Skip to main content

This is your Donation message.

2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Department of Geography

College of Social Sciences and Public Policy

Web Page: http://geography.fsu.edu/

Chair: James Elsner; Professors: Elsner, Horner, Mesev, Yang; Associate Professor: Zhao; Assistant Professors: Folch, Lawhon, Lester, McCreary, Pau, Pierce, Uejio; Affiliate and Adjunct Faculty: Cole, Doel, Miller, Molina, Quinton, Weisman, Winsberg

The Department of Geography offers two separate degrees reflecting the discipline's position straddling the social and natural sciences: bachelors in Geography and the new STEM bachelors in Environment and Society. While these programs overlap to some extent, they differ in how society interacts with the natural environment: Geography examines how location and scale affect human behavior, while Environment and Society explores how humans both affect and are affected by changes in the natural environment. Students may double major in Geography and Environment and Society; with a maximum of eleven semester hours allowed to overlap.

Several career paths await the graduating geographer and environmentalist in the public and private sectors. Both bring important knowledge and analytical techniques to natural resource management and urban planning agencies. Training in location analysis enables geographers and environmentalists to determine where public facilities and infrastructure are best located so that the greatest number of people benefit. These skills are also valued by private firms investing in residential or commercial development; a geographer can pinpoint where investments are likely to yield the best returns, while an environmentalist is concerned with public health and habitat disturbance. Geographers are concerned with mapping how changes to the landscape, vegetation, animals, climate impact on where humans live, socialize, work, trade, and form cultural and nationalist identities. They examine agricultural practices, industry, boundary disputes, urban decay, political ideologies, religious principles, and how these relate to perceptions of the environment, concern for global warming, and recycling/sustainability practices. On the other hand, environmentalists work as policy analysts and natural resource conservationists, dealing with issues as wide-ranging as food production, marine exploitation, soil pollution, land use planning, coastal protection, severe storm mitigation, waste disposal, and environmental health, and urban sustainability. Many of these are mapped and monitored using geographic information systems (GIS), including remote sensing and spatial statistics. Students are encouraged to use the College of Social Sciences and Public Policy's GIS laboratory running the market-leader ArcGIS software. Finally, an understanding of geographic and environmental changes lead some to finding jobs as teachers and instructors.

For a complete education in Geography or Environment and Society, all students are given the opportunity to take courses that reflect the department's research strengths in transportation optimization, land use/land cover change, urban growth, population mapping, regionalization and location theory, political ecology, race and identity, environmental conflict and policy, urban sustainability, environmental health, hurricane forecasting, tropical forests and grasslands, coastal and estuarine ecosystems, energy consumption and conservation, and biodiversity and resource management. Please note that previous major, Environmental Studies, has been converted to Environment and Society as of Fall 2016. Visit the department Web site (http://geography.fsu.edu), Bellamy 301, or contact Undergraduate Program Director, Dr. Victor Mesev (vmesev@fsu.edu) or Academic Program Coordinator, Dr. Alex Cohn (asc07h@fsu.edu)

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into this upper-division degree program:

  1. GEO XXXX and GEO XXXX: two introductory geography courses (GEO prefix) for a total of six credit hours

Geography Major

Geography bridges the social sciences and physical sciences in the pursuit of how humans affect and are affected by natural environment. Geographers examine many social/physical issues at every scale, such as housing development and habitat loss, insurance premiums and storm damage, commercial fishing and marine sustainability, transport flow and air pollution, energy needs and mineral exploitation, and intensive farming and deforestation. Geography is the study of place and space, in the same sense that history is the study of time. Geographers ask where are things located? Why are they located where they are? And how do we map them? Geographers are concerned with mapping how changes to the landscape, vegetation, animals, climate impact where humans live, socialize, work, trade, and form cultural and nationalist identities. They examine agricultural practices, industry, boundary disputes, urban decay, political ideologies, religious principles, and how these relate to perceptions of the environment, concern for global warming, and recycling/sustainability practices. All these can by mapped using computer-based GIS, GPS and satellite surveillance techniques with ever-improving geographic accuracy and precision.

