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2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Motion Picture Arts

College of Motion Picture Arts

Web Page: http://film.fsu.edu/

Dean: Reb Braddock; Interim Associate Dean: Dr. Andrew Syder; Interim Assistant Dean: Tony Ciarlariello; Associate Professors: Auzenne, Baggott; Filmmakers in Residence: Allen, Apter, Cohen, France, Honn, Kaleko, Maurer, Mendez, Meyer, Mikota, Nunez, Robkin, Scoon, Simmons, Slade, E. Stone, J. Stone, Tripp, Williams; Dean Emeritus: Fielding

The Florida State University College of Motion Picture Arts offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree at the undergraduate level, with majors in Production and in Animation and Digital Arts. The BFA programs combine schooling in motion picture production with solid grounding in liberal studies. The curriculum of each program directs students through a course of study that teaches the special language of motion picture storytelling through the production of a series of short, narrative projects. The College funds virtually all student production expenses, including those of the thesis projects, a portion of production design, and catering. Screenwriting, production, and film analysis are each viewed as part of an integrated process. The goal of the programs is to produce educated, literate, and creative artists who are prepared for careers in the motion picture industry. Core courses in the BFA majors include producing, directing, screenwriting, editing, camera and lighting, sound, production management, animation, visual effects, motion picture history, theory, and aesthetics.

The purpose of this curriculum is to furnish the conceptual framework, the professional training and the working environment for eventual participation in a profession that is a powerful influence in our culture. The goals of the College of Motion Picture Arts are to fully educate students and to help them become integral members of the academic community of Florida State University, responsible members of the entertainment profession, and participants in a creative and artistic process.

The program in Motion Picture Arts is under constant review and subject to change. For further information, please refer to http://film.fsu.edu/programs/Undergraduate-Programs.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in the College of Motion Picture Arts satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in FIL 4972r, Thesis Film Production Management.

Facilities

The College of Motion Picture Arts operates extensive production facilities for its graduate and undergraduate programs in University Center A on Florida State University's campus in Tallahassee, and in an off-campus site in Midway, Florida, known as the Torchlight Center.

Considered one of the finest facilities in the world devoted exclusively to film education, it includes: professional sound stages, a green-screen/motion capture stage, a cinematography and set operations teaching stage, grip and electric trucks fully equipped with industry standard G&E equipment, an ADR and Foley recording studio, re-recording stages, QC and dailies screening rooms, digital animation/VFX production labs, color correction suites, a 120-seat screening room, digital animation/VFX production suites, seminar rooms, writer rooms, interactive classrooms, individual post production suites, teaching labs and student production planning rooms.

The College is equipped for and supports industry-standard acquisition in HD, 2k, 4k, digital formats, and digital sound recording formats.

In addition, the College hosts a resource center of over 5,000 motion picture titles, and other resources which include screenplays, books, and an archive of 35mm and 16mm film prints.

Requirements for a Major in Motion Picture Arts - Production

This major emphasizes three areas: production skills, screenwriting, and interpretative analysis. Traditional classes in these areas will be supplemented with: (1) problem-solving seminars simulating entertainment business dilemmas; (2) laboratory courses in production techniques; and (3) screenings and workshops conducted by active film professionals.

The degree will require completion of a minimum of one hundred twenty semester hours. For a sample listing of the required curriculum plan, please refer to http://film.fsu.edu/programs/Undergraduate-Programs.

To fulfill the requirements of the Production major in the College of Motion Picture Arts, a student must:

  1. Possess sufficient mobility, strength, and dexterity in both hands and legs to lift, carry, and operate filmmaking equipment
  2. Possess sufficient visual capacity to perform the functions of a film crew member without the assistance of visual aids other than contact lenses or eyeglasses
  3. Possess sufficient aural capacity to hear and understand spoken instructions without assistance other than a hearing aid
  4. Be able to comprehend oral and written instructions, policies, and procedures related to the College of Motion Picture Arts, filmmaking protocols, and the operation of equipment
  5. Possess the ability to adequately communicate orally, in English, with others

Requirements for a Major in Motion Picture Arts - Animation and Digital Arts

This major emphasizes three core areas: live-action and CG production skills, screenwriting and pre-visualization, and interpretative analysis. Traditional classes in these areas will be supplemented with: (1) problem-solving seminars simulating entertainment business dilemmas; (2) laboratory courses in production techniques; and (3) screenings and workshops conducted by active professionals.

