requirement.
  7. A student who transfers to Florida State University from a Florida public community/junior college or senior institution will be deemed to have satisfied the University’s liberal studies requirement if all general education requirements stipulated by the community/junior college or senior institution have been met and the student’s transcript has been so marked.
  8. A course approved for liberal studies credit at the time the course was completed will meet liberal studies requirements, even if the course was not listed as a liberal studies course in the General Bulletin under which the student entered.

Courses for the Liberal Studies Program shall be selected from the following five areas. Students should check departmental curriculum listings to determine prerequisites and course duplications prior to taking courses.

Note: Some students will be required to take preparatory coursework prior to enrollment in English composition and/or mathematics courses. See ‘Required Preparatory Courses’ in the “Academic Regulations and Procedures” chapter of this General Bulletin.

Symbol Legend

  • C Stands for combined lecture and laboratory
  • L Stands for laboratory
  • R Stands for “repeatable” and indicates that the course may be taken more than once
  • W Denotes a course that meets the Writing Requirement (i.e., a writing intensive course)
  • X Denotes a course that meets Cross-Cultural requirements
  • Y Denotes a course that meets the Diversity in Western Culture requirements
  • * Denotes a course that meets literature requirements

Area I. Computation

Students must complete (or be exempted from with credit) at least six semester hours in mathematics. Eligible students will enroll, as space permits, in three semester hours in the Department of Mathematics during their first regular length term on campus and continue with the course until it has been completed. All six semester hours of the computation liberal studies requirement should normally be completed by the end of the sophomore year.

Students must complete three semester hours in the Department of Mathematics and three additional semester hours in the Department of Mathematics or the Department of Statistics, or take a course from a list approved by the Faculty Senate and maintained by the Office of Undergraduate Studies.

Area II. English Composition

Students must complete (or be exempted from with credit) at least six semester hours in English composition. All students, with such exceptions as have been or may be established by the Faculty Senate, shall complete the required English writing courses during their first academic year in residence at Florida State University or must show exemption from six semester hours of freshman writing courses. Each of these courses will require 6,000 words of writing. All courses used to satisfy this requirement must be completed with a grade of “C–” or higher.

Students must complete both ENC 1101 (or 1121) and a second course from the following list.

ENC 1101W Freshman Composition and Rhetoric (3)

ENC 1102W Freshman Writing, Reading, and Research (3)

ENC 1121W Freshman Composition and Rhetoric: Honors (3)

ENC 1122W Freshman Writing About Literature: Honors (3)

ENC 1142W Freshman Imaginative Writing Workshop (3)

ENC 1144W Freshman Article and Essay Workshop (3)

ENC 1145W Freshman Special Topics in Composition (3)

Additional courses may be approved and added to the above list from time to time.

Area III. History/Social Science

Students must complete six to twelve semester hours, including a minimum of three semester hours of history and three semester hours of social science.

History

AMH 1091yW The African American Experience in the United States (3)

AMH 2010W, 2020W A History of the United States (3, 3)

AMH 2095yW The American Indians and the United States (3)

AMH 2096yW Black Women in America (3)

AMH 2097yW Nationality, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

AMH 2583y History of the Seminoles and Southeastern Tribes (3)

ASH 1044xW Middle Eastern History and Civilization (3)

ASH 3100xW History of Asia (3)

EUH 2000W Ancient and Medieval Civilizations (3)

EUH 3205W 19th-Century Europe: A Survey (3)

EUH 3530W England, the Empire, and the Commonwealth:18th Century to
Present (3)

HIS 3464yW History of Modern Science (3)

HIS 3491yW Medicine and Society (3)

HIS 3505W Perspectives on Science and Mathematics (3)

LAH 1093xW Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History (3)

WOH 1023W The Modern World to 1815 (3)

WOH 1030W The Modern World Since 1815 (3)

Social Science

AFA 3101yW Theory and Dynamics of Racism and Oppression (3)

ANT 2410x Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

ANT 2416x Childhood Around the World (3)

ANT 3141x World Prehistory (3)

ANT 3212x Peoples of the World (3)

CCJ 2020 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)

CCJ 3011 Criminology (3)

CPO 2002x Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics (3)

ECO 2000 Introduction to Economics (3)

ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)

ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics (3)

EVI 1012yW The Blindness Experience (3)

FAD 2230 Family Relationships: A Life Span Development Approach (3)

GEA 1000x World Geography (3)

GEO 1330 Environmental Science (3)

GEO 1400x Human Geography (3)

INR 2002 Introduction to International Relations (3)

ISS 2937rW Social Science Honors Seminar (3). (For honors students only.)

LIS 3103 Information and Society (3)

PAD 3003 Public Administration in American Society (3)

POS 1041 American Government: National (3)

PSY 2012 General Psychology (3)

PUP 3002 Introduction to Public Policy (3)

SOP 3004 Social Psychology (3)

SYD 3020x Population and Society (3)

SYG 1000 Introductory Sociology (3)

SYG 2010y Social Problems (3)

SYO 3100y Family Problems and Social Change (3)

SYO 3200x Sociology of Religion (3)

URS 1006x World Cities: Quality of Life (3)

Area IV. Humanities/Fine Arts

Students must complete five to eleven semester hours. One course must meet the literature requirement. Courses meeting the literature requirement are marked by an asterisk (*). Courses DAN 3144, DAN 3145, and DAN 3146 (the dance series) are marked by a pound sign (#) to indicate that they have a credit limit and only one course will earn credit toward meeting the liberal studies requirement.

