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2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Department of Classics

College of Arts and Sciences

Web Page: http://classics.fsu.edu/

Chair: Pullen; Leon Golden Professor: Marincola; M. Lynette Thompson Professor: de Grummond; Professors: Cairns, Fulkerson, Pullen; Associate Professors: Luke, Pfaff, Sickinger, Slaveva-Griffin, Stover; Assistant Professors: Clark, De Giorgi, Lewis, Weiberg; Associate Teaching Professor: Branscome; Professors Emeriti: Golden, Plescia

The influence of the art, languages, literatures, and cultures of the Greco-Roman world pervades every western and many non-western societies. Modern America is no exception. A meaningful appreciation of our classical past is vital both for understanding the impressive continuity of western institutions and values as well as for recognizing how recent innovations and transformations of received assumptions have rendered aspects of the classical world alien and sometimes exceptionable. The classics are crucial both to the perpetuation and to the critique of the western liberal arts education.

The Department of Classics is committed to advancing our knowledge and critical appreciation of the ancient Mediterranean world through excellence in research and in teaching. The department seeks to create an atmosphere that fosters traditional scholarly approaches to the classical past at the same time as it welcomes and encourages innovative methods and perspectives. The department values the interdisciplinary nature of the classics and strives to achieve an integrated understanding of the ancient world that includes a full appreciation of its history, literature, art, and archaeology. Students are encouraged to view the classics within the context of the traditional humanities as well as in terms of the contemporary criticism of received cultural canons.

All courses in classics emphasize critical thinking, careful analysis, and effective speaking and writing skills. Most classics majors find that their broad liberal arts background is excellent preparation for pursuing careers in the learned professions, such as government, journalism, or law. Some who major in classics will go on to academic careers as philologists or archaeologists. Others will become teachers in the schools or specialist in museum work.

In addition to offering instruction to majors, the department participates in the University's Liberal Studies for the 21st Century Program and offers innovative courses that satisfy the University's diversity requirement. Courses in beginning Greek or Latin can be used to fulfill the language requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences.

The faculty in classics is distinguished in teaching and research. Several members of the faculty have received University and national teaching awards. Individual faculty members have also won numerous competitive grants. The department boasts special strengths in ancient literary criticism, the archaeology of Greece and Italy, the political and social history of Athens and of Rome, Greek and Roman religion, and ancient sexuality and gender studies. Several faculty members direct archaeological projects in Greece and Italy, and students are active participants in these.

Majors and elective students alike will find many intellectual opportunities in the department. There is an active chapter of Eta Sigma Phi (the classics honor society) and a vigorous Student Archaeology Club. Each year the department hosts several distinguished guest speakers. The department also regularly hosts a visiting professor of international stature, the Langford Family Eminent Scholar, who teaches a course specifically for undergraduates. Every semester the department hosts a major conference. In the Fall, it is the Langford Latin Seminar; in the Spring, it is the Langford Conference. Recent topics have included the following: Health and Sickness in Ancient Rome; Political Economics of the Aegean Bronze Age; and Disasters in the Ancient World.

Students interested in the classics are encouraged to discuss their future plans with the undergraduate advisor. Many students will find that their needs are best accommodated by the department's very flexible program in classical civilization (see below). Students who intend to pursue a career in teaching Latin or museum work, and students who intend to pursue postgraduate research in ancient history, classical archaeology, or philology will need to enter more specific programs of study. There is also a joint major in classics and religion.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in classics satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in CGS 2060, CGS 2100, or ISC 3313.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into these upper-division degree programs:

Classics and Classical Language

  • XXX XXXX: coursework in classics for a total of six to twelve credit hours and a demonstration of proficiency of a classics world language by testing or completion through the intermediate level. For example, the intermediate level for Latin is LAT X220 or equivalent.

Greek, Classical

  • XXX XXXX: coursework in Greek for a total of six to twelve credit hours or demonstrated proficiency of the language by testing or completion through the intermediate level. The intermediate level is GRE X200 or equivalent.

Latin

  • XXX XXXX: coursework in Latin for a total of six to twelve credit hours or demonstrated proficiency of the language by testing or completion through the intermediate level.