The degree will require completion of a minimum of one hundred twenty semester hours. For a sample listing of the required curriculum plan, please refer to http://film.fsu.edu/programs/Undergraduate-Programs.

To fulfill the requirements of the Animation and Digital Arts major in the College of Motion Picture Arts, a student must:

  1. Possess sufficient mobility, strength, and dexterity in both hands and legs to lift, carry, and operate filmmaking equipment
  2. Possess sufficient visual capacity to perform the functions of a film crew member without the assistance of visual aids other than contact lenses or eyeglasses
  3. Possess sufficient aural capacity to hear and understand spoken instructions without assistance other than a hearing aid
  4. Be able to comprehend oral and written instructions, policies, and procedures related to the College of Motion Picture Arts, filmmaking protocols, and the operation of equipment
  5. Possess the ability to adequately communicate orally, in English, with others

Admission

Admission to the College of Motion Picture Arts is limited access, making admission highly selective and competitive. Applicants must apply to Florida State University's Office of Admissions by their Fall admission deadline and must submit a separate application to the College of Motion Picture Arts by the same Fall admissions deadline used by the Florida State University Office of Admissions. As a part of the College of Motion Picture Arts application, each applicant must submit a resumé, three letters of recommendation, a creative portfolio (which can include film work, photographs, animation, etc.), a writing sample adhering to the given prompt, and a 500–1000 word essay describing his or her motivation for becoming a filmmaker. Any application that does not contain all these items will be considered incomplete and will be denied automatically. All application materials must be online via the application portal for the applicant to be considered for admission the following Fall semester. More information concerning the undergraduate application is available online at http://film.fsu.edu/apply.

Freshmen majors will not enroll in major classes prior to their sophomore year in order to concentrate full-time on fulfilling their general education requirements.

Grade Requirements

All Motion Picture Arts majors must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in all coursework, including general education requirements taken during their freshman year at the University. Any student who falls below that 3.0 cumulative grade point average at any point in their studies will be placed on academic probation. Failure to bring the grade point average above a 3.0 may result in dismissal from the College of Motion Picture Arts.

Retention

All students must meet the University's minimum retention standards as well as the College of Motion Picture Arts Professional Code of Conduct. In addition, continuation as a major will depend on the development of each student's talents, skills, professional discipline, and academic record. A student's work and commitment are under continuous review, and any candidate who fails to maintain high standards will be dismissed from the program.

Probation and/or Dismissal

Motion Picture Arts majors will adhere to the University Academic Honor System, Student Conduct Code, and Summons to Responsible Freedom.

At the end of each semester, the faculty and director will meet to discuss the work, behavior, grades, and progress of the majors. At that time, students may be notified of probation or dismissal by a letter stating their status, with an invitation to meet with the Associate Dean. In addition, a student may be placed on probation or dismissed at any time under the following circumstances:

  1. If the cumulative GPA falls below 3.0, it will result in a one-semester probation. Students will be reinstated in good standing if the cumulative major GPA rises to 3.0 by the end of the following semester. Failure to raise the GPA will result in dismissal from the program.
  2. Attendance will be taken in all classes at the beginning of class. Anyone not in class at that time will be considered absent. Anyone leaving class early may also be counted as absent. Approval of absences is up to the instructor and will require documentation to confirm the legitimacy of the absence.
  3. Professional behavior is expected of film majors at all times. Therefore, behavior so negative, disruptive, or destructive as to compromise the work of fellow students or the effectiveness of the faculty and/or inability to work positively in a collaborative environment shall constitute grounds for probation or immediate dismissal without any prior period of probation. Peer evaluations may be considered in this evaluation process. A student on professionalism probation will be reinstated in good standing if, in the judgment of the faculty and the director, behavioral problems have been corrected. A student's failure to correct problems will result in dismissal from the program.
  4. Any unauthorized use, possession, or willful destruction of College of Motion Picture Arts equipment, facilities, film stock, or finished film will result in immediate notification to the proper authorities. The outcome of their decisions will determine the actions of the College of Motion Picture Arts with respect to the student(s) involved.

