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2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences

College of Human Sciences

Web Page: http://www.chs.fsu.edu/Departments/Nutrition-Food-Exercise-Sciences

Chair and Professor: Ray; Professors: Arjmandi, Delp, Ilich-Ernst, Moffatt, Panton, Sathe; Associate Professors: Figueroa, Kim, Ormsbee; Assistant Professors: Evanson, Hwang, Rao, Salazar; Teaching Faculty III: Farrell, Garber, Kasper, Sehgal; Teaching Faculty II: Spicer; Teaching Faculty I: Maier; Adjunct Professors: Magnuson, Plettl, Qasem, Stapell, Stowers, Trone; Didactic Program in Dietetics Director: Farrell; Dietetic Internship Director: Spicer; Professors Emeriti: Dorsey, Erdman, Harris, Haymes, Hsieh, Kassouny, Toole; Affiliate Faculty: Boche, Dilks, Gibson, Hernandez, Hutcherson, Latimer, Lunt, Pappas, Pfeil; Courtesy Faculty: Blasco, Burkhart, Clay, Conti, Daggy, Florian, Ghosh, Lima, Rahnama; Advisory Board Members: Daggy, Derman, Hamilton, Hennig, Katch, Koo, Weaver

The Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences offers four Bachelor of Science degrees: Athletic Training, Dietetics, Exercise Science, and Food and Nutrition.

The athletic training degree program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) until October, 2019. Students entering the undergraduate program as of Fall, 2016 will be required to complete a graduate professional athletic training program in order to become Board of Certification eligible. A major in athletic training is offered to students interested in working with injury prevention, recognition, immediate care, rehabilitation, health care management, and professional development in a sports medicine environment. Athletic training students have opportunities to gain clinical experience in a variety of sports settings, both on and off campus. Access to the athletic training program is limited by restricting the number of students admitted annually to match the available resources. The admission requirements and procedures for the athletic training program at Florida State University include common entry indicators. The common indicators included in each student's portfolio will be ranked as follows:

  1. FSU cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or better based on at least fifteen hours of FSU coursework (weighted rank of GPA at 50%)
  2. SAT/ACT scores (weighted rank of SAT/ACT at 25%)
  3. Interview score (weighted rank of interview score at 25%).

In order to be eligible for the interview, the student must complete an application portfolio that includes: completion of Technical Standards for Admission, lab skill testing scores, clinical observation log sheets, a resumé, two letters of recommendation, official copies of all post-secondary transcripts, SAT scores, and current enrollment in or completion of ATR 1800.

Composite applicant scores, based on the above indicators, are calculated and ranked. The number of athletic training applicants admitted is determined by available vacancies created by graduation. The top-ranking students are then admitted to fill the vacancies. The Athletic Training Program includes a strict didactic and clinical course progression. New student admission is completed by May 31 of each year. New athletic training students enroll in the first block of courses the following Fall semester. Community college students are required to complete the same application process as resident students. Those who are formally admitted will be required to complete a minimum of six semesters to complete all clinical rotations. Please see the Athletic Training Education Program Web site for retention policies.

The purpose of the dietetics degree program is to provide the foundation knowledge and skills required for the didactic component of entry-level dietetics education. This Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995; (312) 899-0040 (ext. 5400). Graduates of the DPD program earn a DPD verification statement and are eligible to apply to graduate school and/or post-baccalaureate, accredited dietetic internships. An accredited dietetic internship is required for eligibility to take the national Registration Examination for Dietitians. Careers are available for registered dietitians in clinical, research, community food service management, consulting, and educational settings. The dietetics degree program is a limited access program; students apply spring of their sophomore year. Admission requirements and procedures for the Dietetics degree at Florida State University include: minimum GPA of 2.75, a grade of "S" in DIE 3005, a resumé, and a personal statement. It is highly recommended that students earn a "B" or better in the sciences; Chemistry I, Chemistry II, Organic Chemistry, and corresponding labs. Once formally admitted, the program is two years. Please see the dietetics Web page for more information regarding admission to the degree.

The FSU post-baccalaureate dietetic internship program is the supervised practice component of dietetics education available only to graduate students in the department and is required for eligibility to take the national Registration Examination for Dietitians administered by the Commission for Dietetics Registration. The purpose of the internship is to provide students with supervised practice experiences that train interns for the competencies required by entry level positions in dietetics and nutrition practice. Careers are available for registered dieticians in clinical, research, community food service management, consulting, and educational settings. Fifteen graduate students are accepted annually to the graduate internship program through an internship application process.

The exercise physiology major prepares students for graduate study in exercise physiology, physical therapy, and other health fields, including medical school, as well as positions as personal trainers and health fitness instructors with both hospital-based wellness programs and corporate fitness programs.