AFA 2000W Introduction to the Afro-American Experience (3)

* AML 2010W American Authors to 1875 (3)

* AML 2600yW Introduction to African-American Literature (3)

* AML 3041W American Authors Since 1875 (3)

* AML 3311W Major Figures in American Literature (3)

* AML 3630yW Latino/a Literature in English (3)

* AML 3682yW American Multi-Ethnic Literature (3)

ARH 2090xW Great Discoveries in World Archaeology (3)

ARH 3056W History and Criticism of Art I (3)

ARH 3057W History and Criticism of Art II (3)

ARH 3130W Survey of Greek Art and Archaeology (3)

ARH 3150W Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy (3)

ARH 3530xW The Arts of Asia (3)

ART 2003CW Survey of Studio Art Practices (3)

* CHT 3123rx Pre-Modern Chinese Literature and Culture (3)

CHT 3391rx Chinese Film and Culture (3)

* CHT 3392rx Writing Women in Pre-Modern China (3)

* CLA 2010W Introduction to Greek and Roman Civilization (3)

* CLA 2110W The Greek Way: Introduction to Greek Civilization (3)

* CLA 2123W The Roman Way: Introduction to Roman Civilization (3)

CLA 2810W Discovery of Nature: Ancient Science (3)

CLA 3012yW Homosexuality in Antiquity (3)

* CLA 3501yW Gender and Society in Ancient Greece (3)

CLA 3502yW Women, Children, and Slaves in Ancient Rome: The Roman
Family (3)

CLT 2044W Word Building: Greek and Latin Elements in the English
Vocabulary (3)

CLT 2049 Medical Terminology (3)

* CLT 3370W Classical Mythology (3)

* CLT 3378xW Ancient Mythology, East and West (3)

CLT 3510yW The Ancient World in Film (3)

DAN 2100W Introduction to History and Appreciation of Dance (3)

# DAN 3144W History and Philosophy of Dance (3)

Or

# DAN 3145W History and Philosophy of Dance (3)

Or

# DAN 3146W History and Philosophy of Dance (3)

DAN 3185yW African-American Dance in American Culture (3)

ENG 3310W Film Genres (3)

ENG 3600 Hollywood Cinema (3)

* ENL 2012W British Authors: Beginnings to 1790 (3)

* ENL 2022W British Authors: Early Romantics to the Present (3)

* ENL 3334W Introduction to Shakespeare (3)

FIL 2001 Introduction to Film (3)

* FOW 3240yW Literature and Sexuality (3)

FRT 3520ry French Cinema (3)

* FRT 3561yW French Women Writers (3)

* GET 3130yW Masterpieces of German Literature in Translation: 19th and 20th Centuries (3)

GET 3524ryW German Cinema (3)

HPS 3320yW Screening the Scientific Life: Cinema and the Cultural Image of Science (3)

* HUM 2210W Humanities: Pre-History to Late Antiquity (3)

* HUM 2235W Humanities: From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment (3)

* HUM 2250W Humanities: Eighteenth-Century Romanticism to Postmodernism (3)

HUM 2937rW Humanities Honor Seminar (3) (For honors students only.)

HUM 3321yW Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th-Century Culture (3)

* ITT 3430W Masterpieces of Italian Literature in Translation (3)

* ITT 3500W Italian Culture and Civilization: From Origins to the Age of Romanticism (3)

* ITT 3501yW Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present (3)

* ITT 3520yW The Italian-American Experience in Literature and Film (3)

ITT 3523ryW Italian Cinema (3)

JPT 3391rxW Japanese Film and Culture (3)

* LIT 2010W Introduction to Fiction (3)

* LIT 2020W Introduction to the Short Story (3)

* LIT 2030W Introduction to Poetry (3)

* LIT 2081W Contemporary Literature (3)

* LIT 2230xW Introduction to Global Literature in English (3)

* LIT 3043W Modern Drama (3)

* LIT 3383yW Women in Literature (3)

MUH 2011W Introduction to Music History–Music Appreciation: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (3)

MUH 2012W Music in Western Culture: Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (3)

MUH 2019y Modern Popular Music (3)

MUH 2051xW Music Cultures of the World: Music of Tribal and Folk Cultures (3)

MUH 3053yW American Roots Music (3)

MUH 3211W Survey of Music History: Antiquity to 1750 (3)

MUH 3212W Survey of Music History:1750 to the Present (3)

MUL 2110 Survey of Music Literature (2)

MUN XXXX Any undergraduate music ensemble with the prefix MUN. Credit toward the liberal studies requirement is limited to one semester hour in each ensemble course.