Liberal Studies for the 21st Century Program

All undergraduate majors in the College of Motion Picture Arts are required to meet Florida State University's liberal studies requirements as specified in the "Undergraduate Degree Requirements" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Transfer Students

The College of Motion Picture Arts will accept transfer students for admission each Fall semester, and those students must have completed at least thirty semester hours of their general education requirements prior to their initial Fall semester in the College, as well as have at least a 3.0 or better cumulative grade point average. Applications must be submitted separately to both the College of Motion Picture Arts and the Florida State University Office of Admissions. The College of Motion Picture Arts application is available online at http://film.fsu.edu/apply/transfer. Transfer students are subject to the same application requirements and must submit the same application materials as those applying as a freshman applicant.

Financing and Ownership of Student Films

The College of Motion Picture Arts pays for virtually all student laboratory, workshop, and thesis project production expenses at the graduate and undergraduate level. So far as it is known, it is the only film school in the United States to do so.

Under State of Florida law, regulations, and rules, all films and videos produced by Motion Picture Arts students become property of Florida State University and are copyrighted in the name of Florida State University. The same regulations and rules provide that in the event of the commercial exploitation of these films, any net revenues derived from a particular film will be split in a proportion to be determined by Florida State University (currently 50/50) between the College of Motion Picture Arts and all of the graduating student workers on the film including, but not limited to, the writer, director, producer/production manager, sound designer, editor, cinematographer, art director, and musical score composer.

State law provides that any stand-alone screenplays created by students will remain the student's property and may be exploited commercially by them; however, screenplays, script, and story ideas that are proposed and incorporated by students into their workshop or thesis films become the property of Florida State University and will be copyrighted with the University's name.

State law requires that all entering students be provided with a copy of the relevant regulatory rule and that applicants for admission to the College of Motion Picture Arts sign a statement acknowledging their receipt and understanding of the rule prior to official admission and enrollment.

Honors in the Major

The College of Motion Picture Arts offers an Honors in the Major program to encourage talented seniors to write a feature-length screenplay or undertake independent and original research as part of the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. Specific requirements for Honors in the Major are discussed with qualified students during their junior year. For requirements and other information, see the "University Honors Office and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Health Insurance

Students seeking degrees in certain majors, including film, assume any exposure to the particular hazards associated with that major. As protection for our students, the College of Motion Picture Arts requires that majors present proof of health and accident insurance prior to registration in the Fall semester each year. Students are expected to maintain this insurance throughout their enrollment in the program and keep the information updated with the Associate Dean's Office.

Film Studies Minor in the College of Motion Picture Arts

The film studies minor will give students the opportunity to select a program of study that examines the many facets of American and international cinema. The interdisciplinary nature of the program allows students to experience different approaches to film study: film and cultural differences, basic film vocabulary, film history, film and social forces, film genres, film theories, film directors, and film aesthetics. No production or animation classes are offered as part of the film studies minor.

Requirements for a Minor in Film Studies

The interdisciplinary minor requires the completion of fifteen semester hours in courses approved for film studies. All students are required to take either FIL 2001, Introduction to Cinema Studies or FIL 2030, History of Motion Picture. The remaining hours may be selected from the approved film studies offerings. Courses counted toward the film studies minor cannot be counted toward a student's major. All film minor hours must be taken at Florida State University.

For additional information on a film minor and to view the most up-to-date course listings, please visit http://film.fsu.edu/Programs/Minor-in-Film-Studies.

