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2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Department of Biological Science

College of Arts and Sciences

Web Page: http://www.bio.fsu.edu/

Chair: Don R. Levitan; Associate Chair (Graduate Studies): Thomas A. Houpt; Associate Chair (Undergraduate Studies): Karen M. McGinnis; Associate Chair (Academic Programs): Alice A. Winn; Professors: Bass, Chase, Deng, Ellington, Erickson, D. Fadool, J. Fadool, Fajer, Gilbert, Houle, Houpt, Hughes, Inouye, Levitan, Mast, Meredith, Miller, Steppan, Tang, Taylor, Travis, Underwood, Zhu; Associate Professors: Chadwick, Cui, Dennis, DuVal, Jones, L. Keller, T. Keller, Lemmon, Lenhert, Lyons, McGinnis, Rokyta, Stroupe, Trombley, Winn, Wulff, Yu; Assistant Professors: Burgess, Feng, McCoy, M'Gonigle, Rassweiler, Yin; Professors Emeriti: Abele, Anderson, Bates, Caspar, DeBusk, deKloet, Elam, Epstein, Gaffney, Heard, Herrnkind, Homann, James, Livingston, Mariscal, Outlaw, Quadango, Reeves, Roberts, Roeder, Roux, Tschinkel

The Department of Biological Science offers an undergraduate major in biological science that includes programs of study in most contemporary areas of biology. Specific academic concentrations within the major include cell and molecular biology; ecology, evolution, and environmental biology; marine biology; physiology and neuroscience; invertebrate and vertebrate zoology; plant sciences; and pre-professional health sciences. The requirements for the baccalaureate degree in biological science include most prerequisite courses necessary for admission to medical, dental, optometry, veterinary, osteopathic, chiropractic, and other allied health professional schools.

The department also offers a major in computational biology in conjunction with the Computer Science Department. This interdisciplinary major provides a top-notch educational program for students interested in the areas of computational biology and bioinformatics. The program seeks to achieve two goals: (1) to develop an understanding of the issues associated with developing biologically meaningful computational models, and (2) to give students the broad-based education that is needed to create a set of models directed toward solving a practical biomedical problem.

In addition, students interested in marine science may complete the program in marine biology and living resource ecology.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in biological science and in biology/FSU-Teach satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in BSC 2010L.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into these upper-division degree programs:

Biology, General

  1. BSC X010/X010L or BSC X010C or BSC X040/X040L
  2. BSC X011/X011L or BSC X011C or BSC X041/X041L
  3. CHM X045/X045L or CHM X045C, or CHM X040 and CHM X041
  4. CHM X046/X046L or CHM X046C
  5. CHM X210/X210L and CHM X211/X211L, or CHM X210C and CHM X211C, or PHY X053/X053L and PHY X054/X054L, or PHY X048/X048L and PHY X049/X049L
  6. MAC X311 or MAC X233 or MAC X253 or MAC X281 or MAC X241
  7. MAC X312 or MAC X282 or MAC X234 or STA X023 or STA X024 or STA X321

Biology, General FSU-Teach

  1. BSC X010/X010L or BSC X010C or BSC X040/X040L
  2. BSC X011/X011L or BSC X011C or BSC X041/X041L
  3. CHM X045/X045L or CHM X045C, or CHM X040 and CHM X041
  4. CHM X046/X046L or CHM X046C
  5. CHM X210/X210L and CHM X211/X211L, or CHM X210C and CHM X211C, or PHY X053/X053L and PHY X054/X054L, or PHY X048/X048L and PHY X049/X049L
  6. MAC X311 or MAC X233 or MAC X253 or MAC X281 or MAC X241
  7. MAC X312 or MAC X282 or MAC X234 or STA X023 or STA X024 or STA X321
  8. SMT X043
  9. SMT X053

Note: Transfer students will be able to take SMT X043 and SMT X053 while enrolled in upper division.

Computational Biology

  1. BSC X010 or BSC X040 or PCB X011
  2. BSC X011 or BSC X041
  3. CHM X045/X045L or CHM X045C, or CHM X040 and CHM X041
  4. CHM X046/X056L or CHM X056C
  5. PHY X048/X048L or PHY X053/X053L
  6. PHY X049/X049L or PHY X054/X054L
  7. MAC X311
  8. MACX312

Requirements for a Major in Biological Science

Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the "College of Arts and Sciences" chapter of this General Bulletin.