Major Requirements

A major in geography consists of thirty-four semester hours. All courses must be completed with a grade of "C–" or better.

All of the following core courses are required (nineteen hours)

GEA 1000 World Geography

GEO 1400 Human Geography

GEO 2200C Physical Geography

GEO 4162C Spatial Data Analysis

GIS 3015 Map Analysis

GIS 4043 Geographic Information Systems

and

GIS 4043L Geographic Information Systems Lab

Human Geography (three hours) Select one course from the following:

GEO 3502 Economic Geography

GEO 4421 Cultural Geography

GEO 4450 Medical Geography

GEO 4471 Political Geography

GEO 4602 Urban Geography

GEO 4700 Transport Geography

IFS 2029 Dead Cities

IFS 2077 Great Britain? Geography, Imperialism, Industry, and Culture

Physical Geography (three to four hours) Select one course from the following:

EVR 4314 Energy and Society

GEO 4210 Landforms and Landscapes

GEO 4280 Geography of Water Resources

GEO 4300 Biogeography

GEO 4376 Landscape Ecology

GIS 4035 Introduction to Remote Sensing

And

GIS 4035L Introduction to Remote Sensing Lab

IFS 2040 Putting Science into Action: Field Methods in Plant Ecology

IFS 2080 Glaciers, Geysers, and Glades: Exploring U.S. National Parks

General Geography courses (eight to nine hours)

Students must select additional geography courses (GEA/GEO/GIS) at the 3000/4000 level to bring the total credits in the major to thirty-four; coursework may include a maximum of nine credit hours of GEO 4930, Special Topics classes. A maximum of three credit hours may be used from GEO 4905 DIS or GEO 4941 Internship.

No credit for geography courses with a grade below "C–" will be applied towards completion of the major.

Minor Coursework: at least twelve hours

Geography majors are required to complete a minor in any departmental or interdisciplinary area of interest. Minors normally range from twelve to eighteen hours.

Minor in Geography

The geography minor consists of fifteen semester hours of coursework in geography from the following choices:

GEA 1000 World Geography

GEO 1400 Human Geography

GEO 1330 Environmental Science

OR

GEO 2200C Physical Geography

GEO 4162C Spatial Data Analysis

or

GIS 3015 Map Analysis

Any GEA/GEO/GIS 3000 or higher elective

All courses must be completed with a grade of "C–" or better. If the geography minor is combined with the environmental studies major, GEO 1330/GEO 2200C and one other course (up to six credits total) may count toward both the major and the minor. For more information contact the Department of Geography or visit the department's Web site at http://geography.fsu.edu/.

Environment and Society Major

Environment and Society is an interdisciplinary STEM program of study that explores how humans affect and are affected by changes in the natural environment. It combines courses from the social sciences and the natural sciences to investigate today's pressing environmental issues, such as ecosystem management, climate change, natural resource conservation, food production, marine exploitation, urban sustainability, land use planning, severe storm mitigation, and environment health—including how these issues are debated, measured, evaluated and then formulated into public policy. The major is highly flexible and allows students to explore a wide variety of classes when choosing how to study how humans interact, control, and live in harmony with nature. It requires forty-one semester hours with a grade of "C–" or better in each course; at least eighteen semester hours must be taken in upper-level (3000- and 4000-level) courses.

Note: Some of the following courses have prerequisites.

