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2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science

College of Arts and Sciences

Web Page: http://www.eoas.fsu.edu/

Chair: James F. Tull; Professors: Baco-Taylor, Bourassa, Cai, Chanton, Chassignet, Clarke, Dewar, Ellingson, Fuelberg, Hart, Huettel, Humayun, Landing, Liu, MacDonald, Marcus, Misra, Nicholson, Nof, Odom, Ray, Salters, Speer, Sura, Tull, Wang, Wise, Wu; Associate Professors: Ahlquist, Kish, Parker; Assistant Professors: Chagnon, Farris, Fuentes, Holmes, Knapp, Kranz, Mason, Mookjerjee, Owens, Spencer, Stukel, Wing, Young; Professors Emeriti: Barcilon, Burnett, Hsueh, Krishnamurti, Gleeson, LaSeur, Long, Loper, O'Brien, Pfeffer, Staley, Stern, Sturges, Thistle, Weatherly, Winchester

In 2010, the departments of Geological Sciences, Oceanography, and Meteorology merged to form the department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science (EOAS). While retaining their perspective programmatic focus, the geology, oceanography, and meteorology faculty offer a new level of interdisciplinary integration. This creates fresh opportunities for undergraduate and graduate education in the geosciences. The department provides students with an opportunity for holistic study of Earth's physical environment in preparation for professional careers in government, private, and academic sectors. Due to concerns about climate change, environmental sustainability, availability of natural resources and environmental pollution and degradation, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects an overall sixteen percent increase in geoscience-related occupations between 2012 and 2022, which is five percent faster than the growth rate for all U.S. occupations. The opportunities for study and the degree requirements are described below:

  • a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science
  • a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Science and Policy
  • a Bachelor of Science in Geology
  • a Bachelor of Science in Meteorology
  • a Bachelor of Arts in Meteorology
  • FSU Teach Geoscience Program (BS)
  • FSU Teach Environmental Science Program (BS)

The Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science maintains the resources of the three original departments. Our oceanography and meteorology programs are among the leading programs in the country. Our meteorology program is the flagship program in the southeastern United States and is considered to be one of the top five comprehensive meteorology programs in the nation.

Research programs may be conducted within the department, or they may involve collaborative work with members of the departments of Physics and Chemistry, the College of Engineering, the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Institute, the Department of Scientific Computing, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. Within EOAS, the Geology department conducts cooperative programs with the Florida Geological Survey, Northwest Florida Water Management District, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, and the United States Geological Survey. The department provides a service to the international geological community, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), by maintaining a repository for marine cores in the Antarctic Research Facility.

The Florida Climate Center and Office of the State Climatologist are housed in the department and are equipped with archives of Florida weather and climate records. An instrumentation facility is also housed in the department, including data loggers and a variety of modern and historical instruments, and a rooftop meteorological tower for real-time local observations. The National Weather Service Forecast Office, located within the department, facilitates interactions between students and professional operational forecasters.

The department has a complete television studio equipped with state-of-the-art broadcasting technology, where students prepare weathercasts for class (MET 3940) and for regular broadcasts on Florida State University's cable television channel, which is seen in surrounding counties and streamed over the Internet. Students often use this experience to develop internships with television stations and to get jobs. Other internship opportunities through private companies or state, local, or federal agencies also are possible. In particular, partnerships and internships with the headquarters of state government agencies located in Tallahassee continue to offer opportunities for our students.

Available for use on student projects are a full array of equipment for investigating radon and radium in the environment, three mass spectrophotometers capable of measuring stable isotope ratios. The department has equipment for investigating carbon dynamics including greenhouse gasses in the laboratory and the field. The geochemistry program at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has facilities to measure trace level concentrations of most elements of the periodic table as well as measure the isotopic composition of many stable and radioactive elements. These capabilities allow researchers to fingerprint the sources of different elements in the environment as well as to trace chemical processes. Students and faculty have access to five different types of mass spectrometers to take measurements based on their area of "specialization". The laboratories also include a "clean lab" which allows processing of small samples as well as determining concentrations at very low levels. The department also houses a large array of equipment for investigation of microbial ecology including equipment for the cultivation of anaerobic microorganisms.

Graduate Study in Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science

Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science offers the Master of Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Geology, Meteorology, and Oceanography, a non-thesis Master of Science in Aquatic Environmental Science, and a Professional Science Master's in Aquatic Environmental Science.

Undergraduates interested in Oceanography or Geology graduate degrees will find the Environmental Science BS degree excellent preparation for graduate study. Students may choose a specific area of emphasis including geology (coursework will permit graduates to take the examination leading to Professional Geologist Certification), environmental engineering, biogeochemistry, atmospheric science, or marine biology.

Environmental Science

Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science offers two degrees in Environmental Science. Environmental Science is the interdisciplinary study of environmental systems from a scientific perspective. Drawing principally from the areas of oceanography, geology, and meteorology, the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science will prepare students in the broader and technical area of geoscience where the greatest expansion in employment opportunities is predicted and is an attractive option for students seeking a broader interdisciplinary major with the rigor of mathematics and the physical sciences at its core. The BS degree will provide a strong basis for graduate study in environmental and earth sciences.

The department also offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Environmental Science and Policy. The BA degree differs from the BS degree in lower-level mathematics requirements and a greater emphasis on policy. These programs aim to prepare exceptionally well-qualified graduates equipped to work in the interdisciplinary earth sciences, whether in government agencies, NGOs, or the private sector. For additional information, see the department's Web site at http://www.eoas.fsu.edu/.

Geology

Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science offers the Bachelor of Science (BS), Master of Science (MS), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in geology. Emphasis is on fundamental applications of chemistry, physics, biology, and the scientific method in the study of the earth; field experience is also stressed. Faculty members offer coursework in many areas of surficial, tectonic, environmental, and stratigraphic geology; hydrology; and geochemistry.

The major program is intended to provide a well-rounded introduction to the study of the Earth as well as to prepare the student for more advanced study in the fields of natural resources, environmental planning, oceanography, geophysics, and other earth science specialties.

Various scholarships are offered (and part-time work is available) within Earth Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, with the Florida Geological Survey of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and with other agencies of the state and federal governments.

Honors in the major can be earned by talented juniors and seniors by engaging in an independent project ending in an honors thesis. For requirements and other information, see the "University Honors Office and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Meteorology

Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science offers the Bachelor of Science (BS), Bachelor of Arts (BA), Master of Science (MS), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in meteorology. By tradition, meteorology is divided into four branches: physical, dynamical, synoptic, and applied meteorology. Physical meteorologists deal with such areas as the physics of rain formation, atmospheric electricity, and radiative transfer and remote sensing. Dynamical meteorologists work in such areas as the mathematical representation of atmospheric flow patterns and the numerical prediction of these patterns. Synoptic meteorologists are involved with the description of atmospheric disturbances and with weather forecasting. Applied meteorologists deal with the application of meteorological and climatological knowledge to such areas as agriculture, architecture, ecology, and air pollution. The undergraduate program provides a broad overview of these branches of meteorology while graduate students are encouraged to specialize in one of them. Meteorologists are needed in research, forecasting, and operational positions to study, interpret and predict weather and climate processes and patterns and to relate these to human activities. Severe storms, floods, droughts and air pollution are examples of atmospheric phenomena, which influence health, transportation, agriculture, and business activities.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in applied geosciences/FSU-Teach satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in ISC 3523C. Undergraduate majors in environmental science and environmental science and policy satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in BSC 2010L. Undergraduate majors in geology satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in CGS 2060. Undergraduate majors in meteorology satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in MET 3220C.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into these upper-division degree programs:

Applied Geosciences, FSU-Teach

  1. MAC X311
  2. MAC X312
  3. PHY X048/X048L and PHY X049/X049L, or PHY X048C and PHY X049C
  4. CHM X045/X045L and CHM X046/X046L, or CHM X045C and CHM X046C
  5. SMT X043
  6. SMT X053

Note: Transfer students will be able to take SMT X043 and SMT X053 when admitted to upper division.

