Skip to main content

This is your Donation message.

2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

School of Information

College of Communication and Information

Web Page: http://ischool.cci.fsu.edu/

Director: Lorri Mon; Professors: G. Burnett, K. Burnett, N. Everhart, Gross, Kazmer, Latham, Lustria, Marty, McClure, Riccardi, Stvilia; Associate Professors: C. Hinnant, Mardis, Mon, Oh; Assistant Professors: Allen, L. Hinnant, He, Ho, Rodriguez-Mori; Specialized Faculty: Barrager, Gibradze, Jowett, Landbeck, Marks, Swaine; Professors Emeriti: Aaron, Blazek, DePew, Hart, C. Jörgensen, Robbins, Summers, Wiegand, Zachert

The School of Information offers a bachelor of science degree in Information Technology (BSIT) with a major in Information Technology (IT) and a major in Information, Communication, and Technology (ICT); a master of science degree in Information (MSI) accredited by the American Library Association (ALA); a master of science degree in Information Technology (MSIT); a specialist degree in Information; and a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree in Information. A bachelor's to master's degree program (BSIT to MSIT) is also offered combining a bachelor's degree in Information Technology (BSIT) with a master's degree in Information Technology (MSIT). Refer to the "School of Information" section of this General Bulletin or to the School Web site at http://ischool.cci.fsu.edu/ for more details concerning degree programs and other information. For complete details of graduate degree requirements, plus a description of the School of Information and its facilities and opportunities, refer to the Graduate Bulletin.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in Information Technology satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in CGS 2060 or CGS 2100. Undergraduate majors in Information Communication and Technology satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in CGS 2060, CGS 2100, or COM 4470.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into this upper-division degree program:

Information Technology

  1. PSY XXXX: Any course in psychology
  2. STA X023 or STA X122
  3. ECO X013
  4. CGS XXXX: Any database course
  5. COP XXXX: Any course in computer programming
  6. COP XXXX: Any course in object-oriented computer programming
  7. MAC XXXX: A pre-calculus or discrete math course
  8. PHI XXXX: Any course in general ethics

Technology Requirement

All students in the information technology undergraduate program are required to provide their own laptop computer and appropriate software. Specific information may be found online at http://ischool.cci.fsu.edu/academics/online/requirements/.

Requirements for a Major in Information Technology

To major in Information Technology (IT), a student must complete a minimum of forty-two semester hours in information technology, including the six foundation courses, six electives and two capstone courses.

Core Courses (eighteen hours required):

LIS 3021 Technical Communication for the Information Professions (3)

OR

IFS 3108 Technical Communication in the Information Age (3)

LIS 3201 Research and Data Analysis in Information Technology (3)

LIS 3267 Information Science (3)

LIS 3353 Information Technologies (3)

LIS 3706 Information Systems and Services (3)

LIS 3784 Information Organization and Communication (3)

Electives (eighteen hours required):

Eighteen hours of IT elective courses chosen in consultation with an advisor. Students may focus their electives on topics such as networking and security, design and development, health informatics, and social informatics.

Capstone Courses (six hours required):

LIS 4708 Perspective on Information Technology (3)

LIS 4910 Information Technology Project (3)

Note: All courses must be completed with a minimum grade of "C–".

Requirements for a Major in Information, Communication and Technology

The major in Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) is an interdisciplinary program comprised of courses from the School of Communication and the School of Information. A student must complete forty-two semester hours of coursework including three introduction courses, nine electives, and two capstone courses:

Foundation Courses (nine hours required):

LIS 3267 Information Science (3)

LIS 3353 Information Technologies (3)

MMC 2000 Introduction to the Mass Media (3)

Research Skills (three hours from the following list):

ADV 4603 Account Planning (3)

LIS 3201 Research and Data Analysis in Information Technology (3)

Technical Skills (six hours from the following list):

COM 4470 Desktop Multimedia (3)

or

DIG 3118 Digital Graphic Design (3)

LIS 3793 Information Architecture (3)

or

LIS 4351 User Experience Design (3)

LIS 4368 Advanced Web Applications Development (3)

LIS 4380 Social Media Management (3)

LIS 4381 Mobile Application Development (3)

Oral Communication Skills (three hours from the following list):

SPC 2608 Public Speaking (3)

or

SPC 1017 Fundamentals of Speech (3)

Written Communication Skills (three hours required):

