Skip to main content

This is your Donation message.

2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

School of Communication

College of Communication and Information

Web Page: http://comm.cci.fsu.edu

Director: Gary Heald; Professors: Adams, Arpan, Houck, McDowell, Nudd, Opel, Proffitt, Raney; Associate Professors: Cortese, Jordan, MacNamara, Rayburn, Sypher; Assistant Professors: Bruker, Chapa, Clayton, Graves, Harlow, Hou, Lee, Merle; Specialized Teaching Faculty: DuBard, Heald, Laurents, Rodin, Solomon, Zeigler; Professors Emeriti: Heald, Mayo, Wotring, Young.

The School of Communication offers a degree in communication and digital media with two majors (digital media production and media/communications studies), and a degree in professional communication with two majors (advertising and public relations). These majors are organized according to various applications of communication skills and expertise in our society. This unique array of studies allows students to select a sequence of courses that directly reflects their own professional, artistic, and/or academic interests.

Each major requires a series of courses designed to meet predetermined educational and career goals. The specific goals and requirements of some areas of study are detailed in the following section entitled "Descriptions of Emphasis Areas," and on the School Web site at http://comm.cci.fsu.edu. While some areas of emphasis are professionally oriented and others stress theory and a liberal arts education, each introduces the student to the broad range of communication theory and practice and provides the student with an understanding of the fundamental human and mediated communication processes. With few exceptions, the major requires two years to complete.

In terms of both academic criteria and extracurricular accomplishments, the students in the School of Communication are of the very highest caliber. The high quality of undergraduate students is reflected in the numerous University, state, and national scholarship and fellowship recipients. The exceptional caliber and character of communication students are also proven by their extracurricular activities. The Speech and Debate Program is considered one of the most experienced, talented squads in the nation. The program philosophy assures each student the best competitive experience possible. It emphasizes quality competition and provides the resources to help each student excel to the best of his or her abilities. Communication students are also involved in broadcasting activities, including radio station WVFS, a variety of sports-related programs as part of Seminole Productions, and broadcasts on WFSU-TV, Florida State University's PBS station. Other student activities include the Advertising Club, the student chapter of the Florida Public Relations Association, the student chapter of Women in Communication, and Lambda Pi Eta, the national honor society for undergraduate communication students.

Both in and out of the classroom, the students of the School of Communication have an established track record of national recognition and achievement. The University's communication graduates can be found working in virtually every country in the world and every state in the nation. Our graduates occupy productive and prominent positions in government, law, commercial communication, media-related activities, private business interests, and education.

The School of Communication offers programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts (BA), Bachelor of Science (BS), Master of Arts (MA), Master of Science (MS), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees. Consult the Graduate Bulletin or School Web site for information regarding graduate programs.

Note: Students not formally admitted to the School of Communication are prohibited from enrolling in more than eighteen semester hours of coursework in the School of Communication (SPC 1017 and SPC 2608 do not count toward this eighteen semester hour limit). Courses available to non-majors include, but are not limited, to those listed in the following section entitled 'Requirements for a Minor in Communication.'

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in communication satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in CGS 2060, CGS 2100, or COM 4470.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

Note: The above courses are to be outside of the major (ENC and LIT prefix courses) and beyond the thirty-six hours of general education requirements.

Requirements

Admission Information

Communication is a limited-access major. Acceptance into the School of Communication and into the various areas of emphasis is highly competitive.

All students must apply separately to the University and the School of Communication. Admission to the University is not a guarantee of admission into the major and admission to the major is not a guarantee of admission to the University. Students transferring from another institution are strongly encouraged to earn an AA before matriculating at Florida State University, and should apply for admission to the School of Communication before transferring to Florida State University.

Application Process

Minimum Requirements for Application:

Students applying for admission must:

  1. Have an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher on all college coursework to be considered for admission to advertising, public relations, media production and media/communication studies
  2. Have completed CLEP and accelerated credit scores posted by time of application
  3. Have all liberal studies course substitutions approved by the appropriate dean and posted by time of application
  4. In addition, students must complete the following requirements by the end of the Spring semester in which they are applying
    1. A minimum of fifty-two semester hours of college coursework accepted by Florida State University
    2. Successfully complete ENC 1101 (three hours), as well as three hours of State Common Core courses in Math and three hours of additional FSU courses in Math.

Note: All coursework for eligibility must be reflected on submitted transcripts or on Spring course schedules by the application deadline.

The Application

Application information is available on the School of Communication Web site at http://comm.cci.fsu.edu.

To be considered for Summer/Fall admission, completed applications must be received by the School of Communication by the first business day in February at 5:00 p.m. Included in the application process must be copies of transcripts from all colleges and universities attended. Late applications will not be accepted.