Requirements for Majors in Classics

Students should review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the "College of Arts and Sciences" chapter of this General Bulletin. No course for which a student receives a grade below "C" may be counted toward satisfaction of major requirements. In addition, courses used to satisfy the college world language requirement may not be counted toward satisfaction of any major requirements. Interested students should consult with the undergraduate advisor as early as possible to choose a course of study best suited to their needs and goals.

All students are required to complete an exit survey for both the department and the College of Arts and Sciences during the term in which they graduate.

Latin

The major in Latin requires thirty of coursework, to include:

  • fifteen hours of courses in Latin above the 2000-level, with at least six hours at the 4000 level
  • three hours of coursework in Roman Archaeology (ARH 3130)
  • three hours of coursework hours in Roman History (CLA 3430)
  • six hours of elective Classics coursework above the 2000 level
  • three hours in CLA 4935, Seminar in Classical Civilization

Greek

The major in Greek requires thirty hours of coursework, to include:

  • twelve hours of courses in Greek above the 2000 level, with at least six at the 4000 level
  • three hours in Greek Archaeology (ARH 3130)
  • three hours in Greek History (CLA 3430)
  • nine hours of elective Classics courses above the 2000 level
  • three hours in the Classics Seminar, CLA 4935

Latin and Greek

The major in Latin and Greek requires thirty hours of coursework, to include:

  • eighteen hours of courses in Latin and Greek above the 2000 level, including at least six hours in each language, and at least six hours at the 4000 level
  • three hours in Greek or Roman Archaeology (ARH 3130 or 3150)
  • three hours in Greek or Roman History (CLA 3430 or 3440)
  • three hours of elective courses in Classics above 2000 level
  • three hours in CLA 4935, Seminar in Classical Civilization

Classical Civilization

The major in Classical Civilization requires thirty hours of coursework, to include:

  • three hours in Classical Archaeology, either ARH 3130 or 3150
  • three hours in Ancient History, either CLA 3430 or 3440
  • three hours in Classical Mythology, either CLT 3370 or 3378
  • eighteen additional hours of Classics courses, twelve of which must be at the 4000 level
  • three hours in CLA 4935, Seminar in Classical Civilization

Classical Archaeology

The major in Classical Archaeology requires thirty hours of coursework, to include:

  • six hours in ARH 3130 and 3150
  • nine hours of advanced classical archaeology courses chosen from ARH 4110, 4118, 4120, 4131, 4151, 4154, 4173 and CLA 4151
  • twelve hours in Greek or Latin, normally LAT or GRE 1120, 1121, 2220 (these hours cannot be used to satisfy the world language requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences)
  • three hours in CLA 4935, Seminar in Classical Civilization

Students are also encouraged to participate in archaeological fieldwork, and to study at the University's study center in Florence.

Joint Major in Classics and Religion

The departments of classics and religion cooperate in a joint major designed for students with a special interest in religion and culture in the ancient world. The joint major in classics and religion requires (in addition to other college requirements) twenty-seven semester hours in classics and eighteen semester hours in religion for a total of forty-five hours. At least nine semester hours at the 3000 or 4000 level in classics courses with prefixes ARH, CLA, or CLT, or ASH 3200, EUH 4401, EUH 4408, EUH 4412, or EUH 4413 are required. Students must complete twelve semester hours in one ancient classical language (Latin or Greek), but no more than eighteen semester hours of Greek or Latin may count toward the major. Courses used to fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences language requirement may not be counted toward the major. Of the eighteen semester hours in religion, at least six and no more than twelve semester hours must be in the area of religions of western antiquity. Classics courses in which the student receives a grade below "C" will not be counted toward the major. For the joint major in religion and classics, please contact the undergraduate director in the department of religion.

Students choosing the joint major in classics and religion do not need to complete a minor.

Honors in the Major

The Department of Classics offers a program in honors in the major to encourage talented juniors and seniors to undertake independent and original research as part of the undergraduate experience. For requirements and other information, see the "University Honors Office and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin and consult with the undergraduate advisor.

Requirements for a Minor in Classics

A minor requires a minimum of twelve semester hours of coursework in classical civilization, Greek, or Latin. The minor in classical civilization requires no knowledge of Greek or Latin and may consist of any four courses listed under departmental offerings in classical civilization and literature; however, with the approval of the department, appropriate courses in Greek and Latin may be included in this program. For a minor in Greek or Latin, the sequence may begin at the 1000 level, provided this does not duplicate the world language requirements for the baccalaureate degree, or at any appropriate higher level.

