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2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics

College of Arts and Sciences

Web Page: http://modlang.fsu.edu/

Chair: Mark Pietralunga; Professors: Boutin, Fernandez, Galeano, Leparulo, Munro, Pietralunga, Poey, Sharpe, Walters; Associate Professors: Álvarez, Cappuccio, Efimov, Gomariz, Gonzalez, Howard, Lan, Leeser, Leushuis, Maier-Katkin, Reglero, Romanchuk, Soldat-Jaffe, Sunderman, Valisa, Wakamiya, Wang, C. Weber, Zanini-Cordi; Assistant Professors: Coggeshall, Lee, Muntendam, Murray-Román, Stilerman, Treacy, D. Weber; Teaching Faculty I: Barakat, Brudenell, Gutierrez, Lababidi, Prantil, Prosper; Teaching Faculty II: Brandl, Osborn; Teaching Faculty III: Feng, Schlenoff; Postdoctoral Fellows: Albarrán, Nony, and Toymentsev

The Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics provides instruction in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish languages, with an emphasis throughout on cultural communication. Several courses in linguistics are offered, in addition to English-language courses in Arabic, Brazilian, Chinese, French and Francophone, German, Hispanic, Italian, Japanese, Russian, and Turkish film; in Hispanic, Italian, Japanese, Russian, Slavic, and Turkish cultures; in Russian and Slavic folklore; and in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian, and Latin American literature in translation. The department offers a wide range of Liberal Studies (including E-Series) courses that may, in some cases, be accepted for major or minor credit (see individual course descriptions).

All students who intend to continue study of a language at Florida State University in which they have had previous experience (such as high school study or study abroad) must be placed into the appropriate course by the Department of Modern Languages. Students in French, German, and Spanish who continue with the same language must take the placement test before they enroll in a course in the department. Students in other languages must consult the department for the appropriate placement procedures before enrolling.

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Arts (BA) degrees are offered in East Asian Languages and Cultures (Chinese and Japanese), French, French and Francophone Studies (temporarily suspended), German, Italian, Middle Eastern Studies, Russian, and Spanish. All major programs, except for languages with a concentration in business, and French and Francophone Studies will also require a minor degree. Undergraduate minors are offered in Arabic Studies, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Linguistics, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Strategic European Languages and Cultures (SELC), and World Literature/World Film.

Graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts degree are available in French, German, Italian Studies, Slavic Languages and Literatures (emphasis on Russian), and Spanish (emphasis on Literary and Cultural Studies or Linguistics). Programs leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree are offered with French or Spanish as the major field of concentration. For information on graduate programs, refer to the Graduate Bulletin.

Foreign Language Learning Center

The department offers a variety of electronic language learning systems and language media resources. It has a fully equipped computer lab where students may work on their language skills under an instructor's guidance, as well as a walk-in computer lab which they may use at their convenience. The department develops and maintains the Virtual Language Lab, an online language resource site which offers students a wide variety of electronic media resources for the languages taught by the department. The department's video collection has over two hundred foreign films.

Winthrop-King Institute for Contemporary French and Francophone Studies

The Winthrop-King Institute for Contemporary French and Francophone Studies was created as a result of a generous bequest from the late Mrs. Ada Belle Winthrop-King. It is a center for interdisciplinary scholarship focusing on developments in France and the wider French-speaking world dating approximately from the French Revolution to the present, with a particular emphasis on contemporary issues. The institute offers a wide range of study abroad scholarships for students. Strongly interdisciplinary in outlook, the Institute brings together faculty from a variety of departments at Florida State and from universities throughout the world. It hosts leading scholars, artists and public figures and sponsors a wide range of lectures, film screenings, conferences and other events addressing key social, cultural and political issues in France and other French-speaking regions.

Scholarships Offered

Ada Belle Winthrop-King Scholarships are offered on a competitive basis each year for language majors and minors in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. For further information, please contact the Winthrop-King Institute at (850) 644-7636.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in modern languages and linguistics satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in CGS 2060, CGS 2100 or ISC 3313.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into these upper-division degree programs:

East Asian Languages (Chinese and Japanese)

XXX XXXX: coursework in the language for six to twelve credit hours; students must demonstrate proficiency by testing or completion of a foreign language through the intermediate level. Which language is chosen depends upon the track/focus of the student. At FSU, the intermediate level would be either CHI X220 or JPN X220.

French

XXX XXXX: coursework in the language for six to twelve credit hours; students must demonstrate proficiency by testing or completion of the foreign language through the intermediate level. The intermediate level is FRE X220 or equivalent.

French and Francophone Studies (Temporarily Suspended)

Students must demonstrate proficiency by testing or completion of intermediate-level French.

German

XXX XXXX: coursework in the language for six to twelve credit hours; students must demonstrate proficiency by testing or completion of the foreign language through the intermediate level. The intermediate level is GER X220 or equivalent.

Italian

XXX XXXX: coursework in the language for six to twelve credit hours; students must demonstrate proficiency by testing or completion of the foreign language through the intermediate level. The intermediate level is ITA X220 or equivalent.

Russian

XXX XXXX: coursework in the language for six to twelve credit hours; students must demonstrate proficiency by testing or completion of the foreign language through the intermediate level. The intermediate level is RUS X220 or equivalent.

Spanish

XXX XXXX: coursework in the language for six to twelve credit hours; students must demonstrate proficiency by testing or completion of the foreign language through the intermediate level. The intermediate level is SPN X220 or equivalent.

College Requirements

Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the "College of Arts and Sciences" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Note: The department reserves the right to reassign or drop students who are enrolled in a course for which they have not taken the required prerequisites or one that does not correspond to their linguistic abilities.

Honors in the Major

The Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics offers a program in honors in the major to encourage talented seniors to undertake independent and original research as part of the undergraduate experience. For requirements and other information, see the "University Honors Office and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Major in a Language with Concentration in Business

A major in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Spanish, or Russian with a concentration in business may be selected. The program consists of twenty-one semester hours in the language beyond the language requirement plus fifteen approved semester hours of core business courses and twelve approved semester hours in a specialized track of marketing, management, or finance in the College of Business. Students declaring a French major with a concentration in business may take one single French course taught in English with written work done in English to satisfy the requirements of the major. For students declaring Spanish major with a concentration in business, linguistics (LIN) courses will not count for major credit. A major in Chinese or Japanese with a concentration in business requires eighteen semester hours of the selected language numbered above the 2220 level, plus twenty-seven hours in the business track. Of the twenty-seven hours, at least twelve approved semester hours must be taken of core business coursework, and at least nine approved semester hours in a specialized track of marketing, management, or finance. A maximum of six semester hours of CHI/JPN 3000-level courses in Business Chinese or Business Japanese may be substituted for required business courses in the twelve hour specialized track. No minor is required with a concentration in business. Students should consult with their language advisor for a list of appropriate courses. Students majoring in both Business and Language/Business should refer to the requirements below, under "Double Major".

Co-Major in Modern Languages and Linguistics

The department offers an interdepartmental program in which students may choose approved co-majors from the following divisions: French, German, Italian, Russian, and Spanish. The co-major consists of twenty-one semester hours numbered above 1999 in each of two divisions selected. Students declaring a French co-major may take one single French course taught in English with written work done in English to satisfy the requirements of the major. For students declaring a Spanish co-major, linguistics (LIN) courses may count for major credit. A co-major in Chinese and Japanese consists of fifteen semester hours of each language numbered above 2220, plus twelve semester hours of CHT/JPT 3000-level coursework in culture and literature. Of the combined thirty Chinese/Japanese language coursework, at least six semester hours must be taken from two 4000-level courses in one language and three semester hours from a 4000-level course in the other language. The student should consult with the Chinese and Japanese advisors to select appropriate courses. One 2000-level course in either language chosen for all co-majors must be used to satisfy the arts and sciences language requirement. The student should consult with an advisor in each language division to select courses. No minor is required.

Double Major

Students pursuing more than one major must meet the program requirement of both majors, with the following exceptions: (1) a maximum of six semester hours may overlap, i.e. they may be counted toward two separate majors; and (2) no minor is required. Students majoring in both Business and Language/Business are allowed double-counting of the five "core" courses, but are not allowed double-counting of any course in the selected specialized track.

Double Major in Modern Languages

A double major in two modern foreign languages may be approved in selected combinations. Please consult an advisor in each language for course advisement.

Requirements for a Major in Modern Languages and Linguistics

Note: A grade of "C–" or better must be earned in each course applied toward any major or minor degree earned in modern languages and linguistics. A grade of "C–" or better is required for students to advance to subsequent language levels. No courses may be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis except for language internships.

East Asian Languages and Cultures

The East Asian Languages and Cultures degree program offers five separate major tracks: Chinese language and culture (thirty hours), Japanese language and culture (thirty hours), co-major in Chinese and Japanese (forty-two hours), Chinese with a concentration in business (forty-five hours), and Japanese with a concentration in business (forty-five hours).The Chinese and Japanese language and culture majors require thirty semester hours numbered above 2220 including a minimum of six semester hours at the 4000 level. For the Chinese major, a maximum of nine semester hours from 3000-level courses in Chinese culture and literature may count toward the thirty semester hour requirement. The Japanese major will allow a maximum of nine semester hours in Japanese culture and literature to count toward the thirty semester hour requirement. Coursework should be selected by consultation with the Chinese or Japanese advisor in the language area of choice. For further information on requirements, visit http://modlang.fsu.edu/.

French Major

Thirty semester hours numbered above 2999 are required, including two out of three from the series FRE 3501, FRW 3100, FRW 3101; FRE 3420, FRE 3421, FRE 3780 (or FRE 4410), FRE 4422; and three additional 4000-level courses (nine semester hours), at least two of which (six semester hours) must be in literatures, cultures and/or societies of French expression. One 3000–4000 level French elective will complete the requirements. Students are also strongly advised to take the sequence FRW 3100–3101 concurrently with the grammar/composition sequence FRE 3420–3421. Any number of 3000-4000 level French courses taught in English with the written work done in French may count toward the major. Native speakers should register for courses numbered 3000 and above. Majors and minors are eligible for the Ada Belle Winthrop-King Summer Scholarships to Paris. For more information, please visit http://modlang.fsu.edu/Divisions-and-Programs/French-Program.

French and Francophone Studies Major (Temporarily Suspended)

Thirty-six semester hours numbered above 2999 are required in this interdepartmental program with history and art. Twenty-one semester hours of French and fifteen semester hours in either one or two fields related to French and francophone culture will be determined in consultation with the French advisor. The required French courses are FRE 3244, 3420, 3501; FRW 3100, 3101; and two additional 4000-level French courses. Students in this major may take one single French course taught in English with written work done in English to satisfy the requirements of the major. No minor is required. French and francophone studies majors are eligible for the Ada Belle Winthrop King Summer Scholarships to Paris. For more information, please visit http://modlang.fsu.edu/Divisions-and-Programs/French-Program.

