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2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Criminology and Criminal Justice

College of Criminology and Criminal Justice

Web Page: http://criminology.fsu.edu/index.php

Professors: Bales, Beaver, Blomberg, Chiricos, Doerner, Gertz, Hay, Maier-Katkin, Mears, Stewart; Associate Professors: Coonan, Siennick, Stults, Warren; Assistant Professors: Chouhy, Close, Copp, Turanovic, Wegner; Professors Emeriti: Kirkham, Kleck, Waldo

The College of Criminology and Criminal Justice offers undergraduate and graduate programs leading to the Bachelor of Science (BS), Bachelor of Arts (BA), Master of Science (MS), Master of Arts (MA), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees. Undergraduate degree programs include criminology and computer criminology, a joint program with the Department of Computer Science. An accelerated bachelor's to master's degree program is offered in criminology and criminal justice for eligible students. A distance learning certificate is available in criminology. A distance-learning Master of Science (MS) degree program in criminal justice studies is available. Also available is a dual master's degree program with the School of Public Administration and the College of Social Work. Some evening courses are offered for undergraduate and graduate students. A distance-learning Bachelor of Science degree program in criminology is also available.

Refer to the "College of Criminology and Criminal Justice" chapter in this General Bulletin for additional details on degree requirements, the college, student opportunities, and financial aid.

Academic Performance and Retention

The College of Criminology and Criminal Justice reserves the right to discontinue enrollment of any student in the College at any time if satisfactory academic progress is not being made. Specifically, students majoring in criminology must earn a "C" or better in the three core courses and maintain a major GPA of 2.0. A student who has accumulated three unsatisfactory grades, (D+, D, D–, F, U, IE) in criminology and criminal justice courses taken for college credit at Florida State University or elsewhere, whether repeated or not, will not be permitted to continue, be readmitted, or be allowed to graduate with a degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice.

Students majoring in computer criminology must earn a "C" or better in core courses CCJ 2020, CCJ 3011, and CCJ 4700, and a "C–" or better in all other courses for the major, and maintain an overall GPA of 2.0. Students with more than four grades below "C–" (D+, D, D–, F, U, IE) in criminology, criminal justice, computer science, or prerequisite coursework, whether taken at Florida State University or elsewhere, whether repeated or not, will not be permitted to continue in the major.

A student who applies for readmission to the College must meet the major and degree requirements of the General Bulletin in force on the date of readmission.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer competency skills prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in criminology satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in CGS 2060 or CGS 2100. Undergraduate majors in computer criminology satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in COP 3014.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into this upper-division degree program:

Computer Criminology

  1. COP XXXX: one course for three credit hours in computer programming
  2. MAC X105
  3. MAC X140

Major Requirements for Criminology and Criminal Justice

To major in criminology, a student must complete thirty-six semester hours in criminology and criminal justice coursework, including three core courses. The three core courses are Introduction to Criminal Justice (CCJ 2020), Criminology (CCJ 3011), and Introduction to Research Methods in Criminology (CCJ 4700). Two core courses (CCJ 3011 and CCJ 4700) are expected to be taken at Florida State University; CCJ 2020 may be taken at the community college. A minimum grade of "C" must be obtained in each core course. For acceptable core course substitutions, see the department for an approved list. An optional one-semester, full-time (fifteen semester hour) internship is available. If a student chooses to take the internship, only three of the fifteen semester hours will count toward the required thirty-six hours in the major. Students in the major are required to complete either a full time internship, a minor, or second major in another department or program outside the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice, and they must meet all requirements stipulated by that department or program.

For students transferring from another four-year university, at least twenty-seven semester hours must be earned at Florida State University in the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice; the University requires the last thirty semester hours prior to graduation be taken at Florida State University. In addition, all University requirements must be met for either the Bachelor of Arts (BA) or the Bachelor of Science (BS) degrees.