MUT 1001 Fundamentals of Music Theory (3)

MUT 1011 Music Theory for the Non-Music Major (3)

PHH 3130W Plato and His Predecessors (3)

PHH 3140W Aristotle to Augustine (3)

PHH 3400W Modern Philosophy (3)

PHI 2010W Introduction to Philosophy (3)

PHI 2100W Reasoning and Critical Thinking (3)

PHI 2620W Environmental Ethics (3)

PHI 2630W Ethical Issues and Life Choices (3)

PHI 2635yW Bioethics (3)

PHI 3162W Logic and the Law (3)

PHI 3400W History and Philosophy of Science (3)

PHI 3800W Philosophy of the Arts (3)

* PHI 3882W Philosophy in Literature (3)

PHM 2121y Philosophy of Race, Class and Gender (3)

PHM 2300xW Introduction to Political Philosophy (3)

PHM 3020W Philosophy of Sex (3)

PHM 3123yW Philosophy of Feminism (3)

PHM 3351W Philosophy of Human Rights (3)

REL 1300xW Introduction to World Religions (3)

REL 2121yW Religion in the United States (3)

* REL 2210W Introduction to the Old Testament (3)

* REL 2240W Introduction to the New Testament (3)

REL 2315x Religions of South Asia (3)

* REL 3112W Religion and 20th Century Fantasy Literature (3)

REL 3145yW Gender and Religion (3)

REL 3160 Religion and Science (3)

REL 3170xW Religious Ethics and Moral Problems (3)

REL 3431W Critics of Religion (3)

REL 3505W The Christian Tradition (3)

REL 3607W The Jewish Tradition (3)

* RUT 3110yW Russian Literature in English Translation (3)

RUT 3514x Russian Folklore and Fairy Tales (3)

RUT 3523ry Russian Cinema (3)

* SLL 3500x Slavic Culture and Civilization (3)

SLL 3510x The Slavic Vampire (3)

* SPT 3130xW Latin American Literature in Translation (3)

SPT 3391rx Hispanic Cinema (3)

THE 2000yW Introduction to Theatre (3)

* THE 3214W World Theatre History II (3)

TUT 3003y Turkish Culture and Civilization (3)

TUT 3053x Turkish Cinema (3)

WST 3251yW Women in Western Culture: Images and Realities (3)

Area V. Natural Science

Students must complete a minimum of seven semester hours. One of the courses must be accompanied by a corresponding laboratory.

ANT 2100 Introduction to Archaeology (3)

ANT 2100L Introduction to Archaeology Laboratory (1)

ANT 2301 Evolution of Human Sexuality (3)

ANT 2511x Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Prehistory (3)

ANT 2511L Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Prehistory Laboratory (1)

AST 1002 Planets, Stars, and Galaxies (3)

AST 1002L Introductory Astronomy Laboratory (1)

BSC 1005 General Biology for Nonmajors (3)

BSC 1005L General Biology Laboratory for Nonmajors (1)

BSC 2010 Biological Science I (3). (For science majors.)

BSC 2010L Biological Science I Laboratory (1) (For science majors.)

BSC 2011 Biological Science II (3). (For science majors.)

BSC 2011L Animal Diversity Laboratory (2). (For science majors.)

CHM 1020 Chemistry for Liberal Studies (3)

CHM 1020L Chemistry for Liberal Studies Laboratory (1)

CHM 1032 Survey of General Chemistry (3)

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I (3)

CHM 1045L General Chemistry Laboratory I (1)

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II (3)

CHM 1046L General Chemistry Laboratory II (1)

CHM 1050 Honors General Chemistry I (3). (For science majors.)

CHM 1050L Honors General Chemistry Laboratory I (1). (For science majors.)

CHM 1051 Honors General Chemistry II (3). (For science majors.)

CHM 1051L Honors General Chemistry Laboratory II (2). (For science majors.)

CHM 2200 Survey of Organic Chemistry (3)

CHM 2200L Survey of Organic Chemistry Lab (1)

GLY 1000 Dynamic Earth (3)

GLY 1000L Dynamic Earth Laboratory (1)

GLY 1030 Environmental Issues in Geology (3)

GLY 1102 Dinosaurs and Disasters on an Evolving Earth (3)

GLY 2010C Physical Geology (4). (For science majors.)

HUN 1201 The Science of Nutrition (3)

ISC 2003 Global Change: Its Scientific and Human Dimensions (3)

ISC 2937rW Natural Science Honors Seminar (3). (For honors students only.)

ISC 3523C Research Methods (3)

MET 1010 Introduction to the Atmosphere (3)

MET 1010L Introductory Meteorology Laboratory (1)

MET 2101 Physical Climatology (3). (For science majors.)

MET 2700 General Meteorology (3). (For science majors.)

OCE 1001 Elementary Oceanography (3)

PHY 1020 Fundamentals of Physics (3)

PHY 1020L Fundamentals of Physics Laboratory (1)

PHY 1075C Physics of Light and Sound (4)

PHY 2048C General Physics A (5). (For science majors.)

PHY 2049C General Physics B (5). (For science majors.)

PHY 2053C College Physics A (4). (For science majors.)

PHY 2054C College Physics B (4). (For science majors.)

PSB 2000 Introduction to Brain and Behavior (3)

SPA 2001 Communication Sciences and Disorders (3)

Note: Certain restrictions exist regarding the allotment of course credit for the chemistry and geology courses listed above. Students should refer to the course descriptions of each department for specific credit information before registering for these courses.