German Major

Thirty semester hours numbered above 2999 are required, including GER 3400 and GER 3500. For students entering the major from GER 2220, GER 3400 is required to fulfill the composition component; students who enter with advanced proficiency take GER 4420. Students should consult with an advisor to ensure proper placement. Students should have a minimum of six semester hours of skills courses (e.g., GER 3310, GER 3400) and six semester hours of literature, film, and culture classes (e.g., GER 3500, GER 3930). A minimum of nine semester hours must be taken at the 4000 level. A maximum of six semester hours from among the following coursework may count toward the thirty semester hour requirement: GET 3130, GET 3524. For more information, please visit http://modlang.fsu.edu/Divisions-and-Programs/German-Division.

Italian Major

Thirty semester hours numbered above 2220 are required, including ITA 2240, 3420, 3421, at least one 3000-level literature course in Italian (ITW 3100, 3101), and a minimum of twelve semester hours at the 4000 level. A maximum of six semester hours from among the following coursework may count toward the thirty semester hour requirement: ITT 3430, 3500, 3501, 3520, 3523r. For more information, please visit http://www.modlang.fsu.edu/.

Middle Eastern Studies Major

Students majoring in Middle Eastern studies are to construct their study program in consultation with an advisor, around three components in addition to the University requirement for liberal studies and electives. A total of fifty-four semester hours beyond the liberal studies requirement is required. A list of approved courses is available from the program advisors or online at http://mec.fsu.edu. For more information, please visit http://registrar.fsu.edu/bulletin/undergraduate/departments/middle_east_studies/.

Russian Major

Thirty semester hours numbered above 2220 are required, including RUS 2330, 3400, 3420, and at least twelve semester hours of Russian and Slavic coursework at the 4000 level or above. Russian Language and Literature and Strategic European Languages and Cultures tracks have further requirements. For more information, please visit http://modlang.fsu.edu/Divisions-and-Programs/Slavic-Languages-Russian.

Spanish Major

Thirty semester hours, distributed in the following manner, are required: fifteen semester hours of 3000-level courses including SPN 3300, SPN 3400; SPT 3503; one SPW 3000-level literature course; a departmental linguistics course (usually LIN 3041). Required at the 4000 level are fifteen semester hours in SPN or SPW courses, including at least one senior seminar (SPN 4540, SPN 4930, SPW 4930, or SPN 4700). SPT 3100 and SPT 3130 will not count for major credit. Heritage speakers must take SPN 3350 plus one additional 3000- or 4000-level SPW or SPN course (excluding SPN 3400) instead of the required SPN 3300 or SPN 3400. For more information, please visit http://www.modlang.fsu.edu/.

Minor for Modern Languages Majors

Twelve to fifteen semester hours in an approved departmental field are required. If a second foreign language is selected as the minor, the twelve to fifteen semester hours must be earned in courses numbered above 1999. All courses must be taken for a letter grade, and a minimum grade of "C–" must be earned for all courses taken for the minor.

Requirements for a Minor in Linguistics

The undergraduate minor requires twelve semester hours in linguistics. See specific course requirements listed under "Interdepartmental Linguistics Minors."

Note: Linguistics courses will NOT count toward both a major in Spanish and a minor in linguistics.

The graduate minor requires fifteen semester hours. See specific course requirements listed under "Interdepartmental Undergraduate and Graduate Minors."

Requirements for a Minor in Modern Languages and Linguistics

Twelve semester hours in linguistics or in any one of the following languages are required: French, German, Italian, Portuguese, or Russian numbered above 1999. The Chinese minor requires twelve semester hours in courses numbered above CHI 1121. The Japanese minor requires twelve semester hours in courses numbered above JPN 1121. Spanish requires fifteen semester hours numbered above 2220 including three hours in Spanish literature. SPT 3130 will not count for minor credit. Credit extended in meeting the foreign language requirement for graduation may not be used in satisfying the minor.

Requirements for a Minor in Arabic Studies

The minor requires eighteen semester hours, fifteen of which must be from Arabic language courses. The additional three hours may be selected from a list of approved interdepartmental courses related to the Middle East or North Africa. No course taken for the minor may be used for any University language requirement. At least nine of the eighteen semester hours must be earned at Florida State University. A list of approved courses may be obtained from the departmental undergraduate office, 364 DIF. A minimum grade of "C" must be earned for all courses taken for the minor (no S/U grades will apply). Directed Individual Study (DIS) hours are not applicable to the minor without prior approval from the Arabic advisor.

Requirements for a Minor in Hebrew

The undergraduate minor in Hebrew consists of eighteen semester hours, at least fifteen of which must be Hebrew language courses. The remaining three hours may be in any other Semitic language (Arabic, Aramaic, and Syriac are currently taught at FSU). Students must demonstrate they have completed work in both Biblical and Modern Hebrew, reaching the Intermediate level in one. This will normally mean that they must take at least three hours of Biblical Hebrew and three hours of Modern Hebrew (note that these do not have to be taken as part of the minor). All courses in both Biblical and Modern Hebrew with a grade of "C–" or higher (no S/U grade will apply) can be counted toward the minor. No course counting toward any University language requirement may be counted for the minor. At least nine of the eighteen required hours must be taken at FSU. A list of approved courses may be obtained from the departmental undergraduate office, 364 DIF.

Requirements for a Minor in Middle Eastern Studies

The Middle Eastern Studies minor is concerned with the cultures of the Middle East from ancient times to the present. Utilizing the resources of a number of departments and programs, it allows the student to study the region from an interdisciplinary perspective. The minor can provide a Middle East focus for work in another discipline, can build a foundation necessary for advanced degrees in Middle Eastern Studies, and can enable those planning to work in the region to gain a fuller understanding of its cultures. A list of approved courses is available from the program advisor or online at http://mec.fsu.edu. For more information, please visit http://registrar.fsu.edu/bulletin/undergraduate/departments/middle_east_studies/

Requirements for a Minor in Strategic European Languages and Cultures (SELC)

The minor focuses on the languages and cultures of three historically and strategically linked regions that form an "arc" along the eastern edge of the EU: Russia and Ukraine, the Balkans, and Turkey. The minor consists of twelve approved semester hours taken in the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics beyond liberal studies and major requirements. A list of approved courses may be obtained from the department undergraduate office, 364 DIF

Requirements for a Minor in World Literature/World Film

The minor will consist of fifteen semester hours. The student may select five courses from any of the following: CHT 3123, CHT 3124, CHT 3391r, CHT 3392; FRT 3140, 3520r, 3561; GET 3130, 3524r; IFS 3008; ITT 3430, 3523r; JPT 3391r; PRT 3391r; RUT 3110, 3523r; SPT 3130, 3391r. Courses taken for major credit in modern languages may not be counted toward this minor.

Definition of Prefixes

ABT—Arabic Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

ARA—Arabic Language

CHI—Chinese

CHT—Chinese Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

FOL—Foreign Languages

FOT—Foreign Languages (In Translation)

FOW—Foreign Languages, Comparative Literature (Writings)

FRE—French Language

FRT—French Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

FRW—French Literature (Writings)

GER—German

GET—German Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

GEW—German Literature (Writings)

HBR—Modern Hebrew Language

HUM—Humanities

IFS—-Interdisciplinary Florida State University Courses

ITA—Italian Language

ITT—Italian Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

ITW—Italian Literature (Writings)

JPN—Japanese

JPT—Japanese Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

LIN—Linguistics

POR—Portuguese Language

PRT—Portuguese Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

RUS—Russian Language

RUT—Russian Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

RUW—Russian Literature (Writings)

SEC—Serbo-Croatian Language

SLL—Slavic Languages

SPN—Spanish Language

SPT—Spanish Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

SPW—Spanish Literature (Writings)

TUT—Turkish Culture in Translation or Translation Skills

All language and literature courses are taught primarily in the foreign language with the exception of courses in literature in translation and in film.

Undergraduate Courses

Note: Graduate students wishing to take courses at the 1000-4000 level must obtain permission of the instructor, the language coordinator for that course and the Modern Languages' associate chair for graduate studies.

Arabic

ABT 3520r. Arab Cinema and Culture (3). This course explores Arab cinema from the colonial period to the present. It provides an in-depth exploration of cultural identity and politics in the Arab world. Through cinematographic images and readings, students engage in the history of cultural, political, and religious diversity within Arab societies. Knowledge of Arabic is not required. Taught in English.

ARA 1120. Elementary Arabic I (4). This course is for students who have no previous knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic. The aim is basic proficiency in the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Basic vocabulary, sentence structure, grammar, and pronunciation in Modern Standard Arabic are introduced as well as one Arabic dialect. This course follows a communicative approach. It enables students to put the language they are learning into actual use. May not be taken concurrently with ARA 1121 and/or 2220 or by native speakers.

ARA 1121. Elementary Arabic II (4). Prerequisite: ARA 1120. This course introduces extended vocabulary and grammar, and basic conversation is emphasized. Students start conversing in spoken Arabic as well as reading and writing in Modern Standard Arabic. This course also develops the students' knowledge of Arab culture. May not be taken concurrently with ARA 1120 and/or 2220 or by native speakers.

ARA 2220. Intermediate Arabic (4). Prerequisite: ARA 1121. This course solidifies knowledge of basic grammar and expands the students' vocabulary. It emphasizes reading and writing in formal Arabic, as well as listening and speaking in Colloquial. Students participate in cultural activities, write compositions, and give oral presentations in class. May not be taken concurrently with ARA 1120 and/or 1121. Students in this course should have taken two semesters of Arabic in college or the equivalent.

ARA 2240r. Intermediate Conversation (3). Prerequisite: ARA 2220 or instructor permission. This course focuses on a practical communicative approach in order to use Arabic in meaningful contexts. It provides a bridge between Classical and Colloquial Arabic. Students are introduced to authentic Spoken Arabic and learn the language of everyday life. A variety of original texts, video clips, and audio tapes are used in class to give students a better understanding of the Arab world. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ARA 3222. Mid-Intermediate Arabic (3). Prerequisite: ARA 2220 or higher. This course is designed for students who have had three semesters of Arabic language or equivalent learning experience. This course aims to continue developing students' speaking, listening and reading comprehension, as well as writing and cultural skills. It focuses on grammar, composition and vocabulary building. May be taken concurrently with ARA 2240.

ARA 4421. Media Arabic (3). Prerequisite: ARA 2220 or higher. This course introduces students to the Arabic language, the Arab press, and to ordinary news items in print or broadcasted. It provides intermediate level students with an introduction to the language of the Arab media and develops their basic reading and interpreting skills.