The Review Process

A. Advertising, Public Relations, Digital Media Production

A faculty committee will review applications and supporting documents of candidates who meet the minimum requirements for application. There are three major criteria by which all undergraduate applications in the School of Communication will be assessed: GPA in context, strength of experience relevant to the field, and evidence of potential success in a relevant field. More specifically, the faculty members reviewing the applications in all areas will consider the following:

  1. GPA in all college coursework
  2. Record of academic success in communication and communication-related courses
  3. Quality of writing in application materials
  4. Well-defined goals and expectations related to the chosen field
  5. Previous high school, college, or professional experiences related to the chosen field

(See School of Communication application for additional information regarding the review process.)

B. Media/Communication Studies

After meeting the minimum requirements for application (above), the GPA in all college coursework will be the sole admission criterion.

Retention Standards

The School of Communication reserves the right to discontinue enrollment of any student in the major at any time if, in the judgment of the faculty, the student does not meet the standards of the school or the major. Specifically, majors in the School of Communication must maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 on all college coursework or they may be placed on probation and may be dropped subsequently from the major.

Requirements for a Major in Communication

Different programs of study specify different graduation requirements that lead to the baccalaureate degrees in Communication. Descriptions of each program's required and elective course sequences are available on the school's Web site at http://comm.cci.fsu.edu.

The School of Communication has the following requirements for graduation. These requirements are beyond the minimum University requirements and those specified by each emphasis area: (1) meet the school's language proficiency requirement; (2) only coursework with grades of "C–" or above will count toward a student's degree in communication; and (3) completion of a minor in an academic area outside the School of Communication. Students must undergo University and school graduation checks. Students who wish to intern must make arrangements with the faculty advisor and submit school contracts the semester prior to enrollment. Internship requirements vary by program of study. Only formally admitted communication majors can register for a communication internship.

Language Proficiency Requirement

Students formally admitted into any major in the School of Communication during or after the 2003 admission cycle must achieve proficiency in one language other than English prior to graduation. As a school, we define "language" in broad terms, understanding that a variety of skills are equally important to the field of communication. To that end, students may fulfill this requirement by taking courses in modern or business language. In order to fulfill the school's Business Language-Proficiency requirement, students must earn at least a "C–" in each language course. Courses may not be taken on an S/U basis.

Students formally admitted during or after the 2012 admission cycle may take courses in the Modern Language Proficiency on an S/U basis.

The school's language proficiency requirement is more extensive than the University's foreign language admissions requirement. It is important to understand that although completion of two years of high school language courses or two semesters of post-secondary language will satisfy the University's Admissions requirement, these courses do not satisfy the School of Communication's language proficiency graduation requirements. Please consult the "Admissions" chapter of this General Bulletin for more information.

Modern Language Proficiency. Students may satisfy the language proficiency requirement by completing coursework through the 2000 level (2200 or equivalent course) of a classical or modern language. Students admitted prior to 2012 must earn at least a "C–" in each course; courses may not be taken on an S/U basis. For students admitted during or after 2012, language proficiency courses may be taken on an S/U basis. Native speakers of another language and other students who wish to demonstrate proficiency by means other than coursework should consult the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics. Upon graduation, those students who pursue this option through a spoken language (e.g., French, German, Spanish, Latin, etc.) will receive a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree.

Business Language Proficiency. Students may satisfy the business language proficiency requirement by completing the following coursework for a total of nine semester hours: ECO 2013, Principles of Macroeconomics, ECO 2023, Principles of Microeconomics, and one of the following: STA 2023, Fundamental Business Statistics, or STA 2122, Introduction to Applied Statistics. A student taking coursework to fulfill the department's business language requirement must earn at least a "C–" in each course; courses may not be taken on an S/U basis. Upon graduation, students who pursue the business language proficiency option will receive a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree.

Required Minor

A minor of at least twelve semester hours is required. All work counted toward the minor must carry a grade of "C–" or better. The minor must be in a department other than the School of Communication, with the exception of the Minor in Hispanic Marketing Communication. Requirements for the minor are established by the minor department, which can be found under the appropriate entry of this General Bulletin. Minors are checked by the major department upon graduation. See individual descriptions of majors below for suggestions. Communication majors who complete a second major outside of the School of Communication do not need a minor. The required minor is applicable, however, to those pursuing a dual degree.

Interdepartmental Minor

A fifteen semester hour interdepartmental minor is possible, provided that the coursework is outside the School of Communication and is approved in advance by the faculty advisor and the school director.

Honors in the Major

The School of Communication offers a program in honors in communication to encourage talented juniors and seniors to undertake independent and original research as part of the undergraduate experience. For requirements and other information, see the "University Honors Office and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Requirements for a Minor in Communication

The School of Communication offers a minor in communication on a space available basis only. The minor consists of twelve semester hours in communication selected from the following courses:

ADV 3008 Principles of Advertising (3)

ADV 3352 Mass Media Law (3)*

ADV 3410 Hispanic Marketing Communication (3)*

COM 3332 New Communication Technology and Contemporary Society (3)*

COM 3483 Reel Legal (3)*

COM 3930 Special Topics in Communication (3)

IFS 3033 Media, Culture, and the Environment (3)

MMC 2000 Introduction to the Mass Media (3)*

PUR 3000 Introduction to Public Relations (3)*

RTV 3001 Media Techniques (3)*

SPC 3210 Contemporary Human Communication (3)*

*Available online

In addition, any 3000 or 4000 level Communication courses taught by FSU Communication faculty at one of FSU's International Programs can count toward the minor.