How Transfer Credit Applies to the Liberal Studies Program

The Office of Undergraduate Studies evaluates transfer credits as they apply to the Liberal Studies Program and loads the results into the academic advising report SASS system. Students with the AA degree or General Education Statement from a Florida public university, state college, community college, or other colleges with which Florida State University maintains an official articulation agreement are exempted from the above evaluation.

The Multicultural Requirement

Students who would be truly educated must have an appreciation of the interrelatedness of and the diversity within cultural traditions. The multicultural understanding requirement recognizes and reflects the full range of human groupings and cultural perspectives as well as the complex relationships among them. Its role is to enhance students’ self understanding and their understanding of the contemporary cultural context, a context characterized by a rich diversity of cultures and experiences in which the Western European intellectual tradition figures as one among many.

Multicultural courses include cross-cultural studies (those courses marked with an “x”) and diversity in Western experience (those courses marked with a “y”). All students who enter the University with fewer than sixty semester hours must complete at least one “x” and one “y” course. Students transferring to the University with sixty credits or more must complete one multicultural course from either designation. These courses may be taken as part of the liberal studies requirement, as electives, or as part of a student’s major.

The multicultural requirement must be completed with the grade of “C–” or higher prior to the receipt of the baccalaureate degree.

(X) Cross-Cultural Courses

ANT 2410 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

ANT 2416 Childhood around the World (3)

ANT 2460 Anthropology of Food (3)

ANT 2511 Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Prehistory (3)

ANT 3141 World Prehistory (3)

ANT 3212 Peoples of the World (3)

ANT 3610 Language and Culture (3)

ANT 4175 Archaeology of the Islamic World (3)

ANT 4241 Anthropology of Religion (3)

ANT 4242 Symbol and Ritual (3)

ANT 4309 Conquest of the Americas (3)

ANT 4323 Peoples and Cultures of Mexico and Central America (3)

ANT 4352 Peoples and Cultures of Africa (3)

ANT 4363 Japanese Society and Culture (3)

ANT 4422 Kinship and Social Organization (3)

ARH 2090 Great Discoveries in World Archaeology (3)

ARH 3530 The Arts of Asia (3)

ARH 4554 Arts of Japan (3)

ARH 4675 The Art and Culture of the Maya (3)

ASH 1044 Middle Eastern History and Civilization (3)

ASH 3100 History of Asia (3)

CCJ 3677 Crimes against Humanity (3)

CHT 3123r Pre-Modern Chinese Literature and Culture (3)

CHT 3391r Chinese Cinema and Culture (3)

CHT 3392r Writing Women in Pre-Modern China (3)

CLT 3378 Ancient Mythology, East and West (3)

CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics (3)

CPO 3034 Politics of Developing Areas (3)

CPO 3303 Politics of Latin America (3)

CPO 3403 Comparative Government and Politics: The Middle East (3)

CPO 3541 Politics of China (3)

GEA 1000 World Geography (3)

GEO 1400 Human Geography (3)

GEO 4421 Cultural Geography (3)

HFT 2061 Ales, Lagers and International Culture (3)

HFT 2062 International Wine and Culture (3)

HFT 2716 International Travel and Culture (3)

HFT 2890 International Food and Culture (3)

HUN 2125 Food and Society (3)

JPT 3391r Japanese Film and Culture (3)

LAH 1093 Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History (3)

LIT 2230 Introduction to Global Literature in English (3)

MUH 2051 Music Cultures of the World: Music of Tribal and Folk Cultures (3)

MUH 2512 Music Cultures of the World I (2)

PHM 2300 Introduction to Political Philosophy (3)

PRT 3391r Brazilian Literature and Film in Translation (3)

REL 1300 Introduction to World Religions (3)

REL 2315 Religions of South Asia (3)

REL 3170 Religious Ethics and Moral Problems (3)

REL 3340 The Buddhist Tradition (3)

REL 3363 The Islamic Tradition (3)

REL 4335 Modern Hinduism (3)

RUT 3504 Modern Russian Life (3)

RUT 3514 Russian Folklore and Fairy Tales (3)

SLL 3500 Slavic Culture and Civilization (3)

SLL 3510 The Slavic Vampire (3)

SPC 4710 Interracial and Intercultural Communication (3)

SPM 4013 Cross-Cultural Sport (3)

SPN 3520 Cultures of Latin America (3)

SPT 3130 Latin American Literature in Translation (3)

SPT 3391r Hispanic Cinema (3)

SYD 3020 Population and Society (3)

SYO 3200 Sociology of Religion (3)

TUT 3053 Turkish Cinema (3)

URP 4618 Planning for Developing Regions (3)

URS 1006 World Cities: Quality of Life (3)

(Y) Diversity in Western Culture Courses

ADV 3410 Hispanic Marketing Communication (3)

AFA 1003 Diversity and Justice (1)

AFA 3101 Theory and Dynamics of Racism and Oppression (3)

AMH 1091 The African American Experience in the United States (3)

AMH 2095 The American Indians and the United States (3)

AMH 2096 Black Women in America (3)

AMH 2097 Nationality, Race and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

AMH 2583 History of the Seminoles and Southeastern Tribes (3)

AML 2600 Introduction to African-American Literature (3)

AML 3630 Latino/a Literature in English (3)

AML 3682 American Multi-Ethnic Literature (3)

AML 4604 The African-American Literary Tradition (3)