  1. Prerequisites for Upper-Division Biological Science Courses:
    Registration in all 3000- and 4000-level biological science courses is allowed only after meeting the following criteria:
    1. Satisfactory completion ("C–" or better) of BSC 2010/L (Biological Science I with lab) and BSC 2011/L (Biological Science II with lab)
    2. Satisfactory completion ("C–" or better) of CHM 1045/L and CHM 1046/L or CHM 1050/L and CHM 1051/L (General Chemistry I and II with labs)
    3. A minimum combined 2.0 GPA in all biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and statistics courses, and their prerequisites, that are applicable to the major, from any institution attended.
  2. Academic Performance:
    1. All courses applicable to the major, including biological science, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and statistics must be completed with a grade of "C–" or better;
    2. Designation, continuation, and graduation as a biological science major requires a minimum combined 2.0 GPA in all courses taken for the major from any institution, including biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and statistics, and their prerequisites;
    3. A biological science major who applies for readmission to the college must meet the biological science degree requirements of the catalog in force on the date of readmission.
  3. D/F Policy:
    1. A student who has accumulated more than one grade below a "C–" (U, F, D–,D, D+) prior to completing the prerequisite courses required for upper-division status (CHM 1045 and lab, CHM 1046 and lab, BSC 2010 and lab, BSC 2011 and lab) in courses required for the major in biological science (biological science, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and statistics) and their prerequisites at Florida State University or elsewhere, whether or not repeated, will not be permitted to graduate from Florida State University with a degree in biological science;
    2. A student who has completed the prerequisite courses required for upper-division status (CHM 1045 and lab, CHM 1046 and lab, BSC 2010 and lab, BSC 2011 and lab) and earned more than three unsatisfactory grades (U, F, D–, D, D+) in courses required for the major in biological science (biological science, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and statistics) and their prerequisites at Florida State University or elsewhere, whether or not repeated, will not be permitted to graduate from Florida State University with a degree in biological science.
  4. Co-op and Transient Study:
    Florida State University biological science majors who intend to take courses for the major (biological science, chemistry, physics, mathematics, statistics) at other institutions must receive approval from the Department of Biological Science Academic Advising Office prior to enrollment. This policy applies to courses taken as part of the FAMU–FSU and TCC–FSU co-op programs, as well as courses taken elsewhere.
  5. Required Courses in Biological Science:
    Thirty-eight semester hours of biological science coursework are required for the degree. At least twenty of the required semester hours must be taken in residence at Florida State University. The following shall be included in the thirty-eight semester hours:
    1. Eight semester hours (prerequisite to all major coursework in biology): BSC 2010/2010L, 2011/2011L
    2. PCB 3063 General Genetics (3)
    3. PCB 3134 Cell Structure and Function and/or BSC 3016 Eukaryotic Diversity (3)
    4. BSC 3402L Experimental Biology Laboratory (3)
    5. PCB 4674 Evolution (3)
    6. At least one course from two of the three areas:

      Area I: Cell and Molecular Biology

      MCB 4403 Prokaryotic Biology (3)

      PCB 3134 Cell Structure and Function (3)

      PCB 4024 Molecular Biology (3)

      PCB 4253 Animal Development (3)

      Area II: Physiology

      PCB 4701 Human Physiology (3)

      PCB 4843 Fundamentals of Neuroscience (3)

      Area III: Ecology and Environmental Science

      BSC 3052 Conservation Biology (3)

      PCB 3043 General Ecology (3)

      ZOO 4513 Animal Behavior (4)

    7. Additional courses for major credit at the 3000 or 4000 level to complete the thirty-eight semester hour requirement. No more than six semester hours of honors work in biological science (BSC 4970r), six semester hours of directed individual study (BSC 4900r), four semester hours of internship (BSC 4941r), one semester hour of undergraduate supervised teaching (BSC 4945), and two semester hours of senior tutorial (BSC 4931r) can be used to meet the thirty-eight hour requirement
    8. Completion of at least five biology laboratory/field courses (the letter "C" listed after the course number indicates that the course is a lecture and a lab/field combined, and the letter "L" indicates the course is a laboratory or field course).
  6. Required Courses in Collateral Areas:
    1. General Chemistry: Two semesters of general chemistry with laboratory equivalent to CHM 1045/L plus CHM 1046/L or CHM 1050/L plus CHM 1051/L.
    2. Organic Chemistry and Physics: Students are required to take either two semesters or organic chemistry (equivalent to CHM 2210 and 2211 or CHM 3217 and CHM 3218) and one semester of physics or two semester of physics and one semester of organic chemistry (CHM 2210 or CHM 3217). The acceptable physics courses are general physics with laboratories equivalent to PHY 2048C and 2049C (prerequisite of MAC 2311) or PHY 2053c and 2045c (prerequisite are MAC 1114 and MAC 1140) Many health professions programs require two semester of both organic chemistry and physic and also require CHM 2211L (Organic Chemistry II Laboratory), BCH 4053 (General Biochemistry I), and BCH 4054 (General Biochemistry II), which do not apply to the major.
    3. Mathematics/Statistics: Either two semesters of calculus with analytical geometry equivalent to MAC 2311 and MAC 2312, or MAC 2311 and STA 2171, or MAC 2311 and COP 3014.
  7. Exit Survey:
    All seniors must complete the online exit survey in the semester in which they plan to graduate. For details, contact an advisor in the Biological Science Academic Advising Office.
  8. Minor:
    The required collateral courses in chemistry constitute a chemistry minor and fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a minor if two semesters of organic chemistry are taken; students who elect to take two semesters of physics and one of organic will fulfill an interdisciplinary science minor. Students may select other minors in consultation with an advisor.

Honors in the Major in Marine Biology Program

Biological Science majors who are interested in the Honors in the Major in Marine Biology Program may apply if they have completed at least sixty credit hours with at least a 3.2 cumulative GPA on all coursework and at least a 3.2 GPA in the required introductory biology courses, BSC 2010 and BSC 2011, and their labs. Students typically apply at the end of their sophomore year, choose a research topic by the end of their junior year, and complete an honors thesis by the end of their senior year. Those interested in the program should visit an academic advisor for more information or contact Dr. Janie Wulff, the program director.