Please not that only the courses listed above can be applied to the minor, the School will not make substitutions. Additionally, courses taken to meet the minor are not applicable to any other degree requirement.

Only coursework with a grade of "C–" or above in four of these courses will count toward the minor. Credit earned in meeting the Oral Communication Competency Requirement (OCCR) may not be used to satisfy the minor. At least six semester hours of the communication minor must be taken in the Florida State University School of Communication on campus, online, or at one of our International Programs.

The School of Communication also offers a minor in Hispanic Marketing Communication. Please contact the school for more information.

Description of Emphasis Areas

Advertising and Public Relations

  • Career and Educational Goals. Students in this emphasis area will master skills necessary for a career in advertising or public relations.
  • Skills to be Developed. Advertising students will focus on account management, creative strategy, media planning, and research skills. Public relations students will concentrate on public relations writing, tactics, research, and campaign management skills.
  • Focus Areas. A student applying to this program is required to indicate on the application form his/her preferred focus area: advertising or public relations.
  • Major Hours Required. Thirty-nine semester hours. All work counted toward the major must carry a grade of "C–" or better.
  • Required Minor. A minor (or second major), with advisor approval, is required. All minor work must be in a department other than the School of Communication. All work counted toward the minor must carry a grade of "C–" or better. Requirements for the minor are established by the minor department and can be found in this General Bulletin. Suggested minors include: business, psychology, English, journalism (at FAMU), political science, social science, an interdepartmental minor, and others, depending upon one's career objectives.
  • Internship. Advertising and public relations students are required to earn internship hours. Please see our Web site at http://comm.cci.fsu.edu for more information regarding this requirement.

Course Requirements for the Advertising and Public Relations Emphasis Areas

A listing of specific courses and requirements is available at http://www.academic-guide.fsu.edu.

Media/Communication Studies

  • Career and Educational Goals. Students graduating in this emphasis area should have a solid liberal arts education. Degrees in media/communication studies are applicable to a number of fields including law, media industries, media research, communications, management, lobbying, management careers in media, cable, advertising, arts and entertainment, emerging information technologies, and related fields. (Prospective students should note that the School of Communication does not offer a program in print or broadcast journalism.)
  • Major Hours Required. Thirty-three semester hours. All work counted toward the major must carry a grade of "C–" or better.
  • Required Minor. A minor (or second major), with advisor approval, is required. All minor work must be in a department other than the School of Communication. All work counted toward the minor must carry a grade of "C–" or better. Requirements for the minor are established by the minor department and can be found in this General Bulletin. Recommended minors include: English, political science, psychology, journalism (at FAMU), sociology, women's studies, African-American studies, or British studies (the Florida State University London Program). A fifteen semester hour interdepartmental minor is also possible, provided the coursework is outside of the School of Communication and is approved in advance by the faculty advisor and the school director.
  • Internship. An internship (COM 4945r) is strongly recommended. A student may enroll for up to twelve semester hours of internship, but a maximum of three semester hours may be credited toward the major.
  • Recommended Extracurricular Activities. Forensics and Debate, V89, Women in Communication, student government, theatre productions, Seminole Productions, WFSU and 4FSU, Lambda Pi Eta.

Course Requirements for the Media/Communication Studies Emphasis

A listing of specific courses and requirements is available at http://www.academic-guide.fsu.edu.

Digital Media Production

  • Career and Educational Goals. Students with an emphasis in media production typically pursue management or production careers in broadcasting, cable, advertising, video production, arts and entertainment, emerging information technologies, and related fields. Prospective students should note that the School of Communication does not offer a program in print or broadcast journalism.
  • Areas of Special Knowledge and Skills to be Developed. The media production emphasis will expose students to techniques employed in the production of digital media. Students may acquire such skills as writing for the media, on-camera performance, video production, and video editing.
  • Major Hours Required. Thirty-nine semester hours are required in the media production area. All work counted toward the major must carry a grade of "C–" or better.
  • Required Minor. A minor (or second major), approved by your advisor, is required. All work must be in a department other than the School of Communication. All work counted toward the minor must carry a grade of a "C–" or better. Requirements for the minor are established by the minor department and can be found in this General Bulletin. Recommended minors include: business, English, political science, psychology, journalism (at FAMU), sociology, criminology, social sciences, American studies, or British studies (the Florida State University London Program). A fifteen semester hour interdepartmental minor is also possible, provided the coursework is outside the School of Communication and is approved in advance by the faculty advisor and the school director.
  • Internship. An internship (COM 4945r) is strongly recommended. A student may enroll for up to twelve semester hours of internship, but a maximum of three semester hours may be credited toward the major.