Major Requirements for Computer Criminology

To major in computer criminology, a student must complete fifty-two semester hours in criminology and criminal justice, computer science, and mathematics courses. Students will complete twenty-four hours in criminology and criminal justice and twenty-five hours in computer science coursework that includes eight core courses. The required core courses from criminology and criminal justice are: CCJ 2020, CCJ 3011, CCJ 4700, and CJE 3110. The required core courses from computer science are: CDA 3100, COP 3014, COP 3330, and COP 3353. A total of six hours of capstone coursework representing criminology and criminal justice and computer science is required. The capstone course for criminology is CCJ 4938 and the capstone course for computer science is CIS 4385. Students must also complete three hours of Discrete Math, MAD 2104. From an approved list, students will choose nine additional hours in criminology and criminal justice as well as twelve additional hours in computer science coursework. Computer science electives may be chosen from: CIS 4360, CIS 4361, CNT 4406, CNT 4504, CNT 4603, COP 4342, COP 4530, COP 4610, CDA 3101, and COP 4710. Students must earn a "C" or better in CCJ 2020, CCJ 3011 and CCJ 4700 and a "C–" or better in all other courses for the major, and maintain an overall GPA of 2.0. Students with more than four grades below "C–" in criminology, criminal justice, computer science, or prerequisite coursework, whether taken at Florida State University or elsewhere, whether repeated or not, will not be permitted to continue in the major. A minor is not required.

For students transferring from another four-year university, transfer courses within the major are evaluated on an individual basis; the University requires that the last thirty semester hours prior to graduation be taken at Florida State University. In addition, all University requirements must be met for either the Bachelor of Arts (BA) or the Bachelor of Science (BS) degrees.

Approved criminology and criminal justice elective courses include: CCJ 3644, CCJ 3666, CCJ 4497, CCJ 4614, CJC 3010, CJE 4610, CJJ 4010, CJL 3510, CJL 4064.

Minor Requirements

For information concerning requirements for a minor in criminology, please refer to the 'Minor Requirements' section in the "College of Criminology and Criminal Justice" chapter in this General Bulletin.

Internships

A variety of internships are available at the local, state, and federal levels. Students can choose from the fields of law enforcement, courts, corrections, criminal justice planning, criminological research, and private sector opportunities. The internship is available for juniors and seniors who have completed the core courses (CCJ 2020, 3011, and 4700). The intern receives a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) grade, and full credit is given upon successful completion of both the academic component and work hours.

Students are advised that information pertaining to all matters of public record, such as arrests and convictions, may be required by the agencies accepting interns. Although a reasonable effort is made to place a student in an internship, Florida State University will not be liable if a student cannot be placed. Students are responsible for all living and transportation expenses during field experiences.

Certificates

The College of Criminology and Criminal Justice offers a distance learning certificate program in criminology.

Honors in the Major

The College of Criminology and Criminal Justice encourages eligible students to participate in the honors in the major program. For requirements and other information, see the "University Honors Office and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Definition of Prefixes

Criminology and Criminal Justice

CCJ—Criminology and Criminal Justice

CJC—Corrections

CJE—Law Enforcement

CJJ—Juvenile Justice

CJL—Law and Process

IFS—Interdisciplinary Florida State University Courses

SCC—Security

Computer Science

CDA—Computer Design/Architecture

CIS—Computer Science and Information Systems

CNT—Computer Networks

COP—Computer Programming

Undergraduate Criminology and Criminal Justice Courses

CCJ 2020. Introduction to Criminal Justice (3). This course is designed to provide freshmen and sophomore students with knowledge of terminology, classification systems, trends, and theories of criminal justice.

CCJ 3011. Criminology (3). This course offers an examination of the field of criminology, including its theories, basic assumptions, and definitions.

CCJ 3644. White Collar Crime (3). This course provides an overview of major issues in the study of white-collar crime. Topics covered include conceptual and definitional debates; forms of white-collar crime; theories and causes; offenders, victims, and costs; and investigation, prosecution, and sentencing.

CCJ 3666. Victimology (3). This course examines the role of victims in crimes, their treatment by the criminal justice system, their decisions to report crimes and help prosecute offenders, victim assistance, and victim compensation. Special focus on sexual battery and domestic violence.

CCJ 3673. The Social Reality of Black Males (3). This course critically examines different viewpoints and non-reconciled positions about the current economic, social, and political status of Black males in America. The relationship between stereotypical images and the complicated search among Black males for identity and manhood will also be explored.

CCJ 3677. Crimes against Humanity (3). This course is a multi-disciplinary examination of the emergence and impact of modern conceptions of human rights, including inquiry into the nature and sources of rights and of institutions for their enforcement, such as international war tribunals and peace and reconciliation commissions. Particular attention focuses on case studies of the violation or abrogation of human rights doctrines, drawing on literature, law, philosophy, history, religion, and the social sciences to explain and respond to the phenomena of crimes against humanity.

CCJ 3688. Religion and Crime (3). This course examines the influence of religion on crime from historical, sociological, and criminological perspectives. Students learn how religion operates both as a protection against crime and as a motivation for crime.