Honors in the Major

The Department of Biological Science offers a program in honors in the major to encourage talented juniors and seniors to undertake independent and original research as part of the undergraduate experience. For requirements and other information, see the "University Honors Office and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin.

FSU-Teach Program in Science Teaching

For those interested in teaching Biological Science, FSU-Teach is an innovative approach to teacher education that involves a collaboration between scientists, mathematicians, and education faculty at Florida State University. In this program, students develop deep science or mathematics knowledge and the skill and experience needed to be an effective science or math teacher. FSU-Teach pays for tuition for the first two courses (Step 1 and Step 2). Work study positions with scientists, mathematicians and local schools are available.

Prerequisites for admission to the Biological Science/FSU-Teach major are the same as the prerequisites for the Biological Science major. The program is a double-major only curriculum requiring students to complete a primary major in Biological Science in addition to a secondary major in Science and Mathematics Teaching. The discipline area has a special track for FSU-Teach majors enabling students to complete the double major in four years.

The program culminates with conferral of the baccalaureate degree with two majors and all coursework and state testing requirements for initial Florida teacher certification. Note that students seeking certification must be formally admitted to the School of Teacher Education and meet all of the requirements for pursuing a state-approved program. For information regarding the requirements for the second major in Science and Mathematics Teaching, please see the chapter in this General Bulletin for School of Teacher Education. For additional information, see our Web site: http://FSU-Teach.fsu.edu.

Program in Computational Biology

Computational biology is a new and promising field of study. The purpose of the interdisciplinary major is to provide a top-notch educational program for students interested in the areas of computational biology and bioinformatics. The program seeks to achieve two goals: 1) to develop an understanding of the issues associated with developing biological meaningful computational models, and 2) to give students the broad-based educational that is needed to create a set of models directed towards solving a practical biomedical problem. This major is offered through both the Biological Science and Computer Science departments. Students in the program should be sure to consult with the advisors in their home department to make sure they are taking the correct courses in the correct sequence.

Requirements for a Major in Computational Biology

  1. Required Biological Science Courses (seventeen hours)

    BSC 2010 and BSC 2010L Biological Science 1 (3) and Lab (1)

    BSC 2011 and BSC 2011L Biological Science II (3) and Lab (1)

    PCB 3063 Genetics (3)

    PCB 4674 Evolution (3)

    • Three additional hours of biological science courses selected from: BSC 4900, MCB 4403/L, PCB 3134, PCB 3743, PCB 4024, PCB 4233, PCB 4253 or PCB 4843.
  2. Required Scientific Computing Courses (twenty-one hours)

    ISC 3222 Symbolic and Numerical Computations (3)

    ISC 3313 Introduction to Scientific Computing (3)

    ISC 4220C Algorithms for Scientific Applications I (4)

    ISC 4221C Algorithms for Scientific Applications II (4)

    ISC 4304C Programming for Scientific Applications (4)

    ISC 4933r Selected Topics in Computational Science (Introduction for Bioinformatics) (3)

  3. Required Research Experience: ISC 4943r or BSC 4900 (four hours each in two semesters)
  4. Additional Elective Courses (five hours)
    • Five additional hours chose from Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics or Statistics.
    • Physics and Scientific Computing selected from: CDA 3101, COP 4531, COP 4710, COT 4420, and CIS 4900, MAC 2313, MAP 4881, STA 4103, STA 4202, STA 4203, STA 4442, STA 4502, and STA 47012, CHM 1045L, CHM 1046L, PHY 2054C, PHY 2049C, ISC 4223, ISC 4232.
    • Collateral Courses (twenty-four hours)
    • All collateral course must be completed with a grade of C- or better.
    • Mathematics/Statistics (fourteen hours)

    MAC 2311 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (4)

    MAC 2312 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (4)

    MAD 2104 Discrete Mathematics I (3)

    STA 2171 Statistics for Biology (4)

    • Chemistry (six hours)

    CHM 1045 General Chemistry I (3)

    CHM 1046 General Chemistry II (3)

    • Physics (four hours)

    PHY 2053C College Physics A (4)

    • Computer Skills Competency (zero hours beyond major)

    ISC 3313 (3)

Graduate Study

The Department of Biological Science offers work leading to the Master of Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees; consult the Graduate Bulletin for details.

Requirements for a Minor in Biological Science

A minimum of twelve semester hours of biological science courses approved for major credit, including BSC 2010/L and BSC 2011/L plus at least four credit hours of additional upper division biological science course work. No more than one credit hours of S/U graded course work can be counted toward the minor. A minimum of four semester hours of the twelve semester hours must be taken at Florida State University. Grades below "C–" will not be accepted for minor credit.

Definition of Prefixes

BCH—Biochemistry (Biophysics)

BOT—Botany

BSC—Biological Sciences

IFS—Interdisciplinary Florida State University Courses

ISC—Interdisciplinary Sciences

MCB—Microbiology

PCB—Process Biology (Cell/Molecular/Ecology/Genetics/Physiology)

PSB—Psychobiology

SCE—Science Education

ZOO—Zoology

Undergraduate Courses

Courses Not for Major or Minor Credit

BSC 1005. General Biology for Nonmajors (3). This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.

BSC 1005L. General Biology Laboratory for Nonmajors (1). This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.

BSC 1005C. General Biology for Nonmajors (4).

