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2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Department of History

College of Arts and Sciences

Web Page: http://www.history.fsu.edu

Chair: Gray; Associate Chair (Graduate Studies): Sinke; Associate Chair (Undergraduate Studies): Liebeskind; Professors: Blaufarb, Gellately, Grant, Gray, Jones, Jumonville; Associate Professors: Creswell, Culver, Doel, Frank, Hanley, Harper, Herrera, Koslow, Liebeskind, Piehler, Sinke, Stoltzfus, Upchurch, Williamson; Assistant Professors: Mooney, Palmer, Wood; Professors Emeriti: Anderson, Betten, Bryant, Conner, Garretson, Horward, J. Jones, Keuchel, Moore, Ripley, Rogers, Rubanowice, Singh, Strait, Turner, Wynot

History is a liberal discipline that enables students to put their lives in the contemporary world in a broad and meaningful context. It encompasses all aspects of human development chronologically, from ancient times to the present, and topically, in all areas of human interest.

An undergraduate degree in history prepares a student for vocations that require skills in critical thinking and ability in written and oral expression. Combined with certification requirements for social sciences, it can lead to a teaching career in middle or high school. It is an excellent preparation for graduate school or law school and is also desirable for those seeking positions in government or business who require a broad, liberal education rather than technical training.

The department participates in the undergraduate programs in Asian studies, humanities, international affairs, Latin American and Caribbean studies, Russian and East European studies, and in the honors in the major program.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in history satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in HIS 4164, IFS 2116, CGS 2060, CGS 2100, or EME 2040.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into this upper-division degree program:

  1. AFH XXXX or AMH XXXX or EUH XXXX or WOH XXXX or LAH XXXX or ASH XXXX or HIS XXXX
  2. AMH XXXX or EUH XXXX or WOH XXXX or LAH XXXX or AFH XXXX or ASH XXXX or HIS XXXX

Requirements for a Major in History

Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the "College of Arts and Sciences" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Major

Prior to Fall 2012

Thirty-three semester hours, including WOH 1023, 1030; AMH 2010, 2020 (for the application of test credit to the major, see below); and a minimum of twenty-one additional semester hours in history (above 2999) distributed as follows:

  1. Six semester hours of American history
  2. Six semester hours of European history
  3. Six semester hours of Latin American, Asian, African, or Russian history
  4. Three semester hours of HIS 4935 Senior Seminar.

Note: Senior seminar is not offered during the Summer terms. Directed individual studies and tutorials may not be counted toward the major.

At least eighteen of the thirty-three required semester hours must be earned at Florida State University.

Fall 2012 and After

Thirty-nine semester hours, including WOH 1023, 1030; AMH 2010, 2020 (for the application of test credit to the major, see below); and a minimum of twenty-seven additional semester hours in history (above 2999) distributed as follows:

  1. Six semester hours of American history
  2. Six semester hours of European history
  3. Six semester hours of Latin American, Asian, African, or Russian history
  4. Six additional semester hours of history of any area
  5. Three semester hours of HIS 4935 Senior Seminar

Note: Senior seminar is not offered during the Summer terms. Directed individual studies and tutorials may not be counted toward the major.

At least twenty-one of the thirty-nine required semester hours must be earned at Florida State University.

Minor Requirement for History Majors

A minor of twelve semester hours beyond liberal studies requirements in an approved departmental field or fifteen semester hours in an interdepartmental area is required. Individual departments and interdepartmental areas may impose additional requirements. The student should consult the appropriate departmental chapter of this General Bulletin to see if the department has further requirements.

The student may not count toward the major or minor any course in which a grade below "C–" is received. A minimum GPA of 2.0 within both the major and the minor is required.

Double Majors

Students pursuing a double major must meet the program requirements of both majors, with the following exceptions: (1) No more than six semester hours may be overlapped (i.e., counted toward both majors); and (2) no minors are required for the double major.

Test Credit Toward the Major (AP, CLEP, IB)

A student who has earned test credit in American history must not take either AMH 2010 or 2020. A student who has earned test credit in European history must not take EUH 2000, WOH 1023, or WOH 1030. Students with three semester hours of test credit in an area will be required to complete the resulting three semester hour shortfall per area toward the major. For information regarding the fulfillment of this policy, please contact the history department advisor.

Honors in the Major

Honors work in the major is offered to encourage talented juniors and seniors to undertake independent and original research as part of the undergraduate experience. For requirements and other information, see the "University Honors Office and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin and the associate chairman for undergraduate studies in history.

Certification in Social Science Education with History Concentration

All undergraduates interested in certification in social science education should take the core courses as part of their liberal studies requirements; therefore, they are urged to consult an advisor in the College of Education as early as possible. Students seeking certification must also apply for admission to teacher education. Application forms are obtained from the College of Education's office of student services. A student should have and maintain a 2.75 overall GPA in all courses to be eligible.

Requirements for a Minor in History

Twelve semester hours beyond liberal studies requirements in history courses numbered above 2999 are required. A grade of "C–" or better must be earned in each course counted toward the minor. At least six of the twelve semester hours must be earned at Florida State University. Directed individual studies, tutorials, and test credit may not be counted toward the minor.

Definition of Prefixes

AFH—African History

AMH—American History

ASH—Asian History

CLA—Classical and Ancient Studies

EUH—European History

HIS—General History and Historiography

IFS—Interdisciplinary Florida State University Courses

LAH—Latin American History

SLL—Slavic Languages

WOH—World History

Note: Courses marked with (*) are not part of the current course rotation.

Undergraduate Courses

Note: History majors must take the sequence of either WOH 1023–1030 or EUH 2000–WOH 1023 (unless they have test credit in European or world history, or transfer credit equivalent to these courses). Similarly, history majors must take the sequence of AMH 2010–AMH 2020 (unless they have examination credit in any U.S. history, or transfer credit equivalent to these courses.) No other history courses below the 3000-level will count toward the history major.

