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2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

College of Arts and Sciences

Web Page: http://www.chem.fsu.edu/

Chair: Timothy M. Logan; Associate Chairs: Michael Roper, Susan Latturner, Geoffrey Strouse; Professors: Alabugin, Albrecht-Schmitt, Cross, Dalal, Dudley, Dorsey, Holton, Latturner, Li, Logan, Marshall, Mattoussi, Saltiel, Sang, Schlenoff, Shatruk, Steinbock, Stiegman, Strouse, Yang; Teaching Professor: Kearley; Associate Professors: Goldsby, Hilinski, Knappenberger, Miller, Roper, Stagg, Zhu; Assistant Professors: Bleiholder, DePrince, Frederich, Hanson, Hu, Kennemur; Teaching Assistant Professor: B. DePrince; Honors Lecturer: Kearley; Coordinator of General Chemistry Laboratories: Dillon; Coordinator of Organic Laboratories: Profeta; Professors Emeriti: Clark, Cooper, DeTar, Dougherty, Fulton, Johnsen, Kroto, Light, Linder, Mellon, Safron, Schwartz, Sheline, Vickers; Professors Emerita: Gilmer, Hoffman

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers the undergraduate degrees of Bachelor of Science (BS) and Bachelor of Arts (BA) in chemistry, biochemistry, and chemical science. Students seeking BS or BA degrees in chemistry may major in chemistry or environmental chemistry. Students seeking BS or BA degrees in chemical science may major in chemical science or chemical science/FSU-Teach. Please note that a student cannot receive more than one BS or BA degree from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. For example, a student cannot double major in chemistry and biochemistry, due to substantial course overlap between the two majors.

A degree in chemistry or biochemistry is suitable preparation for a variety of career choices, including immediate employment in the chemical, biochemical, environmental, or related industries, or graduate study in chemistry, biochemistry, chemical physics, biophysics, medicine, or other health-related fields. Chemistry majors should take note of the possibility of earning certification by the American Chemical Society in completing their degree requirements. Details of this program are given below. Additional work in mathematics and physics is appropriate for students planning to conduct graduate work in physical chemistry and chemical physics. For those interested in graduate work in biochemistry or biophysics, the baccalaureate degree in biochemistry or the degree in chemistry with electives including BCH 4053, 4054, and selected biology courses is recommended. Students interested in careers in the environmental sciences, ecology and ecosystem management, and environmental toxicology are encouraged to obtain the chemistry degree with a major in environmental chemistry. In every case students should plan their programs in consultation with an academic advisor. Normally students begin taking courses required for the major in the first year, and it is important to consult with a chemistry advisor as early as possible.

The baccalaureate degree in chemical science is offered to meet the needs of those students whose career goals lie outside chemistry but require a strong foundation in science. This program is appropriate, for example, for a student interested in forensic science, medical technology, oceanography, the earth sciences, or health-allied sciences, or for students planning a career in business, public policy, or law with an emphasis in science and/or technology. Compared to the other degree programs in this department, chemical science has a smaller core of required courses to which students are expected to add elective work in other areas after consultation with their advisor. Students interested in teaching chemistry in middle school or high school should consider majoring in chemical science/FSU-Teach; the FSU-Teach Program is described below. The chemical science degree is not appropriate for students interested in graduate study in chemistry or closely related disciplines such as biochemistry, environmental chemistry, or marine chemistry, or for students seeking employment in the chemical industry immediately upon graduation.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in chemistry, biochemistry, and chemical science satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in CHM 3120L. Undergraduate majors in chemical science/FSU-Teach satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in CHM 3120L or ISC 3523C.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into these upper-division degree programs:

Chemistry

  1. CHM X045/X045L, or CHM X040 and CHM X041, or CHM X045C
  2. CHM X046/X046L or CHM X046C
  3. MAC X311 or MAC X281
  4. MAC X312 or MAC X282
  5. CHM X210/X210L and CHM X211/X211L, or CHM X210C and CHM X211C
  6. PHY X048/X048L and PHY X049/X049L, or PHY X048C and PHY X049C, or PHY X053/X053L and PHY X054/X054L, or PHY X053C and PHY X054C

Note: The PHY X048/X049 sequence is required for the Bachelor in Science degree; it is an option for the Bachelor in Arts degree. The PHY X053/X054 sequence is not accepted for the Bachelor in Science degree.