ARA 4905r. Directed Individual Studies (3). Students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of, or in addition to, the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ARA 4970r. Honors Thesis (1–6). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours, three hours of which may be applied to the requirements for a minor in Arabic with permission of the department. All honors work is directed by the student's honors committee.

IFS 3009. Through an Arabic Lens: The Intersection of Film and Culture (3). This course explores Arab cinema from the colonial period to the present, examining the cultural personifications that distinguish it from Hollywood cinema. It provides an in-depth exploration of cultural identity and politics in the Arab World. Through cinematographic images and readings, students engage in the history of cultural, political, and religious diversity within dynamically changing Arab societies. Taught in English. All movies have English subtitles.

Chinese

CHI 1110. Elementary Conversational Chinese (4). This course introduces beginners to basic conversational Chinese, enabling them to develop interpretive and communicative skills in Chinese at the elementary level and grasp rudimentary knowledge of social customs and cultural practices in Chinese-speaking communities.

CHI 1120. Elementary Chinese I (4). This course emphasizes speaking and listening, although an acquisition of reading and writing skills is also an integral part of the course. Some fundamental syntactic constructions introduced are: word order, nominal classifiers, verb classification, and formation of complex sentences. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with CHI 1121 and/or 2220.

CHI 1121. Elementary Chinese II (4). Prerequisite: CHI 1120 or equivalent. This course further emphasizes the skills introduced in CHI 1120, including speaking, listening, and reading. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with CHI 1120 and/or 2220.

CHI 2220. Intermediate Chinese (4). Prerequisite: CHI 1121 or equivalent. This course emphasizes reading and writing and introduces more of the essential Chinese syntax. More time is devoted to learning Chinese characters in both recognition and production levels. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with CHI 1120 and/or 1121.

CHI 2243. Intermediate Conversational Chinese (3). This course helps students to further develop the three kinds of communicative skills in Chinese at the intermediate level: interpreting spoken language and written texts, communicating with Chinese speakers on matters in everyday life, and preparing and delivering presentations on sociocultural topics.

CHI 3240. Chinese Reading and Conversation (3). Prerequisite: CHI 2200 or instructor permission. This course is offered to meet the needs of students in current intermediate-level Chinese classes who seek not only to study Chinese at a more advanced level, but also to improve their Chinese proficiency in reading comprehension and oral communication in various settings.

CHI 3404r. Chinese Calligraphy and Poetry (3). Prerequisite: One Chinese language course or equivalent ability. This course develops both the ability to write Chinese characters and the knowledge of Chinese calligraphy. It comprises two tasks: 1) to grasp the structural rules of Chinese characters and the skills of memorizing and writing characters; 2) to understand the history and appreciate the charm of Chinese calligraphy by integrating calligraphic practice with the study of literary texts. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHI 3420r. Chinese Grammar and Composition (3). Prerequisite: CHI 2220 or instructor permission. This course aims to develop students' Chinese proficiency in reading and writing while focusing on grammar, composition, and vocabulary building. May be taken concurrently with CHI 3240. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours when content changes.

CHI 3422. Grammar and Composition II (3). Prerequisite: CHI 3420 or instructor permission. This course aims to develop students' Chinese proficiency adequate to the intermediate-high level in reading and writing, grammar, composition, and vocabulary.

CHI 3440r. Business Chinese (3). Prerequisite: CHI 2220 or permission of instructor. This course develops students' Chinese proficiency in the context of business activities that require not only adequate language skills at the intermediate-high level but also adequate knowledge of socio-cultural customs in China. May be repeated when content changes to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHI 3441. Business Chinese II (3). Prerequisite: CHI 2220 or equivalent learning experience. This course is a continuation of "Business Chinese I". It is designed to further improve students' language skills and cultural awareness for business purposes. For a Chinese major with business concentration, students can take this course to fulfill either the language or business requirements.

CHI 3501. Readings in Chinese Short Stories and Essays (3). Prerequisite: CHI 2220 or equivalent. This course is an introduction of selected materials in modern Chinese literature. The course objectives are to train students to be able to read some carefully chosen original works and to bring to students' awareness various cross-cultural differences.

CHI 4400r. Chinese-English Translation (3). Prerequisite: CHI 3422. This course introduces students to basic concepts of translation theory, and helps them to obtain fundamental skills and techniques in Chinese-English translation.

CHI 4410r. Advanced Chinese I (3). Prerequisite: Two CHI 3000-level courses or instructor permission. This course is designed for students who have had three years of Chinese language courses or equivalent learning experience. Students study both advanced-level language skills and Chinese culture in the original language. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours when topics vary.

CHI 4411r. Advanced Chinese II (3). Prerequisite: One 4000-level course with the CHI or CHW prefix. This course aims to develop fluency and accuracy in advanced-level Chinese in using complex vocabulary and sentence patterns, grasping basic forms of expository and argumentative prose, and discussing real-life issues of contemporary China both in writing and conversation. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHI 4503. Readings in Chinese History (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course introduces a sketch of Chinese history. Students are taught to read the text in Chinese so they can expand their vocabulary to include those words necessary to understand Chinese culture and tradition.

CHI 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHI 4930r. Special Topics (3). Prerequisite: Divisional permission. This course allows students to study literary topics of a special kind, depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

CHI 4942r. Internship in Applied Chinese (1–6). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Advanced standing in Chinese. This course provides academic credit for students working in governmental agencies or private business where students employ the foreign language. Departmental permission required. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHT 3123r. Pre-Modern Chinese Literature and Culture (3). This course acquaints students with the selected literary works from early China to the nineteenth century. The course provides the knowledge of pre-modern Chinese literature and culture and the analytical skills necessary for examining Chinese literary texts. Major literary genres (poetry, fiction, drama, and prose) and representative writers are discussed. This course can be taken to fulfill the requirement for Chinese or Asian Studies major/minor, liberal studies and multicultural awareness. The course is taught in English. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHT 3124r. Modern Chinese Literature (3). This course examines modern Chinese literature in its historical contexts and examines its role in the nation-building process of Modern China. Students read English translations of works that cover the primary literary genres and were created by major writers during this period from mainland China, Taiwan and the Chinese diaspora. Taught in English. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHT 3301r. Chinese Folklore: Myths, Legends, and Fairy Tales (3). This course focuses on myths, legends, fairy tales, and some other popular components of folklore, such as cultural symbols, which can be constantly observed in present-day Chinese communities. Probing the cultural roots, transformations and adaptations of Chinese folklore, the subject matter of this course spans from antiquity to the present. The course can be taken to fulfill the requirements for Chinese and Asian Studies major/minor and multicultural awareness. The course is also taught in English and has no prerequisites. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHT 3391r. Chinese Cinema (3). This course studies representative films from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan from diverse critical perspectives and in proper historical contexts. Studies Chinese cinema as both a unique genre of modern arts and a powerful sociopolitical discourse. Taught in English. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHT 3392r. Writing Women in Pre-Modern China (3). This course introduces students to Chinese women's writing up to the 19th century. Readings also include some men's writings on women to assist students with the exploration of women's culture in pre-modern society, especially how women negotiated gender power as active agents rather than passive victims. The course can be taken to fulfill the requirements for Chinese or Asian Studies major/minor, liberal studies, and multicultural awareness. This course is taught in English. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHT 3501r. Chinese Civilization (3-6). This course introduces the essentials of Chinese civilization from a historical perspective; it focuses on topics concerning China's social, political, intellectual, religious, and literary traditions, and examines their formations in historical contexts spanning from antiquity to the early 20th century. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CHT 3930r. Topics in Chinese Literature (3). This course is for students interested in Chinese culture and literature in translation. Students learn the skills of interpreting literary works and understand the development of Chinese literature. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. May be repeated within the same semester.

Film Courses

See course descriptions under individual language areas.

ABT 3520r Arab Cinema and Culture

CHT 3391r Chinese Cinema and Culture

FRT 3520r French and Francophone Cinema

GET 3524r German Cinema

IFS 3008 Cinema Gone Global

IFS 3009 Through an Arabic Lens: The Intersection of Film and Culture

IFS 3043 German Society Through Film: The Legacy of Nazi Crimes Against Humanity

ITT 3523 Italian Cinema

JPT 3391r Japanese Film and Culture

PRT 3391r Brazilian Literature and Film in Translation

RUT 3523r Russian Cinema

SPT 3391r Hispanic Cinema

General Foreign Language and Culture Courses

FOL 2100r. International Study of Language and Culture (3). This course is designed around a communicative approach, which is based on the premise that the best way to learn a foreign language is through repeated, meaningful exposure to the foreign language as well as interaction with classmates and the instructor. The course is dedicated to communicating in the host language using grammar and vocabulary and analysis of texts dealing with culture. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FOL 3930r. Experiments in Modern Language (3). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

FOL 4901r. Tutorial in Modern Languages, Literatures or Linguistics (1–6). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisites: Junior standing or command of language and instructor permission. This course allows students to pursue a topic within modern languages (linguistics, literature, culture, or civilization). Number of semester hours taken depends on the content and breadth of the topic. May be repeated twice with different topics to a maximum of six semester hours.

FOW 3240. Literature and Sexuality (3). This course investigates how modern Western fiction, in particular the modern novel, represents and critically examines a variety of themes related to sexuality in a socio-cultural and political context.

FOW 4540. Franco-American Culture Wars (3). This course examines a major shift in the cultural balance of power between the United States and France. Topics range from the transition from the 19th century American awe at French achievements in fiction and painting to the ever increasing American influence on France's literary and visual art.

IFS 2035. (Re)Imagining Florida: From Spanish Colonialism to Today (3). This course explores how the idea of Florida took shape and shifted in the minds of Spaniards from the sixteenth-nineteenth centuries. Throughout, students consider how their reconstruction of the Spanish vision of Florida may enrich and even alter their understanding of Florida today.

IFS 2083. Language Birth, Language Death (3). This course explores how languages are born, the ways and reasons why they change, and the limits of language learning and teaching. The course also examines the factors leading to language loss and language death, the reasons why we, as global citizens, should care, and how language specialists and activists attempt to bring dying languages back to life.

IFS 3008. Cinema Gone Global (3). This course focuses on the aesthetic, technological, economic, and philosophical issues that increasingly connect cinemas across the globe and speak to critical changes in the contemporary world on the basis of various cinema traditions today, negotiating between the global and its "discontents." Course taught in English.

IFS 3091. The Culture Is in the Cuisine: The Food of Italy (3). This course explores the cultural history of Italian cuisine from its ancient roots to contemporary times. Students examine how culinary practices and the culture of food are essential elements of "Italian" identity.

HUM 4934r. Interdisciplinary Topics (3). This course provides students from any discipline with an integrated interdisciplinary learning experience. The course is taught by instructors from at least two different departments and/or colleges. Topics vary. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

French and Francophone Language and Culture

FRE 1120. Elementary French I (4). This course stresses oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with FRE 1121 and/or 2211.