LIS 3021 Technical Communication for the Information Professions (3)

or

IFS 3108 Technical Communication in the Information Age (3)

LIS 4022 Writing for Information Professions (3)

Strategies (six hours from the following list):

ADV 3008 Principles of Advertising (3)

ADV 3410 Hispanic Marketing (3)

LIS 4772 Introduction to Consumer Health Informatics (3)

OR

IFS 3037 Empowering Health Consumers in the eHealth Era (3)

PUR 3000 Introduction to Public Relations (3)

RTV 3001 Media Techniques (3)

Perspectives (six hours from the following list):

ADV 4411 Multicultural Marketing (3)

COM 3332 New Communication Technology and Contemporary Society (3)

COM 3420 Media, Culture and the Environment (3)

OR

IFS 3033 Media, Culture and the Environment (3)

COM 4905r Directed Individual Study (1–3)

COM 4941r Applications of Instructional Methods (1–3)

LIS 4480r Information Technology Leadership (3)

LIS 4905r Directed Individual Study (1–3)

LIS 4930r Special Topics in Information Studies (3)

LIS 4940r Internship in Information Technology (1–6)

MMC 4300 Communication and Change: The Diffusion of Innovations (3)

Capstone Courses (six hours required):

LIS 4708 Perspectives on Information Technology (3)

LIS 4910 Information Technology Project (3)

Note: All courses must be completed with a minimum grade of "C–".

Requirements for a Minor in Information Technology

The School of Information offers a minor in Information Technology on a space available basis. The minor consists of twelve semester hours in Information Technology courses. To minor in Information Technology, a student must complete both LIS 2780 and LIS 3353, and any two of the following courses: LIS 3021 or IFS 3108, LIS 3201, LIS 3267, LIS 4410 or LIS 4480.

Only coursework with a grade of "C–" or above in these courses will count toward the minor. At least six hours of the minor must be taken with the School of Information at Florida State University. Courses taken at another institution must be evaluated by the School of Information to determine equivalency. Courses taken to meet the minor are not applicable to any other requirement.

Bachelor's to Master's Degree Program

The School of Information has also developed a combined bachelor's to master's degree program (BSIT to MSIT) combining a bachelor's degree in Information Technology (BSIT) with a master's degree in Information Technology (MSIT). This program offers eligible undergraduate students the opportunity to take up to twelve semester hours of graduate coursework, which may be counted toward both the BS and MS degrees. Check the Web site for more details: http://ischool.cci.fsu.edu.

Harold Goldstein Library

The Harold Goldstein Library includes technologies and materials for information technology and library science and is the home to a hands-on information makerspace and technology innovation center for emerging technologies including 3D printing and 3D visualization, and electronic circuitry building projects, available to all FSU users. For more information, visit http://goldstein.cci.fsu.edu/.

Definition of Prefix

CGS—Computer General Studies

COP—Computer Programming

IDC—Interdisciplinary Computing

IFS—Interdisciplinary Florida State University Courses

LIS—Library and Information Studies

Undergraduate Courses

CGS 2821. Introduction to Web Site Design (3). This course teaches proper Web site design techniques to students from all degree programs. Topics include visual design and graphics, information architecture, usability and accessibility, communication, adaptation to audience, markup languages, and development tools and processes. Coursework is focused on applying Web site design principles and techniques to projects in the students' disciplines. The course is gauged for beginners who are computer competent; it does not teach computer programming.

CGS 2835. Interdisciplinary Web Development (3). Prerequisite: Computer fluency. This interdisciplinary course provides basic training in project management, communication, information architecture, interface design, graphic design, Web technologies, content editing, and subject-area expertise, thus empowering students across disciplines to effectively communicate their subject-area expertise through today's most popular publishing medium, the Web.

COP 2258. Problem Solving with Object-Oriented Programming (3). Prerequisite: Computer fluency. This interdisciplinary course is designed for students who are not necessarily intent on becoming computer programmers, but are interested in understanding the principles that govern object-oriented programming and software development in order to assist with problem solving in their own disciplines.

IDC 2930r. Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Computing - Beginning Level (1–4). This course covers current issues and topics in interdisciplinary computing that are not discussed in other courses. Topics vary. May be repeated within the same term, to a maximum of nine semester hours.