Environmental Science

Environmental Science BS

  1. BSC X010/X010L
  2. BSC X011/X011L
  3. CHM X045/X045L
  4. CHM X046/X046L
  5. PHY X053/X053L or PHY X048/X048L
  6. GLY X010C or GLY X010/X010L
  7. STA X122 or ISC X532C

Environmental Science and Policy BA

  1. BSC X010/X010L
  2. CHM X045/X045L
  3. MAC X105
  4. MAT X140 or STA 2122
  5. GLY X010C or GLY X010/X010L

Geology

  1. CHM X045/X045L, or CHM X040 and CHM X041, or CHM X045C
  2. CHMX046/X046L or CHM X046C
  3. MAC X311 or MTH X281
  4. GLY X010C or GLY X010/X010L
  5. PHY X048C and PHY X049C, or PHY X048/X048L and PHY X049/X049L, or PHY X053C and PHY X054C
  6. XXX XXXX: Historical Geology is strongly recommended.

Note: The choice of Physics sequence depends on the area of geology specialization.

Meteorology

  1. MAC X311
  2. MAC X312
  3. PHY X048C/X048L and PHY X049/X049L, or PHY X048C and PHY X049C
  4. CHM X045/X045L or CHM X045C

Note: Transfer students will be able to take SMT X043 and SMT X053 when admitted to upper division.

FSU-Teach Program in Applied Geosciences

FSU-Teach is an innovative approach to teacher education that involves a collaboration between scientists, mathematicians, and education faculty at Florida State University. In Applied Geosciences/FSU-Teach, students will develop deep science or mathematic knowledge and the knowledge, skills, and experience needed to be an effective science or math teacher. The program includes coursework in meteorology, geology, oceanography, hydrology, and astronomy. The program will pay for tuition for the first two science/teaching courses. Internship positions with scientists, mathematicians and local schools are available. This is a double-major only program. FSU-Teach majors are first admitted into their primary, discipline-specific major and must meet the state-wide common program prerequisites for that major, in this case Applied Geosciences. Later, students apply for admission into a secondary major within the College of Education called Science Teaching/FSU Teach. Upon graduation, students are awarded the BS degree with majors in Applied Geosciences/FSU-Teach and Science Teaching. For more information, see our Web site: http://fsu-teach.fsu.edu.

Progress in this major and formal admission to FSU-Teach and Teacher Education

FSU native and transfer students will progress to upper-division (junior) status in the College of Arts and Sciences in the same manner as other Interdisciplinary majors: an AA degree or fifty-two earned credits (including at least half of the general education requirement to include the English composition and mathematics), at least a 2.5 GPA, and completion of appropriate milestones. Once these are complete, the student must complete an "Undergraduate Application to Teacher Education" in 2301 Stone Building, at which time the second major in Education will be added.

Required courses for the Applied Geosciences Major (fifty hours)

Geosciences Coursework (twenty-nine hours)

AST 1002 Planets, Stars, and Galaxies (3)

GLY 2100 Historical Geology (3)

One lab selected from AST 1002L Introductory Astronomy Laboratory (1) or GLY 2100L Historical Geology Laboratory (1)

GLY 2010C Physical Geology (4)

GLY 4820 Principles of Hydrology (3)

GEO 2200C Physical Geography (3)

MET 1010L Introductory Meteorology Laboratory (1)

MET 2507C Weather Analysis and Forecasting (2)

MET 2700 General Meteorology (3)

OCE 4008 Principles of Oceanography (3)

OCE 4017 Current Issues in Environmental Science (3)

EVR 4922 Environmental Science Capstone (4)

Required courses for the Education major (about thirty hours)

HIS 3505 Perspectives on Science and Mathematics (3)

ISC 3523C Research Methods (3)

RED 4335 Literacy Across the Content Areas (3)

SMT 1043 Step 1: Inquiry Approaches to Teaching (1)

SMT 1053 Step 2: Inquiry-Based Lesson Design in Science/Mathematics (1)

SMT 3100 Knowing and Learning in Science and Mathematics (FSU-Teach) (3)

SMT 4301 Classroom Interactions (FSU-Teach) (3)

SMT 4664 Project Based Instruction (FSU-Teach) (3)

SMT 4930 Apprentice Teaching Seminar (FSU-Teach) (1–4)

SMT 4945 Apprentice Teaching (FSU-Teach) (5)

TSL 4324 ESOL Instruction in the Content Areas (3)

FSU-Teach Program in Environmental Science

FSU-Teach is an innovative approach to teacher education that involves collaboration between scientists, mathematicians and education faculty at Florida State University. In Environmental Science/FSU-Teach, students will develop environmental science knowledge and the knowledge, skill, and experience needed to be an effective science teacher. Science coursework will include courses in meteorology, geology, oceanography, hydrology, and astronomy. The program will pay for tuition for the first two Education/Teaching courses. For more information, see our Web site, http://fsu-teach.fsu.edu/.

This is a double-major only program. FSU-Teach majors are first admitted into their primary, discipline-specific major and must meet the state-wide common program prerequisites for that major, in this case Environmental Science. Later, students apply for admission into a secondary major within the College of Education called Secondary Science or Mathematics Teaching. Upon graduation, students are awarded the BS degree with majors in Environmental Science and Secondary Science or Mathematics Teaching. Environmental Science is the interdisciplinary study of environmental systems from a scientific perspective. Drawing principally from the areas of oceanography, geology, meteorology, biology, and chemistry, the Environmental Science program will prepare students in the broader area of geosciences and is an attractive option for students seeking a broader interdisciplinary major with the rigor of mathematics and the physical sciences at its core.

Environmental Science Core courses (twenty-two to twenty-three hours)

AST 1002 Planets, Stars, and Galaxies (3)

GLY 2100 Historical Geology (3)

GLY 4751C Introduction to Remote Sensing, Air Photo Interpretation and GIS for the Earth Sciences (3) or GIS 4043 Geographic Information Systems (3) and GIS 4043L GIS Lab (1)

MET 1010 Introduction to the Atmosphere (3) or MET 2700 General Meteorology (3)

OCE 4008 Principles of Oceanography (3)

OCE 4017 Current Issues in Environmental Science (3) or GLY 3039 Energy, Resources, and the Environment (3)

EVR 4922 Environmental Science Capstone (4)

Required Courses for the Education Major (about thirty hours)

HIS 3505 Perspectives on Science and Mathematics (3)

ISC 3523C Research Methods (3) (counts for both Environmental Science and Education requirements)

RED 4335 Literacy Across the Content Areas (3)

SMT 1043 Step 1: Inquiry Approaches to Teaching (1)

SMT 1053 Step 2: Inquiry-Based Lesson Design in Science/Mathematics (1)

SMT 3100 Knowing and Learning in Science and Mathematics (FSU Teach) (3)

SMT 4301 Classroom Interactions (FSU-Teach) (3)

SMT 4664 Project Based Instruction (FSU-Teach) (3)

SMT 4930 Apprentice Teaching Seminar (FSU-Teach) (1–4)

SMT 4945 Apprentice Teaching (FSU-Teach) (5)

TSL 4324 ESOL Instruction in the Content Areas (3)

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science

A minimum of forty semester hours, as specified below is required. Students should complete the prerequisite coursework for entrance to the major program of study. Students must also have completed a minimum of fifty-two hours of credit and at least half the required hours in Liberal Studies including required English and math, or an AA degree. No required course in which a student has earned a grade below "C–" may be applied toward the degree in Environmental Science. A student who has received more than five unsatisfactory grades (U, F, D–, D, D+) in science or mathematics courses (and their prerequisites) taken at Florida State University or elsewhere, including repeated unsatisfactory grades in the same course, will not be permitted to graduate with a degree in this major.

Coursework and Requirements

Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the "College of Arts and Sciences" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Environmental Science Core courses (nineteen to twenty hours)

GLY 4751C Introduction to Remote Sensing, Air Photo Interpretation and GIS for the Earth Sciences (3) or if not available substitute GIS 4043 Geographic Information Processing and Systems (3) and GIS 4043L GIS Lab (1)

MET 1010 Introduction to the Atmosphere (3) or MET 2700 General Meteorology (3)

OCE 4008 Principles of Oceanography (3)

OCE 4017 Current Issues in Environmental Science (3) or GLY 3039 Energy, Resources, and the Environment (3)

EVR 4922 Environmental Science Capstone (4)

Environmental Science Elective courses: Choose a total of twenty-one hours, twelve of which must be selected from List 1 and the remaining nine hours from any of the elective lists below. Students must make sure to satisfy all course prerequisites.