Liberal Studies for the 21st Century: History Courses

Note: In order to fulfill the liberal studies requirement in history, a student must complete a minimum of three semester hours from this list: AMH 2010, AMH 2020, AMH 2091, AMH 2095, AMH 2096, AMH 2097, AMH 2583; ASH 1044, ASH 3100; EUH 2000, EUH 3205, EUH 3530; HIS 2050, HIS 2370, HIS 3464, HIS 3491; LAH 1093; WOH 1023, WOH 1030, WOH 2202.

AMH 2010. A History of the United States to 1877 (3). This course introduces students to the history of British North America and the United States through the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

AMH 2020. A History of the United States Since 1877 (3). This course surveys the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on social, economic, and political problems of the 20th century. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.

AMH 2091. The African-American Experience in the United States (3). This course examines, both chronologically and thematically, the experience of African-Americans in the United States and their role in shaping the nation's history. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.

AMH 2095. American Indians in the United States (3). This course surveys American-Indian relations with the people and the government of the United States, beginning in the 1760s and continuing to the present. Topics cover the Indians' diplomatic and military struggles, as well as the Indian perspective on familiar historical events such as the Civil War, the New Deal, and the 1960s.

AMH 2096. Black Women in America (3). This course examines (chronologically and thematically) the unique experience of the African American woman in the United States and the role they have played in shaping this nation's history. Particular attention is paid to the double burden that black women have experienced because of their race and gender. This course does not count as credit toward the history major.

AMH 2097. Nationality, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States (3). This course explores the history of immigration to the United States. Topics include the evolution of ethnic cultures and the role of race in adjustment, and related conflicts from colonial times to the present. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.

AMH 2583. The Seminoles and the Southeastern Indians (3). This course explores the history of the Seminoles and other Southeastern Native Americans in the territory that is now known as the American South. The course covers the pre-contract era to the present with an emphasis on tribal perspectives.

ASH 1044. Middle Eastern History and Civilization (3). This introductory course is on Middle Eastern history and culture with a considerable emphasis on the impact of religion: Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The primary emphasis of the course is to understand the historical and cultural background of the major problems facing the Middle East today. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.

ASH 3100. History of Asia (3). This course is an introduction to political, cultural, and economic Asian history from antiquity to the present. It places special emphasis not only on the study of important Asian kings and leaders but also on the various religions that originated in Asia.

EUH 2000. Ancient and Medieval Civilizations (3). This course provides a survey of Western traditions from the beginnings through the end of the Middle Ages. Emphasis is on patterns of thinking and on those institutions most distinctive for the Western tradition. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for EUH 2000. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.

EUH 3205. 19th-Century Europe: A Survey (3). This course focuses on the history of Europe from the close of the Napoleonic Wars to the turn of the century, a period in which Europe was at the height of its wealth and power. Particular attention is paid to the major powers.

EUH 3530. England, the Empire and the Commonwealth (3). This course offers a history of the expansion of the British Empire and its evolution into the Commonwealth from the early eighteenth century to the present. It examines the complex set of societies, governing structures, economic systems, and geographic locations encompassed by British overseas expansion.

HIS 2050. The Historian's Craft (3). In this course, students learn how to conduct primary source historical research, and turn their research findings into a high-quality paper based on professional history standards.

HIS 2370. Interpreting Native America (3). This course teaches how to conduct ethnohistorical research on Native Americans in the United States. The course culminates in the annotation and interpretation of a set of primary sources.

HIS 3464. History of Science (3). This course is a study of the mutually-shaping relationships between social and political ideas and the histories of the various sciences.

HIS 3491. Medicine and Society (3). This course examines the development of public health and the history of medicine in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Topics cover changes in medical knowledge, the medical profession, government responsibilities, and public responses; how individuals accept, modify, or reject medical authority; how race, class, gender, and ethnicity shape health practices and the delivery of medical care; how the health of a community can be protected; and what constitutes a public health hazard.

IFS 2000. History of American Popular Culture, 1850-Present (3). This course examines the history of American popular culture from 1850 to the present day, focusing on how Americans have used media, athletics, and other leisure activities to grapple with larger questions of national identity and citizenship.

IFS 2010. The American GI in War and Peace in World War II (3). This course examines the social history of the American GI in World War II. It considers who served in the American military, why they fought and coped with the experience of total war. Special attention is given to the religious experiences of the GI at war and issues of race, ethnicity, and gender.

*IFS 2011. Empire and Revolution in Cold War Latin America (3). This course is designed to familiarize students with the history, current state of research, and continued relevance of what historian Greg Grandin terms as Latin America "long Cold War"; that is, the political, social, and economic history of Latin America after World War II. It pays special attention to issues of revolution and empire, encouraging students to critically explore and engage the intimate connections between the local, national, and transnational manifestations of the Cold War in Latin America.

*IFS 2026. Environment and Society (3). This interdisciplinary course in environmental history explores numerous diverse perspectives of the environment: history, ethics, literature, art, and, of course, science. The course asks, "What is the relationship between humans and the natural world?" and explores how nature has helped to shape culture as well as how humans have modified the natural world and transformed the land in the process of extracting resources, building structures, producing pollution, and importing exotic species.

IFS 2042. Fight the Power: Protesting with Song in America: 20th Century versus 21st Century (3). This course uses the historical method to discuss major protest movements of the 20th and 21st centuries in United States and delves into the question of how protest through song has changed during the 20th century and how it is used today.