Definition of Prefix

FIL—Film

IFS—Interdisciplinary Florida State University Courses

Undergraduate Courses

FIL 2001. Introduction to Cinema Studies: Analysis and Practice (3). This course introduces students to film analysis theories and techniques, including the basics of dramatic structure, genre, prevalent filmmaking theories, and film production processes. Through weekly film screenings, class discussion, and hands-on production exercises, students develop and practice skills to help them compare and interpret films representing a variety of genres, aesthetic traditions, and cultural contexts.

FIL 2030. History of Motion Pictures (3). This course is an overview of international film as an industry, mass medium, and art form.

FIL 2043r. History and Practice of Visual Effects and Animation (1–6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course introduces computer graphics in the contexts of historical approaches to visual effects and animation. Students apply historical techniques to create original animations and visual effects.

FIL 2090r. Professional Communication (1). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides instruction in oral presentation and communication skills for professional settings in the motion picture industry. May be repeated to a maximum of three semester hours.

FIL 2110r. Story Development and Screenwriting I (1-6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course introduces the basic techniques of story development and screenwriting through exercises in story structure, dialogue, and character development.

FIL 2113Lr. Screenwriting Workshop (1-6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides a story room workshop in which students develop original story concepts and scripts for motion picture shorts. Through a variety of weekly activities and writing assignments, students examine and practice a variety of story development techniques as well as industry standard screenwriting practices. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 2423. Filmmaking I (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides a basic understanding of film production technology, equipment operation, terminology, and techniques.

FIL 2441Lr. Practicum in Technical Support (1-6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course introduces students to the technical skills and protocols employed in below-the-line (BTL) positions in the motion picture industry. The course stresses the protocols observed by below-the-line crew to ensure the effective and safe operation of production equipment and adherence to workflows through all stages of production. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 2481Lr. Acting for Filmmakers (1–6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course instructs students in a variety of actor training techniques that can be used to enhance on-camera performances and directing actors. Students apply course concepts through practical acting exercises. Special focus is given to learning the language of actors and experiencing first-hand the actor approach to a role, the challenges of acting for the camera, the rehearsal process, and script analysis. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 2533r. Motion Picture Sound (1–6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course teaches the principles and aesthetics of sound and the basic practices involved in creating a motion picture sound track. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 2552. Film Editing (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course allows students to analyze, discuss, and put into practice the skills and techniques required to edit a narrative motion picture.

FIL 2557r. Motion Picture Editing (1–6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course teaches introductory principles, aesthetics, and theory of motion picture editing and their application in editing narrative shorts. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 2710. Visualization I (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides an introduction to the visual communication skills and techniques required for the development and previsualization of narrative motion pictures.

FIL 2726. Compositing I (1–3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course introduces layer-based compositing concepts and techniques, including their application in visual effects for motion pictures.

FIL 2727r. Compositing II (1–3). Prerequisites: FIL 2726 and major status. This course introduces node-based compositing theory and practice with an emphasis on best practices and professional standards used in the visual effects industry. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FIL 2730. Introduction to 3D Computer Graphics (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides instruction in using industry-standard 3D tools to generate assets, light scenes, and render images. Students apply course concepts to create an original vfx scene extension shot.

FIL 2731r. Introduction to 3D Computer Animation (1-6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides instruction in the foundation principles of animation. Students apply course concepts to create original animation that conveys emotion and demonstrates basic understanding of body mechanics. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 3132r. Screenwriting II (1-6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides conceptual and practical approaches to developing stories intended for intermediate-level short films. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 3363r. Documentary Filmmaking (1–6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course allows students to view and discuss documentary films from various eras, countries, and points of view as a means of understanding personal aesthetic as a documentary filmmaker. Students plan, script, budget, shoot, edit, and mix documentaries. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FIL 3433r. Filmmaking II (1-6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course emphasizes visual storytelling and directing techniques. Students apply concepts by developing and creating motion pictures. Special focus is given to script analysis and interpretation, directing actors, blocking techniques, and methods of visual storytelling. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 3516r. Film Camera and Lighting (1-6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides a theoretical and practical knowledge of all aspects of cinematography: cameras and lenses, film stocks, exposure, lights, lighting, and composition. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 3641Lr. Motion Picture Production Management (1-6). Prerequisite: BFA Status. This course provides instruction in motion picture production management roles and chain-of-title responsibilities in pre-production, production, and post-production such as script breakdowns, scheduling, budgeting, daily production protocols, post-production supervision and final delivery. Can be repeated to a maximum of fifteen semester hours.