  1. Geoscience Elective Courses:

    EOC 4631 Marine Pollution (3)

    GLY 2100 Historical Geology (3)

    GLY 3200C Mineralogy and Crystallography (3)

    GLY 3310C Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (3)

    GLY 3400C Structural Geology (4)

    GLY 3610C Paleontology (4)

    GLY 4884 Environmental Geology I (3)

    GLY 4905 Directed Individual Study (Geohazards) (3)

    MET 2101 Physical Climatology (3) or MET 3103C Climate Change Science (3) or ISC 2003 Global Change: Its Scientific and Human Dimensions (3)

    MET 3220C Meteorological Computations (3)

    MET 3300 Introduction to Atmospheric Dynamics (3)

    MET 3940 Weathercasting (1)

    MET 4159r Selected Topics in Meteorology (1–3)

    MET 4400C Meteorological Instrumentation and Observation (3)

    OCB 4631 Estuarine and Coastal Ecology (3)

    OCB 4637 Marine Benthic Ecology (3)

    OCC 4002 Basic Chemical Oceanography (3)

    OCC 4060 Environmental Science Modeling (3)

    OCE 3555 Environmental Science II: Habitable Planet (3)

    OCE 4064 Marine Conservation Biology (3)

    OCE 4265 Coral Reef Ecology (3)

    OCE 4930r Studies in Oceanography (1–4) (Topics vary: Biodiversity, Earth System, Marine Microbial Ecology, Geomicrobiology, Physics and Flow of Water Bodies, Environmental Toxicology, or other select topics)

    OCP 4005 Introduction to Physical Oceanography (3)

    Other classes are allowed as electives with department permission.

  2. Other related areas of focus:

    Environmental Engineering Tools (nine to ten hour maximum):

    CGN 2327L Civil Engineering Graphics Lab (1)

    CEG 2202C Introduction to Geomatics Engineering (4)

    EES 3040 Introduction to Environmental Engineering Science (3)

    EES 3040L Environmental Engineering Science Lab (1)

    EGM 3512 Engineering Mechanics (4)

    EGN 2123 Computer Graphics for Engineers (2)

    ENV 4001 Environmental Engineering (3)

    ENV 4041 Environmental Systems Analysis (3)

    ENV 4341 Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering (3)

    ENV 4405 Water Reuse Engineering (3)

    Environmental Geology/Geosciences Focus (nine to ten hour maximum):

    GLY 4240 Principles of Geochemistry (3)

    GLY 4451 Introduction to Geophysics (3)

    GLY 4544C Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (3)

    GLY 4820 Principles of Hydrology (3)

    GLY 4884 Environmental Geology I (3)

    GLY 4905 Directed Individual Study (3)

    Environmental Science students with a focus area in GLY, wanting to use Field Camp as their Capstone should take the following coursework:

    GLY 3400C Structural Geology (4)

    GLY 4544C Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (4)

    GLY 4790 Field Course (6)

    Biology Focus (nine to ten hour maximum):

    BOT 4394 Plant Molecular Biology (3)

    BSC 3052 Conservation Biology (3)

    BSC 3312 Marine Biology (3)

    BSC 3402L Experimental Biology Laboratory (3)

    BSC 3930 Seminar in Biological Frontiers (1)

    BSC 3938 Careers in the Biological Sciences (1)

    BSC 4473C Introduction to Scientific Diving (3) (Faculty Permission Required)

    BSC 4933r Selected Topics in Biological Science (1–4)

    PCB 3043 General Ecology (3)

    PCB 4674 Evolution (3)

    ZOO 4454C Biology of Fishes (4)

    Chemistry Focus (nine to ten hour maximum):

    CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I (3)

    CHM 2211 Organic Chemistry II (3)

    CHM 2211L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (3)

    CHM 3120 Analytical Chemistry I (3)

    CHM 3120L Analytical Chemistry I Laboratory (1)

    CHM 4080 Environmental Chemistry I (3)

    CHM 4081 Environmental Chemistry II (3)

    Geography/GIS Focus (nine to ten hour maximum):

    GEO 2200C Physical Geography (3)

    GEO 4114 Environmental Field Methods (3)

    GEO 4162C Spatial Data Analysis (3)

    GEO 4340 Living in a Hazardous Environment (3)

    GEO 4357 Environmental Conflict and Economic Development (3)

    GEO 4376 Landscape Ecology (3)

    GEO 4930r Special Topics in Geography (1–3)

    GIS 3015 Map Analysis (3)

    GIS 4006 Computer Cartography (3)

    GIS 4043 Geographic Information Systems (3)

    GIS 4043L GIS Lab (1)

  3. Graduate School Preparation:

    CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I (3)

    CHM 2211 Organic Chemistry II (3)

    CHM 2211L Organic Chemistry II Lab (3)

    MAC 2311 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (4)

    MAC 2312 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (4)

    MAC 2313 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (5)

    PHY 2049C General Physics B (five hours at FSU) (5)

Collateral Minor: zero hours beyond required courses.

By completing the requirements of the BS Environmental Science Program, students automatically receive a collateral minor in Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science. Twelve additional hours of coursework in specific elective classes may constitute a specific minor within that field. Talk to your advisor for more information.

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Science (for non-environmental science majors)

A minimum of fifteen semester hours of Environmental Science courses approved for major credit as follows: two of the following; MET 1010 (or MET 2700), GLY 2010C or OCE 4008, AND any three courses from the Geoscience Elective courses (List 1). Note, only twelve hours are required for current EOAS major students.

Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Science and Policy

A minimum of thirty-seven semester hours, as specified below is required. Students should complete the prerequisite coursework for entrance to the major program of study. Students must also have completed a minimum of fifty-two hours of credit and at least half the required hours in Liberal Studies including required English and Math, or an AA degree. No required course in which a student has earned a grade below "C–" may be applied toward the degree in Environmental Science and Policy. A student who has received more than five unsatisfactory grades (U, F, D–, D, D+) in science or mathematics courses (and their prerequisites) taken at Florida State University or elsewhere, including repeated unsatisfactory grades in the same course, will not be permitted to graduate with a degree in this major.

Coursework and Requirements

Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the "College of Arts and Sciences" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Environmental Science and Policy Core Courses (thirteen hours):

MET 1010 Introduction to the Atmosphere (3) or MET 2700 General Meteorology (3)

OCE 4008 Principles of Oceanography (3)

OCE 4017 Current Issues in Environmental Science (3) or GLY 3039 Energy, Resources, and the Environment (3)

EVR 4922 Environmental Science Capstone (4)

Required Policy Courses Choose six hours from the following list:

PHI 2100 Reasoning and Critical Thinking (3)

PHI 2620 Environmental Ethics (3)

PUP 3002 Introduction to Public Policy (3)

URP 3000 Introduction to Planning and Urban Development (3)

GEO 4602 Urban Geology (3)

PAD 4391 Foundations in Emergency Management (3)

URP 4423 Environmental Planning & Resource Management (3)

Science and Policy Elective Courses Choose fifteen hours from the following two lists. At least three courses must be taken from List 1. Students must make sure to satisfy all course prerequisites.