BSC 2085. Anatomy and Physiology I (3). This course is the first of a two-semester human anatomy/physiology sequence emphasizing the cell, stimulus-response concept, and the skeletal-muscular and first half of the nervous systems.

BSC 2085L. Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory (1). Corequisite: BSC 2085. This course is the first of two-semester human anatomy/physiology sequence emphasizing the cell, stimulus-response concept, and the skeletal-muscular and first half of the nervous systems.

BSC 2086. Anatomy and Physiology II (3). Prerequisite: BSC 2085 or instructor permission. This course is a continuation of a two-semester human anatomy/physiology sequence beginning with the second half of the nervous system, then continuing with endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems. Also included are fluid-electrolyte balance and immunity.

BSC 2086L. Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory (1). Corequisite: BSC 2086. This lab focuses on sensory and organ systems found in the human body. Physiology of the sensory and organ systems are explored with lab activities and computer simulated experiments.

IFS 2081. Busting Common Biology Myths (3). This course explores areas of biology popularized in the media, politics and global health policies. Students determine strengths and weaknesses of opposing arguments of controversial current biological issues using information found in the scientific literature to support or critique positions. Popular biological issues such as pros and cons of vaccination, the use of stem cells, or the dangers of genetically modified organisms are studied.

IFS 2082. The Ecology of Food (3). This course explores the basic ecology of agriculture and fisheries and considers how conventional and alternative food-production practices generate and solve ecological problems. The course focuses on several major current issues (e.g. genetically modified organisms, pollinator declines, organic agriculture, and fisheries), and for each students learn the science behind the issue and the social forces shaping the problem. Students also learn through discussions of scientific and popular writings, lectures, hands-on and written projects, oral presentations, local speakers and field trips.

IFS 2105. Evolution, Medicine, Evidence (3). This course introduces the study of evolution as it applies to the practice of medicine. Students investigate what constitutes scientific evidence, how to use evidence, the evidence concerning biological evolution, and the implications of evolution for the practice of medicine.

IFS 2117. Genetics in Society (3). This course is intended to help students understand the science behind major issues that are likely to evolve into increasingly important moral, political, and public policy decisions in their lifetime. Topics are discussed such as: choosing the sex or genetic composition of children, human cloning, rebuilding defective organs and tissues from stem cells, and altering genetic constitution.

IFS 2119. Biotechnology: Impact of Life Sciences on Society (3). This course addresses the important impacts that new biotechnological innovations have on society. Using examples from genetically modified crops to advances in personalized medicine, students explore the scientific bases of emerging biotechnologies and compare the scientific data with societal perception and acceptance.

IFS 3044. Living Green, Theory to Action (3). This course examines environmental issues, the three "E"s of sustainability (ecology, equity, and equality), ways to integrate sustainability into infrastructures and social structures, and practical solutions and skills for making personal and professional decisions that support living a sustainable life.

IFS 3092. Broken Clocks and Disrupted Sleep: Impacts of Technology (3). This course explores the impact of changing technology on circadian rhythms and sleep patterns and the consequences to human health. The course is suitable for all majors.

ISC 3076. Science, Technology, and Society (3). Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor permission. This course examines interrelations among science, technology, and society. Science is considered as an enterprise in modern society that produces technological advances and new perspectives on reality. This course cannot be used as credit toward a major or a minor in a science department.

ISC 4420. Introduction to Bioinformatics (4). This course provides a quantitative framework for understanding how the genomic sequence and its variations affect the phenotype. The course is designed for biologists and biochemists seeking to improve quantitative data interpretation skills, and for mathematicians, computer scientists and other quantitative scientists seeking to learn more about computational biology. Lab exercises are designed to reinforce the classroom learning.

MCB 2004. Microbiology for Health Services (3). Corequisite: MCB 2004L. This course covers microbiology for students planning careers in the health services, with emphasis on infectious disease, food microbiology, and public health.

MCB 2004L. Microbiology for the Health Services Laboratory (1). Corequisite: MCB 2004. This course covers microbiological techniques including the isolation, typing, and identification of bacteria, properties of pathogenic bacteria, and food microbiology.

PCB 2099. Human Physiology (3). This course surveys the major systems and their regulation in normal function and disease in the human body.

SCE 4939r. Seminar in Contemporary Science, Mathematics, and Science Education (1). This course includes presentations of contemporary and interesting issues in science, mathematics, or teaching methods. Content varies from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

Courses for Major Credit

Note: All 3000- and 4000-level biological science courses, except BSC 3938 and BSC 3930, have the following minimum prerequisites: BSC 2010/L, 2011/L; CHM 1045/L and 1046/L. Additional prerequisites, if any, are included in the course listing.

Botany

BOT 3015. Plant Biology (2). This course is an introduction to evolutionary relationships, natural history, ecological adaptations, and physiology of plants, fungi, autotrophic protista, and prokaryotes.

BOT 3015L. Plant Biology Laboratory (1). Pre- or corequisite: BOT 3016. This lab explores anatomy, development, and morphology and life cycles of autotrophs and fungi and other osmotrophs.

BOT 3143C. Field Botany (4). This course is an introduction to plant taxonomy with emphasis on laboratory and field study. Orientation to principles of identification, classification, and rules of botanical nomenclature.

BOT 4394. Plant Molecular Biology (3). Prerequisite: BOT 3015. Pre- or corequisite: PCB 3063. This course explores molecular biology and biotechnology of plant growth and development.