IFS 2045. Making Chief Osceola (3). This course uses the historical method to answer a simple question: Why do Americans and Floridians remember Osceola as the leader of Seminole resistance rather than any of the other more prominent, powerful, and successful leaders from the three Seminole Wars? In addition to introducing new historical approaches to Native American history, this course also asks how historical truths and myths are created, sustained, and ultimately embraced. In the process, the course facilitates critical engagement with the living legacies of Indian Removal.

*IFS 2101. Cultures of Medicine (3). This course explores the relationship between various groups of humans and them microbes they encounter.

IFS 2116. Digital Microhistory Lab (3). This course brings together microhistory, urban history, and digital history. Students collect comprehensive data about the events in a single city in a single year, through close reading of an English-language daily newspaper published in that city. They gather much of this data using digital methods and then work together to represent those events in a Web site that employs a variety of digital communication tools.

IFS 3093. Terrorism in Historical Perspective (3). This course examines the history of terrorism as both an idea and a political strategy, with particular focus on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It emphasizes the need for understanding terrorism and related forms of political violence within a systematic framework that takes into account the roles of anti-terrorist policies, police activities, and political debate in shaping not only the public perception of terrorism but also the self-perception of those who would adopt it as a tactic.

IFS 3112. Guns, Drugs, and Slaves: The History of Trafficking in the Modern World (3). This course addresses the real world problem of global trafficking in weapons, drugs, and humans. Such trafficking causes tremendous harm in today's world. Employing a variety of approaches from criminology, law, economics, and international relations, the course examines how and why trafficking became embedded in the modern world.

LAH 1093. Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History (3). This course is a cross-cultural history of Latin America focusing on women, Native Americans, African-Americans, mestizos, and mulattoes in historical context. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.

WOH 1023. The Modern World to 1815 (3). This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents of the modern world from the end of the Middle Ages to 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1023. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.

WOH 1030. The Modern World Since 1815 (3). This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents in the modern world since 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1030. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.

WOH 2202. Mortal Combat: Eurasian Worlds of War Since 1200 (3). This course familiarizes the student with the role of war and military history in shaping the history of Eurasia since 1200.

African History

*AFH 1000. African History and Civilization (3). This introductory course for African history and civilization covers the broad sweep of African history and culture. The primary emphasis is to understand the background to some of Africa's major problems and possibilities today. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.

*AFH 3451. Sub-Sahara Africa Since 1800 (3). This course offers a history of Sub-Sahara Africa since 1800, in an effort to provide an understanding of the background and problems of some of the African states today.

*AFH 4302. North African History: A Survey (3). This course concentrates on the modern history of North Africa including: Maghrib, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia, and Somalia. It is intended to provide an understanding of the background and problems of North African states today.

American History

AMH 2583. History of the Seminoles and Southeastern Tribes, Pre-Contact to Present (3). This course presents a history of the Seminole tribe in the changing racial, ethnic, economic, political, and cultural context of the Southeastern United States from the fifteenth century to present.

AMH 3310. Social History of the United States (3). This course offers an analysis of the day-to-day lives of American people. Topics include morals, manners, religion, family, social class, health, and occupations.

*AMH 3319. The Evolution of Law, Crime, and Justice in American Society, to 1876 (3). This course offers an intermediate level survey of the social and political developments in the fields of law and criminology, from the colonial era through Reconstruction. The course focuses upon social problems, criminal behavior, punishments, changing definitions of citizenship, and the Constitution.

AMH 3351. U.S. Political History to 1877 (3). This course covers the colonial and revolutionary background of U.S. politics. Topics cover U.S. political parties and elections from the 1790s to 1877, emphasizing the presidency and the groups and issues that have influenced political parties.

AMH 3352. U.S. Political History from 1877 to the Present (3). This course studies U.S. political parties and elections from the end of Reconstruction to the present. Special emphasis is placed on the presidency and on the groups and issues that have influenced political parties. AMH 3351 is not a prerequisite for 3352.

*AMH 3444. History of the Trans-Mississippi American West (3). This course covers the history of the Trans-Mississippi West during the nineteenth century. Students are expected to develop an understanding of this area as a geographical region and its role in American history beginning with the early nineteenth century explorations and culminating with the symbolic "closing of the frontier" of the 1890s.

AMH 3470. The Evolution of Organized Crime (3). This course discusses the evolution of organized crime in the United States, the social and legal factors that contributed to its development, and the ethnic groups involved.

*AMH 3472. Evolution of Law, Crime, and Justice in American Society: 1865 to the Present (3). This course serves as an intermediate level survey of the social and political developments in the fields of crime and law from the end of the Civil War to the present. Its focus is on the changing definitions of criminal behavior, regional patterns of crime, the changing nature of punishment, and Constitutional issues relating to crime.

AMH 3540. Military History of the United States (3). This course is a survey of both the military experiences and issues in American history. The course analyzes war, its economic issues, technological developments, politics, and other factors that have influenced the military aspects of American history.

AMH 3544. The United States and Vietnam, 1941–1975 (3). This course examines the involvement of the United States in Vietnam from World War II through the fall of Saigon in 1975 and considers the legacy of this experience for American foreign relations and society.

AMH 3930r. Studies in U.S. History (3). This course includes examination of a special topic related to U.S. history. Topics vary. The course may be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of nine semester hours.

AMH 4110. Colonial America to 1763 (3). This course studies and compares the founding and development of the English colonies in North America.

AMH 4130. Revolutionary America, 1760-1788 (3). This course examines the political, social, and economic history of British America from the end of the Seven Years War to the ratification of the U.S. Constitution. Emphasis is placed on the origins, course, and aftermath of the colonial rebellion that became the American Revolution and led to the founding of the U.S. The course considers the fundamental causes of the Revolution and the many ways in which the former colonies were transformed by the experience.