The food and nutrition science major has a strong science base that prepares students for job opportunities in the food industry, government agencies, and careers in the medical field as well as graduate study in nutrition, food science, or agriculture.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in athletic training, exercise science, and food and nutrition science satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in CGS 2060 or BSC 2010L. Undergraduate majors in dietetics satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in CGS 2060.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into these upper-division degree programs:

Athletic Training

  1. BSC X010/X010L or BSC X010C
  2. PHY X053/X053L or PHY X053C or PHY X048/X048L or PHY X048C
    Note: Physics is a prerequisite; however, a program may choose to waive this coursework as a prerequisite but still require it as a graduation requirement.
  3. PSY X012
  4. STA X023 or STA X122 or STA X201
  5. HUN X201 or HUN X941 or HUN X002 or HSC X577
  6. BSC X093/X093L and BSC X094/X094L, or PET X322C and PET X323C, or ZOO X733C and PCB X703C, or APK X100C and APK X105C, or BSC X085/X085L and BSC X086/X086L, or BSC X085C and BSCX086C

Dietetics

  1. BSC X085/X085L and BSC X086/X086L, or BSC X085C and BSC X086C, or BSC X093C and BSC X094C, or HSC X549 or PCB X702 or PET X322/X322L
  2. CGS X060 or CGS X061
  3. CHM X200C or CHM X200/X200L, or CHM X210/X210L and CHM X211/X211L
  4. CHM X045/X045L and CHM X046/X046L, or CHM X032
  5. ECO X013 or ECO X023 or ECO X000
  6. HUN X201
  7. MAC X105 or MAC X142
  8. MCB X004/X004L or MCB X020C or MCB X013C or MCB X020/X020L
  9. PSY X012 or PSY X020 or PSY X113

Exercise Physiology

  1. BSC X085/X085L or PET X322/X322L, or APK X100C and APK X100L, or BSC X093/X093L
  2. BSC X086/X086L or PET X323/X323L or APK X105/X105L or BSC X094/X094L
  3. PSY X012
  4. BSC X010/X010L
  5. BSC X011/X011L
  6. CHM X045/X045L
  7. CHM X046/X046L
  8. HUN X201
  9. MAC X147 or MAC X311, or MAC X140 and MAC X114

Core Program for All Majors

  1. Liberal Studies. Required courses that may be taken in fulfillment of liberal studies include: English, basic nutrition, general chemistry, organic chemistry, general psychology, family relationships, mathematics, and statistics.
  2. Graduation Requirements. See the "Undergraduate Degree Requirements" chapter of this General Bulletin. For multicultural, HUN 2125 is recommended if the requirement is not satisfied with liberal studies. For computer skills, all majors require a similar course or certification (select BSC 2010L, if taken at FSU).
  3. College of Human Sciences Core. The college core is to be met by taking FAD 2230 and a three credit hour course offered by the College of Human Sciences but outside of the students selected major.
  4. Core Courses. CGS 2060 (or equivalent such as BSC 2010L if taken at FSU); HUN 1201; MAC 1105 or better; BSC 2085/2086 or PET 3322 and PET3322L (see specific major requirements); and STA 2122 or STA 2023.

Bachelor of Science

The Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences offers four Bachelor of Science degrees: athletic training, dietetics, exercise science, and food and nutrition. To complete requirements for these degrees the following are required: (1) liberal studies requirements; (2) general graduation requirements for the University; (3) the preceding college core requirements; and (4) specific requirements for the chosen major. Additional courses may be required to complete the one hundred twenty semester hours required for the degrees. A minimum grade of "C–" is required unless otherwise indicated.

The following are the specific requirements for each major. Students must meet the curriculum requirements in effect at the time they enter the major.

Athletic Training. ATR 4502 or ATR 3942, ; BSC 2010 and BSC 2010L; CHM 1045 and CHM 1045L; ATR 2020; HUN 1201, FAD 2230, MAC 1105, MAC 1114, and MAC 1140; ATR 1800; PHY 2053C/2053L; PSY 2012; STA 2122. Upper division: HSC 4711; ATR 3132, PET 3322/3322L, PET 3323C (or BSC 2085/2085L and BSC 2086/2086L), , APK 3110C, ATR 3102, ATR 4302C, , ATR 4932, ATR 3012C, , ATR 3213C, ATR 3312C,.

The Athletic Training Degree program allows students to choose from four subplan options: 1) Pre-Athletic Training 2) Pre-Physician Assistant 3) Pre-Physical Therapy and 4) Pre-Sports Medicine. All students in the Athletic Training Degree program must complete the core curriculum courses plus the specific subplan course requirements.