Course Requirements for the Media Production Emphasis

A specific listing of courses and requirements is available at http://www.academic-guide.fsu.edu.

Definition of Prefixes

ADV—Advertising

COM—Communication

IFS—Interdisciplinary Florida State University Courses

MMC—Mass Media Communication

ORI—Oral Interpretation

PUR—Public Relations

RTV—Radio: Television

SED—Speech Education

SPC—Speech Communication

VIC—Visual Communication

Undergraduate Courses

ADV 3001. Creative Strategy I (3). This foundation course in advertising explores creativity in a workshop environment.

ADV 3008. Principles of Advertising (3). This course explores advertising and promotion as related to level of economic growth, cultural influences, and sociolegal environments.

ADV 3352. Mass Media Law (3). This course offers a comprehensive review of laws, rules, and regulations affecting both the advertising and broadcast industries as well as other forms of mass media. Topics include libel, slander, invasion of privacy, gathering of information, and copyright laws.

ADV 3410. Hispanic Marketing Communication (3). This course prepares undergraduate students to become educated decision makers and consumers of information regarding U.S. Hispanic marketing communication issues.

ADV 3801r. Advertising Team I (3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course is application-based and provides students with the opportunity to develop a complete Integrated Marketing Communication campaign plan as part of the National Student Advertising Competition sponsored by the American Advertising Federation. The course is set up as hierarchy-based advertising agency with some students in leadership positions and others working in departments that are managed by student directors. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ADV 3823r. Advertising Team II (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course is the second of a two course sequence. The course focuses on campaign execution. The advertising team course is an application-based class, which provides students with the opportunity to develop a complete Integrated Marketing Communication campaign plan as part of the National Student Advertising Competition sponsored by the American Advertising Federation. The class is set up as hierarchy based advertising agency with some students in leadership positions and others working in departments that are managed by student directors. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ADV 4300. Media Planning (3). Prerequisite: ADV 3008. This course explores the coordination of advertising and marketing research, planning, creative strategy, and selection of media and production activities leading to the development of advertising campaigns.

ADV 4411. Multicultural Marketing Communication (3). This course is geared to train students to become effective communicators and marketers when reaching out to multicultural society. Marketers, communicators, and service providers interested in being effective in reaching out to culturally diverse groups need to become adept at designing messages and strategies geared to a culturally diverse society.

ADV 4500. Advertising Research (3). Prerequisite: ADV 3008. This course covers survey, observational, and experimental methods and processes. Topics include research design, planning, questionnaire construction, sampling, validity measurements, field work, tabulations, presentation, and interpretation.

ADV 4603. Account Planning (3). This course explores account planning as a growing practice in advertising and public relations that emphasizes placing the consumer at the center of strategic planning. The account planner obtains consumer insights and ensures that the planning process is informed by consumer needs, values, and dispositions.

ADV 4800. Creative Strategy II (3). Prerequisites: ADV 3001, ADV 3008, and ADV 4500. This course fosters creative and empathetic skills necessary in communicating via print and electronic media and enables students to utilize these skills in creating integrated advertising campaigns.

COM 2080. Online Communication and Presence (3). This course provides students with theoretical background and practical experience in constructing messages for online communication, as well as managing self-presentation and professional relationships in the online environment. The course includes critical analysis of information sources and audiences and the development and delivery of online oral presentations.

COM 2412. Culture, Identity and Communication in Context (3). This course brings international and U.S. American students together to explore intercultural communication in a specific set of contexts, including the academic environment; day to day social interactions; family structures; national political scenes; the business world, and more.

COM 2740. Contemporary Issues in Communication (3). (S/U grade only.) This course introduces contemporary issues in communication, including communication as an academic discipline, a major business and governmental policy sector, and a professional career. The course reviews some historical and predominantly current issues, policies and practices that are central to the field of communication.

COM 3070. Careers in Communication (3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Admission to Media/Communication Studies. This course is designed to help Media/Communication Studies students be able to identify career goals, analyze career fields in communication, create a resumé and cover letter, and demonstrate interviewing skills.

COM 3110. Communication for Business and the Professions (3). This workplace-oriented course provides practical education and experience in the performance of informative, persuasive, and special occasion speeches through individual and group presentations. Fulfills OCCR requirement.

COM 3310. Communication Research Methods (3). This course is an introduction to communication research methods. It examines survey, experimental, observational, and content analysis methods. Philosophy of science, research design, measurement, sampling, data collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting.

COM 3332. New Communication Technology and Contemporary Society (3). This course relates the development and the use of new communication technologies to a variety of issues, such as social, economic, health, and policy implications.