Definition of Prefixes

ARH—Art History

ASH—Asian History

CLA—Classical and Ancient Studies

CLT—Classical Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

EUH—European History

FLE—Foreign Language Education

GRE—Classical Greek (Language Study)

GRW—Classical Greek Literature (Writings)

IFS—Interdisciplinary Florida State University Courses

LAT—Latin (Language Study)

LNW—Latin Literature (Writings)

Undergraduate Courses

ARH 2090. Great Discoveries in World Archaeology (3). This course investigates the meaning and the role of archaeology in shaping our past and present lives. In particular, we ask questions about the purpose, the means, and the agencies behind the excavation process, and thus touch upon the theoretical underpinnings of archaeology as a science. The course is a comprehensive survey that begins with the basics of human evolution and covers the history and material culture of key ancient civilizations, including those that populated the Mesopotamian and Mediterranean basins.

ARH 3130. Survey of Greek Art and Archaeology (3). This course reviews the major accomplishments in Greek art from early times through the Hellenistic period using a survey of principal monuments, works, and archaeological evidence.

ARH 3150. Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy (3). This course is a survey of Italian art and archaeology including early Italy, the Etruscans, and Rome with reference to the major monuments, works, and archaeological evidence.

ARH 4110. Art and Archaeology of the Bronze Age in the Aegean (3). This course studies the major archaeological evidence related to the Bronze Age in Crete and Greece; the major sites, monuments, and artistic works.

ARH 4118. Archaeology of Ancient Egypt (3). This course surveys the archaeology and art of ancient Egypt from the Pre-dynastic to the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. An emphasis is placed on the art, architecture, and culture of the Old and New Kingdoms.

ARH 4120. Etruscan Art and Archaeology (3). This course is a study of Etruscan culture, art, and archaeology.

ARH 4131. Greek Art and Archaeology of the Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C. (3). This course surveys the accomplishments of classical Greek art through an examination of the monuments, works, and archaeological evidence.

ARH 4151. Art and Archaeology of the Early Roman Empire (3). This course examines Roman art and archaeology from Augustus through the Antonines with a survey of the major artistic accomplishments and the archaeological remains.

ARH 4154. Archaeology of the Late Roman Empire (3). This course comprises a study of Roman art and archaeology from the second to the sixth century CE with emphasis on important sites and monuments.

ARH 4173r. Studies in Classical Archaeology and Art (3–9). This course explores studies in specific aspects of the archaeology and art of Greece and Italy. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ARH 4932r. Tutorial in Classical Archaeology (1–3). Prerequisites: ARH 3130, ARH 3150, and instructor permission. This course uses readings and discussions within a small group of advanced undergraduates and discusses specific topics or research problems in classical archaeology. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ASH 3200. History of the Ancient Near East (3). This course is a survey of the Near East—Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Holy Land—in the ancient period.

CLA 2010. Peoples of the Roman World (3). This introductory level course engages with the Roman world from the point of view of the people who lived there. Students study the different kinds of people who inhabited the Roman Empire, focusing on its multiethnic and diverse populaces, and on the ways in which, as in a modern city, rather different groups may have come into contact with one another.

CLA 2110. Debates About the Past: Greek Civilization, History and Culture (3). This course is an introduction to different aspects of Greek, especially Athenian, culture, society, history, and literature from the archaic age (8th-6th centuries BCE) through the classical era (5th-4th centuries BCE) and beyond. The goal is to understand the Greeks through their words and the views of modern scholars, which students encounter in their assigned texts, translations of primary sources, and through lectures.

CLA 2123. Debates About the Past: Roman Civilization, History and Culture (3). This course is an introduction to different aspects of Roman culture, society, history, and literature from the period of the monarchy (roughly 8th century BCE) through the Late Empire (5th century CE). The goal is to understand the Romans through their words and the views of modern scholars, which students encounter in their assigned texts, translations of primary sources, and through lectures. Students also sharpen their oral competency skills through participation in debates in a variety of roles.

CLA 2810. Ancient Science for Non-Science Majors (3). This course introduces students to the history of modern science in the ancient Near East, the Greco-Roman world, the world of Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages.