BOT 4503L. Plant Physiology Laboratory (1). Prerequisite: BOT 3015.

Biological Science

BSC 1100. Natural History, Biodiversity, and the Growth of Evolutionary Thought (3). This course explores Darwin's world and demonstrates why this statement is even more apt today: The foundation for all of modern biology is evolution, and evolutionary thought stands out from other important scientific principles by the way in which it transformed how science and the society in general view the natural world. This course traces the origins of biological thought from the explosion of discoveries about biological diversity arising from the Age of Exploration by northern European countries, especially the UK, the early development of natural history as a field and specifically of natural history museums as a repository of those discoveries, and how these museums and global exploration set the stage for the intellectual transformation that followed.

BSC 2010. Biological Science I (3). This is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.

BSC 2010L. Biological Science I Laboratory (1). This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.

BSC 2011. Biological Science II (3). Prerequisite: BSC 2010. This is the second of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides an overview of the processes underlying the animal embryonic development, inheritance genetics, evolution and ecology.

BSC 2011L. Biological Science II Lab (1). Prerequisites: BSC 2010 and BSC 2010L. Corequisite: BSC 2011. This course focuses on reproduction and development, transmission (Mendelian) genetics, population biology, ecology, and evolution.

BSC 3016. Eukaryotic Diversity (3). This course provides an overview of the diversity of eukaryotic organisms (protists, plants, fungi and animals), the evolutionary origin of this diversity, and its societal relevance. Comparisons of exemplar organisms are used to illustrate broad themes in the anatomy, physiology, behavior, life cycles, and ecologies of all eukaryotes.

BSC 3052. Conservation Biology (3). This course focuses on the history of the conservation movement, the research on populations of animals and plants that is relevant to man's impact upon the environment, pollution in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, endangered species, government regulation, and sustainable development.

BSC 3312. Marine Biology (3). This course explores marine geology, chemistry of the oceans, oceanic circulation, oceanographic techniques, the marine environment and marine life.

BSC 3402L. Experimental Biology Laboratory (3). This course if limited to Biological Science majors. This course is designed to teach students about the process of biological research. Each section of the course is organized around a particular biological concept. The focus in this course is two-fold. First, students are provided with basic background in the field of study. This is done through lab work and lecture. Students are provided with documents to help them with their work. Second, and more important, is the development of skills in biological research. The skills are developed in laboratory and lecture exercises as well as outside of class assignments, culminating in an independent research project, which they present both orally and in writing. This course meets the University's Oral Communication Competency Requirement, and the Upper Division Writing Requirement. Developing oral and written communication skills are major components of this course.

BSC 3930. Seminar in Biological Frontiers (1). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisites: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, and BSC 2011L. This course is a weekly seminar covering topics in biological research. Not repeatable for credit toward major requirements.

BSC 3938. Careers in the Biological Sciences (1). (S/U grade only.) This course is intended for biology sciences majors at any point in their undergraduate career, but is most beneficial to those in their first three years. Career options in biology-related fields (including health professions) and the preparation they require are presented for students planning to immediately enter the job market or to continue their academic careers upon graduation. Not repeatable for credit toward major requirements.

BSC 3949r. Experiential Learning (0). (S/U grade only.) This non-credit, experiential learning course offers students an opportunity to gain "real world" on-the-job work experience related to a specific academic field of study. Students must register for this course through the FSU Career Center.

BSC 4424. Nanotechnology (3). Students are provided with the basic understanding of the relevant aspects of biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, and business to follow a typical lecture at an interdisciplinary nanotechnology conference and/or work in a small nanotechnology start-up company. Specific nanotechnologies, both real and imagined, are discussed in the context of scientific papers, patent literature, and popular media. Examples of topics include lithography, synthetic nanomaterial, and bionanotechnology. Emphasis is placed on industrial implications in computing and communications, medicine, materials, and other topics of interest to the interdisciplinary students.

BSC 4473C. Introduction to Scientific Diving (3). Prerequisites: Open water diver certified by national organization, clear diving medical exam, ability to pass swimming evaluation. This course is designed for the scientist or scientist in training who plans to use SCUBA diving as a tool for underwater research. Skills covered include dive planning, emergency management, underwater navigation, survey techniques, and instrument deployment and recovery.

BSC 4613. Systematics (3). This course explores the history of systematic theory; methods of phylogenetic analysis including distance, parsimony, and likelihood; classification of the diversity of life; the comparative method; analysis of within species variation.

BSC 4821C. Biogeography (4). This course emphasizes ecological and evolutionary biogeography, the physical processes and organismal characteristics that determine distributions, and the analytical methods used to describe distributions and test processes. Geographic data sets are analyzed in lab sessions to search for patterns and test hypotheses with the scientific method.

BSC 4881. Mathematics in Biology (4). Pre- or corequisite: BSC 2010, BSC 2011, AND MAC 2311. In this course, the student will learn how to formulate biological questions as mathematical models and then to develop and analyze these mathematical models. The focus will be on ecological, evolutionary, and epidemiological models. However, other topics will be covered (e.g., demography) and the skills learned are transferable to a much wider array of topics. By the end of the course, the student will be familiar and comfortable with types of models that they will encounter in the primary literature.