IDC 3931r. Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Computing - Intermediate Level (1–4). This course covers current issues and topics in interdisciplinary computing that are not discussed in other courses. Topics vary. May be repeated within the same term, to a maximum of nine semester hours.

IFS 2014. Information Literacy and Society (3). This course introduces students to the concepts of information literacy and what it means to be information literate in 21st century society. Students address the issue of information literacy by learning searching skills, gathering information from primary and derivative sources, and conducting information quality analyses. Students also work with information in real-world content domains to analyze and represent information effectively.

IFS 2041. Information Ethics for the 21st Century (3). This course identifies past, present and future information ethics challenges and encourages students to develop their own standpoints from which to address them. The primary purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to make informed ethical decisions about information production, management and use. Students explore and apply a wide range of ethical theories to examine critical information ethics issues raised by recent advances in information and communication technology.

IFS 2097. Exploring Emerging Technologies (3). This course introduces students to several emerging technologies and briefly examines social, political, or legal issues surrounding the development and use of these technologies in various contexts. Students engage in structured learning activities to learn the basics about the use of selected technologies from set up to the completion of a basic project.

IFS 2118. Is Google Making Us Stupid? The Unintended Consequences of Information Technology (3). This course explores the pros and cons of information technology in our everyday lives, and examines how students can identify and mitigate against risk factors that lead to information technology disasters.

IFS 3037. Empowering Health Consumers in the eHealth Era (3). This course explores the use of emerging technologies for health information seeking, health promotion and disease prevention, and for supporting the treatment and management of chronic illnesses. Students learn how to assess users' information needs, competencies, and health behaviors in order to develop accessible, useful, and effective solutions. They also study issues and concerns influencing adoption of these technologies at different levels.

IFS 3108. Technical Communication in the Information Age (3). This course focuses on understanding the rhetorical situations and developing effective rhetorical strategies for technical communication in the information age. Attention is given to producing both technical documents and technical presentations. Emphasis is placed on the writing process, specifically on analyzing context, purpose, and audience; designing documents; and peer editing.

LIS 2360. Web Applications Development (3). Prerequisite: CGS 2821 or any equivalent course in Web design (HTML and CSS) or with instructor permission. This course introduces the concepts and technical needs of client and server side technologies for Web applications. The course equips students with resources for design, production, and evaluation of Web applications and strategies for locating these resources. Students gain hands-on experience in Web application production, including: client-side markup and programming, server-side programming for data processing, code versioning, accessing Web services, and related authentication techniques.

LIS 2780. Database Concepts (3). This course examines relational database management systems using a typical, commercial DBMS, such as Microsoft Access and/or MySQL and Oracle. Topics include data modeling, database design, implementation, forms and reports, and remote access to databases. The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of database design, implementation, and management concepts and techniques.

LIS 3021. Technical Communication for the Information Professions (3). Prerequisites: LIS 2780, LIS 3267, and LIS 3353. This course covers technical and professional documents generated and used by information professionals. Emphasis is on the writing process, more specifically on audience analysis, document design, collaboration, and peer editing.

LIS 3103. Information and Society (3). This course examines major issues related to living in the "information society," including information literacy, information security, identity theft, privacy, intellectual property, and information ethics. Students gain skills in searching the Web, electronic databases, and print resources. The three broad areas covered by the course are personal information management, academic information, and career/professional information.

LIS 3201. Research and Data Analysis in Information Technology (3). Prerequisites: LIS 2780, LIS 3267, and LIS 3353. This course provides students with an understanding of methods and tools used by information professionals for research and data analysis. It focuses on both quantitative and qualitative methods in information technology professions including surveys, interviews, need assessments, requirements analysis, and transaction log analysis. It provides students with the opportunity to conceptualize an IT problem, develop a research plan, and design methods for assessing, collecting, analyzing, and reporting research data.

LIS 3267. Information Science (3). This course presents the history, philosophical bases, concepts, theories, and methodologies of information science. It also emphasizes the definitions and properties of information, formal and informal information systems, information origination, transfer, classification, formatting, and use.

LIS 3353. Information Technologies (3). This course provides a solid foundation in the fundamental concepts, theories and principles in information technology and discusses critical issues surrounding their use and how they impact everyday life. The course is also an understanding of the concepts and principles underlying the design and use of digital devices, computer hardware, software, telecommunications, networking and multimedia, and is an integral part of any IT curriculum.