CLA 3012. Homosexuality in Antiquity (3). This course combines methods of social history and literary criticism to examine attitudes toward homosexuality in Greek and Roman culture and the influence of the Greek ideal in later literary and artistic culture.

CLA 3430. History of Ancient Greece (3). This course surveys the history of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period, with a focus on political, social, and economic developments.

CLA 3440. History of Ancient Rome (3). This course surveys the history of ancient Rome from the Iron Age through Late Antiquity. Emphasis is on political, social, and economic developments.

CLA 3500. Sports in Antiquity: Olympians, Gladiators, and Superstars (3). This course introduces students to the various athletic events of Greco-Roman antiquity and the festival games in which ancient athletes competed. To explore the subject, students are exposed to a wide variety of evidence, including inscriptions, literary sources, architectural remains, vase-paintings, sculptures, and other types of archaeological finds.

CLA 3501. Gender and Society in Ancient Greece (3). This course examines the role and status of women in ancient Greek society, as depicted in its literature, art, law, and religion.

CLA 3502. Women, Children, and Slaves in Ancient Rome: The Roman Family (3). This course examines the Roman family in its various facets. Its focus will not be only on the nuclear family but also on the broader concept of family, which includes slaves and dependents.

CLA 4151. Pompeii (3). This course provides a study of the archaeology of Pompeii and neighboring towns from the seventh century BCE to the first century CE.

CLA 4437r. Studies in Greek History (3). This course focuses on specified periods of Greek history, whether Archaic, Classical, or Hellenistic. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CLA 4447r. Studies in Roman History (3). This course focuses on specified periods of Roman history in the Republic or Empire. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CLA 4780r. Classical Archaeology: Fieldwork (1–6). This fieldwork course affords students the experience of excavation through an approved archaeological field school or project. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

CLA 4909r. Honors Work (1–6). Up to twelve semester hours may be taken in honors work. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

CLA 4930r. Special Topics in Classics (3–9). This course offers studies in specific aspects of Greco-Roman literature and culture. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

CLA 4935r. Seminar in Classical Civilization (3–6). Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of study in classical civilization or instructor permission. This course covers special topics in classical culture presented around a seminar format. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CLT 2049. Medical Terminology (3). This course introduces students to the medical and technical vocabulary based on Latin and Greek elements in medical Latin and English.

CLT 3370. Classical Mythology (3). This course is a survey of Greco-Roman myth and legend, readings from illustrative ancient authors in English translation, approaches to the study of ancient myth.

CLT 3378. Ancient Mythology, East and West (3). This course provides students with an introduction to the mythological traditions from a diverse group of ancient cultures, including those of Greece and Rome, the Near East, Northern Europe, India, China, Africa, and the Americas.

CLT 3510. The Ancient World in Film (3). This course examines popular representations of Greek and Roman culture in modern film and cinema.

CLT 4291. Greek Tragedy (3). This course is an intensive study of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.

CLT 4340. Greek and Roman Epic (3). This course is a study of the principal epics of the classical world in English translation.

CLT 4372r. Studies in Ancient Mythology (3). This course covers specific topics in the study of ancient myth and its interpretation. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CLT 4532. The Return Home in Greek Myth (3). In this course, students examine different versions of this story pattern, beginning with Odysseus' return home from the Trojan War in Homer's Odyssey. Suitable for anyone interested in literature, psychology, theater, history, war and combat trauma, or gender studies.

CLT 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EUH 4401. Classical Athens and Sparta (3). This course examines the history of Greece from the beginning to Alexander the Great. Emphasis on the social and political structures of Sparta and Athens.

EUH 4408. The Age of Alexander the Great (3). This course is a study of the Greek world from the death of Socrates (399 BC) to the Roman conquest (146 BC, the sack of Corinth by Mummius).

EUH 4412. The Roman Republic (3). This course is a study of the history of Rome from its foundation (traditionally 753 BC) to the fall of the Roman Republic (31 BC, The Battle of Actium).

EUH 4413. The Roman Empire (3). This course focuses on the Roman Empire from Augustus to Constantine. Emphasis on the evolution from the principate of the early empire to the monarchy of the late empire.

GRE 1120, 1121. Beginning Greek I, II (4, 4). This course is an introduction to the basic grammar and syntax of classical Greek. Meets the foreign language requirement for the BA degree. No language laboratory required.