  1. Basic Core Curriculum: all of the following courses (total fourteen credit hours):

    BSC 2010 Biological Science I

    and

    BSC 2010L Biological Science I Lab

    CHM 1045 General Chemistry I

    and

    CHM 1045L General Chemistry I Lab

    GEO 1330 Environmental Science (previously GEO 1331)

    GEO 2200C Physical Geography (previously GEO 3200C)

  2. Natural Science Courses: four courses (total TWELVE credit hours) with at least one from the core list:

    Core List (3 to 12 hours)

    GEO 4210 Landforms and Landscapes

    GEO 4251 Geography of Climate Change and Storms

    GEO 4280 Geography of Water Resources

    GEO 4300 Biogeography

    GEO 4376 Landscape Ecology

    GEO 4930 Special Topics in Geography (Note: content varies and not all GEO 4930 courses will count as electives)

    IFS 2080 Glaciers, Geysers, and Glades: Exploring U.S. National Parks

    Elective List (0 to 9 hours)

    BOT 3143 Field Botany

    BSC 3016 Eukaryotic Diversity

    BSC 3312 Marine Biology

    BSC 4514 Aquatic Pollution Biology

    BSC 4821C Biogeography

    BSC 4934 Selected Topics in Applied Biology (subjects vary and needs advisor approval)

    CHM 4080 Environmental Chemistry I

    CHM 4081 Environmental Chemistry II

    EES 2205C Environmental Engineering Chemistry

    EES 3040 Introduction to Environmental Engineering Science

    ENV 4001 Environmental Engineering

    ENV 4041 Environmental Systems Analysis

    ENV 4341 Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering

    ENV 4405 Water Reuse Engineering

    GLY 1030 Environmental Issues in Geology

    GLY 2010C Physical Geology

    GLY 3039 Energy, Resources, and the Environment

    IFS 3044 Living Green, Theory to Action

    ISC 2003 Global Change, Its Scientific and Human Dimensions

    MET 2101 Physical Climatology

    MET 2507C Weather Analysis and Forecasting

    MET 2700 General Meteorology

    MET 3300 Introduction to Atmospheric Dynamics

    OCE 4008 Principles of Oceanography

    OCE 4017 Current Issues in Environmental Science

    OCE 4265 Coral Reef Ecology

    OCE 4930 Studies in Oceanography (subjects vary and needs advisor approval)

    PCB 3043 General Ecology

  3. Social Science Electives: three of the following courses (total NINE credit hours) with at least one from the core list:

    Core List (3 to 9 hours)

    EVR 4314 Energy and Society

    GEO 3423 Sports Geography

    GEO 3502 Economic Geography

    GEO 4355 Geography: Food and Environment

    GEO 4421 Cultural Geography

    GEO 4450 Medical Geography

    GEO 4471 Political Geography

    GEO 4503 Globalization

    GEO 4602 Urban Geography

    GEO 4700 Transport Geography

    GEO 4930 Special Topics in Geography (Note: content varies and not all GEO 4930 courses will count as electives)

    IFS 2012 Sustainable Society

    IFS 2029 Dead Cities

    IFS 2077 Great Britain? Geography, Imperialism, Industry and Culture

    Elective List (0 to 6 hours)

    AMH 2097 Nationality, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States

    AMH 4630 North American Environmental History

    AMH 4634 Florida Environmental History

    ECP 3113 Economics of Population

    ECP 3302 Economics of Natural Resources, Energy, and the Environment

    INR 2002 Introduction to International Relations

    INR 3502 International Organization

    PAD 3003 Public Administration in American Society

    PAD 4382 Disaster Recovery and Mitigation

    PAD 4603 Administrative Law

    PHI 2620 Environmental Ethics

    PUP 3002 Introduction to Public Policy

    PUP 4203 Environmental Politics and Policy

    SYD 3020 Population and Society

    SYD 4510 Environmental Sociology

    URP 3000 Introduction to Planning and Urban Development

    URP 4318 Growth Management and Environmental Planning

    URP 4402 Sustainable Development Planning in the Americas

    URP 4423 Environmental Planning and Resource Management

    URP 4710 Introduction to Transportation Issues and Transportation Planning

    URP 4936 Special Topics in Planning (if approved by advisor; subjects vary)

  4. Methods Electives: two of the following courses (total SIX to SEVEN credit hours) with at least one from the core list:

    Core List (3/4 to 6/7 hours)