LIS 3946r. Field Study in Information Studies (1–6). Prerequisite: Advisor permission. This course provides students with an unpaid work experience within a major area of information studies. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

LIS 3706. Information Systems and Services (3). Prerequisites: LIS 2780 and LIS 3353. This course provides an overview of information systems concepts and practice including system management, maintenance, assurance, and reporting services, physical and human resources. The course includes an introduction to information system hardware components, operating systems, scripting languages, with practical training in databases and networked servers. In addition, this course provides practice in managing the people, processes and events (planned or otherwise) involved in information system management.

LIS 3781. Advanced Database Management (3). Prerequisite: LIS 3784. This course explores various topics in database management systems (DBMS), using a typical commercial DMBS (e.g., MySQL, SQL Server, Oracle). Administration, security, stored procedures, triggers, transactions, functions, data mining, data warehousing, and remote access to databases are some of the topics covered. Students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of these database concepts through creating, deploying, and utilizing various relational database designs.

LIS 3784. Intermediate Database Analysis (3). Prerequisites: LIS 2780 and LIS 3353. This course examines relational database management systems using a typical, commercial DBMS, such as Microsoft Access and/or MySQL and Oracle. Topics include data modeling, database design, implementation, forms and reports, and remote access to databases. The goal of this course is to provide students with an intermediate understanding of database design, implementation, and management concepts and techniques.

LIS 3793. Information Architecture (3). Prerequisites: CGS 2835, LIS 3267 and LIS 3353. This course provides an introduction to the scope and methods of information architecture in any setting, but emphasizes its application to the Web. The course examines the elements of an information architecture and some common technologies needed to design and create these elements.

LIS 4022. Writing for the Information Professions (3). This course offers practical hands-on experience with forms and practices of technical and professional writing, including documentation, correspondence, audience analysis, writing for social media, evaluation, and review. The course emphasizes clear, concise, and effective writing in information technology settings, both within organizations and for user services.

LIS 4104. Social Networks (3). This course will introduce students to the history and concepts of social networks, the networked society, and to social network analytics – the discovery and communication of meaningful patterns in relational data. Students in this course will develop knowledge and skills with the tools necessary to apply network analytics to fields such as Information Technology, Business, Communications, Sports Performance, Sociology, and Education.

LIS 4264. Systems Approach in the Information Environment (3). Prerequisite: MAC 1105. This course offers an introduction to the systems approach for problem solving in an information seeker's environment. The theories and concepts of information science are integrated with a variety of practical tools for the structured design and analysis of information systems.

LIS 4276. Quantitative Methods in Information Studies (3). Prerequisites: LIS 3201 and senior standing or instructor permission. This course presents practical methods for collecting and analyzing quantitative data. Topics include hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, contingency tables, correlation, and experimental design.

LIS 4277. Usability and Usefulness of Information Systems (3). Prerequisites: LIS 3201 and LIS 4276. This course introduces students to the concepts of cognitive and human information processing, their application to information systems design, and the assessment of the usability and usefulness of information systems.

LIS 4301. Electronic Media Production (3). Prerequisites: CGS 2835 and LIS 3353. This course offers the understanding, skills, and techniques needed for the production and utilization of various types of electronic graphic resources. Emphasis is on visual literacy, the evaluation of graphic resources, design standards, and the visual representation of information. Students evaluate existing materials and design and produce materials for both electronic and print formats, including pages for the World Wide Web, slide shows for visual support of verbal presentations, and documents produced with desktop publishing software.

LIS 4351. User Experience Design (3). Prerequisite: LIS 2360. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the user experience design process, and is intended to familiarize students with the methods, concepts, and techniques necessary to make user experience design an integral part of developing information interfaces. The course provides students with an opportunity to acquire the resources, skills, and hands-on experience they need to design, develop, and evaluate information interfaces from a user-centered design perspective.

LIS 4366. Web Site Development and Administration (3). Prerequisite: LIS 4301. This course covers issues and techniques related to the planning, production, and management of large World Wide Web sites, including information on organization and design, hardware and software, and cutting-edge development tools. Special emphasis is placed on information provision and the role of Web developers as providers and managers of information resources.

LIS 4368. Advanced Web Applications Development (3). Prerequisites: COP 2258, LIS 2360, and LIS 2780. This course provides a foundation in developing web applications with an emphasis on server-side concepts, tools and methods. Topics include basic web application programming, advanced object-oriented PHP and web application development. Students enrolled in this course develop basic programming skills in a modern web development environment, understand web application development principles and be able to find and use web application development resources on the Internet.