List 1

EOC 4631 Marine Pollution (3)

ISC 2003 Global Change: Its Scientific and Human Dimensions (3)

GLY 2100 Historical Geology (3)

GLY 3200C Mineralogy and Crystallography (3)

GLY 3310C Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (3)

GLY 3400C Structural Geology (4)

GLY 3610C Paleontology (4)

GLY 4240 Principles of Geochemistry (3)

GLY 4544C Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (4)

GLY 4751C Introduction to Remote Sensing, Air Photo Interpretation and GIS for the Earth Sciences (3)

GLY 4820 Principles of Hydrology (3)

GLY 4884 Environmental Geology I (3)

GLY 4905 Directed Individual Study (Geohazards) (3)

MET 2101 Physical Climatology (3) or MET 3103C Climate Change Science (3) or ISC 2003 Global Change: Its Scientific and Human Dimensions (3)

MET 3220C Meteorological Computations (3)

MET 3300 Introduction to Atmospheric Dynamics (3)

MET 3520 Current Weather Discussion (1)

MET 3940 Weathercasting (1)

MET 4159r Special Topics in Meteorology (1–3)

MET 4400C Meteorological Instrumentation and Observation (3)

OCB 4631 Estuarine and Coastal Ecology (3)

OCB 4637 Marine Benthic Ecology (3)

OCC 4002 Basic Chemical Oceanography (3)

OCC 4060 Environmental Science Modeling (3)

OCE 3555 Environmental Science II: Habitable Planet (3)

OCE 4064 Marine Conservation Biology (3)

OCE 4265 Coral Reef Ecology (3)

OCE 4930r Studies in Oceanography (1–4) (Topics vary: Biodiversity, Earth Systems, Marine Microbial Ecology, Geomicrobiology, Physics and Flow of Water Bodies, Environmental Toxicology, or other select topics) (consent of advisor)

OCP 4005 Introduction to Physical Oceanography (3)

Other classes are allowed as electives with department permission (six to seven hours maximum).

List 2

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II (3) or BSC 2011 Biological Science II (3) If not used as a prerequisite

CHM 4080 Environmental Chemistry I (3)

HFT 3700 Tourism Management and the Environment (3)

URP 3000 Introduction to Planning and Urban Development (3) If not used as a required policy class

URP 4022 Collective Decision Making (3)

URP 4314 Introduction to Growth Management and Comprehensive Planning (3)

URP 4318 Growth Management and Environmental Planning (3)

URP 4402 Sustainable Development Planning in the Americas (3)

URP 4404 River Basin Management and Planning (3)

URP 4423 Introduction to Environmental Planning and Resource Management (3)

URP 4618 Planning for Developing Regions (3)

URP 4710 Introduction to Transportation Issues and Transportation Planning (3)

URP 4741 Introduction to Issues in Housing and Community Development (3)

Additional Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree (nine hours)

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires nine semester hours in the fields of humanities and/or history in addition to the Liberal Studies and the foreign language requirement.

Minor. A minor is required.

Environmental Science and Policy majors must complete a minimum of twelve hours in an approved minor area. Declare your minor in the Arts and Sciences Dean's office and with an advisor.

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Science and Policy

A minimum of fifteen semester hours which must include two of the following; MET 1010 (or MET 2700), GLY 2010C or OCE 4008, AND any two courses from the Environmental Science and Policy electives, AND one class from the Required Policy Courses list.

Bachelor of Science in Geology

A minimum of thirty-eight semester hours, as specified below, is required. Students should complete the prerequisite coursework for entrance to the major program of study. Students must also have completed a minimum of fifty-two hours of credit and at least half the required hours in Liberal Studies including required English and Math, or an AA degree. A student who has accumulated more than five grades below "C–" (including grades of U) in mathematics, natural science, and statistics courses taken for college credit at FSU or elsewhere, whether repeated or not, will not be allowed admission into or continuation as a geology major.

Coursework and Requirements

Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the "College of Arts and Sciences" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Basic Geology courses (twenty eight hours):

GLY 2010C Physical Geology (with Lab) (4)

GLY 2100 Historical Geology (3) and GLY 2100L (1)

GLY 3200C Mineralogy and Crystallography (3)

GLY 3310C Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (3)

GLY 3400C Structural Geology (4)

GLY 4544C Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (4)

GLY 4790 Field Course (6)

Geology Elective courses (ten hours) chosen from:

GLY 3039 Energy, Resources, and the Environment (3)

GLY 3610C Paleontology (4)

GLY 4240 Principles of Geochemistry (3)

GLY 4780 Environmental Field Problems (4)

GLY 4820 Principles of Hydrology (3)

GLY 4884 Environmental Geology I (3)

GLY 4905 Directed Individual Study (Geohazards) (3), Directed Individual Study (Field Methods) (1)

OCB 4631 Estuarine and Coastal Ecology (3)

OCG 4050 Geological Oceanography (3)

Additional electives can be taken from list of GLY graduate courses with instructor's permission.

Collateral Courses: Twenty-three to twenty-six hours. Collateral courses may also be used to satisfy Liberal Studies, prerequisite, and/or minor requirements.

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I (3) and CHM 1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory (1)

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II (3) and CHM 1046L General Chemistry II Laboratory (1)

MAC 2311 Calculus with Analytical Geometry I (4)

MAC 2312 Calculus with Analytical Geometry II (4) or STA 2122 Introduction to Applied Statistics (3)

PHY 2048C General Physics A (5) or PHY 2053C College Physics A (4)

PHY 2049C General Physics B (5) or PHY 2054C College Physics B (4)

Minor: The required coursework in math, chemistry, and physics will satisfy the requirement for the minor. However, a student may select other minors in consultation with an advisor.

Requirements for a Minor in Geology

A minimum of twelve semester hours of Geology (GLY) courses approved for major credit including GLY 2010C, GLY 2100, GLY 2100L AND four hours of GLY courses at the 3000 level or above.

Bachelor of Science in Meteorology

The department offers a degree program that prepares students for a diverse number of careers, as well as graduate school. It is highly recommended that students meet regularly with their assigned academic advisor to tailor electives to the students' goals. Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the "College of Arts and Sciences" chapter of this General Bulletin. A detailed handout for meteorology majors entitled Undergraduate Program in Meteorology is available at http://www.met.fsu.edu.

Meteorology is a quantitative science requiring extensive preparation in mathematics and physics. Freshmen entering the program are urged to take as many advanced placement (AP), College-Level Exemption Program (CLEP), or other exemption examinations as they can in order to realize maximum flexibility.

Meteorology majors are required to complete a graduation check with the academic coordinator at least one semester prior to graduation. Graduating students also must complete a written exit survey in their final semester, and if possible, an exit interview with the departmental representative. This interview will discuss information provided from the written exit survey. The College of Arts and Sciences will not approve graduation without receiving the written exit survey.

Coursework and Requirements

Required meteorology coursework. MET 2101, 2507C, 2700, 3220C, 3300, 4301, 4302, 4420, 4450, 4500C, and 4501C.

Required courses in mathematics begin with MAC 2311, which may not be taken without its prerequisite courses, MAC 1114 and MAC 1140 or 1147. The following courses, required of all meteorology majors, constitute a minor in mathematics: MAC 2311, 2312, 2313; MAP 2302 or 3305. MAP 3306 or 4341 is strongly recommended for those students wishing to attend graduate school.

All students must complete CHM 1045 and 1045L, STA 3032 or STA 4321, PHY 2048C, and PHY 2049C and are encouraged to take PHY 3101. While PHY 3101 is optional, it strengthens one's background for MET 4450 and with PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C qualifies one for a physics minor. Computer science has arranged for a special optional minor for meteorology majors. Their general minor is recommended for anyone considering additional work in computer science See the "Computer Science" section of this General Bulletin for details. Students wishing to pursue a career as a meteorologist with the federal government should study http://www.opm.gov/qualifications/standards/IORs/gs1300/1340.htm for the Government's definition of a meteorologist to help them pick electives to maximize their opportunities.

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree may be obtained by completing the Bachelor of Science (BS) degree requirements plus nine additional credits in humanities and history.

Academic Performance

All 2000- and 3000-level meteorology courses must be completed with a grade of "C" (2.0) or better to continue to the 4000-level courses. All other required meteorology, mathematics, chemistry, and physics courses must be completed with a "C–" or better before taking a course for which the technical course serves as a prerequisite. Students earning less than the necessary grade in one of these courses will be required to retake the course until the required standard is met. Retaking a course often delays graduation by one year. A student is allowed three grades of D+ or lower in required technical courses (chemistry, mathematics, meteorology, physics, and statistics), whether taken at Florida State University or elsewhere, whether repeated or not. If that number is exceeded, the student must change majors. Exception to this policy or reinstatement requires a petition to the meteorology faculty.

A grade point average of at least 2.0 is required for all meteorology courses numbered 2000 or higher. No more than a total of three S/U-grade only MET prefix courses may be used for the total semester hour requirement for a degree in meteorology.