    GEO 4162C Spatial Data Analysis (cannot take along with SYA 4400)

    GIS 3015 Map Analysis

    GIS 4006 Computer Cartography

    GIS 4035 Introduction to Remote Sensing

    and

    GIS 4035L Introduction to Remote Sensing Lab

    GIS 4043 Geographic Information Systems

    and

    GIS 4043L Geographic Information Systems Lab

    IFS 2040 Putting Science into Action: Field Methods in Plant Ecology

    Elective List (0 to 3 hours)

    ENV 4611 Environmental Impact Analysis

    STA 3024 SAS for Data and Statistical Analysis

    SYA 4300 Methods in Social Research

    SYA 4400 Social Statistics (cannot take along with GEO 4162C)

    Minor in Environmental Studies

    A minor in environmental studies consists of a minimum of fifteen credit hours, composed of the following:

    GEO 1330 Environmental Science

    GEO 2200C Physical Geography

    One Natural Science Elective

    One Social Science Elective

    One Methods Elective

    All courses must be completed with grades of "C–" or better. If an environmental studies minor is combined with a geography major, GEO 2200C and one other course (up to six credits total) may be applied to both the major and the minor.

For more information, contact Department of Geography, or visit the department's Web site at http://www.coss.fsu.edu/geography/.

Graduate Programs

Graduate programs are available leading to the Master of Arts (MA), the Master of Science (MS), the Applied Master of Science (MS) in GIScience, and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Geography. The graduate programs in the Department of Geography lead to an applied or a research-oriented degree centered on geographic information science (GIScience), environmental management, or human-environmental interactions.

Undergraduates contemplating a graduate degree in geography should take the Graduate Record Examination prior to submitting an application. Interested students should contact the Graduate Program Director, Dr. Victor Mesev, 310 Bellamy, or (vmesev@fsu.edu) (850) 645-2498.

Definition of Prefixes

ENC—English Composition

EVR—Environmental Studies

GEA—Geography: Regional Areas

GEO—Geography: Systematic

GIS—Geography: Information Science

IFS—Interdisciplinary Florida State University Courses

Undergraduate Courses

ENC 3466. Writing in Geography (3). This course is intended to develop the writing, analytical, and critical reading skills of students in geography and other social science programs. It focuses on how language conveys information about place and the subject as well as about the speaker; it considers the conscious choices writers make to reach specific audiences.

EVR 4314. Energy and Society (3). Prerequisite: GEO 1330. This course explores the demand and efficient use of energy from fossil fuels and alternate renewable sources, and how energy impacts urban and environmental sustainability.

GEA 1000. World Geography (3). This course is a regional survey of the human occupation of the face of the earth, local cultures, political systems, and development problems.

GEA 2210. United States and Canada (3). This course examines the physical diversity and the cultural and political patterns of North America.

GEA 2270. Florida (3). This course focuses on the physical, social, and economic geography of the state, including growth and environmental issues.

GEA 3173. Third World in Film (3). This course uses weekly feature films to investigate how the Third World is constructed as a distinct region; how its geography has influenced its history, cultural systems, and development prospects; and how residents have attempted to redefine the concept of "development."

GEA 3563. The Mediterranean (3). This course analyzes the Mediterranean region as a unified totality (southern Europe and North Africa), focusing on historical changes that underpin current geography.

GEA 4213. U.S. National Parks (3). This course reviews the history, social, and environmental significance of America's national parks.

GEA 4405. Latin America (3). This course focuses on the contemporary Latin American landscape, its historical formation, societies and problems.

GEA 4500. Europe (3). This course focuses on Europe's terrain, variety of cultures, economies, and recent trends toward unity.

GEA 4520. Britain and Ireland (3). This course examines the physical and human geography of the United Kingdom and Ireland.

GEA 4554. Russia and Southern Eurasia (3). This course explores the peoples, cultures, and places of the former Soviet Union. Discusses the region's natural environment, historical development, and contemporary politics.