Biochemistry

  1. BSC X010/X010L or BSC X010C or BSC X040/X040L or BSC X040C
  2. BSC X011/X011L or BSC X011C or BSC X041/X041L
  3. CHM X045/X045L or CHM X045C, or CHM X040 and CHM X041
  4. CHM X046/X046L or CHM X046C
  5. CHM X210/X210L or PHY X048/X048L or PHY X053/X053L
  6. CHM X211/X211L or PHY X049/X049L or PHY X054/X054L
  7. MAC X312

Note: Although MAC X312 is required for the degree, students may be admitted prior to completion of this course

  1. MAC X311 or MAC X233 or MAC X253 or MAC X281

Chemical Science

  1. CHM X045/1045L, or CHM X040 and CHM X041, or CHM X045C
  2. CHM X046/X046L or CHM X046C
  3. MAC X311 or MAC X281
  4. CHM X210/X210L and CHM X211/X211L, or CHM X210C and CHM X211C

Chemical Science FSU-Teach

  1. CHM X045/X045L, or CHM X040 and CHM X041, or CHM X045C
  2. CHM X046/X046L or CHM X046C
  3. MACX311 or MAC X281
  4. CHM X210/X210L and CHM X211/X211L, or CHM X210C and CHM X211C
  5. SMT X043
  6. SMT X053

Note: Transfer students will be able to take STM X043 and STM X053 when admitted to upper division.

Honors in the Major

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers Honors in the Major to encourage students to undertake independent and original research. For requirements and other information, see the "University Honors Office and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin, or the departmental Web site at http://www.chem.fsu.edu.

FSU-Teach Program in Teaching Chemistry

For those also interested in teaching chemistry in middle school or high school, FSU-Teach is an innovative approach to teacher education that involves a collaboration between scientists, mathematicians, and education faculty at Florida State University. In FSU-Teach, students will acquire knowledge in science or mathematics and the skill and experience needed to be an effective science or math teacher. The program will pay for tuition for the first two courses, and work study positions with scientists, mathematicians and local schools are available. For more information, see the FSU-Teach Web site at http://FSU-Teach.fsu.edu.

Requirements

Please review all college-wide degree requirements, including the foreign language requirement, summarized in the "College of Arts and Sciences" chapter of this General Bulletin.

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree can be obtained by completion of the Bachelor of Science (BS) degree requirements plus additional courses required by the University as set forth in the "Undergraduate Degree Requirements" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Current majors in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry are generally discouraged from taking courses required for the major as transient students unless taken over the Summer, in order to meet milestones in their MAP. All upper-level chemistry courses (i.e. courses at the 3000 or 4000 level) applied toward any of the department's majors must be taken at Florida State University, unless specifically exempted by the chair by written request. Students planning to transfer to Florida State University, either as a transfer or transient student, should make note of this requirement.

Prospective majors should note the mathematics and physics requirements. To allow optimal flexibility in planning the upper-division programs, fulfillment of the mathematics requirements should be started in the freshman year. Chemistry, biochemistry, and environmental chemistry majors are required to take General Physics A and B (PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C) as preparation for Physical Chemistry I and II (CHM 4410 and CHM 4411). Chemical science majors may meet the physics requirement with either the calculus-based or non-calculus-based (PHY 2053C and PHY 2054C) physics sequence.

The calculus courses required for the chemistry major constitute a minor in mathematics, and no other minor is necessary. The biology courses required for the baccalaureate degree in biochemistry constitute a minor in biological sciences, and no additional minor is necessary. The two courses in calculus (MAC 2311 and MAC 2312) and the two calculus-based physics courses (PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C) required for the environmental chemistry major constitute an interdepartmental minor approved by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. This interdepartmental minor may be used for the chemical science majors who substitute calculus-based physics for the required non-calculus-based physics. Otherwise the baccalaureate degree in chemical science must include a minor of at least twelve semester hours in an approved minor field. No courses used for satisfying liberal studies requirements may also be counted toward the minor.

Final clearance for all majors is made by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Students graduating must complete an exit survey, without which the department will not approve graduation.

Academic Performance

No required course in which a student has earned a grade below "C–" may be applied toward any of the degrees in chemistry. Students must also make a "C–" or better in the first semester of a year-sequence course (or obtain the instructor's permission) to continue the sequence.

A student who has received more than two unsatisfactory grades (U, F, D–, D, D+) in the following courses will not be permitted to graduate with a degree offered by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry: CHM 1045, CHM 1045L, CHM 1046, CHM 1046L, CHM 2210, MAC 1105, MAC 1114, MAC 1140, MAC 2311. This rule applies whether these courses are taken at Florida State University or elsewhere, and it includes repeated unsatisfactory grades in the same course.

A student who has received more than five unsatisfactory grades (U, F, D–, D, D+) total in science or mathematics courses (and their prerequisites) required for any major offered by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, taken at Florida State University or elsewhere, including repeated unsatisfactory grades in the same required course, will not be permitted to graduate with a degree in that major.