CCJ 3949r. Experiential Learning (0). (S/U grade only.) This non-credit, experiential learning course offers students an opportunity to gain "real world" on-the-job work experience related to a specific academic field of study. Students must register for this course through the FSU Career Center.

CCJ 4004. Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice (3). This course introduces students to a global, comparative approach to the study of crime and criminal justice systems, beginning with the discussion of transnational crime and issues related to its measurement and continuing with the study of the four major legal traditions (common law, civil law, socialist law, and Islamic law) and the analysis of specific components of the criminal justice system across the world, including the police, courts, and corrections.

CCJ 4031. The Individual and Society (3). This course introduces an understanding of normal human behavior and development in social context.

CCJ 4450. Criminal Justice Administration (3). This course is an application of organization and administration theories to the criminal justice system.

CCJ 4497. Criminal Justice and Public Policy (3). This course examines historically significant and recent crime and criminal justice policies in terms of their antecedent factors, their impact on measurable outcomes, and their unintended consequences.

CCJ 4601. Human Behavior (3). This course studies the origins of human and deviant behavior from a multidisciplinary approach (biological, psychological, sociological, criminological); addresses major theories and research, including case studies illustrative of deviant behavior such as drug abuse, suicide, mental illness, and sexual deviance.

CCJ 4614. Criminal and Delinquent Behavior (3). This course is an examination of patterns of criminal and delinquent behaviors in light of theories and classification concepts.

CCJ 4623. Violence in America (3). This course explores definitions, patterns, and theoretical explanations of aggression and violence in the United States. Issues related to violent offending are discussed as well as the main issues associated with violence in America.

CCJ 4662. Minorities, Crime, and Social Policy (3). This course examines the involvement of minorities, especially African-Americans, in crime and in the criminal justice system. Special attention is paid to the role of racism in theories of crime and in American law and to the treatment of minorities by the various components of the criminal justice system. May require community service hours.

CCJ 4663. Women, Crime and Justice (3). This course provides a flexible forum for the study and discussion of female crime and delinquency and gender issues in the criminal justice system.

CCJ 4700. Introduction to Research Methods in Criminology (3). This course covers basic methodological and statistical issues in criminology.

CCJ 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). Prerequisites: Instructor and dean permission. In this course, a student registered for an individual-study course must submit a prospectus, outline, and bibliography and schedule at least one conference a week on campus. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

CCJ 4909r. Honors in Criminology (3). This course is designed for upper-division students with a grade point average of 3.2 in all courses. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

CCJ 4933r. Seminar in Criminology (3). This course introduces varying topics of selected interest and contemporary significance, discussed in a seminar format. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CCJ 4938r. Special Topics in Criminology (3). This course content varies as instructors present different developments, problems, and controversies. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours. May be repeated within the same semester.

CCJ 4940. Internship in Criminology (15). (S/U grade only.) This internship facilitates field placement in an approved criminal justice agency for integration of theory and practice through participant observation study.

CCJ 4942. Part Time Internship in Criminology (8). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisites: CCJ 2020, CCJ 3011, and CCJ 4700.This course facilitates part time field placement in an approved criminal justice agency for integration of theory and practice through participant observation study.

CJC 3010. Corrections (3). This course provides an overview of correctional philosophies, practices, and procedures.

CJC 4410. Theories and Methods of Offender Treatment (3). This course introduces theories and techniques that may be employed within the boundaries of probation, parole, or prison to influence and alter the attitudes, values, and behaviors of persons adjudicated guilty by the criminal justice system.

CJC 4411r. Methods of Offender Treatment Practicum-Men Helping Men (3). Prerequisite: CJC 4410. This course allows students to implement the theories and methods of treatment in a correctional setting. Students work with the professor to implement and co-facilitate abuse and violence intervention. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CJE 3110. Law Enforcement (3). This course provides an advanced survey of law enforcement concentrating on the police, and places emphasis on functions (law enforcement, order maintenance, public service) and responsibilities (e.g., preservation of constitutional rights, community relations), including organizational and management aspects.

CJE 4114. Police Problems and Practices (3). This course provides an analysis of both the traditional and contemporary issues and problems existing in the law enforcement community. Topics represent a wide variety of concerns, including such areas as corruption, police use of deadly force, and the utilization of law enforcement to combat corporate crime, computer crime, and terrorism.

CJE 4610. Crime Detection and Investigation (3). This course offers an introduction to the lawful gathering and evaluation of information concerning criminal acts, with attention to the fundamentals of investigation, the organization and management of the investigative process, and the knowledge and skills necessary for investigation.