LIS 4369. Extensible Enterprise Solutions (3). Prerequisites: COP 2258, LIS 2360, and LIS 2780; each with a grade of "C–" or better. This course provides the foundational aspects of application design using procedural and object-oriented programming (OOP) concepts and techniques, employing various application development tools.

LIS 4380. Social Media Management (3). This course explores the tools, information management, and communication functions of social media through hands-on work with designing and managing social media sites. Students participating in this class actively design, implement, and coordinate numerous projects that build a foundation in social media management while allowing students to gain valuable leadership, communication, and organizational skills. They also explore the different issues and concerns that may influence the widespread adoption and implementation of social media at the individual and national levels.

LIS 4381. Mobile Application Development and Management (3). Prerequisites: COP 2258, LIS 2360, and LIS 2780; each with a grade of "C–" or better. This course focuses on concepts and best practices for developing and managing "mobile-first" technology projects. It covers processes and requirements for developing mobile web applications and principles for effective interface and user experience design. Students also examine different issues and concerns that may influence the widespread adoption and implementation of mobile web applications. Students develop a prototype of a mobile web app and prepare a proposal and other documentation for communicating contractual and functional specifications to clients.

LIS 4410. Societal Implications of the Information Age (3). This course offers an introduction to the evolving role of information in the "Information Age." The course emphasizes information services in society and contemporary information resources that fulfill society's information needs, and also considers the nature of electronic sources of information as well as other information formats and sources.

LIS 4480r. Information Technology Leadership (3). This course focuses on leadership, group communication, project planning, strategy, and individual development, with a focus on Information Technology and its uses. Students participating in this class actively design, implement, and coordinate numerous ongoing projects that build a strong team atmosphere and allow students to gain valuable leadership, communication, and organizational skills within the context of contemporary IT organizations. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours; duplicate registration not allowed.

LIS 4481. Managing Information Resources and Services (3). Prerequisites: Three of the following: LIS 3201, LIS 3267, LIS 3353, LIS 4276 and LIS 4351. This course offers an introduction to management science and administrative issues as applied to information resources management (IRM), information centers, and information services. Emphasis is placed upon management functions, concepts, and principles. Topics cover IRM definitions and issues, IRM implementation and strategies, as well as life-cycle management and career opportunities.

LIS 4482. Introduction to Networks and Telecommunications (3). Prerequisite: LIS 3353. This course provides a foundation in the use of networking technologies and management of modern data networks, with emphasis on the building blocks of local area networks. Subjects covered include networking architectures, topologies, models, layers, protocols, IP subnetting, equipment, operating systems, security and various tools/utilities.

LIS 4488. Network Administration for the Information Professional (3). Prerequisite: LIS 4482. This course focuses on the planning, design, configuration, operation, and management of computer networks containing data communication devices, servers, workstations, and networked applications and support systems. The course introduces students to administrative techniques inherent to basic operating systems, and also to enterprise management systems required by larger organizations. Students examine and discuss issues of scalability, performance management, and integration of internal resources with external resources such as cloud-based systems.

LIS 4642. Electronic Information Sources and Services (3). This course offers an introduction to the processes of electronic information retrieval including some theoretical principles, laboratory experiences, and selected current research issues.

LIS 4701. Information Representation (3). Prerequisite: LIS 3267. This course addresses the principles and techniques of organizing non-bibliographic information sources including unpublished and transitory materials such as archival and manuscript collections, business/office records, ephemera, and local databases. The course focuses on locally produced resources created for a narrowly defined, specific, and possibly restricted information user group.

LIS 4708. Perspectives on Information Technology (3). Corequisite: LIS 3267, LIS 3353, LIS 3021, or IFS 3108 or LIS 4022, and 2 IT electives for each major. This is the capstone course in the Information Technology degree program. The course provides students with a broad prospective on the information technology field, the skills required to succeed in the field, and a familiarity with emerging technologies. It also allows students to complete their information technology portfolio. The course consists of discussions of issues in the information technology profession, emerging technologies, and directed work on the student's degree portfolio.

LIS 4770. Information and Image Management (3). This course describes the scope and the problems involved in the administrative management of records. Emphasis is placed on the importance of managing and controlling records from the time of their creation until their vital deposition.