AML 4680r Studies in Ethnic Literature (3)

ANT 2534 Race: Biology and Culture (3)

ASL 2510 Deaf Culture (3)

CCJ 4662 Minorities, Crime and Social Policy (3)

CLA 3012 Homosexuality in Antiquity (3)

CLA 3501 Gender and Society in Ancient Greece (3)

CLA 3502 Women, Children, and Slaves in Ancient Rome: The Roman
Family (3)

CLT 3510 The Ancient World in Film (3)

CTE 3512 History of Dress (3)

DAN 3185 African-American Dance in American Culture (3)

EDF 2085 Teaching Diverse Populations (3)

EVI 1012 The Blindness Experience (3)

FOW 3240 Literature and Sexuality (3)

FRT 3520r French Cinema (3)

FRT 3561 French Women Writers (3)

GEA 4405 Latin America (3)

GET 3130 Masterpieces of German Literature in Translation: 19th and 20th Centuries (3)

GET 3524r German Cinema (3)

HFT 2080 International Protocol on Western Behavior and Service Standards (3)

HIS 3464 History of Modern Science (3)

HIS 3491 Medicine and Society (3)

HPS 3320 Screening the Scientific Life: Cinema and the Cultural Image of Science (3)

HUM 3321 Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th-Century Culture (3)

ITT 3501 Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present (3)

ITT 3520 Italian American Experience in Literature and Film (3)

ITT 3523r Italian Cinema (3)

LIT 3383 Women in Literature (3)

LIT 4329 African American Folklore (3)

LIT 4385 Major Women Writers (3)

MUH 2019 Modern Popular Music (3)

MUH 3053 American Roots Music (3)

NSP 3185 Multicultural Factors and Health (3)

PHI 2635 Bioethics (3)

PHM 2121 Philosophy of Race, Class, and Gender (3)

PHM 3123 Philosophy of Feminism (3)

PUP 3323 Women and Politics (3)

REL 1072 Cinematic Courage (3)

REL 2121 Religion in the United States (3)

REL 3145 Gender and Religion (3)

RUT 3110 Russian Literature in English Translation (3)

RUT 3505 Russian Culture and Civilization (3)

RUT 3523r Russian Cinema (3)

SOP 3742 Psychology of Women (3)

SOP 3782 Psychology of the African-American (3)

SOW 4108 Women’s Issues and Social Work (3)

SOW 4620 Diversity in Social Work Practice (3)

SOW 4622 Social Work with Black Families (3)

SYD 3800 Sociology of Sex and Gender (3)

SYD 4700 Race and Minority Group Relations (3)

SYG 2010 Social Problems (3)

SYO 3100 Family Problems and Social Change (3)

THE 2000 Introduction to Theatre for Non-Majors (3)

THE 4233 History of African-American Drama (3)

THE 4433 Gender, Race, and Performance (3)

TUT 3003 Turkish Culture and Civilization (3)

WST 3251 Women in Western Culture: Images and Realities (3)

Oral Communication Competency

Competence in oral communication is indicated by demonstrating the ability to transmit clearly ideas and information orally in a way that is appropriate to the topic, purpose, and audience. It also involves demonstrating the ability to discuss ideas clearly with others, to hear and respond to questions, and to assess critical response appropriately.

A student will satisfy the requirement for competency in oral communication in either of two ways:

  1. Petition to have prior demonstration of oral communication competency accepted in place of an approved Florida State University course. Students may petition the Office of Undergraduate Studies to have prior demonstrations of oral communication competency accepted in place of a course at Florida State University. Acceptable substitutes may include but not be limited to:
    1. A grade of “B” or above in a high school oral communication or speech class; or
    2. Verified successful participation in a forensic or debate program in high school, community college, or college; or
    3. Passing with a “C–” or higher a course in public speaking or argumentation in another college or university (including community college); or
    4. Participation for one semester on a university team in which a student’s debating skill or the creation of an original speech is judged competitively (e.g., Forensics, Moot Court, Debate Team, World Affairs); or
    5. Two years experience in a competitively-selected leadership position in a university-directed, university-sponsored organization with a substantive speaking commitment (e.g., FIG Leaders, University Ambassadors, Orientation Leaders). Administrative positions in fraternities, sororities, or student government do not meet this standard.

The need for specific oral communication skills (such as formal lecture/presentation, interviewing skills, or group dynamics) will vary from discipline to discipline, and while a minimum level of oral competency is required, means of assessing such competency must remain flexible. Thus, several courses will be identified as including basic tests of oral competency, and students passing these courses with a grade of “S” (in S/U courses) or “C–” or higher (in letter graded courses) will automatically be assumed to have completed the requirement.

  1. Earn a grade of “S” (in an S/U course) or “C–” or better (in a letter graded course) in a course which has been approved by the Undergraduate Policy Committee for oral communication competence credit:
    1. Earn a grade of “S” (in an S/U course) or “C–” or better (in a letter graded course) in a course for one to three semester hours in the major or minor that has been certified by the Undergraduate Policy Committee (UPC) as meeting the standards for oral communication competency; or
    2. Earn a grade of “C–” or better in one of the following courses: SPC 1017, Fundamentals of Speech, or SPC 2608, Public Speaking.