CJJ 4010. Juvenile Justice (3). This course provides an examination of juvenile delinquency and juvenile justice, including legal and social history, definition and explanation of delinquency, and assessment of delinquency prevention and correctional programs, with emphasis on application of philosophical, legal, and procedural principles to problems and cases of juvenile justice. May require community service hours.

CJL 3510. The Courts (3). This course examines the jurisdiction, policies, and procedures of courts in the administration of criminal justice.

CJL 4038. Law, Society and the Administration of Justice (3). This course examines how law shapes and is shaped by economic relations, morality, social solidarity, state institutions, political domination, democratic governance, and legal consciousness, and how law impacts and is influenced by race, gender, and class relations. The course explores how social groups use law and legal ideology to press their rights to remedy social inequalities and to what extent these groups are successful. Students become familiar with major theoretical traditions in law and society as well as sociological issues such as civil rights, the legislation of morality, and the administration of justice.

CJL 4064. Individual Rights and the Criminal Justice System (3). This course offers an examination of the full range of rights in criminal justice, dealing with them not only in broad philosophical and social terms but also in terms of specific instances, including the rights of the accused and extending to the rights of convicts, witnesses, victims, probationers, ex-convicts, officials, journalists, and the more generalized rights of participation by interest group advocates, taxpayers, and citizens in criminal justice policy and administration.

CJL 4110. Substantive Criminal Law (3). This course offers an examination of the central principles of criminal law, which includes the substantive elements defining criminal conduct for specific crimes and the various exculpatory conditions for criminal liability.

CJL 4565. Courts and Social Policy (3). This course examines the role of courts in determining social policy as it relates to criminology. Emphasis is directed toward the political and social inputs that influence judicial decision making and the role of democracy and punishment in the courts. These topics are examined using current social policy. The course satisfies oral competency requirements.

IFS 2075. Foundations of Research and Inquiry (3). The purpose of this seminar is to advance library research, writing skills, and critical thinking skills among lower division students. Through participation in the seminar and research activities, students learn to develop and improve their capacity to communicate complex ideas about a topic of their choosing in speech and in writing.

SCC 4004. Public and Private Security (3). This course offers an overview of the major topics of public and private security. The topics represent a wide variety of concerns, including such areas as historical development, the role of security in society, and current practices and standards.

Undergraduate Computer Science Courses

CDA 3100. Computer Organization I (3). Corequisites: COP 3330 and MAD 2104. This core course is intended for computer science majors with previous C/C++ background. The course introduces fundamental concepts in computer organization and digital logic design, including numbering systems and number representation, logic gates and design, the Von-Neumann architecture principle, and the machine instruction cycle. Assembly language programming with C language interfacing is also presented, reinforcing basic computer structure and machine cycle operation principles.

CIS 4361. Applied Computer Security (3). Prerequisite: CDA 3100. This course addresses threats to and vulnerabilities of information systems and provides hands-on opportunities for students to work with current counter-threat technology. This course also covers analytic principles to support vulnerability assessment and countermeasure design.

CIS 4930r. Special Topics in Computer Science (3). Prerequisite: COP 4530. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. May be repeated within the same semester.

CNT 4406. Network Security and Cryptography (3). Corequisite: COP 4530. This course examines threats to computer networks, network vulnerabilities, techniques for strengthening passive defenses, tools for establishing an active network defense, and policies for enhancing forensic analysis of crimes and attacks on computer networks. Topics include private and public key cryptography, digital signatures, secret sharing, security protocols formal methods of analyzing network security, electronic mail security, firewalls, intrusion detection, Internet privacy, and public key infrastructures.

CNT 4504. Introduction to Computer Networks (3). Corequisite: COP 4530. This course covers circuit-switched and packet-switched networks; protocols; protocol layering; application layer and socket programming; transport layer, multiplexing and demultiplexing, UDP, TCP, reliability, flow control, and congestion control; network layer, routing protocols, switching technologies, multicast, and mobility; link layer, local area networks, error detection and correction; wireless networks; multimedia networking; network security; and network management.

CNT 4603. Computer and Network System Administration (3). Prerequisite: CGS 3406 or COP 3014. This course offers a hands-on introduction to Unix and Microsoft Windows systems and network administration. Topics include installation, maintenance, and extension of a multi-user computer system; development of administrative policies and procedures; user assistance and education; specifics of the Unix and Windows operating systems; and practical troubleshooting and problem solving.