LIS 4772. Introduction to Consumer Health Informatics (3). This course explores the design and use of emerging technologies for health promotion and disease prevention, and for supporting the treatment and management of chronic illnesses. It promotes an interdisciplinary and user-centered approach for developing applications for health consumers. Students learn how to assess users' information needs, competencies, and health behaviors in order to develop accessible and effective solutions. They also study issues and concerns influencing adoption of these technologies at different levels.

LIS 4774. Information Security (3). Prerequisites: LIS 2780 and LIS 3353. This course provides a comprehensive, integrated and up-to-date overview of computing security. The topics included provide students with broad and new perspectives on contemporary issues in cybersecurity. Students examine theoretical concepts that form a foundation for information systems security. Students adopt a practical, hands-on approach to examining several fundamental security technologies. The course provides students an opportunity to advance their thinking and troubleshooting ability in solving cyber threat issues.

LIS 4776. Advanced Health Informatics (3). Prerequisite: LIS 4785. This course builds and extends the foundations presented in LIS 4785, while introducing practical solutions for the health IT professional. Students apply IT knowledge to address real-life problems in the medical community. The course provides students with a solid practical set of skills to enter the health industry.

LIS 4777. Advanced Information Security (3). Prerequisite: LIS 4774. This course provides advanced knowledge on organizational computing security and contemporary issues in cybersecurity. Topics include trusted computing and multi-level security management, including risk assessment, IT controls, security auditing, along with technical networking and communication security (e.g., Internet security protocols and standards, and Internet authentication applications). The course adopts a practical, hands-on approach to examine several fundamental security technologies learned from LIS 4774 such as firewalls, intrusion detection systems, operating systems security, vulnerability assessment scanners as well as the legal and ethical aspects of penetration testing and hacking. Students also have an opportunity to advance their critical thinking and troubleshooting skills in a sandbox solving current cyber threat issues.

LIS 4785. Introduction to Health Informatics (3). This course presents how theory and practice in health care, strategy, information technology, communications, and law are integrated in the management and delivery of health care in various situations. Focus is on the emerging specialization in the health-care industry that combines expertise in health care, information technology, and information management.

LIS 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only.) This course consists of guided studies for individual professional and subject needs. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LIS 4910. Information Technology Project (3). Prerequisite: Senior standing or instructor permission. This course consists of students working in teams and individually to manage, design, implement, and evaluate an information technology project. Students are also given evaluation and guidance on improving artifacts from projects entered into their degree portfolio during other courses within the degree program.

LIS 4930r. Special Topics in Information Studies (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course is a directed and supervised investigation of selected problems, issues, and trends in information studies, with an emphasis on research. Each offering may vary because of the evolving nature of the subject matter. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LIS 4938. Seminar in Information Studies (3). Prerequisites: Senior standing and three of the following: LIS 3232, LIS 3267, LIS 3342, LIS 4276, and LIS 4351. This seminar involves intensive reading and preparation of position papers concerning current issues in information studies, followed by discussions of these papers with faculty and information specialists.

LIS 4940r. Internship in Information Technology (1–6). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course provides students with opportunities to test theory in practice and to gain work experience in a real information technology environment. Specifically, students work under the guidance and supervision of a professional in an organization that provides information technology services. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LIS 4941r. Information Technology Practicum (3). This practicum is designed to provide the student with exposure to hands-on technical problem solving in a variety of settings. Students learn through practical experience to identify common technical problems experienced by end users; assess the scope and severity of user issues; and to develop, communicate, and implement strategies for successful problem resolution. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Duplicate registration not allowed.

LIS 4970r. Honors Work in Information Studies (1–6). Prerequisites: Admission to the honors program and information-technology major status. This course provides an opportunity for students to engage in independent and original research in a specialized area beyond the current curriculum in information technology. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. To graduate with honors in information studies, the student must complete six semester hours of coursework with at least a "B–" or better and an overall 3.2 GPA or higher.

Graduate Courses

IDC 5015. Teaching Interdisciplinary Computing (2–3).

LIS 5008. Advanced Online Searching (3).

LIS 5020. Foundations of the Information Professions (3).

LIS 5025. Educational Concepts and Strategies for School Librarians (3).

LIS 5028. Writing for the Information Professions (3).

LIS 5105. Communities of Practice (3).

LIS 5112. History of Reading in Everyday Life (3).