GRE 2220. Introduction to Greek Literature (4). This course focuses on the translation and commentary on selected Greek readings. Meets the foreign language requirement for the BA degree. No language laboratory required.

GRW 3104r. Readings in Greek Literature (3). This course focuses on the translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected Greek works. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours with change of content.

GRW 3250r. New Testament Greek (3). Prerequisite: GRE 2220 or completion of twelve-hour foreign language sequence in Greek. This course offers an introduction to reading the New Testament in Greek; it involves a comparison of New Testament Greek to Attic Greek grammar, as well as an introduction to New Testament scholarship. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours provided texts change.

GRW 4210r. Greek Prose Writers (3). This course focuses on the translation, commentary, and interpretation of readings from Greek prose writers. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GRW 4301r. Greek Drama (3). This course focuses on the translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected Greek plays. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GRW 4340r. Greek Poetry (3). This course focuses on the translation, commentary, and interpretation of readings from selected Greek poets. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours as topics vary.

GRW 4500. Greek Philosophical Writings (4). This course focuses on the translation, commentary, and interpretation of readings from the Greek philosophers or religious texts.

GRW 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

IFS 2005. Defining Moments and Identities: From the Persian Wars to September 11th (3). This course offers a comparison of the ways in which societies respond to defining, and sometimes traumatic, events in their histories. Using the Persian Wars of the 5th c. BCE, in which a small and often disunited group of Greeks successfully fought off the invasions of the powerful Persian Empire, as well as the attacks on the United States on September 11th, 2001 as the major touchstones for our investigations, students look at some of the important ways in which societies remember, memorialize, and try to come to grips with major events in their history.

IFS 2006. Citizenship and Debate: Models from the Ancient World (3). This course explores current controversial issues in American society through their counterparts in ancient Greece and Rome. Students extract selections of debates from great works of Classical literature, explore the strengths and weaknesses of opposing arguments, and engage with the parallels that have ensnared political culture in their own day. Throughout, students are concerned with the question of whether political conflict is integral, or an obstacle, to the embodiment of democratic principles.

IFS 3017. Technologies of Memory from Ancient Greece to Today (3). This course seeks to answer questions, such as "How do we know the past?" and "How might technology help or hinder us in knowing the past better?", by studying the changing and diverse roles of the various technologies used to record the past, "technologies of memory." Beginning with the earliest forms of writing, poetry, and ancient memory arts (mnemotechnics) and then extending to the modern day shift to computers and digital memorialization, students ask both what has been gained and what has been lost in these technological turns.

IFS 3018. Ancient Sexualities and Modern Sexual Politics (3). This course examines attitudes towards sexuality in ancient Greek and Roman culture, and the influence of Greek and Roman norms on later cultures and periods, including and especially our own; sexual identities play a large and increasing role in modern political life. Students explore a wide variety of literary, non-literary, and visual material in order to understand the dynamics of sexuality and power as they operate in the ancient and modern world.

IFS 3142. Ethics and Empire in the Roman World (3). This course challenges the popular stereotype of the ancient Romans as being bloodthirsty, sensual, and imperialistic, and instead focuses on their historical reality, which is much richer and far more relatable to our circumstances as members of a global community. The Romans engaged in rich ethical discussions informed by moral anecdotes, law, religion, and philosophy. As such, what can the ancient Romans, so often stereotyped as immoral and bloodthirsty, teach us about ethical living and engagement with others in a diverse global community where customs, values, and religious beliefs regularly clash?

IFS 3144. The Animal in Ancient and Modern Thought (3). This course explores human attitudes toward non-human animals in ancient and modern culture. Students read a sampling of ancient and modern literature and philosophical thought and engage with a range of themes over the course of the semester, including beliefs about animal consciousness, human-animal social relationships, the use of animals in literature and art, and the ethics of animal treatment.

LAT 1120, 1121. Beginning Latin I, II (4, 4). This course is an introduction to the basic grammar and syntax of classical Latin. Meets the foreign language requirement for the BA degree. No language laboratory required.

LAT 2220. Introduction to Latin Literature (4). This course focuses on the translation and commentary on selected Latin readings. Meets the foreign language requirement for the BA degree. No language laboratory required.