Undergraduate Research

All students, particularly those interested in graduate school, are encouraged to volunteer to assist with research in a faculty member's lab. This work requires a substantial time commitment and typically involves computer skills that are learned and polished through this experience. Qualified students can use this as the basis for an Honors in the Major senior thesis; for more information, see the chapter in this General Bulletin titled "University Honors Office and Honor Societies." Dr. Ahlquist is the "honors liaison" for meteorology. Several of our undergraduates have won the American Meteorological Society Macelwane Award for their undergraduate research, and most were not in the Honors in the Major program. In that case, they can register for MET4905 Directed Individual Study (DIS) credit for this work, but that is not required.

Requirements for a Minor in Meteorology

A minor in meteorology requires at least twelve credit hours and must be discussed on an individual basis with a meteorology faculty advisor or academic coordinator. The minor typically begins with MET 1010, MET 1010L, MET 2700, and MET 2101, and options exist for the completion of the minor. MET 2700 has prerequisites of CHM 1045, CHM 1045L, and MAC 2311; and a corequisite of PHY 2048C. Additional information is available from the academic coordinator in the Department of Meteorology, 404 Love Building. In no case may more than three semester hours in S/U courses apply toward a minor in meteorology.

Definition of Prefixes

EOC—Ocean Engineering

ESC—Earth Science

EVR—Environmental Studies

GLY—Geology

IFS—Interdisciplinary Florida State University Courses

ISC—Interdisciplinary Sciences

MAP—Mathematics Applied

MET—Meteorology

OCB—Biological Oceanography

OCC—Chemical Oceanography

OCE—General Oceanography

OCG—Geological Oceanography

OCP—Physical Oceanography

PEN—Physical Education Activities (General): Water, Snow, Ice

SCE—Science Education

Undergraduate Courses

Earth Science

ESC 1000. Introductory Earth Science (3). This course is an introduction to the study of planet Earth, its internal dynamics, and surficial weathering, erosion, sedimentary processes, the composition and motion of its oceans and atmosphere, and its origin as part of the solar system. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1000, GLY 1030, or GLY 2010C.

ESC 2200C. Earth Science for EC/EE Teachers (4).

GLY 1000. Dynamic Earth (3). This course is an introduction to geology as the study of planet Earth, its internal dynamics, and its surficial weathering, erosion, and sedimentary processes. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1030 or GLY 2010C.

GLY 1000L. Dynamic Earth Laboratory (1). Pre- or corequisite: GLY 1000 or GLY 1030. This course is a laboratory introduction to geology as the study of plant Earth, specifically a study of minerals, rocks, and maps.

GLY 1001. Earth As A System (3). This course presents a holistic approach to Earth's history with a view toward using that history to explore the planets future. The course explains how interactions of the biosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and exosphere are expressed in Earth's ever changing environment.

GLY 1030. Environmental Issues in Geology (3). This course examines environmental issues as they relate to geological phenomena, which include volcanic and earthquake hazards, resource and land-use planning, air and water pollution, waste disposal, glaciation and sea-level change, landslides, flooding, shoreline erosion, and global change issues. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1000 or 2010C. Credit can be received for taking GLY 1000L.

GLY 1042. Planetary Geology (3). This course is an introduction to the basic geological processes that apply to the planets and moons of the solar system. Observational evidence from spacecraft and earth-based sensors of the surfaces, dynamics, structures, and geologic evolution. The earth-moon system is presented as a basis for comparison.

GLY 1070. Living on the Water Planet (3). This course provides students with an overview of the basic physics and chemistry of water and the processes that control water supply to natural ecosystems and to human civilization. It covers the hydrologic cycle, floods, drought, groundwater, patterns of water use, threats to water quality, the effects of global climate change on future water supplies, and water issues facing the state of Florida.

GLY 1102. Dinosaurs and Disasters on an Evolving Earth (3). This course examines the history of the earth and its organisms as recorded in the fossil and rock record; principles of geological and paleontological research; evolution of the dinosaurs, mass extinctions, and effects of past continental movements on the diversity of life. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 2100. GLY 2100L recommended.

GLY 2010C. Physical Geology (4). Pre- or corequisite: CHM 1045. This course is an introduction to surficial and internal processes affecting a dynamic planet Earth. For majors in geology and natural sciences. Two hour laboratory required. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1000 or GLY 1030.

GLY 2100. Historical Geology (3). This course examines the history of the earth and is an introduction to the fossil record. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1102.

GLY 2100L. Historical Geology Laboratory (1). Pre- or corequisite: GLY 1102 or GLY 2100. This laboratory is a study of the physical and biological evidence for the known history of the earth.

GLY 3039. Energy, Resources, and the Environment (3). Prerequisites: GLY 1000 and GLY 2010C, or instructor permission. This course examines the origin of our energy and mineral resources (e.g., fossil fuels, uranium, hydrogen), their global supply, and the environmental impacts of extracting and utilizing these resources. Emphasis is placed on the chemical nature of the resources and the impact on the chemical composition of the ocean/atmosphere and the global heat budget. Field trips, in-class demonstrations, and homework exercises provide firsthand experience.

GLY 3200C. Mineralogy and Crystallography (3). Pre- or corequisites: CHM 1045 and GLY 2010C. This course is an introduction to mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and crystallography. Three hour laboratory required.

GLY 3220C. Optical Mineralogy (2). Corequisite: GLY 3200C. This course explores the optical properties of crystals and mineral identification by use of the polarizing microscope. Three hour laboratory required.

GLY 3310C. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (3). Prerequisite: GLY 3220C. This course focuses on the classification, description, and origin of igneous and metamorphic rocks; relation of these rocks to tectonic processes. Three hour laboratory required.

GLY 3340C. Sedimentary Petrography (2). Prerequisite: GLY 3220C. This course is a survey of sedimentary rock types, principles of description and classification, sediment genesis and transport, distribution and origin of sedimentary deposits.

GLY 3400C. Structural Geology (4). Prerequisites: GLY 2100, GLY 2100L, and GLY 3200C. This course focuses on the theory, processes, mechanics of rock deformation and the deformation of the earth's crust. Field trip is required.

GLY 3610C. Paleontology (4). Prerequisites: GLY 2100 and GLY 2100L. This course is a review of invertebrate biology, with emphasis on hard-part nomenclature; the occurrence, distribution, evolution, and ecology of fossil invertebrates.

GLY 4240. Principles of Geochemistry (3). Prerequisites: GLY 2010C and basic chemistry. This course focuses on the crystal chemistry of silicates and other minerals; chemical principles applied to igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary environments and processes; chemistry of natural aqueous systems; chemical equilibria of geologic systems.

GLY 4451. Introduction to Geophysics (3). Prerequisites: MAP 2302 and PHY 2049 or instructor permission. This course explores plate tectonics and earth structure. Current methods of probing the interior: seismology and seismic tomography, geomagnetics, geoid and gravity, geochemistry and geochronology, heat flow, mantle convection, core convection and the geodynamo.

GLY 4511. Principles of Stratigraphy (3). Prerequisite: GLY 3340C.This course is an analysis and synthesis of stratigraphic sequences. Depositional systems; physical and biostratigraphy; geochronology and chronostratigraphy; magnetic, seismic, and sequence stratigraphy; tectonic vs. climatic controls. Term paper required.

GLY 4544C. Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (4). Prerequisite: GLY 2010C. This course surveys sedimentary rock types, principles of description and classification, sediment genesis and origin of sedimentary deposits, analysis and synthesis of stratigraphic sequences. Topics include: depositional systems; physical and biostratigraphy; geochronology and chronostratigraphy; magnetic, seismic, and sequence stratigraphy; and tectonic vs. climatic controls. Term paper required.

GLY 4551. Sedimentology (2). Prerequisite: GLY 3200C. This course is a study of modern and ancient sedimentary deposits, measurement of sediment parameters, analysis of sediment transport modes, classification of sediments and sedimentary rocks, statistical reduction of sedimentologic data. Field trip required. Students concentrating in sedimentary geology are strongly urged to take the laboratory GLY 4551L concurrently.