COP 3014. Programming I (3). Prerequisite: MAC 1140. This course covers fundamental concepts and skills of programming in a high-level language. Flow of control: sequence, selection, iteration, subprograms. Data structures: arrays, strings, structs, ADT lists and tables. Algorithms using selection and iteration (decision making, finding maxima and minima, basic searching and sorting, simulation, etc.). Good program design using a procedural paradigm, structure, and style are emphasized. Interactive and file IO. Testing and debugging techniques. Intended primarily for computer science or computer engineering majors, or anyone who is required to take COP 3330.

COP 3330. Object Oriented Programming (3). Prerequisite: COP 3014 or a comparable course in C or C++ Programming. Corequisite: COP 3353. This course focuses on object-oriented programming in a modern programming language; classes, objects, inheritance, and polymorphism; introduction to data structures and container classes.

COP 3353. Introduction to UNIX (1). This course for majors and non-majors offers an introduction to the UNIX operating system. Topics include: UNIX history, requesting UNIX accounts, logging into a UNIX system, basic operating system concepts and file structure, basic commands, text editor(s) (to include emacs, vi, and pico), printing, mail, and online help. The goals of this course are to enable students to log in to their UNIX accounts from any type of computer and have a basic understanding of the commands and utilities.

COP 4342. Unix Tools (3). Prerequisite: COP 3330. This course is an introduction to selected Unix tools and utilities that are useful for advanced users, programmers, and system administrators, such as shell scripts, the perl language, revision control systems, debuggers, editors, and the make, awk, sed, and expect utilities.

COP 4530. Data Structures, Algorithms and Generic Programming (3). Prerequisites: COP 3330 and MAD 2104. Pre- or corequisite: CDA 3100. This course focuses on definition, use, and implementation of generic data structures using a modern programming language; reusable program components.

COP 4610. Operating Systems and Concurrent Programming (3). Prerequisite: COP 4530, CDA 3100, or instructor permission. This course explores design principles of batch, multiprogramming, and time-sharing operating systems; linking, loading, input-output systems, interacting processes, storage management, process and resource control, file systems.

COP 4710. Theory and Structure of Databases (3). Prerequisites: COP 3330 and MAD 2104. This course examines the theory of relational and object-oriented databases; relational database management systems and SQL; design, development, and implementation issues in database systems.

Graduate Courses

CCJ 5016. Crimes of the Powerful (3).

CCJ 5028r. Seminar in Criminal Justice (3).

CCJ 5029. The Political Economy of Crime and Justice (3).

CCJ 5050. Proseminar in Criminology (3).

CCJ 5078. Computer Applications in Criminal Justice (3).

CCJ 5109. Theory in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3).

CCJ 5138. Science, Evidence and the Law (3).

CCJ 5285. Survey of Criminal Justice Theory and Research (3).

CCJ 5320. Penology (3).

CCJ 5456. Criminal Justice Administration (3).

CCJ 5546. Prevention and Treatment of Crime and Delinquency (3).

CCJ 5606. Survey of Criminological Theories (3).

CCJ 5607. History of Criminological Thought (3).

CCJ 5609. The Conduct of Inquiry in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3).

CCJ 5625. Ecology of Crime (3).

CCJ 5636. Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice (3).

CCJ 5669. Race, Ethnicity, Crime and Social Justice (3).

CCJ 5672. Gender, Crime and Justice (3).

CCJ 5704r. Introduction to Research Methods and Statistics (3).

CCJ 5705. Research Methods in Criminology I (3).

CCJ 5706. Applied Statistics in Criminology I (3).

CCJ 5707. Qualitative Methods in Criminology (3).

CCJ 5709. Survey Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3).

CCJ 5740. Data Analysis in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3).

CCJ 5944. Supervised Teaching (3). (S/U grade only.)

CCJ 5945. Field Practice in Criminology (9). (S/U grade only.)

CCJ 5946r. Criminal Justice Practicum (3–6). (S/U grade only.)

CCJ 5974r. Area Paper in Criminology (1–6). (S/U grade only.)

CCJ 5981r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

CCJ 6065. Professional Development in Criminology (3).

CCJ 6109r. Advanced Seminar in Criminological Theory (3).

CCJ 6665. Victimology (3).

CCJ 6708. Seminar in Crime Research (3).

CCJ 6741r. Advanced Data Analysis in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3).

CCJ 6920r. Seminar in Theoretical Criminology (3).

CJE 5024. Police and Society (3).

CJJ 5020. Juvenile Justice (3).

CJL 5420. Criminal Laws, Criminal Procedure and Individual Rights (3).

CJL 5520. Structure and Process of the American Court System (3).

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.