Regardless of the vehicle, to complete the oral communication competency the student must demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Generate an original oral message that clearly presents ideas and/or information;
  2. Make effective use of both vocal and physical delivery in the presentation;
  3. Adapt the presentation to the particular audience; and
  4. Be receptive to questions and/or criticism.

Because speaking experience must focus on generating “an original oral message” courses that emphasize the interpretation or performance of literature do not satisfy this requirement.

Currently Certified Courses:

AFR XXXX Sequence of three courses. (see the Department of Aerospace Studies for details)

CJL 4565 Courts and Social Policy (3)

CIS 4250 Ethics and Computer Science (3)

COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions (3)

ECH 2050 Chemical Engineering Communications (2)

EDG 4410 Classroom Management and Professional Issues (3)

EEL 4911C Senior Design Project I (3)

CGN 4800 Pre-Senior Design and Professional Issues (2)

AND

CGN 4802 Senior Design Project I (3)

Note: Both courses must be taken to satisfy the requirement.

EML 4551C Senior Design Project I (3)

AND

EML 4552C Senior Design Project II (3)

Note: Both courses must be taken to satisfy the requirement.

FIL 2090r Professional Communication (1)

GEB 3213 Business Communications (3)

MET 3940r Weathercasting (1)

MUE 3491 Communication Skills for the Musician: Choral (2)

AND

MUE 3495 Music Education Laboratory (1)

Note: Both courses must be taken to satisfy the requirement.

MUE 3493 Communication Skills for the Musician: Instrumental (2)

AND

MUE 3496 Music Education Laboratory (1)

Note: Both courses must be taken to satisfy the requirement.

MUY 4402 Music Therapy: Methods and Practicum II (3)

NUR 3076 Communication in Health Care (3)

NSP 4546 Substance Abuse: Effects on Health, Family, Profession (3)

PHY 3091 Communication in Physics (2)

SMT 4664 Project-Based Instruction (3)

SOW 3350 Interviewing and Recording in Social Work (3)

SPC 1017 Fundamentals of Speech (3)

SPC 2067 Communication for Arts and Design (3)

SPC 2608 Public Speaking (3)

SPC 4620 Strategic Speaking (3)

THE 2020 Introduction to Theatre for Majors (3)

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. The computer competency requirement may be satisfied in one of two ways:

  1. Earn a grade of “C–” or better in a course(s) that has been approved by the Undergraduate Policy Committee for computer skills competency in the major
  2. Have a prior course, passed with a grade of “C–” or better, certified by the student’s major department as equivalent to the courses approved for computer skills competency in the major

The specific computer competency skills needed vary from discipline to discipline, and while a minimum level of competency is required, means of assessing such competency must remain flexible. Thus, associated with each major is a required course(s) that provides instruction in the discipline-specific computer skills, and students passing this course(s) with a grade of “C–” or better will be considered to have completed the requirement. The list of required courses for each major will include at least one course flagged as satisfying the computer skills requirement. Students should check with their major department to identify the course(s) designated by the department as satisfying the computer skills competency in the major.

Through the vehicle used to satisfy the computer competency requirement, students must demonstrate

  • Competent use of a discipline-useful software package
  • The ability to perform simple transactions using the Web/Internet

College-Level Communication and Computation Competencies

The state mandates and University-wide requirements for minimum communication and computation skills apply to the rules for academic progress to be followed by students in the state universities of Florida. The statewide graduation requirements of these rules follow.

State Mandates and University-wide Requirements

Procedures. Students will satisfy the requirements of this rule by completing, with a grade of “C–” or better in each course, the liberal studies requirements in Area I (computation), Area II (English composition), and four more liberal studies courses designated by the Undergraduate Policy Committee as requiring 3,000 words of writing (courses indicated with a “W”). These requirements must be completed prior to receipt of an associate in arts certificate from Florida State University or admission to upper division. For more information, see the ‘Progression to Upper Division’ section in this chapter.

Exemptions, Waivers, and Advanced Placement. A student shall be allowed to at least partially satisfy the computation requirement through exemption in one of the following ways:

  1. By scoring appropriately on an examination administered on campus by the Department of Mathematics
  2. By obtaining a score of at least 680 on the mathematics test of the SAT or the equivalent score (30) on the mathematics test of the Enhanced ACT
  3. By satisfying College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) requirements in mathematics for post admission exemptions of coursework

Any student who has satisfied CLEP requirements in mathematics and whose high school transcript shows successful completion of higher mathematics coursework, including college algebra, trigonometry, and calculus, shall be certified as having satisfied the computation requirement, though the student may still be required to complete the computation requirement for liberal studies.

An Advanced Placement calculus score of 3 or higher will satisfy the second computation course requirement.

A student may also be allowed to satisfy the English component through one of the following methods:

  1. Students who score 650 or higher on the critical reading portion of the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT-1) or 29 or higher on the English portion of the Enhanced American College Testing Program test (ACT) will be granted three semester hours of credit equivalent to ENC 1101.
  2. For Advanced Placement (AP) scores of 3 on either English Language and Composition or English Literature and Composition a student will be awarded three semester hours of credit for ENC 1101. A score of 4 or 5 on a single exam earns the student six semester hours of credit for liberal studies and state mandates and University-wide requirements.