GEA 4635. Geography of the Middle East (3). This course reviews the history and essential economic and environmental factors of the Middle East region. The centrifugal and centripetal forces affecting development, culture, religion, ethnicity, and geopolitics.

GEO 1330. Environmental Science (3). This course explores the causes of local and global environmental problems and their impacts, including resource use, pollution, ecosystems, and population growth.

GEO 1400. Human Geography (3). This course is an introductory survey of geographic theories, issues and applications from the human perspective. The course discusses how people interact with each other politically, economically, culturally and socially across distances, scales and within various physical environments. In addition, global contrasts are examined using urban versus rural habitation, local versus transnational trade, and uneven economic development.

GEO 1931r. Colloquium in Social Science and Public Affairs (1). This course provides a venue for discussing key issues and controversies that students are likely to encounter as they pursue a major in one of the social sciences. Students learn critical skills in debating public policy issues while also gaining an appreciation for topics that shape everyday life. Those topics are impacted by social forces, economic dynamics, and governmental decisions around the world. May be repeated to a maximum of two semester hours.

GEO 2200C. Physical Geography (3). This course is an overview of earth-sun relations, weather, climate, landforms, water systems, soils, and vegetation.

GEO 3423. Sports Geography (3). This course focuses on the geographical basis of sports at different spatial scales, including locational strategies of franchises, recruiting patterns, and the urban political economy of professional sports arenas.

GEO 3502. Economic Geography (3). This course examines the geography of economic activity at local, national, and global scales: historical development of capitalism, regional development, spatial structure of agriculture, manufacturing and services, the global economy, third world poverty, and population growth.

GEO 4114. Environmental Field Methods (3). This course focuses on the design and implementation of a field-based project employing field sampling, GIS, GPS, and exploratory statistical methods.

GEO 4162C. Spatial Data Analysis (3). This course is an introduction to the quantitative analysis of geographic data that explores clustering, spatial patterns, and intrinsic relationship between geographic variables.

GEO 4210. Landforms and Landscapes (3). This course is on the spatial distribution of geomorphic landforms across landscapes: how they form, how they change over time, how they are designated, and their nomenclature. Emphasis is given to how humans interact with these landscapes and how these landscapes can impact human habitation.

GEO 4251. Geography of Climate Change and Storms (3). This course explores the critical debate on global climatic fluctuations and extreme weather frequency in relation to human impact and interference. Particular focus is given to geographic variations and temporal validity.

GEO 4251. Geography of Climate Change and Storms (3). This course explores the critical debate on global climatic fluctuations and extreme weather frequency in relation to human impact and interference. Particular focus is given to geographic variations and temporal validity.

GEO 4280. Geography of Water Resources (3). This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the natural processes associated with water occurrence and resources. Focus is given to water's unique properties, how it occurs and moves through Earth's environment; how it impacts human habitation, and its future as a critical and valuable natural resource. Development of socio-economic concepts of management, supply, use, reclamation, and sustainability are also emphasized.

GEO 4300. Biogeography (3). This course examines the spatial distributions of flora and fauna, ecosystem change, and human interventions such as logging, invasive species, and wilderness preservation.

GEO 4340. Living in a Hazardous Environment (3). This course explores types of environmental hazards (natural and human-made) and their effects, techniques for the analysis of risks, and strategies for recovering losses.

GEO 4355. Geography: Food and Environment (3). This course explores food production, distribution and consumption by intensive global agro-food and local organic farm operations, and their impacts on environmental sustainability.

GEO 4357. Environmental Conflict and Economic Development (3). This course examines controversies over the use, transformation, and destruction of nature, including political ecology.

GEO 4372. Natural Resource Assessment and Analysis (3). This course examines the assessment and analysis of policies concerning natural resources and environmental management in the U.S. and internationally.