FIL 3690r. Digital Studio Department Leadership (1–12). Prerequisites: Major status and instructor permission. This course provides instruction and practice in the leadership and management of departments within the field of visual effects and animation. The course also addresses positions such as digital effects producer, supervisor, as well as modeling, animation, and compositing leads. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 3702Lr. Lighting, Texturing, and Rendering I (1–6). Prerequisites: FIL 2730 and major status. This course provides an introduction to concepts of CG lighting and rendering to enhance original animations and visual effects. The course also addresses basic lighting theory needed to create virtual lighting effects. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FIL 3711. Visualization II (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides an intermediary-level instruction in the visual development skills required for the preproduction and previsualization of narrative motion pictures.

FIL 3725r. Stop Motion Animation (1–6). Prerequisites: FIL 2043, FIL 2726 and major status. This course teaches principles of stop-motion and forward-animation. Through the creation of original animations, it also explores stop-motion cinematography, Claymation armature and set-construction.

FIL 3736r. Character Animation I (1–6). Prerequisites: FIL 2730, FIL 2731 and major status. This course provides instruction in developing and creating believable and compelling animated characters. Topics and skills covered include body mechanics, facial animation, lip synching, conveying human emotion, acting theory for animators, and production processes from planning shots to final polishing.

FIL 3792r. Visual Effects Aesthetics (1–3). Prerequisites: FIL 2730 and major status. This course provides continuing theory and practice in modeling, texturing, and lighting to create visual effects that are believable and fit the aesthetic style of a given cinematic world. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

FIL 3793. Visual Effects Cinematography (3). Prerequisites: FIL 2043, FIL 3516, and major status. This course surveys techniques used in both practical and digital effects cinematography through the hands-on planning and execution of visual effects cinematography projects.

FIL 3803. The Contemporary Cinema: Theory and Practice (3). This course is a review and analysis of post-1950 motion pictures with emphasis on technique and industrial evolutions.

FIL 3833r. Film Styles (3–6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course allows students to analyze motion picture form and content through the styles of selected filmmakers with emphasis on genres, national movements, and other topics of interest. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FIL 3922r. Film Genres and Filmmakers (1). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides students the opportunity to view historical and current films followed by discussions in an academic forum. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FIL 3932r. Special Topics (1–12). Prerequisite: Major status. This course is an analysis of specialized topics in motion pictures. May be repeated during the same term to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 3963. BFA Qualifying Exam (0). Prerequisite: Major status. This course evaluates the progress of the student and recommends continuance in the film school or directs the student toward other areas of study.

FIL 3965r. BFA Comprehensive Exam (0). (S/U grade only.)

FIL 3971r. Thesis Film Support (2–12). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Major status. This course covers the principles and responsibilities of grips, gaffers, assistant directors, assistant camerapersons, and production managers, as well as the performance of these responsibilities on the set of BFA thesis films. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 4135. Thesis Development (3). Prerequisite: FIL 2110 and major status. This course teaches conceptual and practical approaches to developing stories intended for short films. Students develop an original screenplay through multiple drafts and iterations.

FIL 4160. Feature Screenwriting (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course teaches aspects of feature screenwriting format, pitching ideas, creating and developing character, story, and dialogue.

FIL 4164. Feature Screenwriting: Development (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course teaches the various techniques of scene breakdown, setting up, sequencing, character development, and dialogue development. Also teaches rewriting techniques to strengthen first drafts.