AMH 4172. The Civil War Era (3). This course offers an in-depth study of the twenty years from 1845 to 1865. Emphasis is placed on the coming of the Civil War, the secession crisis, and on both the military and nonmilitary events of the war years.

AMH 4173. Post–Civil War America, 1865–1890 (3). This course analyzes post–Civil War America with emphasis on the black role in American society and the attempt to heal the wounds of the Civil War. Topics include the rise of big business, labor unions, and the last frontier.

AMH 4220. U.S. Progressive Era, 1890–1920 (3). This course includes a study of the development of domestic and foreign policy, the revolution of social thought, and the paradoxical path of reform in urbanized, industrial America. Emphasis is placed on the nation's effort to accommodate old values with the new realities.

AMH 4231. The United States, 1920–1945: Prosperity, Depression, and World War II (3). This course offers an overview of U.S. history from 1920 through 1945. Topics include political, economic, diplomatic, military, social, and cultural and intellectual developments during that period.

AMH 4270. The United States Since 1945 (3). This course focuses on the political and cultural issues faced by the United States during the period of the Cold War (1945 to 1988). Special attention is given to postwar affluence, suburban America, the mass society, the movement from isolationism to interventionism, McCarthyism, the civil rights movement, social conflict in the 1960s, and the rise of postwar conservatism.

AMH 4273. America in the 1960s (3). This course examines selective aspects of the era known as "the sixties." Spanning two decades, it starts in 1954 with the decision to integrate America's schools as a flash point for the civil rights struggle, and it concludes in 1974 with Richard Nixon's resignation, the final statement in the Watergate affair. During those years of intense and accelerated change, civil rights, black power, the war in Vietnam, radical politics, and the counter culture divided the country so passionately that at times it appeared as though the nation might come apart.

*AMH 4331. U.S. Intellectual History I: Beginning to 1880 (3). This course offers an interdisciplinary study of American thought from the Puritans to the late 19th century, asking, among other questions, what mission America assigned to itself. Topics include Puritanism, the Revolutionary ideology, federalism, the American Enlightenment, romanticism, individualism, and manifest destiny.

*AMH 4332. U.S. Intellectual History II: 1880 to the Present (3). This course offers an interdisciplinary study of the impact on American thought of social Darwinism, industrialism, naturalism, the culture of consumption, radicalism, anticommunism, postindustrialism, and affluence. Examines the growth of cultural criticism as a task required of the 20th-century intellectual.

AMH 4402. The Old South (3). This course offers a study of the social and economic development of the Southern states from settlement by Europeans to the end of the Civil War with emphasis on the rise of the Cotton Kingdom and the causes of secession.

AMH 4403. The South Since 1865 (3). This course views the South both as a distinct region and as an area gradually coming back into "regular" American life after the Civil War. The unique problems of adjusting to defeat, the revolution in the labor system, and troubled race relations are considered.

AMH 4420. The History of Florida (3). This course is an online course that explores the history of Florida from its pre-Columbian origins to the present.

AMH 4423. History of Florida from 1821 to the Present (3). This course covers the history of Florida from the period of its acquisition from Spain in 1821 until the present. The various "periods" in the state's past are discussed with special attention given to the period 1920 to the present.

AMH 4511. Twentieth-Century United States Foreign Relations (3). This course covers the responsibilities of global power and how American foreign policy changed to meet rapidly altering circumstances.

*AMH 4530. U.S. Immigration History (3). This course explores the histories of different immigrant and migrant groups and how they have shaped and been shaped by the United States.

*AMH 4553. American Legal History I (3). This course surveys the history of the U.S. Constitution up to 1800, including the British background, the first state constitutions, the Articles of Confederation, the Constitutional Convention, ratification debates, and first use of the Constitution in the 1790s. It concludes with the first major controversies faced by the founders, issues that the Constitution did not resolve for them easily. The course is not about constitutional interpretation or theories applied by the current Supreme Court.

*AMH 4554. American Legal History II (3). This course surveys the history of both the U.S. Constitution and American law in the nineteenth century. Topics include the Marshall Court, slave law and the Dred Scott decision, the impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on the law, and the effects of industrialization on American law. The course is not about constitutional interpretation or theories applied by the current Supreme Court.

AMH 4561. Women in 19th-Century America (3). This course examines the experiences of women in nineteenth-century America, focusing upon the ways gender, race, ethnicity, class, religion, and region interacted to shape women's lives. Examines women's family, work, social, and political roles. Also examines women's contributions and quest for equality.

AMH 4562. Women in Modern America (3). This course examines the experiences and contributions of women in twentieth-century America, with particular attention to the forces that served to differentiate the opportunities and roles of women from those of their male peers.

AMH 4571. Black America to 1877 (3). This course begins with the African background of Black Americans and ends with the final curtailment of Reconstruction in 1877. Although some portions of the course are topical, cutting across chronological divisions, there is a general chronological progression from colonial times to the end of Reconstruction.

AMH 4572. Black America Since 1877 (3). This course traces the social, economic, cultural, and political activities of African-Americans from Reconstruction through the Civil Rights Movement.

AMH 4585. History of the Seminole Indians (3). This course offers an ethnohistory of the Seminole Indians in Florida from prior to their formation, in the eighteenth century, to present. The course focuses on the Indians themselves and their experiences, exposing students to the history of the Seminole's culture, lifestyles, religions, economy, and tribal community.

*AMH 4630. North American Environmental History (3). This course introduces the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world in America through time.

*AMH 4633. The Nature of Florida (3). This course is an online course that applies the methods and approaches of environmental history to Florida and the southeastern United States.

*AMH 4634. Florida Environmental History (3). This course applies the methods and approaches of environmental history to Florida, considering the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world through time. The field explores how nature has helped to shape culture as well as how humans have modified the natural world and transformed the land.