Baccalaureate Degree in Chemistry

Major in Chemistry

Complete the two-semester sequences in general chemistry (CHM 1045, 1045L, 1046, 1046L, or CHM 1050, 1050L, 1051, 1051L); organic chemistry (CHM 2210, 2211, 2211L); analytical chemistry (CHM 3120, 3120L, 4130, 4130L); physical chemistry (CHM 4410, 4410L, 4411, 4411L); and one semester of inorganic chemistry (CHM 4610) and the associated laboratory (CHM 4610L). Also required are mathematics through calculus III and two semesters of calculus-based physics. The physics and math requirements should be met before taking physical chemistry. Biochemistry, environmental chemistry, and chemical science majors cannot double major in chemistry.

Major in Environmental Chemistry

Complete the two-semester sequences in general chemistry (CHM 1045, 1045L, 1046, 1046L, or CHM 1050, 1050L, 1051, 1051L); organic chemistry (CHM 2210, 2211, 2211L); analytical chemistry (CHM 3120, 3120L, 4130, 4130L); physical chemistry (CHM 4410, 4410L, 4411, 4411L); and two semesters of advanced work in chemistry of the environment, including some aspects of aquatic, atmospheric, and geological chemistry. Courses that satisfy this requirement include: CHM 4080, CHM 4081, CHM 4905 (three credit hours), CHM 4906 (three credit hours), EOC 4631, GLY 4240, GLY 4780, GLY 4884, and OCC 4002. Also required are mathematics through calculus II, two semesters of calculus-based physics, two semesters of either biology or geology (at least one of these courses must include a lab), and one semester of computer programming, numerical modeling, advanced statistics, or calculus III. Courses that satisfy the computational/statistics requirement include: ISC 3222, ISC 4302, OCC 4060, STA 3032, STA 4102, STA 4321, and MAC 2313. Calculus III is recommended as preparation for physical chemistry. The physics and math requirements should be met before taking physical chemistry. Students may obtain an elective from a list obtained from the environmental chemistry advisor or the departmental Web site. Chemistry, biochemistry, and chemical science majors cannot double major in environmental chemistry.

American Chemical Society Certification

Students obtaining the baccalaureate degree in chemistry may obtain certification from the American Chemical Society (ACS). Certification requires completion of the core chemistry curriculum listed above, plus BCH 4053 or BCH 4624 and one additional upper-level chemistry course. Independent research taken as CHM 4905r, Directed Individual Study, or 4906r, Honors Work, may be counted as the upper-level chemistry course, provided that a final report is written by the student and approved by the supervising faculty, and a copy of the report submitted to the Student Affairs Office. Students planning to obtain ACS certified degrees should have their program of studies approved by an advisor in the department.

Baccalaureate Degree in Biochemistry

Students must complete the two semester sequences in general chemistry (CHM 1045, 1045L, 1046, 1046L, or CHM 1050, 1050L, 1051, 1051L); organic chemistry (CHM 2210, 2211, 2211L); analytical chemistry (CHM 3120, 3120L, 4130, 4130L); physical chemistry (CHM 4410, 4411); and biochemistry (BCH 4053, 4054) along with one of the following laboratories: physical chemistry (CHM 4410L and 4411L), biochemistry (BCH 4053L), or honors research (CHM 4906r). Mathematics through calculus II and two semesters of calculus-based physics are also required and should be completed before taking physical chemistry. Calculus III is recommended as preparation for physical chemistry. Further, the following biology courses are required: general biology (BSC 2010, 2010L, 2011, 2011L), genetics (PCB 3063), and a biology elective from a list obtained from the biochemistry advisor or the departmental Blackboard site. Chemistry, environmental chemistry, and chemical science majors cannot double major in biochemistry.

Baccalaureate Degree in Chemical Science

Major in Chemical Science

Students must complete the two-semester sequences in general chemistry (CHM 1045, 1045L, 1046, 1046L, or CHM 1050, 1050L, 1051, 1051L); organic chemistry (CHM 2210, 2211, 2211L); analytical chemistry (CHM 3120, 3120L, 4130, 4130L); physical chemistry (CHM 3400 or both CHM 4410 and 4411); mathematics through calculus I; and a two-semester sequence in physics, either with or without the use of calculus. Chemistry, biochemistry, and environmental chemistry majors cannot double major in Chemical Science.