FRE 1121. Elementary French II (4). Prerequisite: FRE 1120 or equivalent. This course places further emphasis on oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with FRE 1120 and/or 2211.

FRE 2211. Intermediate French Readings (4). Prerequisite: FRE 1121 or equivalent. This course offers a rapid review of basic French structures and introduces some of the finer points of French grammar. May not be taken concurrently with FRE 1120, FRE 1121, and FRE 2220 or by native speakers.

FRE 2220. Reading and Conversation (4). Prerequisite: FRE 2211 or equivalent. This course expands the students' oral and written French expression through structured debate and argumentation based upon readings. May not be taken concurrently with FRE 1120, FRE 1121, and FRE 2211, or by native speakers.

FRE 3244. Intermediate French Conversation (3). Prerequisite: FRE 2211. Through readings and films about contemporary issues facing French society, this course aims at developing oral communication skills in a broad cultural context.

FRE 3420. French Grammar and Composition I (3). Prerequisite: FRE 2211 or equivalent. This course is an in-depth study of French grammar emphasizing subtleties of written expression.

FRE 3421. French Grammar and Composition II (3). Prerequisite: FRE 2211 or equivalent. This course is a further study of the subtleties of written expression in the French language.

FRE 3440. Commercial French (3). Prerequisites: FRE 2211 and FRE 3420. This course develops language and correspondence skills appropriate to business transactions in such areas as sales, finance, transportation, management, etc.

FRE 3501. Contemporary France (3). Prerequisite: FRE 3420. This course, taught entirely in French, provides the student with an understanding of French culture and society from WW II through the present day. Topics include high vs. popular culture, political life, Franco-American relations, economics, media, France and the European Union, social interactions of the French, family life, education system, religion, cuisine, and immigration and multiculturalism. Activities and assignments emphasize French writing and speaking skills.

FRE 3780. French Phonetics (3). Prerequisite: FRE 3420. This course targets pronunciation practice using the phonetic alphabet with the objective of improving production of standard French pronunciation. French majors only.

FRE 4410. Advanced Conversation (3). This course is about oral expression, listening skills and vocabulary acquisition in French in a variety of domains using contemporary materials.

FRE 4422. Advanced Grammar and Composition (3). Prerequisite: FRE 3420 and FRE 3421. This course aims at developing writing and speaking ability at an advanced level through a review of French grammar, an introduction to Comparative Stylistics of French and English, the reading of sophisticated French prose, and the writing of two research papers.

FRE 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRE 4930r. Special Topics (3). Prerequisite: Divisional coordinator permission. This course allows students to study literary topics of a special kind, depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

FRE 4935r. Honors Thesis (1–6). This course may be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours, three hours of which may be applied to the requirements for the major with permission of the department. All honors work is directed by the student's honors committee.

FRE 4942r. Internship in Applied French (1–6). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Advanced standing in French. This course provides academic credit for students working in governmental agencies or private business where students employ the foreign language. Departmental permission required. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

French and Francophone Cultures in Translation

Note: FRT courses do not count toward the major unless the student reads the works in French, writes all assignments in French, and can provide a letter from the instructor granting him/her permission to take the course for major credit.

FRT 3140. Masterworks of French Literature in Translation (3). This course is a survey of selected masterpieces of French literature, ranging from the Middle Ages to the present. The readings and instruction are in English. Can be used for minor credit in French with permission of the coordinator.

FRT 3520r. French and Francophone Cinema (3). This Francophone cinema course is offered in two versions: one focusing on the relationship between cinema and Francophone cultures and societies, and another taking a chronological and thematic approach to the movements and directors of metropolitan French cinema. This course is taught in English and, with instructor permission, three hours may be used for major or minor credit. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRT 3561. French Women Writers (3). Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1121, or equivalent. This course addresses issues of race, gender, and class in a selection of works written by prominent French/francophone writers. Taught in English. Can be used for minor credit with permission of the coordinator.

Literatures, Cultures and/or Societies of French Expression

FRW 3100. Survey of French Literature: Origins Through 18th Century (3). Prerequisite: FRE 2211; FRE 3420 or FRE 3421 recommended. This course is an introduction to the study of early-modern French literature by reading and discussing works representative of the various schools and movements.

FRW 3101. Survey of French Literature II: Modern France (3). Prerequisite: FRE 2220. This course is an introduction to the study of modern French literature by reading and discussing works representative of the various schools and movements. (Spring semester only.)

FRW 4420. Medieval and Renaissance Literature (3). Prerequisite: FRW 3100. This course is an introduction to the poetry and prose of the medieval and early-modern periods. Emphasis is on the themes of love and friendship.

FRW 4433. 17th- and 18th-Century Literature (3). Prerequisite: FRW 3100 or FRW 3101. This course surveys major works in the areas of theatre, philosophy, and prose fiction. Special attention is given to the possible meanings of central concepts such as Classicism and Enlightenment.

FRW 4460. 19th-Century Literature (3). Prerequisite: FRW 3101. This course focuses on major themes and issues in 19th-century literature and culture.

FRW 4480. 20th-Century Literature (3). Prerequisite: FRW 3101. This course is a survey of the major works (novels, theatre, poetry) and movements of 20th-century French literature.

FRW 4761r. Studies in Francophone Literatures and Cultures (3). Prerequisite: FRW 3100 or FRW 3101. This course is an examination of selected aspects of cultural forms (books, film, music, etc.) associated with one or more French-speaking regions located outside France, including North Africa, West Africa, the Antilles, Quebec, Indo-china, and French-speaking islands in the Indian and Pacific oceans. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FRW 4770r. Francophone Caribbean/African Cultures (3). Prerequisite: FRW 3101. This course examines the literature of Africa and the Caribbean written in French with an emphasis on Negritude and/or Creolite. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

German

German Language

GER 1110. Elementary Conversational German (4). (Conversational method.) This course is an introduction to German with emphasis on speaking. Additional hours arranged for conversational practice. Students with more than two years of high school German or the equivalent should consult the department for placement. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1111, 1120, 1121 and/or 2220.

GER 1111. Elementary Conversational German (4). Prerequisites: GER 1110, GER 1120 or equivalent. This course is an introduction to German with emphasis on speaking (conversational method). Additional hours arranged for conversational practice. Students with three or four years of high school German or the equivalent should consult the department for placement. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1120, 1121, and/or 2220.

GER 1120. Elementary German I (4). This course is an introduction to German. May not be taken by native speakers. Students with more than two years of high school German or the equivalent should consult the department for placement. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121 or 2220.

GER 1121. Elementary German II (4). Prerequisites: GER 1110, GER 1120 or equivalent. This course may not be taken by native speakers. Students with three or four years of high school German or the equivalent should consult the department for placement. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1120, and/or 2220.

GER 2220. Intermediate German (4). Prerequisites: GER 1121, GER 1111 or equivalent. This course expands skills in reading, writing, and conversation. This course completes the baccalaureate degree requirement and serves as the transition to upper-level study. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1120, and/or 1121.

GER 3310. German Grammar (3). Prerequisite: GER 2220 or equivalent. This course focuses on the rules of German grammar and syntax and employing them correctly in speaking and writing.

GER 3400. Composition and Conversation (3). Prerequisite: GER 2220 or instructor permission. In this course, the objective is the ability to write and converse on general cultural topics at a level that demonstrates near mastery of German grammar and the beginning of a personal style in the language. The course is conducted in German.

GER 3440. German Business Language and Practice (3). Prerequisite: GER 2220 or instructor permission. This course in an introduction to business languages and practices in German-speaking countries.

GER 3500. German Studies (3). Prerequisite: GER 2220 or instructor permission. This course, taught primarily in German, serves as an introduction to German studies. The course provides the student with an understanding of the major cultural aspects (literature, visual arts, history, politics, etc.) of German-speaking countries from the twentieth century to the present; the emphasis is placed on Germany in the second half of the twentieth century.

GER 3502r. Topics in German Studies (3). Prerequisite: GER 2220 or instructor permission. GER 3500 or GER 3310 are recommended. This course, taught primarily in German, presents a survey of one topic in the area of German studies. Topics may include themes from art, music, or literature placed in a cultural and historical perspective. Topics change frequently. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours with permission of instructor.

GER 3780. Phonetics (3). Prerequisite: GER 2220. In this course, the objectives are the acquisition of correct German sound formation by comparison with English phonetics and the improvement of the student's conversational German through pronunciation exercises. The course is conducted in German.

GER 3930r. Special Topics (3). Prerequisite: GER 2220 or instructor permission. GER 3500 or GER 3310 are recommended. This course allows students to study non-literary topics of a special kind, depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours when content changes.

GER 4420. Advanced Composition (3). Prerequisite: Two 3000-level GER courses or instructor permission. In this course, the objective is to gain the ability to write with a developed personal style in German on intellectually demanding topics, including commentary on literature. Near mastery of German grammar is a prerequisite. The course is conducted in German.

GER 4480. Modern German of the News Media (3). Prerequisite: Two 3000-level courses or instructor permission. This course is an advanced-level skills course. Discussion of current events and mass media in German-speaking countries and work with authentic texts (newspapers and audio-visual material).

GER 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GER 4935r. Honors Thesis (1–6). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours, three hours of which may be applied to the requirements for the major with permission of the department. All honors work is directed by the student's honors committee.

GER 4942r. Internship in Applied German (1–6). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Advanced standing in German. This course provides academic credit for students working in governmental agencies or private business where students employ the foreign language. Departmental permission required. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

German Literature in Translation

GET 3130. Masterpieces of German Literature in Translation: 19th and 20th Centuries (3). This course offers an introduction to masterpieces of German literature from the 19th century to the present. It uses works by authors of various ethnic, minority, and gender backgrounds that bring forth German representations of gendered or cultural others and transcultural issues. May be counted for major or minor credit. Taught in English.

GET 3524r. German Cinema (3). This course covers the contextual and stylistic features of German cinema from its classical period, in the 1920s, to the New German Cinema, through the present. The course focuses on methods of film analysis and on film criticism. Taught in English. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

GET 4800. Translation German-English/English-German (3). Prerequisite: GER 3400 or instructor permission. This course is an advanced-level skills course. Translating a variety of texts that illustrate important distinctions between German and English grammar, syntax, vocabulary, etc.

IFS 3043. German Society Through Film: The Legacy of Nazi Crimes Against Humanity (3). This course explores cinematic responses to Nazi crimes against humanity in German society. Drawing on the perspective of victims, perpetrators, bystanders, helpers, resisters, as well as preceding generations, the course investigates how cultural memory is created to reveal a multiplicity of voices and to reflect the indelible mark of the Nazi past in Germany. The course is taught in English.