GLY 4551L. Laboratory Methods in Sedimentology (1). This laboratory focuses on standard sedimentologic methods, including textural analysis, heavy mineral separation and identification, carbonate staining, X-ray diffractometry, and statistical reduction of sedimentologic data. May be taken separately, but students concentrating in sedimentary geology should take GLY 4551L concurrently with 4551.

GLY 4700C. Geomorphology (3). Prerequisite: Senior standing. This course is an introduction to the description of landforms and landscapes on the earth's surface. Emphasis is placed on the basic mechanisms that govern landform evolution, and on the history of geomorphic study. Several field trips are required.

GLY 4730. Marine Geology (3). This course examines shoreline, shelf and deep ocean processes; marine sediment types and sedimentary environments; plate tectonics; origin of the ocean; paleoceanography; marine mineral resources. Includes research methods cruise for familiarization with marine geologic sampling and sensing devices. Credit received for GLY 4730 precludes credit being received for GLY 5736 or OCG 5050.

GLY 4750. Geological Field Methods (1). (S/U grade only.) Corequisite: GLY 3400C. This course provides a working knowledge and some experience of techniques, procedures, and tools that are essential to geological field research, the professional geologist, and the required summer field course.

GLY 4751C. Introduction to Remote Sensing, Air Photo Interpretation and GIS for the Earth Sciences (3). Prerequisites: GLY 3400C and PHY 2049. This course is an introduction to the study of the earth using photographic and electronic imaging acquired from aircraft and satellites; physics of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and materials of Earth's surface and hydrosphere; principles of electronic and microwave imaging; and use of digital image analysis and GIS in the study of earth resources and global change.

GLY 4780. Environmental Field Problems (4). Prerequisite: GLY 2010C. This course emphasizes the use of field-related observations in the study of environmental problems. Fieldwork includes the study of soils, surface waters and groundwater, erosion and mass wasting, and the chemical contamination of soils and surface waters. Evaluation of student performance in the course is based upon a series of written reports.

GLY 4790. Field Course (6). Prerequisites: GLY 3400C and GLY 4750. This course is a series of field problems based largely on exposures of strata and structures. Preparation of geologic maps, sections, and reports.

GLY 4812C. Ore Deposits (3). Prerequisites: GLY 3310C and GLY 3400C. This course is an introduction to the study of metallic ore deposits. Laboratory studies of ores using the reflected light microscope and economic evaluation of ore deposits.

GLY 4820. Principles of Hydrology (3). Prerequisites: CHM 1046 and PHY 2049C. This course focuses on the fundamentals of hydrogeology with an emphasis on groundwater flow and hydrochemistry. Both theory and applications are addressed.

GLY 4884. Environmental Geology I (3). This course examines the application of geologic and geochemical principles to environmental issues. Topics include: an evaluation of contaminants in surface water and ground water; hydrocarbon geochemistry and petroleum storage tank problems; waste management, including solid, toxic, and nuclear waste; air quality issues including radon and asbestos; geologic hazards in upland and coastal areas; environmental geologic methods and instrumentation; quality assurance and quality control in environmental analysis; principles of toxicology; risk assessment and risk management; and environmental assessments.

GLY 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–9). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GLY 4915r. Undergraduate Research (1–9). (S/U grade only.) This course includes projects in the Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science department arranged in advance between the student and a member of the teaching faculty of the department. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GLY 4917. Senior Thesis (1). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: GLY 4915r. This course consists of a written report and an oral presentation discussing research work done under GLY 4915r. The grade is assigned by a committee of three faculty members.

GLY 4989r. Honors Work (1–6). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

IFS 2087. Trilobites to T. Rex: History of Life on Earth (3). This course is an overview of fossil record of life on earth from its first appearance to the dinosaurs. Emphasis is placed on the nature of fossil data, relationship to modern biology and how inferences about life habits are made.

ISC 2937r. Natural Science Honors Seminar (3). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

SCE 4939r. Seminar in Contemporary Science, Mathematics, and Science Education (1). This course includes presentations of contemporary and interesting issues in science, mathematics, or academic methods. Content varies from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

Environmental Science

EOC 4631. Marine Pollution (3). Prerequisite: Understanding of chemical processes. This course introduces students to chemical, physical, and biological aspects of dominant marine pollutants, including dissolved toxic metals, complex organic and inorganic contaminants, and particulate pollutants. Topics cover the sources and types of dominant contaminants, their key characteristics, their pathways (as traced through the marine ecosystem from the source to the sinks), their impact on the environment, as well as approaches that could lead to the reduction or elimination of pollutants in the marine environment.

EVR 1001. Introduction to Environmental Science (3). This course is an introduction to environmental science that covers the basic functioning of the earth's environmental system and human effects on that system.

EVR 1001L. Environmental Science Laboratory (1). Corequisite: EVR 1001.

EVR 4922. Environmental Science Capstone (4). Corequisite: OCE 4008. This course allows students an opportunity to apply knowledge from coursework to a number of individual and group projects. There is a strong field component conducted on and off campus using techniques in basic surveying, sampling, and safety. Meets Liberal Studies upper division writing skills requirement.

IFS 2088. Sustainable Food and Water: Soil, Animals, Vegetables, and Grain (3). This course provides an overview of the issues involved in food and water security on a planet where a billion people are malnourished, while at the same time another billion are overweight. The course examines the science and sustainability of food production, water quality, and soil development.

ISC 2003. Global Change, Its Scientific and Human Dimensions (3). Prerequisites: Two years high school science and two years high school math. This course covers global environmental change, scientific and human dimensions, and international public policy implications.

Ocean Science

ESC 2200C. Earth Science for EC/EE Teachers (4).

OCB 2302. Biology of Marine Animals (3). Prerequisite: BSC 1005. This course explores marine mammals such as cetaceans, pinnipeds, sirenians, and sea otters from the point of view of their biology and ecology. More specifically, the course offers an overview of the evolution, taxonomy, anatomy, and physiology of marine mammals, as well as an in-depth examination of their acoustics, ecology, and behavior. Course lecture is accompanied by discussions of the current specific literature.

OCB 4631. Estuarine and Coastal Ecology (3). Prerequisite: Understanding of chemical processes. This interdisciplinary course addresses the ecology of estuaries and the part of the inshore waters with which estuaries interact directly. The lectures address the general ecological principles that govern the productivity and diversity of estuaries, including their hydrodynamics, sedimentology, chemistry, as well as plant and animal community structure. Key species of estuarine systems are introduced and cycles of carbon and nutrients are explained.

OCB 4637. Marine Benthic Ecology (3). Pre- or corequisite: ZOO 4203C or instructor permission. This course studies the physical setting and ecological organization of the communities found in the rocky intertidal, in the fouling habitat, on sandy beaches, in subtidal soft bottoms, and in the deep sea. This is presented through lectures, substantial reading, and class discussions.

OCC 4002. Basic Chemical Oceanography (3). Prerequisite: CHM 1046. This course focuses on the chemical composition of seawater, carbon dioxide system, nutrients, trace elements, and biogeochemistry.

OCC 4060. Environmental Science Modeling (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2311, MAC 2312, and either STA 2122 or STA 4102. This course gives students an understanding of explanatory and predictive models of the earth's systems and environmental processes therein. Analytical and numerical methods for solving equations are examined and applied. Discussions cover relevant scientific issues, mathematical and computational procedures, visualization techniques, as well as the use of models in research and decision making.

OCE 1001. Elementary Oceanography (3). Prerequisite: MGF 1106 or MGF 1107. This course studies the structure and motion of the ocean and its environs, properties, populations, and energy budget. Not intended for upper-division science or mathematics majors. Upper-division science or mathematics majors are encouraged instead to take OCE 4008.

OCE 3555. Environmental Science II: Habitable Planet (3). This course explores the earth system at and above the surface of the earth. It combines earth and biological sciences to explore the co-evolution of the earth and life over geological time. Evolution of the hydrosphere, atmosphere, and lithosphere are discussed.

OCE 4008. Principles of Oceanography (3). Prerequisite: A science major or minor status and junior or senior standing. This course focuses on dynamic motions and life processes in the marine environment. Long-term geologic history of the oceans and recent changes caused by man. An overview of oceanography for upper-division students majoring in science, mathematics, or science teaching.