Major in Chemical Science/FSU-Teach

Students must complete the two-semester sequences in general chemistry (CHM 1045, CHM 1045L, CHM 1046, CHM 1046L, or CHM 1050, CHM 1050L, CHM 1051, CHM 1051L); organic chemistry (CHM 2210, CHM 2211, CHM 2211L); plus at least one semester of analytical chemistry (CHM 3120, CHM 3120L); physical chemistry (CHM 3400 or both CHM 4410 and CHM 4411); inorganic chemistry (CHM 4610); biochemistry (BCH 3023C or BCH 4053); as well as one or more of the following electives for at least three credit hours: Advanced Analytical Chemistry (CHM 4130), Environmental Chemistry I (CHM 4080), Directed Individual Study (CHM 4905r), or Honors Research (CHM 4906r). Mathematics through calculus I; and a two-semester sequence in physics, either with or without the use of calculus. Chemistry, biochemistry, and environmental chemistry majors must receive permission from the department to double major in Chemical Science/FSU-Teach. Students in the FSU-Teach Program must also complete a Science Teaching major; for more information, see the FSU-Teach Web site at http://FSU-Teach.fsu.edu.

Suggested Specialized Electives for Chemical Science

Medicine

Students intending to study medicine are advised to satisfy the minimum requirements with BSC 2010, 2010L, 2011, 2011L; PCB 3063; and the four credit hour premedical Human Biochemistry (BCH 4624) course. Vertebrate Physiology (PCB 3743) is a recommended elective. Furthermore, calculus II, the calculus-based physics courses, and certain other upper-level biology courses may provide additional preparation for the MCAT and subsequent coursework in medical school. These students should prepare programs of study in consultation with advisors in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and with the College of Medicine.

Forensic Science

Students intending to pursue a career in forensic science may choose to major in chemical science with the addition of the following courses: BSC 2010, 2010L, 2011, 2011L and a biochemistry course with lab (BCH 3023C, or BCH 4053 and BCH 4053L). Certain government agencies (e.g. the FBI) may recommend a background in accounting.

Oceanography

Students intending to specialize in oceanography are advised to include OCE 4008 in the program of studies, along with selected electives in biological and earth sciences (e.g., GLY 4240; OCC 5050).

Business

The baccalaureate degree in chemical science with a minor in business can prepare students for management and marketing positions in the chemical and other technical industries and also provide a strong technical background for students interested in entering programs such as that for the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. Suggested minor courses are at least one course each in accounting, management, marketing, and finance and one or more business electives. In addition, courses in economics and behavioral science (satisfying liberal studies social sciences requirement) and in computer programming, statistics, and written composition beyond basic English are recommended. Consult with an advisor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and with a representative of the College of Business in preparing a specific program.

Requirements for a Minor in Chemistry

The requirements for a minor in chemistry include the two-semester sequence in general chemistry (CHM 1045, 1045L, 1046, 1046L, or CHM 1050/1050L, 1051/1051L) and at least one of the following course sequences: CHM 2210–2211, CHM3120–3120L, CHM 4410–4411. A minimum of twelve semester hours is required. Grades below "C–" will not be accepted for minor credit.

Advanced Placement in Chemistry

Students with an Advanced Placement (AP) score of 3 will receive four semester hours of credit in CHM 1020 and 1020L; an AP score of 4 earns the student credit for CHM 1045 and 1045L; an AP score of 5 earns the student credit for CHM 1045, 1045L, 1046, and 1046L. Students with an AP score of 3 are eligible to take a departmental placement exam for CHM 1045 and 1045L.

International Baccalaureate Diploma

International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma holders with a score of 4 will receive three semester hours of credit in CHM 1020C. Those with a score of 5 or higher will earn credit for CHM 1020 (two hours) and 1045/1045L (four hours).

Policy on Reduced Credit

Students may* register for reduced credit if CHM 1032 is taken after passing CHM 1020, if CHM 1045 is taken after passing CHM 1020, or if CHM 1045 is taken after passing CHM 1032, as indicated in the following table:

Sequence of Lecture Courses Taken: Semester Hours Awarded for Each Course:
CHM 1020 CHM 1032 CHM 1045
CHM 1020 only 3
CHM 1032 only 3
CHM 1045 only 3
CHM 1020, then 1032 3 2
CHM 1020, then 1045 3 2
CHM 1020, then 1032, then 1045 3 2 1
CHM 1032, then 1045 3 2
* Students seeking admission to professional programs such as medicine or pharmacy should not take courses for reduced credit.

Note: CHM 1020 and 1032 are not preparatory courses for CHM 1045 and should not normally be taken prior to beginning the general chemistry sequence.

Definition of Prefixes

BCH—Biochemistry (Biophysics)

CHM—Chemistry

ISC—Interdisciplinary Sciences

PSC—Physical Sciences

SCE—Science Education

Undergraduate Courses

General Chemistry

CHM 1020. Chemistry for Liberal Studies (3). This course introduces basic chemical principles without an extensive use of mathematics and illustrates with applications in health, energy, and the environment. The course strives to show chemistry as a human endeavor that provides insight into the natural world and informs our decisions as citizens and consumers. Specific topics vary by semester. Designed as a course for students who wish to fulfill the liberal studies science requirement with chemistry and will take no further chemistry courses, not as a preparatory course for CHM 1045. Credit is not allowed for CHM 1020 after taking CHM 1032, 1045, or equivalent.