BSC 4900r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). Prerequisites: A combined 3.0 GPA in biology, chemistry, physics, math, and statistics courses applied to the major; permission from a biological science instructor; and Department of Biological Science Advising Office permission. This course is a supervised study of a special topic or research participation in the area of the faculty member's research. Graduate students may not register for this course. A maximum of six semester hours may be applied to biological science major credit. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

BSC 4901. Directed Individual Study (0). Pre- or corequisite: BSC 4900. In this course, students communicate the results of their research in writing or through an oral presentation.

BSC 4910. Directed Independent Study (0). (S/U grade only.) Pre- or corequisite: BSC 4900. In this course, students communicate the results of their research in writing or through an oral presentation.

BSC 4931r. Senior Tutorial in Biological Science (1). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Senior standing. This course focuses on selected topics in contemporary biological science; maximum enrollment of five students in each tutorial. May be repeated to a maximum of two hours

BSC 4933r. Selected Topics in Biological Science (1–4). Prerequisites: Courses as specified and junior or senior standing. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

BSC 4933Lr. Selected Topics in Biological Science Lab (1–4). Prerequisites: Courses as specified and junior or senior standing. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

BSC 4934r. Selected Topics in Applied Biology (1–4). (S/U grade only.) Some sections are not for major credit. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

BSC 4937. Seminar in Living Marine Resource Ecology (1). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This seminar course in marine resource ecology is designed to introduce students to a broad array of current research priorities and interests in marine ecology. Students have the opportunity to meet with resource managers and scientists from both the biological and social fields. Lecture topics range from life history studies of marine fish to the economic consequences of marine policy.

BSC 4940. Research Internship in Marine Biology (3–9). Prerequisites: PCB 3043, junior or senior standing, 3.0 GPA in biology, a course in the area of research, and associate chair written permission. This course is a special supervised study in marine biology at the National Marine Fisheries Services Laboratory in Panama City, the Mote Marine Laboratory, or other approved location. Students may receive up to nine semester hours of credit, of which four semester hours would apply to the biological science major. Offered during the Summer only.

BSC 4941r. Internship in Biological Science (1–4). (S/U grade only) Prerequisites: In addition to the required introductory courses in biology and chemistry, junior or senior standing, a 3.0 or greater GPA in biology, and permission of the Associate Chair of Undergraduate Studies. This internship course is designed for majors in the department of Biological Science who wish to gain real world experience in their field of interest through on-the-job practice and have this experience reflected on their transcript. Students work under the supervision of an approved professional in the field of biological science with oversight by the Associate Chair of Undergraduate Studies. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours, but only four hours may count towards the major.

BSC 4942. Internship in Biological Science (0). Pre- and corequisite: BSC 4941. This internship course is designed for majors in the department of Biological Science who wish to gain real world experience in their field of interest through on-the-job practice and have this experience reflected on their transcript. Students work under the supervision of an approved professional in the field of biological science with oversight by the Associate Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

BSC 4945. Undergraduate Supervised Teaching (1). Prerequisites: Senior standing and instructor permission. In this course, students serve as Laboratory Assistants in BSC 1005L or as Tutors in BSC 2010 or BSC 2011, or BSC 1005. Students also receive training in interactive techniques and use this training to lead classroom discussions and interactive exam review sessions.

BSC 4970r. Honors Work in Biological Science (1–6). Prerequisite: Admission to the department's honors-in-the-major program. This course involves participation in a supervised research problem. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours, of which six semester hours may be applied to biological science major credit.

Microbiology

MCB 4403. Prokaryotic Biology (3). Prerequisites: CHM 2210 and PCB 3063. Corequisite: MCB 4403L. This course covers structural and functional characteristics of microorganisms, with emphasis on prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea) and viruses. Topics include: prokaryotic cell structure and function, physiology and genetics of prokaryotes and viruses, physiological and molecular aspects of microorganisms and human disease, and biotechnological applications of microbial physiology (environmental, food, and industrial microbiology).

MCB 4403L. Prokaryotic Biology Laboratory (2). This course covers laboratory methods for growth, handling, and study of prokaryotes and other types of microorganisms. Topics include: aseptic technique and isolation of pure cultures; microscopic methods; effects of environment on growth; viruses; physiological characterization methods; and methods related to medical, environmental, and food microbiology.

Process Biology

PCB 3043. General Ecology (3). This course focuses on topics such as: population biology; population growth; community processes, succession, nutrient cycling, and energy flow; species interactions; ecological efficiency; and biogeographical ecology.

PCB 3043L. Lab for Ecology (2). Pre- or corequisite: PCB 3043. In this course, topics covered include quantifying populations and population growth; species interactions such as competition, predation, and mutualisms; documenting community patterns against gradients; adaptation and traits of species; habitat use, movement and species ranges; natural history of local habitats.

PCB 3063. General Genetics (3). This course is an introduction to the principles of transmission and molecular genetics of prokaryotes and eukaryotes and significance of these principles to other aspects of biological science.

PCB 3134. Cell Structure and Function (3). This course focuses on topics such as: cellular chemistry and physiology, morphology, and function of cellular organelles; and cellular motility, growth, division, communication, and regulation.

PCB 3743. Vertebrate Physiology (3). This course studies physiological systems of vertebrates with emphasis on mammals. Mechanisms underlying physiological processes and the physico-chemical principles upon which they depend are also studied.