*AMH 4640. Humor and the American Mind (3). This course discusses American intellectual and cultural history from the eighteenth-century to the present, through the lens of humor. It investigates the relationship between American ideas and historical transformations. It uses humor to explore the connections and tensions between the various parts of the American mind.

AMH 4684. Women and Children in the Civil Rights Movement (3). This course examines the role of women and children in the modern day Civil Rights Movement in the United States with the underlying themes of race, class, and gender.

Asian History

ASH 3230r. Middle East Research: An Interdisciplinary Seminar (3–6). This seminar surveys regional studies' methodology by introducing a dozen examples of a domain of Middle Eastern studies (for example, cities, biographies, countries, sect, dialects), using a variety of lecturers and approaches. Students a) become familiar with the particular characters of dozen instances of a Middle Eastern domain, in this way learning something of the diversity of the region, b) encounter a variety of approaches to the study of the region, and c) develop deep knowledge of one instance, which they study over the course of the semester. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ASH 3382. The History of the U.S. and East Asia: 1850 to the Present (3). This course investigates the history of the U.S. and modern East Asia from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, covering political interactions and cultural encounters between Americans and Japanese, Koreans, and Chinese.

ASH 3930r. Studies in Asian History (3). This course includes examination of a specific topic related to Asian history. Topics vary. The course may be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ASH 4223. Modern Middle East (3). This course is an examination of modern Middle Eastern history, focusing on the origins of recent problems in the imperialistic era, the clash of political and cultural traditions, national rivalries, the impact of OPEC, the Palestinians, and the Iranian Revolution.

ASH 4261. Central Asia (3). This course covers Central Asian history through the medieval and modern periods, with special emphasis on the political and ethnic histories of the Central Asian peoples.

*ASH 4520. Traditional India (3). This course deals with the history of India from antiquity to the 17th century. It puts special emphasis not only on the study of Indian religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism, but also on the roles played by various important ancient and medieval kings.

ASH 4550. Modern India (3). This course is an introduction to the history of India from the 18th century to the present. It deals in depth with the impact of British rule on India and the lives of modern South Asian leaders like Gandhi, Nehru, and Jinnah.

Classical History

Note: The following history courses are offered through the Department of Classics.

ASH 3200. History of the Ancient Near East (3). This course is a survey of the Near East—Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Holy Land—in the ancient period.

CLA 4437r. Studies in Greek History (3). This course focuses on specified periods of Greek history, whether archaic, classical, or Hellenistic. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CLA 4447r. Studies in Roman History (3). This course focuses on specified periods of Roman history in the Republic or Empire. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

EUH 4401. Classical Athens and Sparta (3). This course examines the history of Greece from the beginning to Alexander the Great. Emphasis on the social and political structures of Sparta and Athens.

EUH 4408. The Age of Alexander the Great (3). This course is a study of the Greek world from the death of Socrates (399 B.C.) to the Roman conquest (146 B.C., the sack of Corinth by Mummius).

EUH 4412. The Roman Republic (3). This course is a study of the history of Rome from its foundation (traditionally 753 B.C.) to the fall of the Roman Republic (31 B.C., The Battle of Actium).

EUH 4413. The Roman Empire (3). This course focuses on the Roman Empire from Augustus to Constantine. Emphasis on the evolution from the principate of the early empire to the monarchy of the late empire.

European History

EUH 3205. 19th-Century Europe (3). This course is an introduction to key themes and problems in the social, political, and cultural history of Europe from the era of the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. Although this is an upper-level course, no prior background in European history is required.

EUH 3206. 20th-Century Europe: A Survey (3). This course covers European history from the turn of the century through the two world wars. Particular attention is paid to the major powers in this period when Europe declined from its preeminent position.

EUH 3293. Twentieth-Century Europe Through Film (3). This course uses film in combination with texts to introduce questions about some of the main themes in 20th-century European history. The course uses film to explore the relationship between modernity and 20th-century Europe, particularly the changing relationship of individuals to state and society, and attitudes about ethnicity, class, and gender. Topics include the possibilities and limitations of the individual in mass society, paying particular attention to themes of heroism, despotism, war, and lifestyle values.

*EUH 3431. Modern Italy (3). This course traces the development of Italy from the Enlightenment to the present. Discussions concentrate on the major social, political, and intellectual currents, centering on the unification movement, the crisis of the Liberal State, and Fascism.

EUH 3461. German History, 1740–1918 (3). This course examines the political, social, and cultural history of the German lands from the age of Enlightenment to the end of World War I. It emphasizes the impact of war and revolution on the process of nation-building and the persistence of political, social, and religious conflict after the foundation of the German Empire under Bismarck.

*EUH 3501. The Making of Modern England (3). This course is a rapid survey of English history from Anglo-Saxon times to 1783. The lectures emphasize the constitutional and legal aspects of English history, while the readings cover broadly cultural and social aspects as well.

EUH 3530. England, the Empire and the Commonwealth (3). This course offers a history of Great Britain and the Empire-Commonwealth since 1783 and developments within the Commonwealth itself. Some consideration is given to post–World War II changes within Britain and to Britain's foreign affairs.

EUH 3533. History of Ireland (3). This course surveys the history of Ireland from prehistory and the Celtic-Gaelic settlement to the near-present. Examines the waves of settlers who came to the island since the Celts, and the problem of defining the Irish (i.e. the roles of religion and ethnicity). It cannot avoid treating in depth the tangled and tragic relations of the Irish with the kingdom of England, later Great Britain.

*EUH 3551. Modern Poland (3). This course examines the social, economic, and cultural as well as political development of the Polish nation in the 19th and 20th centuries. Although particular stress is placed on internal history, appropriate attention is focused on Poland's role in international relations.