CHM 1020C. Chemistry for Liberal Studies (4). This course introduces basic chemical principles without an extensive use of mathematics and illustrates with applications in health, energy, and the environment. The course strives to show chemistry as a human endeavor that provides insight into the natural world and informs our decisions as citizens and consumers. Specific topics vary by semester. Designed as a course for students who wish to fulfill the liberal studies science requirement with chemistry and will take no further chemistry courses, not as a preparatory course for CHM 1045. Credit is not allowed for CHM 1020 after taking CHM 1032, 1045, or equivalent.

CHM 1020L. Chemistry for Liberal Studies Laboratory (1). Pre- or corequisite: CHM 1020. This laboratory emphasizes major topics from CHM 1020 relating chemistry concepts and techniques to everyday life experiences. This laboratory-based course meets two hours a week. No credit allowed after taking CHM 1045.

CHM 1032. Survey of General Chemistry (3). Prerequisite: MAC 1105 with a grade of "C–" or better or placement beyond MAC 1105. This lecture-based course is the first course in general chemistry for students in nursing, nutrition and fitness, and other areas requiring a short course leading to CHM 2200. Students taking CHM 1032 after taking CHM 1020 may register for reduced credit; see Policy on Reduced Credit.

CHM 1045. General Chemistry I (3). Prerequisite: MAC 1105 with a grade of "C–" or better or placement beyond MAC 1105. This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.

CHM 1045L. General Chemistry I Laboratory (1). Prerequisite: MAC 1105 with a grade of "C–" or higher or placement beyond MAC 1105. Corequisite: CHM 1045. This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.

CHM 1046. General Chemistry II (3). Prerequisites: CHM 1045 or CHM 1050, each with a grade "C–" or better. This course includes topics such as intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.

CHM 1046L. General Chemistry II Laboratory (1). Prerequisites: CHM 1045 and CHM 1045L or CHM 1050 and CHM 1050L. Corequisite: CHM 1046. This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.

CHM 1050. Honors General Chemistry I (3). Prerequisite: MAC 1105 with a grade of "C–" or better or placement beyond MAC 1105. Corequisite: CHM 1050L. This course is a first general chemistry course for honors students. Topics include kinetic theory, atomic theory of matter, atomic structure and the periodic chart, condensed phases, introductory chemical bonding.

CHM 1050L. Honors General Chemistry I Laboratory (1). Prerequisite: MAC 1105 with a grade of "C–" or higher or placement beyond MAC 1105. Corequisite: CHM 1050. This laboratory is an introduction to quantitative techniques and chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, thermodynamics, gases, as well as acids and bases, chemical structures and reactivity.

CHM 1051. Honors General Chemistry II (3). Prerequisites: CHM 1050 and CHM 1050L, each with a grade of "C–" or better, or CHM 1045 and CHM 1045L, each with a grade of "C–" or better and instructor permission. Corequisite: CHM 1051L. This course is a continuation of general chemistry for honors students. Topics include solution equilibria; acid/base chemistry; oxidation, reduction, and electrochemical cells; chemical analysis; hydrides and oxides of the elements; kinetics; advanced bonding and structure.

CHM 1051L. Honors General Chemistry II Laboratory (2). Prerequisites: CHM 1050 and CHM 1050L, each with a grade of "C–" or better. Corequisite: CHM 1051. This laboratory is an opportunity for research-based special projects.

CHM 2047L. One Semester General Chemistry Laboratory (1). Prerequisite: MAC 1105. Corequisite: CHM 2047. This course provides a thorough review of the quantitative techniques required to perform chemical research.

CHM 3930r. Special Topics in Chemistry (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

CHM 4090L. Science Glassblowing (1). This course is laboratory instruction of fundamental glassblowing techniques of greatest utility to the experimental scientist who may require custom glassware.

CHM 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). Prerequisites: Upper class standing, "B" average in chemistry courses, and approval of the faculty supervisor. May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

CHM 4906r. Honors Work (1–6). This course is for Honors in the Major work only. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ISC 3076. Science, Technology, and Society (3). Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor permission. This course examines interrelations among science, technology, and society. Science is considered as an enterprise in modern society that produces technological advances and new perspectives on reality. This course cannot be used as credit toward a major or a minor in a science department.

PSC 2801C. Physical Science for EC/EE Teachers (4). This course is designed for prospective elementary and early childhood education majors. The course combines physics and chemistry and the laboratory is integral to the course. The course includes laboratory exercises. Students work in groups in a hands-on, minds-on approach to learning physical science.