OCE 4017. Current Issues in Environmental Science (3). This course is taught at an introductory level and includes discussions of current ground-breaking research, environmental problems, and approaches to solving them. It consists of presentations by experts on their current research topics or environmental issues.

OCE 4064. Marine Conservation Biology (3). Prerequisite: BSC 2011. This course discusses anthropogenic impacts on the world's marine biological resources and ways to mitigate those impacts. The course begins with a brief overview of some relevant key concepts in marine biology and ecology.

OCE 4265. Coral Reef Ecology (3). Prerequisite: A good basic understanding of biological, chemical, and physical processes. In this course, the student learns the components of warm water coral reef ecosystems, their functions and interactions, and their response to environmental change. The biological, chemical and physical processes that govern the ecology of warm water coral reef ecosystems are addressed as well as the anthropogenic impact on reef ecosystems and the management of coral reef ecosystems.

OCE 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only.) May be repeated to a maximum of ten semester hours.

OCE 4906r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. May be repeated, subject to limitations that may apply from the individual student's major departments, to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

OCE 4930r. Studies in Oceanography (1–4). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Topics vary. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours when content changes.

OCG 3103. The Earth System (3). This course is an examination of the modern approach to understanding Earth's climate history and climate change on a global scale.

OCG 4050. Geological Oceanography (3). This course studies the structural and oceanographic setting of continents and ocean basins, plate tectonics, ocean margins, marine sediments, and ocean history.

OCP 4005. Introduction to Physical Oceanography (3). Prerequisite: MAC 2313. This course examines waves, currents, tides, El Niño, and climate change prediction.

PEN 1136. Theory and Practice of Compressed-Gas Diving (1). This course is an introduction to the field of compressed-gas diving that exposes students to the use of underwater technology and techniques in support of science.

Atmospheric Science

ESC 2200C. Earth Science for EC/EE Teachers (4).

ISC 3076. Science, Technology, and Society (3).

MET 1010. Introduction to the Atmosphere (3). This course covers the structure of the atmosphere; weather processes and weather systems, including climatic processes. Credit may not be received in this course if student has already received credit in 2000-level or higher MET courses.

MET 1010L. Introductory Meteorology Laboratory (1). Prerequisites: MAC 1105 or equivalent and college-level algebra. Corequisite: MET 1010. This course covers data analysis, instruments, and weather system models.

SCE 4835C. Teaching Earth and Space Science (3). This course examines the pedagogical content knowledge needed to teach earth/space science.

SCE 4939r. Seminar in Contemporary Science, Mathematics, and Science Education (1). This course includes presentations of contemporary and interesting issues in science, mathematics, or academic methods. Content varies from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

Required Courses for Meteorology Majors

MET 2101. Physical Climatology (3). Corequisite: MET 2700. This course covers global distribution of principal climatic elements with emphasis on physical causes. Statistical analysis of distributions of climatological variables.

MET 2507C. Weather Analysis and Forecasting (2). Prerequisite: MET 2700 with a grade of "C" or better. This course is an introduction to meteorological observations, data, codes, and scalar analysis practices. Weather applications software systems and computing environments for meteorological analysis and weather forecasting techniques are examined.

MET 2700. General Meteorology (3). Prerequisites: CHM 1045 and MAC 2311, both with a grade of "C-" or better. Corequisite: PHY 2048C. This course covers atmospheric structure and composition; weather and circulation systems; physics of atmospheric processes, including thermodynamics of dry and moist air.

MET 3220C. Meteorological Computations (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2312 ("C-" or better), MET 2101 ("C" or better), and MET 2700 ("C" or better). This course covers the solution of meteorological problems using computer and statistical programs; distributions of meteorological variables; meteorological programming.

MET 3300. Introduction to Atmospheric Dynamics (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2312 ("C-" or better), PHY 2048C ("C-" or better), and MET 2700 ("C" or better). This course examines a variety of topics, including equations of motion, mass conservation, thermodynamics, vorticity, and geostrophic, gradient and thermal winds.

MET 4301. Atmospheric Dynamics I (4). Prerequisite: MET 3300 with a grade of "C" or better. Corequisites: MAP 2302 or MAP 3305 and MET 4420. This course covers acceleration in rotating curvilinear coordinates; momentum, continuity, and energy equations; geostrophic, gradient, and thermal winds; generalized coordinates; circulation and vorticity theorems; scale analysis; Reynolds stresses; Prandtl and Ekman layers; developing baroclinic systems.

MET 4302. Atmospheric Dynamics II (4). Prerequisites: MET 4301 ("C-" or better), MAP 2302 or MAP 3305 ("C-" or better). This course covers linear perturbation theory; sound, gravity, and Rossby waves; numerical weather prediction; baroclinic and barotropic instability; energetics. An introduction to theory of partial differential equations applied to meteorological problems also is presented.

MET 4420. Atmospheric Physics I (3). Prerequisites: PHY 2048C ("C-" or better), PHY 2049C ("C-" or better), MET 2700 ("C" or better), and MAC 2313 ("C-" or better). This course covers classical equilibrium thermodynamics; first and second law, entropy, phase changes, potentials. Physics of moist air; physics of aerosols; condensation of water vapor on aerosols. Microphysics and dynamics of clouds; growth of ice crystals.

MET 4450. Atmospheric Physics II (3). Prerequisite: MET 4420 with a grade of "C-" or better. This course covers radiative processes in the atmosphere; radiative transfer equation, absorption by gases, Rayleigh scattering. Remote sensing using radars and satellites.

MET 4500C. Synoptic Lecture-Laboratory I: Basic Analysis Techniques (3). Prerequisites: MET 2507C ("C" or better), MET 3300 ("C" or better), or instructor permission. Corequisites: MET 4301 or MET 5311, MET 4420, and CGS 3460 or another programming language. This course covers the analysis of scalar and vector fields, introduction to the three-dimensional structure of atmospheric systems, and thermodynamic diagrams.

MET 4501C. Synoptic Lecture-Laboratory II: Four-Dimensional Structure (4). Prerequisites: MET 4500 or MET 5500; MET 4301 or MET 5311; MET 4420 or MET 5420; and STA 2122 or equivalent. This course covers synoptic calculation and four-dimensional analysis of weather systems.

Required Courses for FSU-Teach Applied Geosciences

ISC 3523C. Research Methods (3). Prerequisites: SMT 1043 and SMT 1053. In this course, students learn appropriate scientific research methods for several types of research questions. Using the inquiry method of learning, they develop a research question and an experiment to answer it, and then use statistical techniques to analyze their resulting data.

MET 3103C. Climate Change Science (3). Prerequisite: MET 2700 with a grade "C" or better. This course enables students to explore the science behind our understanding of climate change. The course provides an in-depth exploration of the use of proxi, in situ, remote-sensing data, climate models, and their public policy implications. Students gain experience in evaluating internal and external forcings on the climate system and make quantitative assessments of change. The course also gives students an understanding of energy transfer methods between the atmosphere, cryosphere, oceans, and fresh water systems.

Elective Courses for Meteorology Majors

MET 3520r. Current Weather Discussion (1). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: MET 2700. This course includes discussion of facsimile analysis and prediction materials. Three meetings per week. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

MET 3940r. Weathercasting (1). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: MET 1010. Corequisite: MET 2700. This course includes practice in preparing and presenting weathercasts for radio and television. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

MET 3949r. Experiential Learning (0). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This non-credit, experiential learning course offers students an opportunity to gain "real world" on-the-job work experience related to a specific academic field of study. Students must register for this course through the FSU Career Center.

MET 4159r. Selected Topics in Meteorology (1–3). Prerequisite: MET 2700 with a grade of "C" or better. Corequisites: MET 2101, MET 3300, and instructor permission. This course covers selected topics in meteorology and climatology not covered in other courses. May be repeated as content changes to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

MET 4400C. Meteorological Instrumentation and Observations (3). Prerequisites: PHY 2048C and MET 2700, both with a grade of "C" or better. This course covers theory and practice of calibration and operation of basic sensors, measurement of temperature, heat flow, fluid flow, pressure, and moisture. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory.