GEO 4376. Landscape Ecology (3). Prerequisites: GEO 1330, GEO 2200C, and GIS 4043. This course offers a review of methods on analyzing geographic patterns of natural phenomena, including ecological conservation, natural resource management, landscape and urban planning, as well as human-environmental interactions and implications. Familiarity with software packages such as ArcGIS is assumed.

GEO 4403. Global Change, Local Places (3). This course examines four aspects of global change—economic, environmental, cultural, and political—with a focus on how globalization is impacting individual countries and how places are responding to globalization's challenges.

GEO 4412. Environment and Gender (3). In this course, students look at how physical space (be it national boundaries or public parks) and the terrain of the symbolic realm are sometimes at odds. Included in the investigation is the examination of how ideas of gender, place and space affect individuals' experiences and how said experiences are created and limited by ideas at various geographical scales and contrasts between more and less economically developed nations.

GEO 4421. Cultural Geography (3). This course studies the processes by which various cultural features have diffused throughout the world. Emphasis is on the contemporary cultural landscape

GEO 4450. Medical Geography (3). Prerequisite: GEO 1400. This course applies geographical concepts and techniques to health-related problems, including the ecology of health, disease diffusion, medical cartography, and health care access.

GEO 4471. Political Geography (3). This course focuses on the spatial dimensions of political processes from the local to the global level, including elections and geopolitics of the world system.

GEO 4503. Globalization (3). This course explores the concepts and processes that define a world system of commodity production, labor costs, and cultural exchange.

GEO 4602. Urban Geography (3). This course explores the historical growth of cities; spatial structure of commercial, industrial, and public facilities within cities; residential segregation; urban poverty and fiscal distress, and urbanization in the third world.

GEO 4700. Transport Geography (3). This course offers a review of the literature and techniques for the spatial impacts of transportation systems, including functionality, and their role on society, the economy, energy, the environment, and sustainability.

GEO 4703. Communications Geography (3). This course examines the geopolitics and space-shrinking effects of telecommunications as well as economic and social impacts of several technologies, including the Internet and cyberspace.

GEO 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–5). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GEO 4930r. Special Topics in Geography (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GEO 4932r. Honors Work (1–6). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GEO 4941r. Internship (3–6). This course provides students with an opportunity to apply skills in supervised situations off-campus. Course may be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Only three may be counted toward the major.

GIS 2040. Essentials of GIS (3). This course is an introduction of the basic principles and techniques of geographic information systems (GIS) for students with no or rudimentary knowledge of geographic concepts and practices.

GIS 3015. Map Analysis (3). This course is an introduction to the acquisition, processing, and presentation of cartographic data.

GIS 4006. Computer Cartography (3). This course is an examination of computer mapping systems, theory, methodology, and applications.

GIS 4035. Introduction to Remote Sensing (3). Corequisite: GIS 4035L. This course covers remote sensing foundations and the use of remote sensing for environmental and cultural applications. Focus is on the foundations of remote sensing, aerial photography and photogrammetry, characteristics of various sensing systems, remote sensing applications, and an introduction to digital image processing.

GIS 4035L. Introduction to Remote Sensing Lab (1). Corequisite: GIS 4035. This lab provides practice with the concepts and techniques in remote sensing. Specifically, the lab covers the foundations of remote sensing, aerial photography and photogrammetry, characteristics of various sensing systems, remote sensing applications, and basic skills in digital image processing.

GIS 4043. Geographic Information Systems (3). This course is a survey of GIS topics, including locational control, spatial data structures, modeling and analysis, and future trends in decision support, sensors, and geographic methods.

GIS 4043L. GIS Lab (1). Prerequisite: GIS 3015. Corequisite: GIS 4043. This course is a survey of GIS topics, including locational control, spatial data structures, modeling and analysis, and future trends in decision support, sensors, and geographic methods.

GIS 4330. Florida GIS Applications (3). This course is an evaluation of the breadth of environmental and social applications of geographic information systems specific to the State of Florida.