Transfer Credits or Correspondence Credits. Students transferring to Florida State University who have been certified by Florida State University as having completed the requirements of the Liberal Studies Program by virtue of having received the AA degree from their previous institution will be deemed to have satisfied these state mandates and University-wide requirements.

Students transferring from other institutions that come under the provision of these state mandates, but who have not received the AA degree will be deemed to have satisfied these state mandates and University-wide requirements, if the previous institution indicates, by notation on the transcript or by some other form of written certification, that the student has satisfied these state mandates before leaving that institution.

Transferring students who do not fall into either of the above categories will be required to satisfy Florida State University’s Plan for state mandates and University-wide requirements.

Courses taken by correspondence will be treated in the same manner as courses accepted for transfer.

Progression to Upper Division

For progression to upper-division status at Florida State University, a student must meet the following minimum requirements:

  1. Completion of at least fifty-two semester hours of college credit
  2. Achievement of a minimum adjusted GPA of 2.0 on all work attempted at Florida State University

Note: Some degree programs require a higher GPA for admission to upper-division status.

  1. Students who began college work prior to October 15, 1982 must complete a minimum of one-half of the required semester hours from the required liberal studies curriculum, including English composition and undergraduate mathematics (computation).
  2. Students who began their college-level work on or after October 15, 1982 must complete a minimum of one-half of the required semester hours from the liberal studies curriculum, including the completion of state mandates and University-wide requirements for specific coursework in writing and computation. A minimum grade of “C–” is required in each of the courses used to fulfill the liberal studies requirements in Area I (computation) and Area II (English composition).
  3. Acceptance by a college for admission to a degree program

Transfer from a lower-division major advisement program to an upper-division degree program is completed by the student’s baccalaureate dean after the student has declared a choice and has been declared eligible for transfer under the above requirements. Transfer from undergraduate studies directly into a baccalaureate degree program is accomplished between the Office of Undergraduate Studies and the appropriate baccalaureate dean under the same conditions.

All transfer students admitted to the University who do not meet the above requirements for admission to an upper-division degree program (except those students majoring in music, dance, or the BFA in theatre) and who have fewer than fifty-two semester hours of transferable credit will be assigned to the Division of Undergraduate Studies. Students with fifty-two or more semester hours of transferable credit will be assigned to the lower-division major advisement program under the appropriate baccalaureate dean unless they request assignment to the Division of Undergraduate Studies. Students requesting assignment to undergraduate studies must do so through the undergraduate admissions office at least one month prior to registration. All students, including transfer students, must have met the requirements for transfer from the Division of Undergraduate Studies by the time they have attempted a total of seventy-five semester hours of college work.

Transfer Among Colleges for Upper-Division Students

For an upper-division student to change colleges within the University, the student must meet the following requirements:

  1. Obtain a signed approval form from the dean of the college to which the student wishes to transfer.
  2. Obtain an approval signature on that form from the dean of the college from which the student wishes to transfer.
  3. Personally submit the original copy of the approved change form to the Office of the University Registrar.

The Associate in Arts

The Associate in Arts (AA) certificate may be granted through the Division of Undergraduate Studies to students who have completed sixty semester hours with an adjusted GPA of 2.0 or better at Florida State University and an overall 2.0 GPA on all college work attempted. A minimum of twenty of the last thirty semester hours of work must be earned in residence. Successful completion of the Liberal Studies Program with a 2.0 GPA or better is required for the AA certificate. Students beginning their college program January 1983 or later must also meet state mandates and University-wide requirements for specific coursework in writing and computation.

Students cannot apply for both an Associate in Arts certificate and a bachelor’s degree to be awarded in the same semester. Also, the Associate in Arts certificate cannot be awarded once a bachelor’s degree has been conferred.

The awarding of the AA certificate does not alter the calculation of the cumulative GPA at Florida State University. Certification for the AA certificate in no way affects the requirements of individual colleges for the completion of the major/minor for a baccalaureate degree.

Students interested in receiving the AA certificate and who are completing or have completed all the requirements listed above must officially apply at the Office of Undergraduate Studies.

Educator Preparation

Section 1004.04, Florida Statutes, Public Accountability and State Approval for Teacher Preparation Programs, and State Board of Education Rule 6A-5.066, Approval of Educator Preparation Programs, state that students planning to enroll in a teacher-education program at Florida State University must: (1) complete all University liberal studies requirements; (2) take and pass the General Knowledge portion of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam (FTCE); and (3) acquire a passing score on the Professional Knowledge and Subject Area tests of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam (FTCE) prior to the final term internship and graduation. Students must also complete: (1) specified degree prerequisites referred to in the appropriate program chapters of this General Bulletin; (2) specific admission criteria described in the “Admissions” and “College of Education” chapters of this General Bulletin; and (3) the “General Requirements” described earlier in this chapter of the General Bulletin.

Note: Students must consult with an adviser to determine how to simultaneously satisfy Florida State University’s liberal studies requirements and the teacher preparation general education core curriculum requirements.

The Baccalaureate Degree

Florida State University’s general requirements for all baccalaureate degrees (bachelor’s degrees) are listed at the beginning of this chapter under “General Requirements.”