FIL 4434r. Advanced Filmmaking (1–9). This course provides instruction in the creative aspects of filmmaking through the hands-on production of a short film. Students work in a variety of creative roles, including directing, cinematography, art direction, and editing. May be repeated to a maximum of fifteen semester hours.

FIL 4474. Production: Advanced Cinematography (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course introduces advanced lighting techniques and allows hands-on exercises emphasizing the creative use of lighting for mood and storytelling.

FIL 4539. Production: Advanced Sound (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides students with a thorough understanding of digital sound recording, sound mixing, and various stages of sound post-production as it applies to 16mm filmmaking.

FIL 4567. Production: Advanced Editing (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course offers advanced study in film editing techniques and styles.

FIL 4602. Film Business Planning (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course exposes students to current business trends and issues in the film industry; introduces case studies that examine all business aspects surrounding a feature film; introduces current readings on the film industry.

FIL 4613r. Motion Picture Marketing and Exhibition (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides an introduction to the marketing and exhibition of motion pictures, with an emphasis on current methods and practical techniques for promoting, publicizing, and distributing short films. Throughout the course, students develop original marketing materials to be used primarily for film festivals. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hors.

FIL 4653. Film Law (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides a working knowledge of the specialized concepts and vocabulary pertaining to entertainment-related forms of intellectual property and the contractual relationships necessary to finance, create, and license various forms of entertainment.

FIL 4654. Film Producing and Finance (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course is an introduction to the techniques necessary to create a responsible business approach for the production of motion pictures and to create a greater individual awareness of the motion picture producer as a career opportunity.

FIL 4712r. Visualization III (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course provides an advanced-level instruction in the visual development skills required for the preproduction and previsualization of narrative motion pictures. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FIL 4713r. Character Art (1–6). Prerequisites: FIL 2730 and major status. This course provides theory and practice in developing digital characters and figures including concept art, modeling sheets, digital sculpture, texture, and preparation for rigging and animation.

FIL 4737r. Character Animation II (1–3). Prerequisites: FIL 2731, FIL 3736, and major status. This course provides continuing theory and practice in character and creature animation with an emphasis on animating believable multi-character dialogue and combat scenes and on implementing professional workflow standards. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

FIL 4872. Film Aesthetics (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course allows students to analyze film with regard to three basic questions: 1) What is film? 2) How do we perceive film? 3) How is an aesthetic developed?

FIL 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisites: Major status and junior standing. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FIL 4910r. Application of Research and Creative Methods (1–3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisites: Major status and junior standing. In this course, students participate in a faculty or graduate student research and/or creative project. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FIL 4923r. Undergraduate Film Seminar (1–6). Prerequisite: Major status. This course consists of the development of a creative film project under the direction of a faculty member or industry professional in various areas. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FIL 4933. Professional Development (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course prepares students to enter the professional film work arena; addresses the search for employment within the film industry and the search for funds to produce independent work.

FIL 4940r. Application of Instruction Methods (1–3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Major status. This course allows students to participate in the instructional process under the strict supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

FIL 4945r. Professional Internship (1–12). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Major status. This internship gives apprenticeship experience with a company involved in film/video production, distribution, or exhibition. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

FIL 4970r. Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Major status. This course involves the presentation of senior thesis film to the faculty and student body for review and approval.

FIL 4972r. Thesis Film Production Management (1-6). Prerequisite: Major status. Production management for BFA thesis films. May be repeated to a maximum of fifteen semester hours.

FIL 4973r. BFA Thesis Production (1–15). Prerequisite: Major status. This practicum course focuses on all creative aspects of BFA thesis production. May be repeated to a maximum of fifteen semester hours.

FIL 4975r. Undergraduate Honors Thesis (1–6). Prerequisites: Admission to the undergraduate Film School honors program and major status. Student must complete a minimum of six semester hours; may be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

FIL 4976. Thesis Script Rewrite (3). Prerequisite: Major status. This course teaches students to articulate on paper an idea that is both discernible and visual in the form of a collection of interesting moments that add up to tell a story.