PCB 4022C. Intensive Modern Molecular Biology (4). Prerequisites: PCB 3063 and PCB 4024. This course teaches modern molecular biology methods in a cohesive single project. Working with a single gene, students design overexpressing clones to be transfected into human cells. Additionally, using CRISPR gene editing, students knock that gene out of cells. RNA is isolated from each experiment and full transcriptomes are sequenced and analyzed.

PCB 4024. Molecular Biology (3). Prerequisite: PCB 3063 and PCB 3134 is recommended, but not required. This course studies the molecular basis of cellular function with emphasis on the activities of DNA, RNA, and the regulation of gene expression.

PCB 4024L. Molecular Biology Laboratory (1). Corequisite: PCB 4024.

PCB 4109. The Genetic Basis of Cancer (3). Prerequisite: PCB 3063. This course introduces students to a range of cancer related topics from the cancer related mutations and signaling pathways to the cutting-edge research that offers attractive development for new anti-cancer drugs and therapeutic strategies. From tumor inducing viruses to multi-steps of tumorigensis, students learn the history of cancer and how it has shaped contemporary research.

PCB 4233. Immunology (3). Prerequisites: CHM 2210, PCB 3063, PCB 3134, or instructor permission. This course analyzes the tissues, cells, and molecules of the immune system and their relationships to disease and transplantation.

PCB 4233L. Laboratory in Immunology (1). Prerequisites: PCB 3063, PCB 3134, and CHM 2210. Corequisite: PCB 4233. This course analyzes the tissues, cells, and molecules of the immune system and their relationships to disease and transplantation.

PCB 4244. Biology of Aging (3). Prerequisite: PCB 3063. This course provides an introduction to multi-disciplinary questions and approaches in the biology of aging. Both ultimate (evolutionary) and proximate (molecular, physiological) mechanisms are discussed, and the interrelationship between these kinds of explanations are explored. The course emphasizes learning to read and evaluate the primary research literature focused on biological studies of age.

PCB 4253. Developmental Biology (3). Prerequisite: PCB 3063. This course discusses a number of topics, including fertilization, early embryonic events, organogenesis, differentiation, morphogenesis, cytoplasmic localization, determination, and differential gene expression.

PCB 4253L. Developmental Biology Laboratory (3). Prerequisite: PCB 3063. Corequisite: PCB 4253. This lab combines lecture and laboratory experiments regarding sea urchin fertilization, frog and chick early development, gene expression, cell-cell interactions, and metamorphosis.

PCB 4402. Ecology of Infectious Disease (1). Prerequisites: BSC 2010, BSC 2011, and MAC 2311. This course explores how concepts and tools of basic ecology can and have been used to understand the dynamics of infectious disease, and contribute to our ability to predict, prevent, and control disease outbreaks. Students consider diseases of humans and their domesticated plants and animals, as well as the role of disease in natural systems. Students are also expected to read extensively in the primary literature, and to contribute to regular class activities and discussions as well as research and present information on specialized topics such as the role of conservation corridors in the spread of disease, possible responses to pandemics and bioterrorism, and identification of sources of emerging diseases.

PCB 4674. Evolution (3). Prerequisites: PCB 3063 and senior standing. This course places emphasis on the processes of evolution: origin of life, theories of evolution, sources of variation, natural selection, population systems, isolating mechanisms, evolution above the species level.

PCB 4701. Human Physiology (3). Pre- or corequisites: PCB 3063 or PCB 3134. This course covers the human nervous system, special sensory organ systems, the central nervous system, the muscle and skeletal systems, the heart and circulatory system, the respiratory system, the urinary and digestive systems, the endocrine system, and reproduction. Cellular mechanisms underlying the homeostatic regulation of each organ system are studied in the context of clinical impacts based upon diseases. For example, Muscular Dystrophy, diabetes mellitus, cardiac arrhythmias, cardiovascular disease, renal failure, pulmonary disease, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, metabolic disorders, or infertility.

PCB 4723. General and Comparative Animal Physiology (3). Prerequisite: CHM 2210. This course studies the physiological and biochemical interactions of animals with their respective environments. Emphasis on non-mammalian vertebrate and invertebrate systems.

PCB 4843. Fundamentals of Neuroscience (3). Prerequisite: PCB 3134 and PCB 3743 or PCB 4701. This course emphasizes cellular and molecular approaches to neuroscience and brain function and emphasizes simple model systems including invertebrates.

Zoology

ZOO 3141L. Animal Diversity Laboratory (3). Prerequisite: BSC 3016. This introductory zoology laboratory course provides an overview of the diversity of animal form and function through comparisons of exemplar organisms representing the major animal phyla. Students are expected to dissect preserved specimens and to make detailed observations of both live (invertebrate) and preserved animals. Students develop critical zoological laboratory skills in dissection, the correct use of both compound and dissecting microscopes, the ability to carefully observe and draw specimens and images from microscope slides, and the application of their knowledge on laboratory practicals. Outside assignments allow students to recognize the diversity among our local fauna. The knowledge and skills gained from this course provide a solid foundation for more specialized studies in animal biology.

ZOO 3205. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology (2). Prerequisite: BSC 3312 and ZOO 3141L. Corequisite: ZOO 3205L. This course focuses on the structure, function, behavior, and evolution of the invertebrate phyla, especially those taxa living in the sea.