IFS 3054. Robots, Monsters, Avatars: Technology and the (Post-)Human Condition (3). This course investigates the intricate relationship between the human existence and technology from both theoretical and practical perspectives. It explores fundamental questions concerning the human condition and searches for solutions to related practical problems.

German Literature (Writings)

GEW 3320. Drama (3). Prerequisites: GER 2220 or instructor permission. GER 3400, GER 3310, or GER 3500 are recommended. This course focuses on contemporary German drama in a socio-historical context. Addresses the difficulties authors confront when dramatizing current social trends, as well as the problems of interpreting and staging a play.

GEW 3370. German Short Fiction (3). Prerequisite: GER 2220 or instructor permission. GER 3400, GER 3310, or GER 3500 are recommended. This course introduces students to the principles of literary study through reading and discussion of short pieces of fiction, primarily from the twentieth century.

GEW 4591r. Studies in an Author or Theme (3). Prerequisites: Two 3000-level courses or instructor permission. This course offers the opportunity to study either a single author in-depth or to follow a specific theme that may extend over a brief period or over centuries. Course material may include non-literary textual and audio-visual material. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GEW 4592r. Studies in a Period or Movement (3). Prerequisites: Two 3000-level courses or instructor permission. This course concentrates on a specific literary movement such as Romanticism, Realism, Expressionism, or on a period such as the Baroque, the Enlightenment, or the Weimar period. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

GEW 4930r. Special Topics (3). Prerequisites: Two 3000-level courses or instructor permission. In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake study in areas outside the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

Hebrew

HBR 1120. Elementary Modern Hebrew I (4). This course is an introduction to the alphabet, basic vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of modern Hebrew. Oral comprehension, speaking, and writing are emphasized through a communicative approach. Students are also introduced to modern Israeli culture. No previous knowledge required. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with HBR 1121 and/or 2220.

HBR 1121. Elementary Modern Hebrew II (4). Prerequisite: HBR 1120 or equivalent. This course continues the introduction to modern Hebrew begun in HBR 1120. Cultural orientation and the practical use of Hebrew in meaningful situations. Oral comprehension, speaking, and writing are emphasized through a communicative approach. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with HBR 1120 and/or 2220.

HBR 2220. Intermediate Modern Hebrew (4). Prerequisites: HBR 1120 and HBR 1121 or equivalent. This course is an introduction to modern Hebrew prose (fiction and non-fiction) as well as the continued development of speaking, listening, writing, and grammatical skills. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with HBR 1120 and/or 1121. Completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the College of Arts and Sciences.

Italian

Italian Language

ITA 1110. Elementary Conversational Italian I (4). This course is an introductory course emphasizing learning Italian through speaking and understanding skills at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120, 1121, and/or 2220. (Dartmouth method)

ITA 1111. Elementary Conversational Italian II (4). Prerequisite: ITA 1110 or equivalent. This course builds upon the speaking and reading skills learned at the 1110 level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1110, 1120, 1121, and/or 2220. (Dartmouth method)

ITA 1120. Elementary Italian I (4). This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121, and/or 2220.

ITA 1121. Elementary Italian II (4). Prerequisite: ITA 1120 or equivalent. This course builds upon the student's ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.

ITA 2220. Reading and Conversation (4). Prerequisite: ITA 1111 or ITA 1121. This course stresses skills in reading and conversational Italian at the second-year level. Readings are supported by discussions of the materials. This course completes the baccalaureate degree requirement. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120, and/or 1121. May not be taken by native speakers.

ITA 2240. Conversation (3). Prerequisite: ITA 2220. This course stresses development of conversational skills at the third-year level. May not be taken by native speakers.

ITA 3420. Grammar and Composition (3). Prerequisite: ITA 2220. This course presents a review and further study of grammar and idiomatic constructions. Composition practice augments the skills developed.

ITA 3421. Grammar and Composition (3). Prerequisite: ITA 3420. This course is a continuation of ITA 3420 with greater stress on theme-writing skills.

ITA 3440. Business Italian (3). Prerequisite: ITA 2220 or equivalent. This course introduces current Italian business formats and provides practice in commercial correspondence with its specialized vocabulary and syntax.

ITA 3941r. Directed Individual Tutorial Practice (3). Prerequisites: ITA 1111, ITA 1120, ITA 1121, ITA 2220, or equivalent. This course develops skilled undergraduate tutors for the Dartmouth method ITA 1110/1111 sequence. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ITA 4410. Advanced Italian Conversation (3). Prerequisite: ITA 2240. This course is designed to develop fluency in conversation skills at the fourth-year level by means of extensive vocabulary building and practice.

ITA 4450. Advanced Italian Composition and Style (3). Prerequisite: ITA 3421 or equivalent. This course stresses the morphological and syntactical order of Italian by means of extensive drill in controlled and free composition.

ITA 4500. Italian Culture and Civilization (3). Prerequisite: ITA 3100 and ITA 3101, or equivalent. This course surveys Italian culture and civilization and provides a historical perspective to aspects of Italian society.

ITA 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). For this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ITA 4930r. Special Topics (3). Prerequisite: Divisional coordinator permission. This course allows students to study literary topics of a special kind, depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ITA 4935r. Honors Thesis (1–6). This course may be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours, three hours of which may be applied to the requirements for the major with permission of the department. All honors work is directed by the students' honors committee. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ITA 4942r. Internship in Applied Italian (1–6). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Advanced standing in Italian. This course provides academic credit for students working in governmental agencies or private business where students employ the foreign language. Departmental permission required. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Italian Literature and Culture in Translation

ITT 3430. Masterpieces of Italian Literature and Culture in Translation (3). After a general overview of Italian history and culture, this course introduces students to a sample of novels, plays, paintings and movies that present key aspects of Italian culture and its achievements. Taught in English.

ITT 3500. Italian Culture and Civilization: From Origins to the Age of Romanticism (3). This course is an introduction to artistic, intellectual, social, and political trends in Italy from pre-Roman time to the Age of Romanticism with specific reference to Medieval and Renaissance Italy as a center of culture in Europe. Offered in English.

ITT 3501. Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present (3). This course is an introduction to the cultural developments and sociopolitical changes in modern Italy from the Risorgimento to the formation of a nation. Students examine Fascism's influence on the national culture, as well as consider the contemporary impact of immigration on diversity. Offered in English.

ITT 3520. The Italian-American Experience in Literature and Film (3). This course examines the literary and cinematic contributions that Italian Americans have made during the past century. The course is designed to assist students in exploring ways in which Italian and American cultures have combined to form a distinctive ethnic culture.

ITT 3523. Italian Cinema (3). This course offers an introduction to Italian cinema: history, practices, and protagonists. Taught in English.

Italian Literature (Writings)

ITW 3100. Survey of Italian Literature: Origins through 18th-Century (3). Prerequisite: ITA 2220 or equivalent. This course introduces students to representative literary figures and movements from the beginnings through the 18th century.

ITW 3101. Survey of Italian Literature: 19th- and 20th-Centuries (3). Prerequisite: ITA 2220. This course introduces students to representative literary figures and movements from the 19th and 20th centuries.

ITW 4400. Renaissance Literature (3). Prerequisites: ITW 3100 and ITW 3101, or equivalent. This course offers selected readings and discussions of the literature of the Italian Renaissance including such figures as Alberti, Lorenzo deMedici, Poliziano, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Ariosto, and Tasso.

ITW 4440r. 18th- and 19th-Century Literature (3). Prerequisites: ITW 3100 and ITW 3101, or equivalent. This course offers readings and discussions of figures and movements of the 18th and 19th centuries including Goldoni, Alfieri, Foscolo, Manzoni, Leopardi, and Verga. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

ITW 4480. 20th-Century Literature (3). Prerequisites: ITW 3100 and ITW 3101, or equivalent. This course offers readings and discussions of figures and movements in 20th-century Italian literature.

ITW 4481. Readings in Contemporary Italian Prose (3). Prerequisites: ITW 3100 and ITW 3101, or equivalent. This course offers readings and discussions of works of contemporary Italian writers.

ITW 4700. The Trecento Writers (3). Prerequisites: ITW 3100 and ITW 3101, or equivalent. This course offers a study of the Trecento writers: Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. Readings and discussions are available in both English and Italian.

Japanese

JPN 1120. Elementary Japanese I (4). This course stresses speaking and listening, although the acquisition of reading and writing skills is also an integral part of the course. Some fundamental syntactic and morphological points introduced are word order, nominal particles, verbal endings, verb classification, speech levels, and the formation of some complex sentences. In addition, an introduction is given to the Japanese syllabaries and kanji. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with JPN 1121, 2220 and/or 2300.

JPN 1121. Elementary Japanese II (4). Prerequisite: JPN 1120 or equivalent. This course continues to stress speaking, reading, listening, and writing skills using the syntactic and morphological points introduced in JPN 1120. Further study is made of the Japanese syllabaries and kanji. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with JPN 1120, 2220 and/or 2300.

JPN 2220. Intermediate Reading and Conversation (4). Prerequisite: JPN 1121 or equivalent. May not be taken by native speakers. This course continues to emphasize speaking and listening and introduces more of the essentials of Japanese syntax. In this course more time is devoted to reading and writing. About 400 kanji are introduced. May not be taken concurrently with JPN 1120, 1121 and/or 2300.

JPN 2300. Review Grammar and Syntax (4). Prerequisite: JPN 2220. This course is designed to give students an opportunity not only to strengthen their knowledge of basic Japanese, but to gain better insight into the structure of modern Japanese. Through graded exercises students are taught to write sophisticated Japanese. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with JPN 1120, 1121 and/or 2220.

JPN 3132. Listening Drill I (1). Prerequisite: JPN 1121. This course prepares students at the advanced-elementary level in Japanese. Students are exposed to authentic Japanese in order to master basic listening skills. Emphasis is placed on conversational Japanese and basic daily situations to familiarize students with common structures, vocabulary, and grammar, and to facilitate improved oral comprehension in Japanese.

JPN 3133. Listening Drill II (1). Prerequisite: JPN 2300. This course prepares students at the intermediate level in Japanese. Students are exposed to authentic Japanese at natural speed in order to master intermediate-level listening skills. Emphasis is placed on conversational Japanese, daily situations, news, stories, and explanations to prepare students to pick significant components out of complex speech, and to facilitate improved overall oral comprehension in Japanese.

JPN 3202. Readings in Short Stories and Essays (3). Prerequisite: JPN 2300. This course introduces selected materials in modern Japanese literature, humanities, and social sciences. The objectives of this course are to train students to be able to read some annotated works in original Japanese and to bring to students' awareness various cross-cultural differences. May not be taken by native speakers.

JPN 3240L. Conversational Japanese (3). Prerequisite: JPN 2300 or equivalent, or instructor permission. This course enables students to develop intermediate-level communicative skills in Japanese. Students communicate in Japanese on sociocultural issues and topics pertinent to daily life, interpret spoken language, and learn expressions critical to spoken fluency in Japanese.