SCE 4939r. Seminar in Contemporary Science, Mathematics, and Science Education (1). This course includes presentations of contemporary and interesting issues in science, mathematics, or teaching methods. Content varies from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

Analytical Chemistry

CHM 3120. Analytical Chemistry I (3). Prerequisite: CHM 1046 and CHM 1046L, each with a grade of "C–" or better. This first course in analytical chemistry covers statistical analysis of analytical data, acid-base equilibria, acid-based titrations, electrochemistry, analytical separations, as well as atomic and molecular optical spectroscopy.

CHM 3120L. Analytical Chemistry I Laboratory (1). Corequisite: CHM 3120. This course is the laboratory portion of Analytical Chemistry I. Experiments include: potentiometric titration of acid mixtures, spectrophotometric determination of pH, spectrophotometric determination of iron in drinking water, lithium by flame emission, fluoride ion-selective electrodes, copper in metal alloys by liquid-liquid extraction, and quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by gas chromatography.

CHM 3217. One Semester Organic Chemistry (3). Prerequisites: CHM 1046 and CHM 1046L or CHM 2047 and CHM 2047L. This course is a rigorous one semester overview of the structure, properties, and reaction of organic compounds. It is intended for students who are willing and able to move more quickly into advanced coursework.

CHM 3218. One Semester Biochemistry (3). Prequisites: CHM 3217 or CHM 2211, and CHM 3217. This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of biochemistry and molecular biology from an organic chemistry structural and mechanistic perspective.

CHM 4080. Environmental Chemistry I (3). Prerequisites: CHM 1046, CHM 1046L, and CHM 3120, each with a grade of "C–" or better. This course focuses on the application of geologic and geochemical principles to environmental issues. Topics include: an evaluation of contaminants in surface and ground water; hydrocarbon geochemistry and petroleum contamination; waste management, including solid, toxic and nuclear waste; air quality issues, including radon and asbestos; geologic hazards in upland and coastal areas; environmental methods and instrumentation, quality assurance and quality control in environmental analysis; principles of toxicology; risk assessment and risk management.

CHM 4081. Environmental Chemistry II (3). Prerequisite: CHM 2211 with a grade of "C–" or better. This course studies the organic geochemistry of natural waters and sediments. It offers an overview of the sources of organic matter in aquatic systems, the important reactions and transport mechanisms that control the biochemical cycling of organic carbon in these systems, and the impact of naturally-occurring organic carbon on environmental and ecological processes. Attention is also devoted to anthropogenic (xenobiotic) organic molecules. It also discusses how analytical techniques such as 13C NMR, mass spectroscopy, and capillary electrophoresis provide useful organic biogeochemical information.

CHM 4130. Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3). Prerequisites: CHM 3120 and CHM 3120L, each with a grade of "C–" or better, as well as PHY 2048C or PHY 2053C with a grade of "C–" or better. Corequisite: CHM 4410. This course covers data analysis, laboratory computers, atomic and molecular optical spectroscopy, nuclear-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, chromatography and electrophoresis, electrochemistry, and mass spectrometry.

CHM 4130L. Advanced Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (1). Corequisite: CHM 4130 (recommended before CHM 4130L). This course is the laboratory portion of CHM 4130, Advanced Analytical Chemistry. Experiments include: signal enhancement by filtering and ensemble averaging, flame spectroscopy determination of Li and Mg, spectroflurometric determination of quinine, UV-visible spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) simulations, Raman spectroscopy, solvent extraction and gas chromatography, as well as HPLC determination of analgesics. It is recommended that students complete CHM 4130 with a grade of "C–" or better before taking CHM 4130L, although the courses can be taken simultaneously.

Biochemistry

BCH 3023. Survey of Biochemistry (3). Prerequisite: CHM 2200 or CHM 2211. Corequisite: BCH 3023L. This course is designed to provide a survey of biochemistry topics relevant to those in the allied health and pre-medicine fields of study.

BCH 3023C. Introduction to Biochemistry (3). Prerequisites: CHM 2200 and CHM 2200L both with a grade of "C–" or better, or CHM 2211 and CHM 2211L both with a grade of "C–" or better. This course is a survey of modern biochemistry with special emphasis on those concepts which might be of use to nutrition and food scientists.

BCH 3023L. Survey of Biochemistry Laboratory (1). Corequisite: BCH 3023. This course focuses on application of molecular biology techniques to a broad range of biochemistry topics and provides a basic survey of information relevant to students in allied health and pre-medicine fields of study.