MET 4705. Operational Meteorology (2). Prerequisite: MET 4500C. This course introduces observational analysis products used in operational weather forecast offices. Topics include applications of radar and satellite data, the various applications of numerical weather prediction, and types of weather forecasts.

MET 4900r. Honors Work (1–6). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

MET 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

MET 4945r. Meteorology Internship (1–9). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course is a supervised internship individually assigned to accommodate student's background and objectives. Credit proportional to scope and significance of work. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

Graduate Courses

Geology

ESC 5211r. Current Topics in Earth Science (3).

ESC 5215r. Current Topics in Earth Science (3).

GLY 5135. Quaternary Geology (3).

GLY 5265. Nuclear Geology (3).

GLY 5267. Stable Isotopic Tracers in the Environment (3).

GLY 5297r. Advanced Topics in Geochemistry (1–3).

GLY 5395r. Advanced Topics in Petrology (1–3).

GLY 5425. Tectonics (3).

GLY 5455. Introduction to Geophysics (3).

GLY 5465. Geomechanics (3).

GLY 5495. Advanced Topics in Geophysics (3).

GLY 5497r. Advanced Topics in Structural Geology (1–3).

GLY 5516. Stratigraphy and Sequence Analysis (3).

GLY 5556. Hydrodynamics (3).

GLY 5573. Fluvial Processes (3).

GLY 5575. Coastal Geology (3).

GLY 5577. Sedimentary Basin Analysis (3).

GLY 5595r. Advanced Topics in Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (1–3).

GLY 5624C. Introduction to Micropaleontology (3).

GLY 5625C. Advanced Micropaleontology (3).

GLY 5695r. Advanced Topics in Paleontology (1–3).

GLY 5696Cr. Mesozoic Planktonic Calcareous Nannofossils (4–8).

GLY 5697Cr. Cenozoic Planktonic Calcareous Nannofossils (4–8).

GLY 5736. Marine Geology (3).

GLY 5757C. Fundamentals of Remote Sensing, Air Photo Interpretation and GIS for the Earth Sciences (4).

GLY 5825. Physical Hydrology (3).

GLY 5826. Numerical Modeling of Groundwater Flow (3).

GLY 5827. Principles of Hydrology (3).

GLY 5885. Geologic Hazards Assessment (3).

GLY 5887. Environmental Geology I (3).

GLY 5896r. Advanced Topics in Hydrology (1–3).

GLY 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

GLY 5910r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

GLY 5931r. Graduate Seminar (1). (S/U grade only.)

GLY 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

GLY 6982r. Doctoral Seminar (1). (S/U grade only.)

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

Oceanography

Core Curriculum

OCB 5050. Basic Biological Oceanography (3).

OCC 5050. Basic Chemical Oceanography (3).

OCG 5051. Basic Geological Oceanography (3).

OCP 5050. Basic Physical Oceanography (3).

Biological Oceanography

OCB 5015. Marine Nekton: Larval Fish to Whales (3).

OCB 5067C. Ecology of Marine Sediments (4).

OCB 5264. Selected Topics in Coral Reef Ecology (3).

OCB 5565. Marine Primary Production (3).

OCB 5600. Biological Fluid Dynamics (3). (S/U grade only.)

OCB 5635. Selected Topics in Coastal Ocean ology (3).

OCB 5636. Marine Microbial Ecology (3).

OCB 5639. Marine Benthic Ecology (3).

Chemical and Geological Oceanography

OCC 5052. Aquatic Chemistry (3).

OCC 5062. Marine Isotopic Chemistry (3).

OCC 5415. Marine Geochemistry (3).

OCC 5417. Geochemical Ocean Tracers (3).

OCC 5554. Atmospheric Chemistry (3).

OCG 5457. Stable Isotopes as Tracers in Aquatic Ecosystems (3).

OCG 5664. Paleoceanography (3).

Physical Oceanography

MAP 5431. Introduction to Fluid Dynamics (3).

MAP 6434r. Advanced Topics in Hydrodynamics (2).

OCP 5056. Introduction to Physical Oceanography (3).

OCP 5160. Ocean Waves (3).

OCP 5256. Fluid Dynamics: Geophysical Applications (3).

OCP 5263. Equatorial Dynamics (3).

OCP 5265. Main Ocean Thermocline (3).

OCP 5271. Turbulence (3).

OCP 5285. Dynamic Oceanography (3).

OCP 5551. Physics of the Air-Sea Boundary Layer (3).

Specialized Instruction and Seminar

OCB 5930r. Special Topics in Biological Oceanography (1–3).

OCB 5939r. Biological Oceanography Seminar (1). (S/U grade only.)

OCC 5419C. Advanced Biogeochemistry: Field Methods and Concepts (3).

OCC 5930r. Special Topics in Chemical Oceanography (1–3).

OCC 5939r. Chemical Oceanography Seminar (1). (S/U grade only.)

OCE 5065. Marine Conservation Biology (3).

OCE 5077. Marine Environment Pollution (3).

OCE 5908r. Directed Individual Study (1–12). (S/U grade only.)

OCE 5910r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

OCE 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

OCP 5930r. Special Topics in Physical Oceanography (1–3).

OCP 5939r. Physical Oceanography Seminar (1). (S/U grade only.)

General

OCE 5009. Advanced General Oceanography (3).

OCE 5009L. Coastal Oceanography and Marine Field Methods (4).

OCE 5018. Current Issues in Environmental Science (3).

OCE 5554. Habitable Planet (3).

OCG 5106. The Earth System (3).

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

Meteorology

Dynamical Meteorology

MAP 5431. Introduction to Fluid Dynamics (3).

MAP 6434r. Advanced Topics in Hydrodynamics (3).

MET 5311. Advanced Dynamic Meteorology I (3).

MET 5312. Advanced Dynamic Meteorology II (3).

MET 5340r. Large-Scale Atmospheric Circulations (3).

MET 5406. Satellite Observations and Their Applications in Numerical Weather Prediction (3).

MET 5541r. Dynamical Weather Prediction (3).

MET 6308r. Advanced Topics in Dynamical Meteorology (3).

OCP 5256. Fluid Dynamics: Geophysical Applications (3).

Physical Meteorology

MET 5407. Fundamentals of Atmospheric Data Assimilation (3).

MET 5411. Radar Meteorology (3).

MET 5421. Radiative Transfer (3).

MET 5425. Advanced Atmospheric Physics I (3).

MET 5451. Advanced Physical Meteorology II (3).

MET 5455. Cloud Physics (3).

MET 5471. Satellite Remote Sensing of Planetary Atmospheres (3).

MET 6480r. Advanced Topics in Physical Meteorology (3).

Synoptic Meteorology

MET 5505C. Advanced Synoptic Lecture–Laboratory I (3).

MET 5506C. Advanced Synoptic Lecture–Laboratory II (4).

MET 5510C. Midlatitude Synoptic Scale Systems (4).

MET 5511C. Meso-Meteorology Lecture Laboratory (4).

MET 5533. Tropical Meteorology I (3).

MET 5534. Tropical Meteorology II (3).

MET 6561r. Advanced Topics in Synoptic Meteorology (3).

Climatology

MET 5105. Global Climate System (3).

MET 5135. Dynamic Climatology (3).

MET 6155r. Advanced Topics in Climatology (1–3).

Other Courses

MET 5090r. Applied Time Series Analysis (3).

MET 5403C. Meteorological Instruments and Observations (3).

MET 5905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

MET 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3).

MET 5910r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

MET 5920r. Colloquium: Topics in Meteorology Research (1). (S/U grade only.)

MET 5930. Master's Seminar (2).

MET 5979r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

MET 6906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

MET 6930r. Doctoral Seminar (1).

OCP 5271. Turbulence (3).

OCP 5551. Physics of the Air-Sea Boundary Layer (3).

SCE 5836C. Teaching Earth and Space Science (3).

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

Graduate Study

The department offers courses leading to the Master of Science in Oceanography and in Meteorology, a non-thesis master's in aquatic environmental sciences, and Doctor of Philosophy in Oceanography and in Meteorology. Consult the Graduate Bulletin or http://www.eoas.fsu.edu for details.

ECOLOGY:

see Biological Science