JPN 3250. Practical Skills in Japanese Communication (3). Prerequisite: JPN 2300. This course prepares students at the high-intermediate level in Japanese. Students develop oral communication skills that enable them to perform appropriately in Japanese in various authentic, real-life situations.

JPN 3301r. Kanji Drill (1). This course is designed to develop students' Kanji skills in both writing and reading. Students learn and practice approximately 300 Kanji during the semester, in addition to acquiring knowledge of Kanji radicals and origins, which facilitates additional Kanji comprehension and memorization. May be repeated to a maximum of two semester hours.

JPN 3302r. Kanji Drill II (1). Prerequisite: JPN 3301 or JPN 2302, or equivalent. This course continues to develop students' Kanji skills in both writing and reading. Students learn and practice approximately 200-250 intermediate-level Kanji during the semester, in addition to building knowledge of Kanji radicals and origins.

JPN 3303. Writing and Reading Japanese (3). Pre-or corequisite: JPN 2220; or instructor permission. This course is designed to augment the skills students acquire in 1000- and 2000-level Japanese courses by stressing reading and writing skills at the intermediate level.

JPN 3440. Business Japanese (3). Prerequisite: JPN 2220. This course trains students to utilize appropriate expressions in various business-related situations in Japan.

JPN 3441. Business Japanese II (3). Prerequisite: JPN 3440. This course is a continuation of Business Japanese I. It is designed to further develop students' language skills and knowledge of socio-cultural customs in Japan for business purposes, preparing students to utilize appropriate expressions and behaviors in various business-related situations in Japan.

JPN 4130. Reading Modern Japanese Literature (3). Prerequisites: JPN 3202 or instructor permission. This course is an introduction to modern and contemporary Japanese literature through the reading of short novels and plays.

JPN 4412. Advanced Japanese (3). Prerequisite: JPN 3202. This course leads qualified students to develop their advanced-level skills in Japanese by reading and discussing various types of writings, ranging from newspaper articles to literary stories and essays.

JPN 4413. Advanced Japanese B (3). Prerequisite: JPN 3202. This course prepares students at the upper-intermediate to advanced level in Japanese. It aims to improve students' communicative fluency and accuracy in Japanese through emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

JPN 4414. Advanced Japanese C: Reading and Writing (3). Prerequisite: JPN 3202. This course targets intermediate and advanced students of Japanese. Students improve reading skills by practicing various reading techniques. Focus is placed on written Japanese and the acquisition of natural reading ability.

JPN 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

JPN 4930r. Special Topics (3). Prerequisite: Divisional coordinator permission. This course allows students to study literary topics of a special kind, depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

JPN 4942r. Internship in Applied Japanese (1–6). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Advanced standing in Japanese. This course provides academic credit for students working in governmental agencies or private business where students employ the foreign language. Departmental permission required. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

JPT 3122r. Modern Japanese Literature in Translation (3). This course covers short stories and novels of major authors in modern Japanese literature after 1868, giving students an understanding of various aspects of modern Japan. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Taught in English.

JPT 3391r. Japanese Film and Culture (3). This course is for students interested in Japanese film and culture, and culture in translation. Students learn the skills of analyzing films and come to understand the development of Japanese film and culture. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Taught in English.

JPT 3510r. Japanese Economy and Environment (3). This course introduces students to current topics related to Japan's economy and social environment. Students learn about and discuss significant issues, such as employment, education, international trade, and energy, to better understand contemporary Japanese society. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours when topics vary.

JPT 3511r. Japanese Popular Culture (3). This course explores Japanese popular culture from a range of perspectives. Students investigate cultures of reception, shifting demographics and key developments in multiple media, and various forms of leisure and modes of consumption, to consider their relationship to history, culture, and lived experience.

JPT 3512r. Contemporary Japanese Culture (3). This course investigates contemporary developments in Japanese culture, focusing on features both that are particular to Japan and that tie Japan to global culture. Students explore the connections between various forms of cultural production and social interaction and other social, political, and economic institutions in Japan, as well as the relationship between new technologies and markets and the global exchange of cultural forms and social ideas. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

JPT 4020r. Japanese Calligraphy (1). Prerequisite: JPN 1120 or equivalent. This course is designed to teach beginning students how to write the Japanese kana syllabaries and kanji properly according to the stroke order. The art of sumi writing is also introduced. May be repeated to a maximum of two semester hours.

JPT 4124r. Contemporary Japanese Literature in Translation (3). This course introduces students to contemporary literature in Japan. It approaches principal developments in literary production since the 1980s from multiple perspectives. Focus is placed on how these texts resonate with both sociocultural contexts in Japan and global issues in literary and media studies. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

JPT 4310. Japanese Manga (3). This course traces the history of manga from its hybrid prehistory to its developments as a postwar industry and cultural form, investigating manga's connections to adjacent media practices and its social and cultural importance both domestically and abroad.

JPT 4504. The Culture of Tea in Japan (3). This course introduces students to the Japanese Tea Ceremony, from its inception in medieval Japan to its metamorphosis under 20th century nationalism and its global expansion during the postwar economic boom. Taught in English.

Linguistics

Note: All linguistics courses taken for Spanish major credit must be taken through the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics.

LIN 3041. Introductory Linguistics for Foreign Language Majors (3). This course helps develop an understanding of the nature of language, to dispel a number of myths and misconceptions about language, and to provide tools and techniques for describing linguistic data. May count toward the major in Slavic (Russian) and Spanish. May count toward the major in Spanish with a concentration in business, and the Spanish co-major.

LIN 4030. Introduction to Historical Linguistics (3). This course is designed to familiarize students with the world language families, notion of relatedness, sound correspondence, comparative method, internal reconstruction, and the reconstruction of the Proto-Indo-European languages. Several theories of sound change are also discussed.

LIN 4040. Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics (3). This course attempts to develop an understanding of the organization of language, to provide tools and techniques for describing language data, and to examine various models of linguistic description. May count toward the major in Slavic (Russian) and Spanish.

LIN 4512. Introduction to Transformational Grammar (3). The purpose of this course is to expose students to the underlying principles of syntax. Students are taught the mechanics of syntactic theories dating from the late 1960s to the present.

LIN 4644. Kichwa Language and Culture (3). This course combines learning the basics of the Kichwa language with linguistic theory relevant to Kichwa.

LIN 4664. Ethnopoetics (3). This course uses linguistic patterns to trace the formal structures of texts. Topics addressed in this course include oral poetry, anthropological linguistics, linguistic relativity, ethnopoetic and discourse analyses, speech genres, linguistic transcription and performance, symbolism, ethnomusicology, writing and ethnography.

LIN 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

LIN 4930r. Topics in Linguistics (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake study in areas outside the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours. May be repeated within the same semester.

Portuguese (Brazilian)

POR 1120. Elementary Portuguese I (4). This course is a first semester course in Portuguese for beginning students with no prior exposure to the language. This course emphasizes the four basic communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context.

POR 1121. Elementary Portuguese II (4). Prerequisite: POR 1120. This course is a second semester course in Portuguese for beginning level students. This course emphasizes the four basic communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context.

POR 2220. Intermediate Portuguese (4). Prerequisites: POR 1120 and POR 1121. This course is a third semester course in Portuguese for intermediate level students. This course emphasizes the four basic communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context.

POR 3140. Portuguese for Advanced Students of Spanish I (3). Prerequisite: A 3000-level course in Spanish (completed or concurrent enrollment) or instructor permission. An intensive course in Brazilian Portuguese for advanced students of Spanish, other Romance languages, and/or heritage speakers of Portuguese. It is based on positive transfer of applicable linguistic structures of Spanish, avoidance of negative transfer, and concentration on structures unique to Portuguese. Understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills are practiced.

POR 3141. Portuguese for Advanced Students of Spanish II (3). Prerequisite: POR 3140. This course is based on positive transfer of applicable linguistic structures of Spanish and/or other Romance languages, avoidance of negative transfer, and concentration on structures unique to Portuguese. Understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills are practiced.

POR 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

POR 4930r. Special Topics (3). Prerequisite: Divisional coordinator permission. This course allows students to study literary, cultural, or linguistic topics of a special kind, depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

PRT 3391r. Brazilian Literature and Film in Translation (3). This course explores literary and film studies of the Portuguese-speaking world. Taught in English or Portuguese, this course counts toward major or minor credit in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, the minor in Portuguese, and/or world literature/world film. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Russian

Russian Language

RUS 1120. Elementary Russian I (4). This course introduces basic Russian. Students with high school language experience or equivalent should consult the department for placement. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with RUS 1121 and/or 2220.

RUS 1121. Elementary Russian II (4). Prerequisite: RUS 1120 or equivalent. This course is a continuation of RUS 1120. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with RUS 1120 and/or 2220.

RUS 2220. Intermediate Russian (4). Prerequisite: RUS 1121 or equivalent. This course focuses on grammar, reading, and conversation. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with RUS 1120 and/or 1121.

RUS 2330. Russian Grammar and Popular Culture (3). Pre- or corequisite: RUS 2220. This multimedia course offers a thorough overview of grammar and basic cultural literacy. Language structures are studied through popular fiction and film genres. Students produce a short film in Russian.

RUS 3240. Reading and Conversation (3). Prerequisite: RUS 2220 or equivalent. In this course, oral expression is emphasized.

RUS 3400. Conversation and Composition (3). Pre- or corequisite: RUS 2330 or equivalent. This course focuses on oral expression, writing practice, and review of grammar.

RUS 3420. Russian Grammar and Composition (3). Pre- or corequisite: RUS 2330 or equivalent. This course focuses on the development of writing and grammar skills.

RUS 4410r. Advanced Russian Conversation and Composition (3). Prerequisite: RUS 3400. This course focuses on the styles and levels of oral expression on a wide range of topics. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

RUS 4421. Advanced Russian Grammar and Composition (3). Prerequisite: RUS 3420. This course focuses on the practical application of advanced language skills.

RUS 4780. Phonetics (3). Prerequisite: RUS 2220 or instructor permission. This course provides an understanding of the phonetic and phonemic structure of Russian with extensive oral practice.

RUS 4840. History of the Russian Literary Language (3). Prerequisite: RUS 3400. This course studies the development of the phonological and grammatical systems from the earliest records to the present.

RUS 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). In this course, students arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

RUS 4930r. Special Topics (3). May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours for the major. Only three semester hours taken in any Summer session count towards the major.

RUS 4935r. Honors Thesis (1–6). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours, three hours of which may be applied to the requirements for the major with permission of the department. All honors work is directed by the student's honors committee.