BCH 4053. General Biochemistry I (3). Prerequisite: CHM 2211 with a grade of "C–" or better. This course is the first course required for biochemistry majors; the course is also recommended for other majors who intend to study advanced biochemistry. Topics covered include protein structure, protein function, membranes, enzyme catalysis, bioenergetics, carbohydrate metabolism, and lipid metabolism.

BCH 4053L. General Biochemistry I Laboratory (3). Prerequisite: BCH 4053 or instructor permission. This lab explores laboratory methods in biochemistry including electrophoresis, chromatography, cell fractionation, enzyme assays, ligand interactions, and recombinant DNA technology.

BCH 4054. General Biochemistry II (3). Prerequisite: BCH 4053 with a grade of "C–" or better. This course is the second course required for biochemistry majors; it is also recommended for other majors who intend to study advanced biochemistry. Topics include quantitative analysis of assembly and mechanisms of molecular machines involved in metabolic and information transfer processes, how proteins bind proteins, nucleic acids, and ligands, as well as the methods for characterizing structures and interactions. This lecture-based course meets three hours a week.

BCH 4624. Human Biochemistry (4). Prerequisite: CHM 2211 or instructor permission. This course is intended for pre-professional students who are not majoring in biochemistry; it covers the main concepts of biochemistry at same level as BCH 4053/4 but presents them at an accelerated pace. Topics include molecular structure, bioenergetics, enzymology and enzyme regulation, metabolism, as well as gene expression and regulation. This lecture-based course meets four hours a week.

Inorganic Chemistry

CHM 4610. Inorganic Chemistry (3). Prerequisites: CHM 2211 and CHM 2211L, each with a grade of "C–" or better. Corequisite: CHM 4410 or instructor permission. This course explores physical principles, systematics in the chemistry of periodic groups, descriptive chemistry of the inorganic elements. Topics include atomic structure and the periodic classification of the elements, chemical bonding and reactivity, acid-base chemistry, chemistry of main group elements, and coordination chemistry of the transitional metal elements.

CHM 4610L. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (1). Prerequisite: CHM 4610 with a grade of "C–" or better. This lab covers synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds.

Materials Chemistry

CHM 4714. Chemistry of Materials (3). Prerequisites: CHM 1045 or CHM 1046; CHM 2210 or CHM 2211; or instructor permission. This course is an introduction to materials chemistry, focusing on the structure, properties, and functional applications of molecular materials, polymers, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and bio- and nanomaterials.

Organic Chemistry

CHM 2200. Survey of Organic Chemistry (3). Prerequisites: CHM 1045 and CHM 1045L and CHM 1046 and CHM 1046L, each with a grade of "C–" or better. This course is a one-semester survey of organic chemistry intended for students in nutrition and fitness (fitness option), or for students needing an overview of organic compounds, functional groups, and reactions.

CHM 2200L. Survey of Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1). Corequisite: CHM 2200.

CHM 2210. Organic Chemistry I (3). Prerequisite: CHM 1046 and CHM 1046L, each with a grade of "C–" or better. Students who complete CHM 1045 or CHM 1050 with a grade of "B" or better and have instructor permission may take this course simultaneously with either CHM 1046 or CHM 1051. This course is the first in a sequence of courses for chemistry majors, premedicine students, biologists, or any other majors requiring a good background in organic chemistry, the course covers the fundamentals of structure and chemical behavior of organic molecules.

CHM 2211. Organic Chemistry II (3). Prerequisite: CHM 2210 with a grade of "C–" or better or instructor permission.

CHM 2211L. Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (3). Pre- or corequisite: CHM 2211. This lab is a one semester organic laboratory for majors in the physical and life sciences.

Physical Chemistry

CHM 3400. General Physical Chemistry (4). Prerequisites: CHM 1046, CHM 1046L, and MAC 2311, each with a grade of "C–" or better. This course focuses on an elementary treatment of general physical chemistry, including thermodynamics, equilibrium, electromotive force, kinetics, atomic structure, and an introduction to quantum theory. For the chemical science major and interested nonmajors.

CHM 4410. Physical Chemistry I (3). Prerequisites: CHM 1045 and CHM 1045L with a grade of "C–" or better or instructor permission; MAC 2312 with a grade of "C–" or better; MAC 2313 with a grade of "C–" or better recommended. Corequisite: PHY 2049C. This course covers thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, reaction kinetics, as well as introductions to quantum mechanics and to statistical mechanics.

CHM 4410L. Physicochemical Measurements and Techniques I (1). Corequisite: CHM 4410. Before attempting this course satisfaction of the University's requirement for computer skills is recommended.