LNW 3211r. Readings in Latin Prose (3–6). Prerequisite: LAT 2220. This course introduces intermediate students to the translation and interpretation of standard Latin prose authors. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LNW 3323r. Readings in Latin Poetry (3–6). Prerequisite: LAT 2220. This course introduces intermediate students to the translation and interpretation of standard Latin poets. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LNW 4313. Plautus and Terence (3). This course focuses on the translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected plays from Plautus and Terence.

LNW 4320r. Roman Lyric, Elegiac, and Pastoral Poetry (3). This course focuses on the translation, commentary, and interpretation of poetry selected from the Roman elegists, the lyric tradition, and Roman pastoral. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LNW 4340r. Roman Epic (3). This course focuses on the translation, commentary, and interpretation of the works of Vergil or the other hexameter poets. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LNW 4360r. Roman Satire (3). This course focuses on the translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected readings from Horace and Persius, Juvenal, Martial, Petronius, or Apuleius. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LNW 4380r. The Roman Historians and Cicero (3). This course focuses on the translation, commentary, and interpretation of selected works from the Roman historians or Cicero's historical speeches and letters. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LNW 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

LNW 4999r. Tutorial in Latin (1–3). Prerequisites: LNW 3211, LNW 3323, and instructor permission. This course includes intensive work by a small number of undergraduates on a specific topic or research problem in Latin studies. May be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of six semester hours.

Graduate Courses

ARH 5111. Art and Archaeology of the Bronze Age in the Aegean (3).

ARH 5119. Archaeology of Ancient Egypt (3).

ARH 5125. Etruscan Art and Archaeology (3).

ARH 5140. Greek Art and Archaeology of the Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C. (3).

ARH 5160. Art and Archaeology of the Early Roman Empire (3).

ARH 5161. Archaeology of the Late Roman Empire (3).

ARH 5174r. Studies in Classical Art and Archaeology (3).

ARH 5934r. Tutorial in Classical Archaeology (1–3).

ARH 6937r. Doctoral Seminar in Classical Archaeology (3).

CLA 5155. Pompeii (3).

CLA 5438r. Studies in Greek History (3).

CLA 5448r. Studies in Roman History (3).

CLA 5789r. Classical Archaeology: Fieldwork (1–6).

CLA 5799r. Seminar in Classical Archaeology (3).

CLA 5905r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). (S/U grade only.)

CLA 5910r. Supervised Research (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

CLA 5919. Master of Arts Paper (3). (S/U grade only.)

CLA 5920r. Classics Colloquium (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

CLA 5931r. Special Topics in Classics (3–9).

CLA 5936. Proseminar in Classical Studies (1). (S/U grade only.)

CLA 5940r. Supervised Teaching (0–3). (S/U grade only.)

CLA 5942r. Internship in Museum Studies (3–6).

CLA 6906r. Readings for Exams (1–12). (S/U grade only.)

CLA 6932r. Seminar in Classics (3–12).

CLT 5295r. Studies in Greek Tragedy: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides (3).

CLT 5345. Studies in Greek and Roman Epic (3).

CLT 5379r. Seminar in Ancient Mythology (3).

EUH 5407. Hellenistic Greece (3).

EUH 5417. The Roman Republic (3).

EUH 5418. The Roman Empire (3).

FLE 5810. Teaching Classics (3).

GRW 5215r. Studies in the Greek Prose Writers (3).

GRW 5305r. Studies in Greek Drama (3).

GRW 5345r. Greek Poetry (3).

GRW 5505r. Greek Philosophical Writings (3).

GRW 5908r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). (S/U grade only.)

GRW 5909r. Tutorial in Greek (1–3).

GRW 6106. Survey of Greek Literature (3).

GRW 6930r. Seminar in Greek (3).

LAT 5069. Graduate Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only.)

LNW 5316r. Studies in Roman Drama (3).

LNW 5325r. Roman Lyric, Elegiac, and Pastoral Poetry (3).

LNW 5345r. Studies in Roman Epic (3).

LNW 5365r. Studies in Roman Satire (3).

LNW 5385r. The Roman Historians and Cicero (3).

LNW 5908r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). (S/U grade only.)

LNW 5932r. Tutorial in Latin (1–3).

LNW 6106. Survey of Latin Literature (3).

LNW 6930r. Seminar in Latin (3).

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE:

see Graduate Bulletin