COM 3420. Media, Culture, and the Environment (3). This course examines the role of language and representation in our understanding of the natural world. The course examines news media coverage of environmental issues, environmental images in popular culture, as well as the communication strategies of environmental organizations.

COM 3483. Reel Legal (3). This course provides students with a basic understanding of the law through the use of films about the law. Concepts include: natural law, coaching witnesses, rights of the accused, jury deliberations, perjury, legal ethics, congressional investigations, obligation of witnesses, right to counsel, etc. Topics such as race, class, gender, and ethnicity as pertaining to law are also explored.

COM 3510. Political Communication and Campaigning (3). This course explores campaigns, elections, and American politics in a communication framework; planning campaign strategies.

COM 3930r. Special Topics in Communication (3). This course is an analysis of specialized topics of current concern in communication. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours; duplicate registration allowed.

COM 3933r. Application of Communication Skills (1–6). (S/U grade only.) This course combines some classroom lecture with other types of instruction that allows students to apply a variety of communication skills in diverse settings. The course is meant for groups of students rather than individuals. The other types of instruction can be a combination of any or all of the following: internship, directed individual study, project implementation, laboratory, and other instructional modes tailored to the specific topic of the course and the educational goal of the students. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours; duplicate registration allowed.

COM 3949r. Experiential Learning (0). (S/U grade only.) This non-credit, experiential learning course offers students an opportunity to gain "real world" on-the-job work experience related to a specific academic field of study. Students must register for this course through the FSU Career Center.

COM 3950r. Communication Activities (1). (S/U grade only.) May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours; duplicate registration allowed.

COM 4173. ICT Enterprise (3). This course is an introduction to information technology entrepreneurship. The course includes critical aspects of small business development; building entrepreneurial attitudes and behaviors that lead to inventive thinking as well as the important aspects of planning, managing, and funding a startup business.

COM 4330. Communication and the Internet (3). This course develops technical and communication skills in Internet-based communication technologies. Hands-on survey of Internet technologies with focus on communication issues, problems, and competencies.

COM 4470. Desktop Multimedia (3). This course provides overview of operations and applications of software packages; principles of design and presentation for print-based as well as audio-visual productions.

COM 4480. Legal Communication (3). This course is an analysis of how communication affects and is affected by our legal institutions and processes.

COM 4560. Social Marketing (3). Prerequisite: MMC 2000 or PUR 3000. This course is an overview and application of social marketing principles and campaigns. The course is designed to familiarize students with current theory and knowledge in the field of social marketing and to provide students experience with planning a social marketing campaign.

COM 4561. Social Media Campaigns (3). This course prepares students to design and implement a social media campaign, and introduces them to the social, political, and ethical contexts of using new technologies. The class takes either a social advocacy or a marketing perspective.

COM 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Admission to a Communication major. In this course, students select a topic of interest to pursue under supervision of a faculty member. Could be research/creative, pedagogy, service, or applied. Results in final project, scope and type to be defined by student and faculty supervisor. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

COM 4909r. Honors Work (1–6). Prerequisite: Admission to the major. This course is for students in the honors program who are working on an honors thesis. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

COM 4910r. Application of Research Methods (1–3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course offers experience in methods and strategies of research in communication concepts. Individually designed to accommodate student's background and objectives. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours; duplicate registration allowed.

COM 4930r. Undergraduate Seminar in Communication (3). This course explores advanced communication issues with an emphasis on research. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours; duplicate registration allowed.

COM 4935. Senior Seminar in Communication Studies (3). This course is an advanced seminar in communication studies with an emphasis in legal communication studies, communication and culture, or rhetorical studies.

COM 4941r. Application of Instructional Methods (0–3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Admission to a Communication major. This course provides experience in methods and strategies of teaching communication concepts within the University context. Individually designed to accommodate student's background and objectives. May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours; duplicate registration not allowed.

COM 4945r. Communication Internship (1–12). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Admission to a major in Communication. This course is a supervised internship. The credit is proportional to the scope and significance of work and may not be applied to graduate degrees. The course is individually designed to accommodate student's background and objectives. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

IFS 2021. Social Responsibility (Rhetorically Speaking) (3). This course is for students living in the social justice living learning community. It acquaints students with the principles of communication and the role it plays in social justice movements.

IFS 2052. Global Perspectives: Communication (3). This course introduces students to the basic processes of intercultural communication from a global perspective in hopes of increasing their curiosity and acceptance of other cultures.

IFS 2078. Communication Matters – Personal Responsibility in Public Speaking (3). This course covers both the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking with an emphasis on personal responsibility.

IFS 2102. From Page to Screen: The Art and Politics of Adaptation (3). In this course, students read original texts in different genres (e.g. mystery, children's fantasy novel, play, choreopoem, film, short story) and then watch and analyze films based on those texts. In doing so, students explore two major questions: "Why are cinematic adaptations so prolific in America?" and "Why do we like (or hate) film adaptations of texts we have already read"?