RUS 4942r. Internship in Applied Russian (1–6). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Advanced standing in Russian. This course provides academic credit for students working in governmental agencies or private business where students employ the foreign language. Departmental permission required. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Russian Courses in Translation

RUT 3110. Russian Literature in English Translation (3). This course focuses on readings and discussion of major Russian literary works.

RUT 3504. Modern Russian Life (3). This course is an overview of current social and cultural issues in Russian, including the legacy of the Soviet period, the relationship between literature and daily life, women's issues, ecology, mass media, and the efforts of the country to define itself in its new setting and role. No knowledge of Russian is required. May count toward the Russian major. Taught in English.

RUT 3505. Russian Culture and Civilization (3). This course examines the Russians, their history, culture, and traditions, from the Middle Ages to the present. Fiction and film give students a perspective from the "inside." Taught in English.

RUT 3514. Russian Folklore and Fairy Tales (3). This course considers a range of critical approaches and provides a general introduction to the study of folk belief, folklore and fairy tales, and their continuing influence in Russian and world culture. The course focuses primarily on Russian folk and fairy tales, but also includes cross cultural comparisons. Taught in English.

RUT 3523r. Russian Cinema (3). This course consists of viewing and discussion of Russian classics and contemporary films. Credit may be applicable to the Russian major. Knowledge of Russian is not required. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

RUT 3800. Introductory Russian to English Translation (3). This course focuses on the essentials of translation techniques. Requires grade of "B" or better in RUS 2220 (or equivalent) or permission of the instructor.

RUT 4213r. Russian Love Prose in English Translation (3). This course explores the development of the Russian love prose in the 19th-21st centuries in such literary trends and movements as Romanticism, Realism, Symbolism, Silver Age, Socialist Realism, Soviet Underground, and Postmodernism. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours when content varies.

Russian Literature (Writing)

RUW 3100. Survey of Russian Literature I (3). This course surveys representative works of Russian 19th and early 20th century fiction. Taught in Russian.

RUW 3101. Survey of Russian Literature II (3). This course surveys representative works of Russian 20th century short and long fiction. Taught in Russian.

RUW 4470r. Modern Russian Literature (3). Prerequisite: RUW 3100 and RUW 3101, or equivalent. This course studies the great works of major Russian writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, encompassing study of specific movements such as Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and Socialist Realism. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

Serbo-Croatian

SEC 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). This course allows students to arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Slavic

SLL 3500. Slavic Culture and Civilization (3). This course examines the Slavic peoples, their cultures and traditions, from prehistory to present day. Novels and film give students a perspective from the "inside." Taught in English.

SLL 3510. The Slavic Vampire (3). This course is an exploration of the myth of the Vampire, from its origins in Slavic folklore to its appropriation by the West. It examines why the Vampire has endured not only in Eastern Europe but also in the Western imagination. Taught in English.

SLL 4905r. Directed Individual Study (3). This course allows students to arrange with individual faculty members to undertake specialized study in areas outside of or in addition to the regular curriculum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Spanish

Spanish Language

SPN 1120. Elementary Spanish I (4). This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.

SPN 1121. Elementary Spanish II (4). Prerequisite: SPN 1120 or equivalent. This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and poems and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220.

SPN 1124. Comprehensive Elementary Spanish (4). This is a one-semester course designed for those students who have had at least two years of high school Spanish (or the equivalent), but who do not feel ready to go directly into SPN 2220 Intermediate Spanish. May not be taken by native speakers. Students passing SPN 1124 with a grade of "C" or better are eligible to enroll in SPN 2220.

SPN 2160. Spanish for Careers (4). Prerequisites: SPN 1120 and SPN 1121, or SPN 1124, or instructor permission. This course introduces students to linguistic and cultural skills in Spanish needed for specific work environments such as law enforcement, education, or medicine. Course content varies with semester. May not be taken by native speakers. With approval of the department, may fulfill the Arts and Sciences language requirement.

SPN 2220. Intermediate Spanish (4). Prerequisite: SPN 1121 and SPN 1124 or equivalent. This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124. May not be taken by native speakers.

SPN 2240. Intermediate Spanish II (3). Prerequisite: SPN 2220 or equivalent. This course completes the intermediate Spanish skills sequence and finishes the review of the grammar sequence begun in SPN 2220. Students deepen their functional skills in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish and gain an overview of Hispanic culture in various countries. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.

SPN 3300. Spanish Grammar and Composition (3). Prerequisite: A grade of "C–" or higher in SPN 2240. This course covers the theory and practice of Spanish grammar and its application to compositions. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3400.

SPN 3350. Spanish for Heritage Speakers (3). This course offers intensive Spanish for heritage speakers who have had little or no formal training in the language. Writing skills are emphasized over oral communication.

SPN 3400. Spanish Reading and Conversation (3). Prerequisite: A grade of "C–" or higher in SPN 2240. This course develops communicative proficiency and accuracy in both reading and writing Spanish. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3300. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.

SPN 3440. Language and Culture in Business (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400, or SPN 3350. This intermediate-level language course is aimed at raising cross-cultural awareness in international business. It also is designed to better prepare students to meet the challenges of our global economy.

SPN 3510. Cultures of Iberia (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400, or SPN 3350. This course provides students with fundamental knowledge about the cultures and history of the Iberian peninsula in an effort to enhance their cultural and historical knowledge. This course also aims to improve their basic communicative skills in Spanish.

SPN 3520. Cultures of Latin America (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400, or SPN 3350. This course provides students with fundamental knowledge about the cultures and history of Latin America in an effort to enhance their cultural and historical knowledge. This course also aims to improve their basic communicative skills in Spanish.

SPN 4036. Spanish Medical Interpreting (3). Prerequisite: SPN 3300 or SPN 3350. This course is designed to provide Spanish speaking students with training in medical terminology, cultural issues in medicine, and healthcare interpreting skills.

SPN 4420. Advanced Spanish Composition and Translation (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400. This course stresses composition in Spanish with less emphasis on translation from Spanish into English. For students with prior knowledge of essential points of Spanish grammar.

SPN 4444. Business Writing in Spanish (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400. This course covers letter writing, business terminology, as well as conducting business in the Hispanic world.

SPN 4540r. Regional Cultural Studies (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400, or SPN 3350. This course provides students with exposure to texts and cultural productions from specific regions of Latin America, Spain, or the Latino enclaves in the U.S. Texts may include historical documents, legends and myths, poetry, fiction, essays, or popular music. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Duplicate registration allowed in the same semester.

SPN 4700. Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400; or SPN 3500 (for Spanish heritage speakers); LIN 3041 (highly recommended). This course examines the origin, development and present-day variation of the Spanish language and provides an introduction to Spanish linguistics from a theoretical and empirical point of view.

SPN 4740. Hispanic Sociolinguistics (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400, or SPN 3350. This course provides students with a cultural and linguistic awareness of the Spanish language and of the various and numerous societies in which it is spoken. Topics that relate to Spanish may include linguistic variation, language and gender, the sociology of language, the rights of linguistic minorities, language movements, and language policy.

SPN 4780. Spanish Phonetics (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400, or SPN 3350. This course involves training in the production of acceptable speech sounds in Spanish and a knowledge of when to use those sounds (allophonic distribution). The class meets both in the classroom and in the language laboratory. The nonnative speaker can profit most from this course.

SPN 4840. History of the Spanish Language (3). Prerequisites: LIN 3041, SPN 3300, SPN 3350, and SPN 3400. This course examines the origin and development of Spanish in the context of Indo-European and Romance languages. The course explores the linguistic changes that took place from Latin to Spanish, and compares them to those undergone by related (co)dialects and languages.

SPN 4905r. Directed Individual Study in Hispanic Language, Linguistics or Literature (3). Prerequisites: Approval of faculty member, the divisional coordinator, and the Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies. This course in for advanced students who arrange a specialized study with a faculty member, outside or in addition to, regular studies. The course needs approval and may be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

SPN 4930r. Studies in Hispanic Language (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400 or instructor permission. May be repeated when content varies to a maximum of six semester hours.

SPN 4935r. Honors Thesis (1–6). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours, three hours of which may be applied to the requirements for the major with permission of the department. All honors work is directed by the student's honors committee.

SPN 4942r. Internship in Applied Spanish (1–6). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Advanced standing in Spanish. This course provides academic credit for students working in governmental agencies or private enterprise where students employ the foreign language. Departmental permission required. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

Spanish Literature in Translation

SPT 3100. Spanish Literature in Translation (3). This course is an introduction to the rich literary traditions of Spain through the study of major works and writers of Spain's literary history. Students also learn important aspects of Spanish culture. The course is conducted in English. Does not count toward major or minor in Spanish.

SPT 3130. Latin American Literature in Translation (3). This course includes the reading and study of some of the outstanding modern prose writers of Latin America, such as Azuela, Carpentier, Borges, Rulfo, Fuentes, Garcia Marquez, Machado de Assis, and Amado. The course is taught in English.

SPT 3391r. Hispanic Cinema (3). This course is a study of the films, movements and directors of Hispanic cinema. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Taught in English.

SPT 3503. Introduction to Hispanic Cultural Analysis (3). This course provides students with opportunities for detailed cultural analysis in the various geographies, historical contexts and intellectual endeavors of the Hispanic world.

Spanish Literature (Writings)

SPW 3030. Approaching Hispanic Literature (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300, SPN 3350, or instructor permission. This course is a multi-genre introduction to literary analysis. It seeks to further develop basic language and critical thinking skills, understanding of Hispanic cultures, and interpretation of Hispanic literature.

SPW 3103. Readings from Early Iberia (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400; or SPN 3350. Through a variety of readings and written and oral activities, this course provides students with a fundamental knowledge of the critical issues related to the early Iberian peninsula, from approximately 1000 to 1700 A.D. Such topics may include medieval multiculturalism, the cultural role of the Church, and culture in an age of territorial expansion.

SPW 3104. Readings from Iberia (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400; or SPN 3350. This course guides students through close readings of a wide-ranging selection of texts from all genres and periods of Iberian literature, as well as the critical issues involved in interpreting them.

SPW 3132. Readings from Early Spanish America (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and 3400; or SPN 3350. Through a variety of readings and written and oral activities, this course provides students with knowledge about early Spanish America, from approximately 1492 to 1800. Topics may include the conquest, slavery, mestizaje, founding cultural institutions, and the aesthetics and ideologies of nation-building.

SPW 3493. Readings from Modern Spanish America (3). Prerequisites: SPN 3300 and SPN 3400; or SPN 3350. Through a variety of readings and written and oral activities, this course provides students with knowledge about modern Spanish America, from 1800 to the present. Topics may include indigenous and Afro-Caribbean cultures, multiculturalism, revolutions, globalization, and border issues.