*EUH 3571. Russia to Nicholas I (3). This course explores Russian history from the emergence of the Muscovite state through the establishment of the Romanov dynasty, to the reforms of Peter the Great and the enlightened despotism of Catherine the Great, and finally the nature of the state in the early nineteenth century.

*EUH 3572. History of Russia, 1825 to the Present (3). This course examines the social, economic, and cultural as well as the political development of Russia from the reign of Tsar Nicholas I to the present day. Although particular stress is on internal history, appropriate attention is paid to Russia's role in international relations.

EUH 3930r. Studies in European History (3). This course includes examination of a special topic related to European history. Topics vary. The course may be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of nine semester hours.

EUH 4121. Earlier Middle Ages (3). This course provides a survey of European history from c. 300 to c. 1150, from the origins of the medieval world in the Roman, Christian, and Germanic past through the gradual emergence of a distinctively European civilization to its first major period of expansion and accomplishment.

EUH 4122. Later Middle Ages (3). This course provides a survey of European history from c. 1150 to c. 1500, from the height of medieval civilization in Europe through the crises of the late Middle Ages to the recovery leading to a new age.

EUH 4124. The Crusades (3). This course provides a historical understanding of the material and spiritual basis for the reentry of Western Christendom into the Mediterranean world; the ways in which Crusaders organized, financed, and participated in Crusades and the impact this had on European institutions and thought; and the interrelations of Christians (East and West) and the Muslim world in the period of the Crusades.

EUH 4140. Renaissance (3). This course is a study of the character of medieval Italy and a survey of economic, political, and cultural changes in Western Europe.

EUH 4144. Reformation (3). This course is an examination of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations in Europe from 1517 to the Peace of Westphalia in 1648.

*EUH 4233. Rise of Nationalism (3). This course analyzes the European struggle toward democracy and nationalism from the collapse of Napoleonic Europe to the establishment of the German Empire, emphasizing the development of liberalism, socialism, communism, etc.

EUH 4241. The Holocaust in Historical Perspective (3). This course details the background and career of the Holocaust as well as the continuing problem of "Holocaust denial." Special emphasis is given to the ideas of such racists as de Gobineau and Hitler.

EUH 4242. World War I: Europe, 1900-1918 (3). This course covers European history in the period 1900-1918 with a review of the domestic situation and foreign policy of the major Continental powers. It includes an analysis of the origins of the war, how and why the war was fought as it was, and the experience of the major powers on the home front.

*EUH 4282. Europe Since 1945 (3). This course focuses on the post–World War II era in Europe, tracing occupation policies, the division of Europe East and West, the development of the major European states, and the efforts to arrive at detente in respect to East-West tensions.

*EUH 4331. East Central Europe, 1815 to Present (3). This course examines the social, political, economic, and cultural development of the lands traditionally known as Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and the Baltic States from the Congress of Vienna to the present. Wherever possible, attempts are made to present issues within a comparative framework.

*EUH 4332. Balkans Since 1700 (3). This course on Balkan history emphasizes the penetration of the Hapsburg and Russian empires, the decay of the Ottomans, and the emergence of the Balkan states after the wars of liberation, with stress on the cultural peculiarities of the various ethnic groups.

EUH 4452. The Age of the French Revolution, 1715–1795 (3). This course is a study of the 18th century and its transformation by the forces unleashed by the French Revolution. The radicalization of the Revolution is traced to the Terror and the overthrow of Robespierre's dictatorship.

EUH 4454. Napoleonic Europe, 1795–1815 (3). This course traces the rise of Napoleon and his impact—political, social, economic, military, etc.—on France and Europe, culminating in his defeat at Waterloo.

EUH 4465. Weimar and Nazi Germany (3). This course examines the background of the Nazi regime, the character of Hitler's dictatorship, and the origins and course of WWII in its European context. Also examined is National Socialism's impact on German institutions and racial consequences.

EUH 4502. England Since 1870 (3). This course explores the history of Great Britain (since 1870) from a great world power to a European Common Market member. Economic, diplomatic, imperial, social, and political affairs are considered.

EUH 4512. Stuart England (3). This course covers the history of England from the reign of James I to the death of Queen Anne in 1714. Scottish history is covered as well, and due attention is given to Irish history and to such areas as the arts, literature, and political theory.

EUH 4520. England, 1714–1870 (3). This course investigates the social, cultural, and political history of Great Britain from 1714 to approximately 1870. Major themes include the evolution of social structures; new cultural trends; changing political culture, ideologies, and institutions, as well as the relationship between these perspectives.

EUH 4544. Sex and Class in England, 1750–1914 (3). This course offers students a perspective on the critical relations between class and gender in industrializing England, 1750–1914. Examines the lives and activities of English women, from the poorest to the wealthiest classes, against the background of the major dislocations occurring in British society during this period.

EUH 4574. 19th-Century Russia (3). This course is an examination of the history of Russia from 1801 to the beginning of the 20th century, with emphasis on foreign relations and the development of the political and social conflicts that resulted in the revolutions of 1917.

EUH 4576. 20th-Century Russia (3). This course examines the social, economic, cultural, and international, as well as political, development of Russia from the final years of Tsarist rule through the Bolshevik Revolution to its emergence as one of the world's superpowers in the 1990s.

*EUH 4602. European Intellectual History, 1500–1800 (3). This course explores the history of ideas documenting transition from "Medieval Mind" to "Modern Mind," including impact of four Renaissances, Protestant Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and Age of Enlightenment. Interdisciplinary approach includes philosophy, literature, art, political theory, science, economic thought, religion, and music.