IFS 2103. Documentary Film: History, Theory, and Practice (3). This course examines the major trends in the documentary film tradition, beginning with the first efforts in the early part of the 20th century and moving up to the present while providing students the opportunity to learn the basics of documentary practice.

IFS 3033. Media, Culture and the Environment (3). This course examines the role of language and representation in our understanding of the natural world. The course examines news media coverage of environmental issues, environmental images in popular culture as well as the communication strategies of environmental organizations.

MMC 2000. Introduction to the Mass Media (3). This course covers a historical and social overview of the mass media and their relationship to the mass communication process in a modern society.

MMC 3703. Media, Sports, and Society (3). Prerequisite: MMC 2000. This course introduces students to various aspects of the sports-media relationship, including the history of, the industries that constitute, the audiences drawn to, and the social issues that arise from the relationship.

MMC 4200. Media Legalities (3). Prerequisite: MMC 2000. This course is a review and application of media business practices and legal requirements involved in the conception and production of media content on electronic, online, and new media platforms.

MMC 4203. Media Ethics (3). Prerequisite: MMC 2000 or RTV 3001. This course surveys the ethical principles, standards, and problems in the practice of journalism, advertising, and/or public relations.

MMC 4300. Diffusion of Innovations (3). This course is an analysis of the process of change, particularly from the standpoint of how communication is used in the introduction, spread, and adoption of new ideas, behaviors, and products within a society.

MMC 4302. Comparative and International Media Studies (3). Prerequisite: Admission to one of the majors in the School of Communication. This course is an examination of various international and national media systems and the elements which determine the type of media currently operating throughout the world.

MMC 4602. Mass Media and Society (3). Prerequisite: MMC 2000. This course is an analysis of the effects of mass media on public opinion and behavior. A review of social science research exploring the impact of TV on children and others.

MMC 4641. Political Economy of Media (3). Prerequisite: MMC 2000 or RTV 3001. This course covers the structure and functions of U.S. and other mass-communication systems as well as their relationship to the political and economic systems.

ORI 3004. Performance Studies (3). This course allows students to collect, analyze, and perform personal narratives and everyday conversations.

ORI 3110. Performance of Contemporary Literature (3). This course includes analysis of and practical experience in the performance of poetry and prose.

PUR 3000. Introduction to Public Relations (3). This course introduces the student to the principles and practices of the public relations profession throughout all organizations using public relations.

PUR 3002. Public Relations Techniques (3). Prerequisites: PUR 3000 and PUR 3100. This course covers the tools and techniques of public relations. Application of public relations principles.

PUR 3100. Writing for Public Relations (3). Pre- or corequisite: PUR 3000. This course is designed to develop professional-level writing skills for public relations.

PUR 3930. Public Relations Proseminar (1). (S/U grade only.) Corequisite: PUR 3000. For this course, public relations majors must register for the proseminar on admission to the program. They are to become active in FPRA, PRSSA, or WIC and remain active during undergraduate work.

PUR 4600. Public Relations Management: Cases and Campaign Strategies (3). Prerequisites: PUR 3000, PUR 3002, and PUR 3100. This course is designed to focus on the management function of public relations. Focus is on significant cases and campaign strategies.

PUR 4940r. Public Relations Internship (1–12). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisites: PUR 3000, PUR 3002, and PUR 3100. This course consists of practical application of classroom principles in public relations settings. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

RTV 3001. Media Techniques (3). This course introduces students to basic principles and terminology associated with the aesthetics of film making and television production.

RTV 3003. Elements of Broadcasting (3). This course surveys American broadcasting from the standpoint of communicators, organizations, content, and audience with special emphasis on research.

RTV 3101. Writing for the Electronic Media (3). This course consists of non-fiction writing for television and radio including public affairs, commercials, and documentaries.

RTV 3103. Narrative Writing for Television and Film (3). This course consists of the development and writing of fictional scripts for television and film.

RTV 3531. Single-Camera Video Production (3). Corequisite: RTV 3571. This course addresses direction and production of single-camera video projects including camera, audio, lighting, and linear editing.

RTV 3533. Television Production (4). This course consists of the fundamentals of studio and field production including camera, audio, lighting, and production planning using the crew system.

RTV 3543. Multiple Camera Studio Production (3). Prerequisite: RTV 3531. This course studies the direction and production of multiple-camera studio video projects including camera, lighting, audio, and live-to-tape switching.

RTV 3571. Video Post Production (3). (S/U grade only.) Corequisite: RTV 3531. This course consists of advanced editing and post production techniques applied to field and studio projects. Emphasis on digital non-linear editing systems.

RTV 3602. Television Interviewing and Hosting (3). This course introduces students to on-camera interviewing and hosting of news and public affairs programs including research and writing components.

RTV 3610. Computer Graphics and Animation (3). Prerequisites: RTV 3531 and RTV 3571. This course studies the design and production of computer-generated graphics and animation for video projects.