LIS 5113. History of American Librarianship (3).

LIS 5203. Assessing Information Needs (3).

LIS 5241. International and Comparative Information Service (3).

LIS 5255. Information, Technology, and Older Adults (3).

LIS 5260. Information Science (3).

LIS 5263. Theory of Information Retrieval (3).

LIS 5270. Evaluating Networked Information Services and Systems (3).

LIS 5271. Research in Information Studies (3).

LIS 5273. Practical Library and Information Science Exploration (3).

LIS 5275. Usability Analysis (3).

LIS 5313. Digital Media: Concepts and Production (3).

LIS 5316. Information Graphics (3).

LIS 5362. Design and Production of Networked Multimedia (3).

LIS 5364. Web Site Development and Administration (3).

LIS 5367. Advanced Web Applications (3).

LIS 5385. Social Media Management (3).

LIS 5403. Human Resource Management for Information Professionals (3).

LIS 5405. Leadership in Technology (3).

LIS 5408. Management of Information Organizations (3).

LIS 5411. Introduction to Information Policy (3).

LIS 5413. Seminar in Information Policy (3).

LIS 5416. Introduction to Legal Informatics (3).

LIS 5417. Introduction to Legal Resources (3).

LIS 5418. Introduction to Health Informatics (3).

LIS 5419. Consumer Health Informatics (3).

LIS 5426. Grant Writing, Evaluation, and Administration (3).

LIS 5441. Leadership in Reading (3).

LIS 5442. Information Leadership (3).

LIS 5472. Digital Libraries (3).

LIS 5474. Business Information and Competitive Intelligence (3).

LIS 5484. Introduction to Data Networks for Information Professionals (3).

LIS 5485. Introduction to Information Technologies (3).

LIS 5487. Information Systems Management (3).

LIS 5489. Network Administration (3).

LIS 5511. Management of Information Collections (3).

LIS 5512. School Collection Development and Management (3).

LIS 5513. Preservation of Information Materials (3).

LIS 5524. Instructional Role of the Informational Professional (3).

LIS 5528. Storytelling for Information Professionals (3).

LIS 5564. Information Needs of Children (3).

LIS 5565. Information Needs of Young Adults (3).

LIS 5566. Diverse Resources for Children and Young Adults (3).

LIS 5567. International Literature for Children and Young Adults (3).

LIS 5576. Information Needs of Adults (3).

LIS 5577. Graphic Novels in Libraries (3).

LIS 5590. Museum Informatics (3).

LIS 5602. Marketing of Library and Information Services (3).

LIS 5603. Introduction to Information Services (3).

LIS 5631. Health Information Sources (3).

LIS 5661. Government Information (3).

LIS 5703. Information Organization (3).

LIS 5711. Cataloging and Classification (3).

LIS 5736. Indexing and Abstracting (3).

LIS 5737. Subject Analysis (3).

LIS 5751. Computers as Persuasive Technology (3).

LIS 5771. Information and Image Management (3).

LIS 5775. Information Security (3).

LIS 5782. Database Management Systems (3).

LIS 5786. Introduction to Information Architecture (3).

LIS 5787. Fundamentals of Metadata Theory and Practice (3).

LIS 5788. Management of Health Information Technology (3).

LIS 5900r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

LIS 5916r. Issues in Information Studies (3).

LIS 5945r. Internship (0–12). (S/U grade only.)

LIS 6024. Seminar in Theory and Foundations of Information Sciences (3).

LIS 6027. Statistics and Data Analysis for Information Studies (3).

LIS 6040. Teaching in Information Studies (3). (S/U grade only.)

LIS 6205. Issues in Information Behavior (3).

LIS 6269. Seminar in Information Science (3).

LIS 6272. Qualitative Research in Information Studies (3).

LIS 6278. Seminar in Theory Development (3–5).

LIS 6279r. Research in Information Studies (3).

LIS 6289. Seminar in Education for Information Studies (3).

LIS 6662. Seminar in Information Policy (3).

LIS 6759. Seminar in Intellectual Access (3).

LIS 6909r. Directed Individual Study (1–9). (S/U grade only.)

LIS 6911r. Research Collaboration (1–5). (S/U grade only).

LIS 6919r. Issues in Information Studies (1–3).

LIS 6936r. Proseminar in IS Research and Teaching (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH:

see Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEMS:

see Educational Psychology and Learning Systems