*EUH 4603. European Intellectual History, 1800 to Present (3). This course explores the history of ideas in the last two hundred years, exploring the 19th century as the Age of "Isms" (including Liberalism, Conservatism, Communism, Romanticism, Idealism, Nationalism, Industrialism, Imperialism, Positivism, Darwinism, Historicism) and establishing the 20th century as the Age of Crisis in which traditional Western Civilization disintegrates.

HIS 4250. War and the Nation State (3). This course examines the phenomenon of war in its broader social-political-economic context from a historical and comparative perspective.

HIS 4260. War and Society in the Age of Revolution (3). This course offers an overview of the interaction between war, social change, and political transformation during the Age of Revolution (1750-1850) in the Atlantic World.

SLL 3500. Slavic Culture and Civilization (3). This course examines the Slavic peoples, their cultures and traditions, from prehistory to present day. The nations profiled are Ukraine, Czech Republic, Poland, Croatia, Bosnia, and Serbia. Novels and film give students a perspective from the "inside." Taught in English.

*WOH 4222. The Worlds of Captain Cook (3). This course explores the social and cultural worlds of the great 18th-century British navigator, James Cook. Specifically, the course explores the places where Cook went, the social world of the British Navy, the ethnohistorical dynamics of British-Native interactions in the Pacific, as well as Cook's legacy for the British and for the peoples of the Pacific.

Historical Administration

HIS 4065. Public History Theory and Methods (3). This course offers an overview of the different specialties of public history, the historic preservation movement in the US, archives, history museums, oral history, commemoration, and the use of new media for public presentations of history.

HIS 4164. Digital History (3). This course examines the theory and practice of the ways in which history is collected, preserved, and interpreted using digital mediums.

Latin American History

LAH 3411. History of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean (3). This course covers the history of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean nations of Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Puerto Rico from the Indian civilizations of the remote past to the social conflicts of the present.

*LAH 3456. History of Panama Since 1940 (3). This course covers the history of Panama from 1940 to the present. Emphasizes the impact of WWII, politics, social change, and democracy in Panama.

*LAH 3500. History of South America (3). This course is an introductory survey from the Inca Civilization to modern Chile, Peru, Argentina, etc. Emphasis is placed on the contrasts and conflicts between Indian and European culture and on basic social, economic, and political evolution. The persistence of "underdevelopment" and poverty are also explored.

LAH 3734. Latin American History Through Film (3). This course is an introduction to Latin American history through films. Analysis of how Latin Americans are portrayed in international and national cinema. Integration of television and literature to illustrate the impact of mass media on Latin Americans.

LAH 3930r. Studies in Latin American History (3). This course includes examination of a special topic related to Latin American history. Topics vary. The course may be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of nine semester hours.

LAH 4430. History of Mexico (3). This course covers the history of Mexico from the great Indian empires to the present, emphasizing the 19th and 20th centuries. Deals with cultural and social history as well as political movements.

LAH 4470. History of the Caribbean (3). This course focuses on Cuba, Puerto Rico, and other Caribbean societies. European and United States colonialism and local Caribbean forces are studied to help understand the area's social, economic, and political problems and prospects.

*LAH 4600. History of Brazil (3). This course focuses on Latin America's largest and most populous nation. Themes include the evolution of Brazil's multi-ethnic society, the struggle for economic development, and the search for a viable political regime.

LAH 4723. Race and Class in Colonial Latin America (3). This course is a comprehensive examination of Latin America from 1492 to 1830, with emphasis on native and African reactions to colonial rule and the creation and growth of multi-ethnic groups and their solidification into classes.

LAH 4748. Social Revolutionary Movements in Latin America (3). This course is a thematic coverage of the history of social revolutionary movements in Latin America, using specific case studies drawn from, among others, the Mexican, Bolivian, and Cuban revolutions.

Others

HIS 3464. History of Science (3). This course is a study of the mutually-shaping relationships between social and political ideas and the histories of the various sciences.

HIS 3505. Perspectives on Science and Mathematics (3). This course examines the interrelationship between science, mathematics, and society from the time of the Babylonians to the present day, and how these lessons related to placing the secondary math and science curriculum into historical context.

HIS 3949r. Cooperative Education Work Experience (0). (S/U grade only.) This course does not count as credit toward the history major.

*HIS 4070. Oral History (3). This course exposes students to the use of oral history as a research technique and provides experience in conducting professionally acceptable oral history interviews. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.

HIS 4080. Managing Archives and Historical Records (3). This course examines the nature of archives; various types of records; arranging and processing archives; restoring and protecting records; archival institutions, policies, and procedures. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.

HIS 4081. Museum Management (3). This course examines the history and philosophy of museums, especially historical museums; organization and operation; planning exhibits; educational activities; and public relations. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.

HIS 4086. Preserving Historic Sites and Spaces (3). This course focuses on the identification, preservation, and maintenance of historic sites; the historic preservation movement. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.

HIS 4906r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours. This course does not count as credit toward the history major or minor.

HIS 4930r. Special Topics in History (3). This course includes specialized approaches to history. Topics vary. The course may be repeated for different topics to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.

HIS 4931r. Tutorial in History (1–2). Prerequisites: Senior history majors or minors status and instructor permission. This course covers selected topics in history. A maximum enrollment of five students in each tutorial. May be repeated only once and to a maximum of four semester hours. The course does not count as credit toward the history major or minor.

HIS 4935. Senior Seminar (3). This course is an advanced training in historical methods and historiography. The historical material varies from seminar to seminar depending upon the instructor's area of expertise.