IFS 2013. Reality and Illusion in World Cinema (3). This course examines world cinema with a focus on the elusive and continually shifting boundary between reality and illusion. The course investigates creative approaches to story telling and the craft of filmmaking not typically seen in traditional Hollywood or American independent film productions.

IFS 2027. Animation and Identity (3). Prerequisite: Honors student status. This course examines the medium of animation and the contributions of influential animators with a focus on how identity and societal milieu influence artistic expression in animation. Through animation screenings, discussion, and hands-on animation exercises, students are exposed to diverse animation styles and approaches, create original short animations, and come to better understand the creative process utilized in animation.

IFS 2028. Child and Youth Media Cultures in the U.S. (3). Prerequisite: Honors or major status. This course examines the role of media in the lives of U.S. children and youth by looking at young people's media use in diverse contexts throughout the U.S. and asking how child and youth identities and cultures are influenced by and co-constructed with media. The course also incorporates practical exercises in applying theory and research to study young people's media practices and to develop media products intended for child and youth audiences.

Graduate Courses

FIL 5021. History and Criticism I (3).

FIL 5022. History and Criticism II (3).

FIL 5147r. Writing the Dramatic Series Pilot (1–6).

FIL 5155Lr. Screenwriting: Short Format (1-12).

FIL 5156Lr. Screenwriting: Feature Format (1-12).

FIL 5157L. Screenwriting 3: Advanced Workshop (2–6).

FIL 5159r. Screenwriting: Motion Picture Workshop (1-6).

FIL 5408r. Preproduction and Production Planning (3–12).

FIL 5429L. Basic Film Production (2–6).

FIL 5458r. Principles and Practice of Technical and Creative Support (3).

FIL 5459r. Practicum in Technical Support (1–12).

FIL 5484Lr. Directing Actors (2).

FIL 5498. Advanced Directing (2).

FIL 5499. Acting for the Camera (3).

FIL 5519Lr. Camera and Light Mechanics (1–6).

FIL 5546. Advanced Sound (2–6).

FIL 5555Lr. Motion Picture Editing (1–6).

FIL 5568L. Advanced Editing (2–6).

FIL 5590L. Lighting Workshop (2–6).

FIL 5591r. Production Design Workshop (1–12).

FIL 5592Lr. Sound Workshop (1-6).

FIL 5593L. Post-production Sound Workshop (2).

FIL 5594r. Directing: Multicamera Workshop (3–9).

FIL 5595Lr. Directing: Single-Camera Workshop (2).

FIL 5635r. Motion Picture Marketing and Distribution (1-6).

FIL 5636Lr. Advanced Workshop in Area of Specialization (2–12).

FIL 5642L. Producing 1 (2).

FIL 5646L. Producing 2 (2).

FIL 5648Lr. Production Management (2).

FIL 5715Lr. Pre-Visualization (1–6).

FIL 5774r. Basic Video Production (3–6).

FIL 5781. Intermediate Television Editing (3).

FIL 5782. Advanced Television Editing (3).

FIL 5795Lr. Visual Effects (1-6).

FIL 5805r. Critical Studies in Film and Television (3).

FIL 5806. Critical Methods in Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts (3).

FIL 5807. Critical Methods of Film Analysis (3).

FIL 5875r. Film Aesthetics (1).

FIL 5906r. Directed Individual Study (3–12). (S/U grade only.)

FIL 5912r. Supervised Research or Creative Activity (3). (S/U grade only.)

FIL 5921r. Colloquium in Motion Picture Arts (1-6).

FIL 5930r. Proseminar in Motion Picture, Television, and Recording Arts (1).

FIL 5931r. Special Topics in Motion Picture Arts (1–12).

FIL 5955r. Apprenticeship (1–12). (S/U grade only.)

FIL 5962r. MFA Qualifying Project (3–15).

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

MOTOR BEHAVIOR:

see Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences

MOVEMENT SCIENCE:

see Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences

MULTILINGUAL/MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION:

see Middle and Secondary Education