RTV 3611. 3D Video Animation (3). This course covers the techniques used to prepare, create, and post-produce 3D graphics and animation with video.

RTV 3671. Directing Performance for the Camera (3). Prerequisite: RTV 3531. This course allows students to direct student actors in a workshop setting. Actors and directors gain experience with an appreciation for those on the other side of the camera.

RTV 3680r. Video Workshop (1–3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Communication major status. This course is designed for students to gain experience in the production of television programs and video projects. May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

RTV 3926r. Radio Workshop (1–3). (S/U grade only.) This course consists of general staff work in any department of the campus student-run radio station. Designed to afford both entry-level training and advanced application of skills. Students must work three hours per week for one hour of credit. May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

RTV 3941r. Radio Practicum (3–6). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course consists of advanced radio work in either of two areas: management or other supervisory roles at the student radio station; or special individual projects in the application, study, or research of audio pertaining to radio broadcasting. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

RTV 4291. Advocacy Video Theory and Practice (3). Prerequisites: RTV 3531, RTV 3571, and admission to the Media Production major or instructor permission. This course explores the theory and practice of short-form video production. In addition, the course examines the social media distribution possibilities for these videos.

RTV 4332. Documentary Video Production (3). Corequisites: RTV 3531 and RTV 3571. This course offers instruction in the theory and practice of production of non-fiction documentary video. Students produce a final video product after studying the documentary tradition, theory, and history.

RTV 4467r. Television Practicum (3–6). Prerequisites: RTV 3531 and RTV 3571. This course consists of producing and directing television programs and video projects. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

RTV 4504. Electronic Media Audience Measurement (3). Prerequisite: ADV 3008. This course provides an understanding of past and current methods of measuring radio, TV and cable audiences; terms and formulas used by the ratings services; the local market radio (Arbitron) and TV (Nielsen) reports; how ratings and other audience estimates are utilized in radio/TV/cable programming and sales; the newest developments in audience measurement; customized and qualitative approaches to audience measurement; and computer applications widely used in the broadcasting and advertising industries.

RTV 4595. Immersive Video Production (3). Prerequisites: RTV 3531, RTV 3571, and admission to the DMP major or special permission by instructor. This course explores a range of new camera technology and software that allows for the post-production of immersive media, and identifies best practices for producing, shooting, editing and displaying immersive video products.

RTV 4651. Advanced Narrative Production (3). Prerequisites: RTV 3531 and RTV 3571. This course includes original student narratives produced through writing, pre-production, and post-production stages.

RTV 4682. Advanced Feature Production (3). Prerequisites: RTV 3531 and RTV 3571; or RTV 3533. This course is a "professional experience" course designed to give students professional production experience in an educational environment. Students act as the production crew on program features. This includes videography, editing, audio, and graphic design.

RTV 4686. Advanced Feature Reporting (3). Corequisite: RTV 3602. This is a professional course designed to give you on-air experience in an educational environment, while promoting FSU athletics. Students produce features for Seminole Sports Magazine, a thirty-minute show that airs weekly on Sun Sports.

RTV 4800. Radio-Television Station Operation and Programming (3). Corequisite: MMC 2000. This course deals with the purpose, function, organization, and programming of the radio and television station with an emphasis on research.

RTV 4930. Los Angeles Television Experience (3). Prerequisite: Admission to the Media Production major. This course examines the TV and film industry in Los Angeles including the industry structure, production cycles, the studios, the networks, and the writers. The course takes place in Los Angles and also addresses professional career paths in the Los Angeles entertainment industry.

RTV 4970. Senior Thesis in Production (3). Prerequisites: Senior standing, twelve semester hours of 3000 level production courses, and instructor permission. This culminating course for students in production enables individual students, focusing on areas they have mastered in intermediate courses, to produce senior thesis video projects.

SPC 1017. Fundamentals of Speech (3). This course provides a survey and application of communication theory, including interpersonal communication, small group communication, and public speaking.

SPC 2608. Public Speaking (3). This course covers both the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).

SPC 2730. Global Perspectives: Communication (3). This course gives students an introduction to the basic processes of intercultural communication from a global perspective with a goal of increasing their curiosity and acceptance of other cultures.

SPC 3210. Contemporary Human Communication (3). This introductory course surveys current scholarship in five areas of communication theory: group, rhetorical, interpersonal, legal, and performance communication.

SPC 3233. Classical Rhetoric (3). Recommended prerequisite: SPC 3210. This course allows students to examine the origins of rhetorical theory during the classical period. The course emphasizes ideas on rhetoric of Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, and Quintillian.

SPC 3301. Interpersonal Communication (3). This course is a survey of recent literature on interpersonal communication including such topics as self-concept, emotional behavior, interpersonal conflict, and interpersonal attraction.

SPC 3331. Nonverbal Communication (3). This course is a review of recent literature on nonverbal communication including such topics as kinesics, proxemics, kinesthetic behavior, environment, physical characteristics, and personal appearance.