HIS 4936r. Honors Work (1–6). This course is open to participants in the University's and departmental honors program. The student must complete six thesis hours. The course does not count as credit toward the history major. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

HIS 4944r. Undergraduate History Internship (3). (S/U grade only.) This course provides students with the opportunity to engage in a formative active learning experience: working in a cultural institution that collects, preserves, and presents history for general audiences. It exposes students to the diversity of possible career paths related to the field of public history. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

WOH 3228. Business and Globalization in World History (3). This course familiarizes the student with the role of business and economics in shaping modern world history since 1500. It explores the themes of commerce, culture, and economic competition. Among the themes covered are industrialization and the development of the global economy, economic imperialism, the rise and spread of big business, and the emergence of Multinational Corporations. The course is oriented toward comparative approaches to these topics as they pertain to the various regions and countries around the world.

WOH 3930r. Studies in World History (3). This course includes examination of a special topic related to world history. Topics vary. The course may be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of nine semester hours.

*WOH 4235. Disease, Race, and Environment (3). This course examines the close relationship between disease, race, and environment in the development of civilizations of the world.

WOH 4244. World War II (3). This course deals with World War II on a global basis while avoiding the common Eurocentric approach. It also analyzes the character of the Pacific theater as well as that of the European war, presenting the student with insights into and contrasts between the various belligerents.

Graduate Courses

African History

*AFH 5308. Northern African History (3).

American History

AMH 5116. Colonial American History to 1763 (3).

AMH 5139. Revolutionary America, 1760-1788 (3).

AMH 5177. The Civil War Era (3).

AMH 5229. U.S. Progressive Era, 1890–1920 (3).

AMH 5239. The United States, 1920–1945: Prosperity, Depression, and World War II (3).

AMH 5278. The United States Since 1945 (3).

*AMH 5336. U.S. Intellectual History I: Beginning to 1880 (3).

*AMH 5337. U.S. Intellectual History II: 1880 to the Present (3).

*AMH 5404. The Old South (3).

AMH 5405. The South Since 1865 (3).

AMH 5424. History of Florida from 1821 to the Present (3).

AMH 5426. The History of Florida (3).

AMH 5518. Twentieth-Century United States Foreign Relations (3).

*AMH 5555. American Legal History I (3).

*AMH 5556. American Legal History II (3).

AMH 5567. Women in 19th-Century America (3).

AMH 5576. Black America to 1877 (3).

AMH 5577. Black America Since 1877 (3).

AMH 5589. History of the Seminole Indians (3).

*AMH 5635. Florida Environmental History (3).

*AMH 5636. North American Environmental History (3).

*AMH 5637. The Nature of Florida (3).

*AMH 5645. Humor and the American Mind (3).

AMH 6379. Technology in America (3).

Asian History

ASH 5226. Modern Middle East (3).

ASH 5266. Central Asia Since the Mongols (3).

*ASH 5529. Traditional India (3).

Classical History

Note: The following history courses are offered by the Department of Classics.

CLA 5438r. Studies in Greek History (3).

CLA 5448r. Studies in Roman History (3).

European History

*EUH 5125. The Crusades (3).

EUH 5127. Earlier Middle Ages (3).

EUH 5128. Later Middle Ages (3).

EUH 5146. The Renaissance (3).

EUH 5147. The Reformation (3).

*EUH 5238. Rise of Nationalism (3).

EUH 5246. World War I: Europe, 1900–1918 (3).

EUH 5249. The Holocaust in Historical Perspective (3).

*EUH 5285. Europe Since 1945 (3).

*EUH 5338. History of East Central Europe, 1815 to the Present (3).

*EUH 5365. The Balkans Since 1700 (3).

EUH 5457. The Age of the French Revolution, 1715–1795 (3).

EUH 5458. Napoleonic Europe, 1795–1815 (3).

EUH 5467. Weimar and Nazi Germany (3).

EUH 5508. England in the Middle Ages (3).

EUH 5509. Modern Britain Since c. 1870 (3).

EUH 5518. Stuart England (3).

EUH 5527. England, 1714-1870 (3).

EUH 5548. Sex and Class in England, 1750–1914 (3).

EUH 5578. 19th-Century Russia (3).

EUH 5579. 20th-Century Russia (3).

*EUH 5608. European Intellectual History, 1500–1800 (3).

*EUH 5609. European Intellectual History, 1800 to Present (3).

HIS 5256. War and the Nation State (3).

HIS 5265. War and Society in the Age of Revolution (3).

Historical Administration and Public History

HIS 5067. Public History Theory and Methods (3).

HIS 5082. Managing Archives and Historical Records (3).

HIS 5083. Preserving Historic Sites and Spaces (3).

HIS 5084. Museum Management (3).

HIS 5085r. Internship in Historical Management (3–6). (S/U grade only.)

HIS 5089. Historical Administration and Public History Capstone Research Project (1–6). (S/U grade only.)

HIS 5165. Digital History (3).

HIS 6087. Exhibiting History (3).

Latin American History

LAH 5439. History of Mexico (3).

*LAH 5475. History of the Caribbean (3).

LAH 5727. Race and Class in Colonial Latin America (3).

LAH 5749. Social Revolutionary Movements in Latin America (3).

Others

*HIS 5077. Oral History (3).

HIS 5909r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). (S/U grade only.)

HIS 5911r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

HIS 5932r. Graduate Tutorial in History (1–2).

HIS 5935r. Special Topics in History (3).

HIS 5940r. Supervised Teaching (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

HIS 6058. Approaches to History (4).

HIS 6059. Historical Methods (3).

HIS 6469. Historiography and Science (3).

*HIS 6500. History of Life Sciences (3).

HIS 6909r. Directed Individual Study (1–4). (S/U grade only.)

HIS 6934r. Special Topics in History (3).

HIS 6941. Teaching History at the College Level (3).

*WOH 5226. The Worlds of Captain Cook (3).

*WOH 5238. Disease, Race, and Environment (3).

WOH 5246. World War II (3).

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION:

see Educational Leadership and Policy Studies