CHM 4411. Physical Chemistry II (3). Prerequisites: CHM 1045 and CHM 1045L and CHM 4410 with a grade of "C–" or better or instructor permission; MAC 2312 with a grade of "C–" or better; MAC 2313 with a grade of "C–" or better recommended. Corequisite: PHY 2049C. This course covers thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, reaction kinetics, as well as introductions to quantum mechanics and to statistical mechanics.

CHM 4411L. Physicochemical Measurements and Techniques II (2). Prerequisite: CHM 4410L with a grade of "C–" or better. Corequisite: CHM 4411. Before attempting this course satisfaction of the University's requirement for computer skills is recommended.

Graduate Courses

Analytical Chemistry

CHM 5086. Environmental Chemistry I (3).

CHM 5087. Environmental Chemistry II (3).

CHM 5138. Mass Spectrometry (3).

CHM 5140. Introduction to Chemical Instrumentation (3).

CHM 5151. Optical Methods of Chemical Analysis (3).

CHM 5153. Electrochemistry (3).

CHM 5154. Chemical Separations (3).

CHM 5180r. Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry (1–3).

CHM 5454. Polymer Characterization (3).

CHM 6190r. Analytical Chemistry Seminar (1).

CHM 6191r. Analytical Chemistry Seminar (1). (S/U grade only.)

Biochemistry

BCH 5405. Molecular Biology (3).

BCH 5505. Structure and Function of Enzymes (3).

BCH 5745. Chemical and Physical Characterization of Biopolymers (3).

BCH 5884. Programming for Chemists and Biochemists (3).

BCH 5886r. Special Topics in Biochemistry and Cell Biology (1–3).

BCH 5887r. Special Topics in Biochemistry and Cell Biology (1–3).

BCH 6896r. Biochemistry Seminar (1).

BCH 6897r. Biochemistry Seminar (1). (S/U grade only.)

CHM 5506. Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules I (3).

CHM 5507. Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules II (3).

Inorganic Chemistry

CHM 5442. Kinetics and Mechanisms (3)

CHM 5620. Principles of Inorganic Chemistry (3).

CHM 5680r. Current Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (1–3).

CHM 5681r. Current Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (1–3).

CHM 6690r. Inorganic Chemistry Seminar (1).

CHM 6691r. Inorganic Chemistry Seminar (1). (S/U grade only.)

Materials Chemistry

CHM 5715r. Topics in Materials Chemistry I (1-3).

CHM 5716r. Characterization of Materials I (1-3).

CHM 5717r. Characterization of Materials II (1-3).

CHM 5718r. Topics in Materials Chemistry II (1-3).

CHM 6936r. Materials Chemistry Seminar I (1). (S/U grade only.)

CHM 6937r. Materials Chemistry Seminar II (1).

Organic Chemistry

CHM 5225. Advanced Organic Chemistry—Structure (3).

CHM 5226. Advanced Organic Chemistry—Reactions (3).

CHM 5245. Physical Organic Chemistry (3).

CHM 5250. Advanced Organic Synthesis (3).

CHM 5330. Graduate Survey of Organic Chemistry (3).

CHM 5380r. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (1–3).

CHM 6390r. Organic Chemistry Seminar (1). (S /U grade only.)

Physical Chemistry

CHM 5440. Physical and Chemical Kinetics (3).

CHM 5442. Kinetics and Mechanisms (3).

CHM 5460. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3).

CHM 5461. Advanced Statistical Mechanics (3).

CHM 5470. Valence Theory (3).

CHM 5480. Quantum Mechanics (3).

CHM 5481. Advanced Quantum Mechanics (3).

CHM 5506. Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules I (3).

CHM 5507. Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules II (3).

CHM 5580r. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (1–3).

CHM 5581r. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (1–3).

CHM 5585. Experimental Methods in Physical Chemistry (3).

CHM 6590r. Physical Chemistry Seminar (1).

Multiple Area Courses

CHM 5175r. Measurements and Data Analysis in Chemistry (1–3).

CHM 5555r. Chemical Reactivity (1–3).

CHM 5710r. Chemical Structure and Bonding (1–3).

CHM 5801r. Safety in Scientific Research (1). (S/U grade only.)

CHM 5823r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

CHM 5830r. Directed Individual Study (1–6).

CHM 5831r. Directed Individual Study (1–6). (S/U grade only.)

CHM 5832r. Directed Individual Study (1–6). (S/U grade only.)

CHM 5833r. Directed Individual Study (1–6). (S/U grade only.)

CHM 5908r. Focus on Physical Chemistry (3). (S/U grade only).

CHM 5910. Chemical Research (3).

CHM 5911. Chemical Research (3).

CHM 5912. Chemical Research (3).

CHM 5935r. Chemistry Seminars (0). (S/U grade only.)

CHM 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

CHM 5945. Seminar on Chemical Education (1). (S/U grade only.)

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

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