IFS 2012. Sustainable Society (3). This course provides students with the opportunity to observe and inquire about sustainable practices through field studies at local organic farm, hydro-power station, new urbanism community, and recycling facilities, etc., as well as through interactions with community-based programs. Students engage in critical thinking about the sustainability of human society and the environment from various aspects, which include producers, consumers, public-service sectors, and policy makers.

IFS 2029. Dead Cities (3). This course poses the question: How can we understand and respond to urban decay and decline? Using examples from the U.S. and abroad, students explore the differences between "conventional" urban poverty (which may be a necessary part of successful cities), systematic urban decline, new suburban poverty, favelas and shantytowns, etc. Students also examine recent strategies to "reclaim" failing cities.

IFS 2040. Putting Science into Action: Field Methods in Plant Ecology (3). This course addresses scientific research design and field data collection, drawing on principles in biogeography and ecology. Students focus on sampling design and survey methods for plants on three scales: populations, communities, and ecosystems. Students also gain insight into field-based inquiry and techniques to monitor and assess plant populations, communities, and ecosystems.

IFS 2077. Great Britain? Geography, Imperialism, Industry, and Culture (3). This course studies the regional geography of the island of Great Britain; its changing position from a "great" imperial and industrial power to a "great" financial and cultural leader.

IFS 2080. Glaciers, Geysers, and Glades: Exploring U.S. National Parks (3). This course explores the sustainability of the National Parks of the United States; their geographic distribution, physical structure, economic management, and cultural recreation.

Graduate Courses

GEA 5195r. Advanced Area Studies (3).

GEO 5058. Survey of Geographic Thought (3).

GEO 5115. Environmental Field Methods (3).

GEO 5118C. Introduction to Geographical Research (3).

GEO 5165C. Quantitative Geography (3).

GEO 5305. Biogeography (3).

GEO 5345. Disaster Preparedness and Hazards Mitigation (3).

GEO 5358. Environmental Conflict and Economic Development (3).

GEO 5377. Natural Resource Assessment and Analysis (3).

GEO 5378. Landscape Ecology (3).

GEO 5414. Geospatial Data and Analysis (3).

GEO 5417. Race and Place (3).

GEO 5425. Cultural Geography (3).

GEO 5451. Medical Geography (3).

GEO 5453. Global Health (3).

GEO 5472. Political Geography (3).

GEO 5545. Advanced Economic Geography (3).

GEO 5555. World Systems Theory (3).

GEO 5704. Transport Geography (3).

GEO 5705. Communications Geography (3).

GEO 5908r. Directed Individual Study (1–6). (S/U grade only.)

GEO 5918r. Supervised Research (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

GEO 5934r. Seminar in Current Topics (1–3).

GEO 5947r. Supervised Teaching (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

GEO 6093. Professional Development in Geography (3).

GIS 5034. Introduction to Remote Sensing (3).

GIS 5034L. Introduction to Remote Sensing Lab (1).

GIS 5038C. Advanced Remote Sensing (3).

GIS 5073. GIS Land Survey Methods (3).

GIS 5100. Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3).

GIS 5101. Geographic Information Systems (3).

GIS 5101L. GIS Lab (1).

GIS 5106. Advanced Geographic Information Science (3).

GIS 5111. Spatial Modeling in Geographic Information Science (3).

GIS 5122. Applied Spatial Statistics (3).

GIS 5131. Geographic Visualization (3).

GIS 5305. Geographic Information Systems for Environmental Analysis and Modeling (3).

GIS 5306. Environmental Change Modeling (3).

GIS 5400. Geographical Information Systems Applications in Social Sciences (3).

GIS 5605. GIS Local Government (3).

GIS 5950. GIScience Capstone (6).

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

GEOPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS:

see Graduate Bulletin

GERMAN:

see Modern Languages and Linguistics

GERONTOLOGY:

see Social Work

GREEK:

see Classics

GROWTH MANAGEMENT AND COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING:

see Urban and Regional Planning

HEALTH EDUCATION:

see Middle and Secondary Education