ZOO 3205L. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory (2). Prerequisite: PCB 3034, PCB 3063, ZOO 3713C, or instructor permission. Corequisite: ZOO 3205. This laboratory deals with the structure, function, behavior and ecology of the invertebrate phyla, especially those taxa living in the sea.

ZOO 3713C. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (4). This course emphasizes form and function and origin and evolution of structure.

ZOO 4204C. Biology of Higher Marine Invertebrates (5). Prerequisite: BSC 3312, PCB 3043, ZOO 3205, or ZOO 3205L. This course focuses on the biological specializations of crustaceans, mollusks, and echinoderms, including life history, behavior, ecology, biomechanics, and environmental adaptations.

ZOO 4343C. Biology of the Lower Vertebrates (4). This course explores the systematics, ecology, and evolution of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles.

ZOO 4353C. Biology of Higher Vertebrates (4). (Omithology) This course covers the systematics, ecology, and evolution of birds and mammals.

ZOO 4454C. Biology of Fishes (4). This course provides an overview of the systematics, morphology, ecology, behavior, physiology, and life history of the most diverse group of vertebrates on earth, the fishes. It includes conservation and management issues and laboratory exercises balanced with field trips to different northwest Florida habitats, including freshwater springs, salt marshes, seagrass beds, and offshore reefs.

ZOO 4513. Animal Behavior (4). This course discusses modern perspectives of the behavior of animals.

ZOO 4753C. Histology (4). Prerequisite: PCB 3134. This course explores the microscopic anatomy and functions of the cells, tissues, and glands composing the organs and systems of humans.

ZOO 4823. Insect Biology (3). This course discusses the morphology, classification, natural history, physiology, and evolution of insects.

ZOO 4823L. Insect Diversity of North Florida (2). Prerequisite: MAC 2311. Pre- or corequisite: ZOO 4823. This course includes topics such as: collection, keying, and curation of local insects.

Graduate Courses

Biochemistry

BCH 5886r. Special Topics in Biochemistry and Cell Biology (1–3).

BCH 5887r. Special Topics in Biochemistry and Cell Biology (1–3).

Botany

BOT 5505. Plant Physiology (3).

BOT 5938r. Selected Topics in Botany (1–4).

BOT 6936r. Seminar in Botany (2). (S/U grade only.)

Biological Science

BSC 5409. Biophysical Principles of Biological Techniques (3).

BSC 5476C. Introduction to Scientific Diving (3).

BSC 5900r. Directed Individual Study (1–12). (S/U grade only.)

BSC 5932r. Graduate Tutorial in Biological Science (1). (S/U grade only.)

BSC 5936r. Selected Topics in Biological Science (1–4).

BSC 5945r. Supervised Teaching (1–2). (S/U grade only.)

BSC 6921r. Colloquium in Biological Science (1). (S/U grade only.)

Secondary Science Teaching

ISC 5098. Reflective Science Teaching (2).

ISC 5525. Accomplished Practices in Science Teaching (2).

ISC 5535. Research in the Content Area for Teachers (6).

ISC 5944. Ethics, School Law, and Management of Science Classrooms (3).

ISC 5945. Full-Time Teaching Internship (6). (S/U grade only.)

ISC 5946. Half-Time Teaching Internship (3). (S/U grade only.)

ISC 8939. Portfolio Review (0). (S/U grade only.)

Microbiology

MCB 5408. Prokaryotic Biology (3).

MCB 5505. Virology (3).

MCB 5936r. Selected Topics in Microbiology (1–4).

Process Biology

PCB 5029C. Intensive Modern Molecular Biology (4).

PCB 5137. Advanced Cell Biology (3).

PCB 5425. Population Ecology (3).

PCB 5447. Community Ecology (3).

PCB 5525. Molecular Biology (3).

PCB 5595. Advanced Molecular Biology (3).

PCB 5615. Ecological Genetics (3).

PCB 5672. Evolution (3).

PCB 5675. Advanced Evolutionary Biology (3).

PCB 5682 Macroevolution (3).

PCB 5785. Biology of Muscle (3).

PCB 5786. Membrane Biophysics (3).

PCB 5795. Sensory Physiology (3).

PCB 5845. Cell and Molecular Neuroscience (4).

PCB 5936r. Selected Topics in Genetics and Cell Biology (1–4).

PCB 5937r. Selected Topics in Physiology (1–4).

PCB 5938r. Selected Topics in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (1–4).

PCB 6936r. Seminar in Genetics and Cell Biology (2). (S/U grade only.)

PCB 6938r. Seminar in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (2). (S/U grade only.)

Neuroscience

PSB 5057. Neuroscience Methods: Molecules to Behavior (2). (S/U grade only.)

PSB 5077. Responsible Conduct of Research (2). (S/U grade only.)

PSB 5341. Systems and Behavioral Neuroscience (3).

PSB 5347. Neuropharmacology (3).

PSB 6070r. Current Problems in Neuroscience (2). (S/U grade only.)

PSB 6920r. Neuroscience Colloquium (1). (S/U grade only.)

PSB 6933r. Seminar in Neuroscience (1–2). (S/U grade only.)

Zoology

ZOO 5935r. Selected Topics in Zoology (1–4).

ZOO 6933r. Seminar in Marine Biology (2). (S/U grade only.)

ZOO 6934r. Seminar in Zoology (2). (S/U grade only.)

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.