SPC 3593r. Competitive Intercollegiate Forensics (1). This course consists of competitive debate and individual events. Experienced students develop and perfect their speaking skills in a highly competitive, structured format of instruction and competition. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

SPC 3644. Rhetoric of Didactic Literature (3). This course is an analysis of drama as an instrument for advancing a political or social thesis.

SPC 4540. Persuasion (3). This course is a study of the psychology of attitude formation and change, including theories of persuasion and principles of persuasive communication.

SPC 4605. The Principles of Speechwriting (3). Corequisite: COM 3110. This course explores the history and principles of speechwriting, the ethical issues involved, and speechwriting skills based on sound principles of communication.

SPC 4630. Rhetoric of Women's Issues (3). This course is an examination of selected social and political issues that affect women today. The course includes analysis of content, lines of argument, supporting evidence, and rhetorical strategies.

SPC 4680. Methods of Rhetorical Criticism (3). Recommended prerequisite: SPC 3231 or SPC 3233. This course examines methods for the practice of doing criticism of rhetorical discourse. Topics include Aristotelian, Metaphor, narrative, post-modern, and cultural approaches to the analysis of texts.

SPC 4710. Interracial/Intercultural Communication (3). This course is an exploration of interracial and intercultural communication and the philosophies that underlie the concept.

SPC 4711. Gender and Communication (3). This course is designed to help students gain knowledge of the theory and process of gender communication (about and between genders) from an interpersonal context perspective.

Graduate Courses

ADV 5007. Foundations of Integrated Marketing Communications (3).

ADV 5415. Hispanic Marketing Communication (3).

ADV 5416. Multicultural Marketing Communication (3).

ADV 5503. Media Consumer Behavior (3).

ADV 5605. Account Planning (3).

ADV 5701. Communication Career Futures (3). (S/U grade only.)

COM 5126. Organizational Communication Theory and Practice (3).

COM 5127. Assessing Organizational Communication (3).

COM 5312. Research Methods in Communication (3).

COM 5314. Measurement of Listener-Viewer Attitude and Response (3).

COM 5316. Statistical Methods in Communication Research (3).

COM 5317. Content Analysis in Communication Research (3).

COM 5331. Computers in Communication Research (3).

COM 5338. Web Site Usability and Design (3).

COM 5339. Interactive Programming and Design for the Web (3).

COM 5340. Historical-Critical Methods of Research (3).

COM 5348. Qualitative Methods in Communication Research (3).

COM 5364. Foundations of Digital Media (3).

COM 5365. Computer Graphics and Animation (3).

COM 5401. Analysis of Communication Theory (3).

COM 5426. Media, Culture, and the Environment (3).

COM 5450. Introduction to Project Management (3).

COM 5451. Advanced Topics in Project Management (3).

COM 5452. Agile Project Management (3).

COM 5467. System Thinking and Project Management (3).

COM 5526. Marketing Communication Management (3).

COM 5546. Political Communication (3).

COM 5565. Social Media Advocacy Campaigns (3).

COM 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

COM 5911r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

COM 5920r. Colloquium in Communication (0–1). (S/U grade only.)

COM 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

COM 5946r. Communication Residency (1–6). (S/U grade only.)

COM 5955. Capstone Creative Project (1–6). (S/U grade only.)

COM 6015. Gender and Communication (3).

COM 6400r. Seminar in Communication Theory (3).

COM 6403r. Advanced Problems in Communication Theory and Research (2–8).

COM 6900. Preparation for the Preliminary Examination (2–4). (S/U grade only.)

COM 6931r. Special Topics in Communication Research (3).

COM 8975. Capstone Creative Project Defense (0). (S/U grade only.)

MMC 5305. Comparative Systems of Mass Communication (3).

MMC 5600. Mass Communication Theory and Effects (3).

MMC 5646. Political Economy of Media (3).

MMC 6469. Diffusion of Innovations (3).

MMC 6920r. Colloquium in Mass Communication (3).

RTV 5333. Documentary Video Production (3).

RTV 5423. New Communication Technology: Theory and Research (3).

RTV 5575. Digital Post Production (3).

RTV 5596. Immersive Video Production (3).

RTV 5652. Advanced Narrative Production (3).

RTV 5702. Communication Regulation and Policy (3).

RTV 6425r. Advanced Seminar in New Communication Technologies (3–6).

SED 5346. Teaching Oral Communication Courses (3).

SPA 5058. Clinical Methods (4).

SPC 5234. Classical Theories of Rhetoric (3).

SPC 5442. Group Dynamics and Leadership (3).

SPC 5545. Studies in Persuasion (3).

SPC 5614. Criticism of Contemporary Public Address (3).

SPC 6306. Contemporary Topics in Interpersonal Communication (3).

SPC 6715. Race, Culture, and Communication (3).

SPC 6920r. Colloquium in Speech Communication (3).

VIC 5006. Visual Communication (3).

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.