Graduation Checks

All undergraduate students must request a graduation check from the Office of the University Registrar, Graduation Section, A3900 University Center. This check will be an overview of university requirements needed for graduation. This request should be made at the time the student has earned ninety semester hours of credit or two terms prior to the planned graduation date.

Request for a graduation check of major requirements must be made to the student’s academic dean one term prior to graduation. If a graduation check has not been requested by the time the student reaches one-hundred semester hours (hours earned plus current enrollment to equal 100), a stop will be placed on the student’s future registration.

Application for Graduation

Application for a degree must be made by the date stated in the academic calendar in this General Bulletin during the term in which the student expects to graduate. Students can apply for graduation online through Blackboard’s Secure Apps. If the student is unable to graduate at the end of the term for which application was made, he/she must reapply for the degree no later than the deadline for the next term in which he/she expects to graduate.

The Bachelor of Arts Degree

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree requires all the general criteria listed at the beginning of this section, and

  1. Completion of a classical or modern foreign language through the 2000 level (2200 or equivalent course)
  2. Nine semester hours in the fields of humanities and history, in addition to the liberal studies and the foreign language requirement; Courses may be selected from the following colleges, and departments: College of Visual Arts, Theatre and Dance; College of Music; College of Communication and Information (not including work in communication disorders or information), and the departments of Classics; English; History; Modern Languages and Linguistics; Philosophy; or Religion in the College of Arts and Sciences.

The Bachelor of Science Degree

The Bachelor of Science (BS) degree requires all the general criteria listed at the beginning of this section.

Second Baccalaureates and Second Majors

Students should note that there is a difference between a second major and a second baccalaureate degree.

Students may receive a second baccalaureate degree provided that: (1) the requirements for each major/minor as well as individual college requirements for both the first and the second degrees are satisfied; and (2) thirty semester hours in residence are completed, in addition to the hours required for the first degree. The additional thirty semester hours must be completed in residence after the completion of the first degree. Hours earned by the student during the completion of the first baccalaureate degree, over and above those extra credit hours actually required for the first degree, may not be included in the thirty semester hours. There are no liberal studies requirements for the second degree.

To obtain a second major, one must meet all requirements of the college of the primary major but only the major requirements of the secondary major. For information about the second major see ‘Second Majors and Academic Regulations’ in the “Academic Regulations and Procedures” chapter of this General Bulletin.

University policy prohibits the awarding of more than one degree from a specific degree program due to the overlap of core requirements of that degree program. Students should seek guidance from their advisers or their college when choosing to pursue a double major or dual degree. This policy applies to both current and readmitted students.

Degrees of Distinction

Three degrees of distinction are granted to graduating students based on all college-level work attempted (excluding physical education activity courses) and including the term’s work in which baccalaureate degree requirements are completed:

  • Cum Laude for an overall average of 3.500
  • Magna Cum Laude for an overall average of 3.700
  • Summa Cum Laude for an overall average of 3.900

Degrees with distinction are granted to transfer students who meet all three of the following requirements:

  1. The student must complete at this University at least forty semester hours of letter-graded work, including the final term’s work.
  2. The student must have the required grade point average on all work taken at this University.
  3. The student must have the required overall grade point average on all work attempted, including any transfer credit excluding any physical education activity courses or vocational courses, regardless of how many years have elapsed since the credit was earned. Transfer credit cannot raise a student’s Florida State University grade point average.

Graduation “With Honors”

Students who complete and successfully defend an upper-division honors thesis or equivalent honors projects (as defined by individual departments offering honors in the major) will graduate with the designation “With Honors.” Students may graduate with one of the three degrees of distinction described above and “With Honors.” The “University Honors Program and Honor Societies” chapter of this General Bulletin fully describes the Honors in the Major Program.

Policy for Awarding Degrees

The Florida State University helps students meet their academic goals by monitoring academic progress toward their degree.

If an undergraduate student has completed his or her respective degree requirements, the Academic Dean of the student’s program confirms this, and the student is eligible to be awarded the degree, the University reserves the right to award the degree. Once the degree is awarded, the student must be readmitted to Florida State University in order to enroll in any courses.

Students pursuing double majors or dual degrees must formally notify their academic dean of their intent. Undergraduate students pursuing dual degrees in different disciplines must obtain formal approval of their academic dean, following established University procedures for such approvals.

Should the University invoke its prerogative to award a degree once a student has completed all stated degree requirements, the student may appeal this decision. If the student can demonstrate that continued enrollment is necessary to achieve his or her academic goals, the appeal may be granted. Reasons such as, but not limited to, desire to continue financial aid, participate in student activities, and access student services do not constitute legitimate reasons for appeal.

Any undergraduate student who wishes to appeal for continued enrollment, thereby postponing graduation, must submit a written request to the student’s academic dean no later than ten class days after being notified that the University is invoking its right to award the degree. This appeal will be reviewed by a committee composed of the student’s primary academic dean, the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, and the University Registrar. The committee must find evidence to support the student’s claim of a legitimate academic need in order to grant permission to continue taking courses.

Once a degree has been awarded, all coursework leading to that degree is considered final and not subject to change. Grade changes or withdrawals for coursework that applies to the awarded degree may be considered only in cases of documented University error or in cases where the courses in question are documented as applying to a degree that is still in progress.