SPW 4140r. The Poetics of Hispanic Love and Violence (3). Prerequisite: One 3000-level literature course. This course explores poems and other forms of expression that address the complexities of the sentiments of love and violence in the manner that it has been expressed in Hispanic culture. It introduces and engages these topics as they relate to issues of gender, national politics, and culture from Latin America and Spain. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

SPW 4150r. Transatlantic Encounters (3). Prerequisite: One 3000-level literature course. This course emphasizes the cultural and historical connection between Spanish America and Spain. Topics of study may include the subaltern in early Spain and Spanish America, nineteenth-century nation identities, and Modernismo/Generacion del 98. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

SPW 4190r. Special Topics in Hispanic Languages and Literature (3). Prerequisite: One 3000-level course. This course consists of variable topics chosen from Spanish language movements, periods, figures, and problems. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

SPW 4301r. Hispanic Culture and Performance (3). Prerequisite: One 3000-level literature course. This course studies dramatic works or performances from a Spanish-speaking region within a particular period, including its socio-historical, literary, biographical, and cultural contexts. Students may participate in a workshop production of the work(s) studied. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

SPW 4481. Contemporary Spanish Women Writers (3). Prerequisite: One 3000-level literature course. This course introduces students to the works of 20th-century Spanish women writers and the critical attention they have received.

SPW 4491. Spanish-American Women Writers (3). Prerequisite: One 3000-level literature course. This course studies Spanish-American women writers, varying from year to year, focusing on prose fiction, non-fiction and/or drama. Supplementary readings from critical and theoretical works.

SPW 4510. Latin American Indigenous Mythology (3). Prerequisite: One 3000-level literature course. This course, which is taught in Spanish, explores the literary and humanistic implications of Latin American Indigenous mythology. The course focuses on the ancestral, indigenous cultures of Amazonia but also looks at myths from various groups throughout the Americas.

SPW 4770. Caribbean Literature (3). Prerequisites: One 3000-level literature course. This course focuses on the reading, discussion, and analysis of works by Hispanic Caribbean authors, with an emphasis on the history, cultural life, and social conditions of Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic as it is reflected in the literature.

SPW 4930r. Studies in Hispanic Literature (3). Prerequisite: One 3000-level literature course. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

Turkish

TUT 3003. Turkish Culture and Civilization (3). This course offers a comprehensive exploration of Turkish culture and society by foregrounding the many diverse social currents, traditions, and ethnic groups that have shaped its profoundly multicultural identity. Includes topics such as education; public policy; its relations to the EU, the Arab World, and the U.S.; its literary and musical heritage; Islam, religion, and spiritualism; and its everyday cultural and social life such as family traditions, rituals, popular mentalities, holidays, folklore, hospitality, and gastronomy. Taught in English, all course materials in English.

TUT 3053. Turkish Cinema (3). This course studies how contemporary Turkish films confront identity issues in a Muslim country unique for being a secular democracy and a bridge culture between East and West. Students analyze how filmmakers address the socio-cultural dilemmas facing the individual in Turkish society (modern/traditional, eastern/western, urban/rural, religious/secular, nationalist/minority, etc.). The course also explores in detail the aesthetic vision of a sample of successful Turkish filmmakers. Taught in English, course materials in English, and all films subtitled in English.

Graduate Courses

Chinese

CHI 5505r. Readings in Chinese Literature (3).

CHI 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

CHI 5910r. Supervised Research in Chinese (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

CHI 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only.)

French

French and Francophone Language and Culture

FRE 5060. Graduate Reading Knowledge in French (3). (S/U grade only.)

FRE 5069r. Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only.)

FRE 5456. Stylistics (3).

FRE 5505r. French and Francophone Cultures (3).

FRE 5535. Post-Colonial Cultures in France (3).

FRE 5755. Old French (3).

FRE 5756. Reading in Old French Language (3).

FRE 5900r. Studies in French Language and Literature (3).

FRE 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only.)

FRE 6925r. Tutorial in Professional Issues (0–2). (S/U grade only.)

FRW 5765r. Studies in Francophone Literatures and Cultures (3).

French Literature in Translation

FRT 5555. Immigration and National Identity in France (3).

French and Francophone Literatures, Cultures and Civilizations

FRW 5315. Classical Theatre of the 17th Century (3).

FRW 5415. Old French Literature I (3).

FRW 5419r. Studies in Medieval French Literature: Figure or Genre (3).

FRW 5586r. Studies in 16th-Century Literature: Figure or Movement (3).

FRW 5587r. Studies in 17th-Century Literature: Figure or Movement (3).

FRW 5588r. Studies in 18th-Century Literature: Figure or Movement (3).

FRW 5595r. Studies in 19th-Century French Literature (3).

FRW 5598r. Studies in 20th-Century Pre-War (1900–1940) French Literature: Figure or Movement and/or Genre (3).

FRW 5599r. Studies in 20th-Century Post War (1940) French Literature: Figure or Movement and/or Genre (3).

FRW 5775r. Francophone Caribbean/African Cultures (3).

FRW 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

FRW 5910r. Supervised Research in French (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

FRW 6938r. Graduate Seminar in French Literature (3).

General Foreign Language Courses

FOL 5934r. Problems and Studies in Modern Languages and Literature (3).

FOT 5805. Translation Theory and Practice (3).

FOW 5025. Critical Theory and Its Application to Non-English Literatures (3).

FOW 5595. Transnational Literature (3).

FOW 6907r. Directed Readings (1–6). (S/U grade only.)

HUM 5938r. Interdisciplinary Topics (3).

German

German Language

GER 5060. Graduate Reading Knowledge in German (3). (S/U grade only.)

GER 5069r. Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only.)

GER 5425. Essay Workshop (3).

GER 5906r. Studies in German Languages and Literature (3).

GER 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only.)

GER 6925r. Tutorial in Professional Issues (0–2). (S/U grade only.)

German Literature in Translation

GET 5135. German Literature in Translation (3).

GET 5525r. German Cinema (3).

GET 5588r. Studies in a Theme (3).

German Literature (Writings)

GEW 5208r. Studies in a Genre (3).

GEW 5595r. Studies in a Theme (3).

GEW 5596r. Studies in an Author or Movement (3).

GEW 5597r. Studies in a Period: Special Topics (3).

GEW 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

GEW 5915r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

Italian

Italian Language

ITA 5060. Graduate Reading Knowledge in Italian (3). (S/U grade only.)

ITA 5069r. Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only.)

ITA 5455r. Advanced Italian Composition and Style (3).

ITA 5505r. Italian Culture and Civilization (3).

ITA 5900r. Studies in Italian Language and Literature (3).

ITA 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only.)

ITA 6925r. Tutorial in Professional Issues (0–2). (S/U grade only.)

Italian Literature (Writings)

ITW 5415r. Italian Renaissance Literature (3).

ITW 5445r. 18th- and 19th-Century Italian Literature (3).

ITW 5485r. 20th-Century Italian Literature (3).

ITW 5486r. Readings in Contemporary Italian Prose (3).

ITW 5705r. The Trecento Writers (3).

ITW 5905r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

ITW 5910r. Supervised Research in Italian (1–5). (S/U grade only).

Japanese

JPN 5900r. Studies in Japanese Language and Literature (3).

JPN 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

JPN 5915r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

JPN 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only.)

Linguistics

LIN 5035. Historical/Comparative Linguistics (3).

LIN 5045. Descriptive Linguistics (3).

LIN 5510. Transformational Grammar (3).

LIN 5744. Introduction to Language, Language Learning, and Language Instruction (3).

LIN 5908r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

LIN 5910r. Supervised Research (1–5).

LIN 5932r. Topics in Linguistics (3).

Portuguese (Brazilian)

Portuguese Language

POR 5069r. Graduate Reading Knowledge Examination: Portuguese (0). (S/U grade only.)

POR 5930r. Studies in Portuguese (Brazilian) Language and Literature (3).

POR 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only.)

Portuguese (Writings)

POW 5905r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

POW 5910r. Supervised Research in Portuguese (1–5). (S/U grade only)

Russian

Russian Language

RUS 5069r. Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only.)

RUS 5415r. Graduate Russian Conversation and Comprehension (3). (S/U grade only.)

RUS 5845. History of the Russian Language and Reading of Old Russian Texts (3).

RUS 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only.)

RUS 6925r. Tutorial in Professional Issues (0–2). (S/U grade only.)

Russian Literature in Translation

RUT 5115. Seminar: Russian Literature in English Translation (3).

Russian Literature (Writings)

RUW 5335. Russian Poetry (3).

RUW 5375. Russian Short Story (3).

RUW 5559r. Seminar in 19th-Century Russian Literature (3).

RUW 5579. Modern Russian Literature (3).

RUW 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

RUW 5910r. Supervised Research in Russian (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

RUW 5930r. Special Topics (3).

Serbo-Croatian

SEC 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

SEC 5910r. Supervised Research in Serbo-Croatian (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

Slavic

SLL 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

SLL 5915r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

Spanish

Spanish Language

SPN 5060r. Graduate Reading Knowledge in Spanish (3). (S/U grade only.)

SPN 5069r. Reading Knowledge Examination (0). (S/U grade only.)

SPN 5795. Phonology of Spanish (3).

SPN 5805. Spanish Morphology and Syntax (3).

SPN 5845. History of the Spanish Language (3).

SPN 5900r. Studies in Hispanic Language and Literature (3).

SPN 5940r. Teaching Practicum (0–5). (S/U grade only.)

SPN 6925r. Tutorial in Professional Issues (0–2). (S/U grade only.)

Spanish Literature (Writings)

SPW 5195r. Studies in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures (3).

SPW 5216. Spanish Golden Age Prose (3).

SPW 5275r. Spanish 20th-Century Novel (3).

SPW 5315. Spanish Golden Age Theater (3).

SPW 5337. Spanish Poetry through 1700 (3).

SPW 5338r. Spanish Poetry from 1700 to Present (3).

SPW 5356. Spanish American Poetry (3).

SPW 5357. Contemporary Spanish American Poetry since Modernism (3).

SPW 5365. Spanish American Prose: Nonfiction (3).

SPW 5385. Early and Modern Spanish American Prose Fiction to 1927 (3).

SPW 5386. Contemporary Spanish American Prose Fiction since 1927 (3).

SPW 5405. Medieval and Early Renaissance Spanish Literature (3).

SPW 5486. Contemporary Spanish Women Writers (3).

SPW 5496. Spanish-American Women Writers (3).

SPW 5606. Cervantes (3).

SPW 5757. 20th-Century Mexican Prose (3).

SPW 5908r. Directed Individual Study (3). (S/U grade only.)

SPW 5910r. Supervised Research in Spanish (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

SPW 6806. Research Criticism and Professional Issues (3). (S/U grade only.)

SPW 6934r. Topics in Hispanic Language and Literature (3).

SPW 6939r. Seminar on a Spanish American Author (3).

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY:

see Biological Science

MOLECULAR BIOPHYSICS, PROGRAM IN:

see Graduate Bulletin