  1. Athletic Training Sub-Plan. PET 3361, ATR 4503, APK 3113, APK 2001, ATR 1810, 2820, 3832, 4842, 4852, 4862, Elective-3 hours
  2. Pre-Physician Assistant Sub-Plan.CHM 1046/1046L, MCB 2004/MCB 2004L or MCB 4403/MCB 4403L, APK 2001, CHM 2200 or CHM 2210, Elective-6 hours
  3. Pre-Physical Therapy Sub-Plan. BSC 2011/BSC 2011L, CHM 1046/CHM 1046L, PHY 2054C, Psychology 3-6, Electives 3-6 hours
  4. Pre-Sports Medicine Sub-Plan. BSC 2011/BSC 2011L, CHM 1046/CHM 1046L, PHY 2054C, CHM 2210, CHM 2211/CHM 2211L, BCH 4053/BCH 4053L, Electives 3-9 hours

Dietetics. See liberal studies requirements, college and department core, and common prerequisites. CHM 1045/1045L**, CHM 1046/1046L**, and CHM 2200/2200L**; BCH 3023C; DIE 3005, DIE 4243*, DIE 4244*/4244L*, and DIE 4310*; ECO 2XXX, FAD 2230 and FAD 4601; FOS 3026/3026L, FOS 4114C, and FOS 4209; FSS 4135 and FSS 4315*; HUN 1201*, HUN 2125, HUN 3224, HUN 3226, and HUN 3403*; HUN 4905 (Professionalism and Ethics in Dietetics), MCB 2004/MCB 2004L**, PSY 2012, PET 3322/3322L, PET 3361, STA 2122 and electives (to meet graduation requirements). All courses marked with an (*) must be completed with a "B" or better, PET 3322/3322L must be completed with a "C+." A grade of "B" or better is suggested in courses marked with (**) to apply to the limited access program.

Exercise Physiology. Lower division: see liberal studies and college core, plus: BSC 2010*/2010L* and BSC 2011*/2011L*; CHM 1045*/1045L*, CHM 1046*/1046L*, CHM 2200*/2200L* or CHM 2210* and CHM 2211/2211L; HUN 1201; MAC 1105*, MAC 1114* and MAC 1140*, PHY 2053C and PHY 2054C; PSY 2012*; STA 2122*. Upper division: APK 3110C, BCH 3023C or BCH 4053/4053L and BCH 4054, or BCH 4624; FAD 2230; HUN 3224, HUN 3226; PET 3102, PET 3322/3322L, PET 3323C, and PET 4551; and three courses for a minimum of nine credit hours from the following list: APK 3113, HSC 4711; ATR 3102, PET 3361, PET 3932 (Special Topics: Exercise and Disease), HUN 3934, APK 3164 or PET 4076 and electives (to meet graduation requirements). Exercise science majors who plan on pursuing advanced degrees in physical therapy or medicine may need to take specified electives to meet admission requirements for these programs. HUN 1201 must be completed with a "B–" or better, PET 3322 and lab must be completed with a "C+." Courses marked with an (*) must be completed with a grade of "C" or better; a single repeat for only one of these courses is allowed.

Food and Nutrition Science. Lower division: see liberal studies, college core, plus: BSC 2010/2010L; CHM 1045/1045L, CHM 1046/1046L, CHM 2210, and CHM 2211/2211L; ECO 2013 or equivalent; FAD 2230; HUN 2125 and HUN 1201; MAC 1105, MAC 1114, MAC 1140, and MAC 2311; MCB 2004/2004L; PHY 2053C; PSY 2012; STA 2122 or STA 2023. Upper division: BCH 3023C; CHM 3120C; FOS 3026, FOS 3026L, FOS 4114C, and FOS 4209; HUN 3224, and HUN 3226; PET 3322 and PET 3322L or PCB 3063 or PCB 3134; and electives to meet graduation requirements. At least ten additional semester hours must be at the 3000-4000 level for a total of forty hours at the 3000-4000 level. HUN 1201 must be completed with a "B–" or better, PET 3322/3322L must be completed with a "C+" or better.

Honors in the Major

The Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences offers a program in honors in the major to encourage talented juniors and seniors to undertake independent and original research as part of the undergraduate experience. Students complete a senior thesis, which usually involves six semester hours, and present an honors seminar. For requirements and other information, see the "University Honors Office and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Master's and Doctoral Degrees

The Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences offers work leading to the Master of Science in nutrition and food science, the Master of Science in exercise science, the Doctor of Philosophy in human sciences, and the Doctor of Philosophy in exercise science. Consult the Graduate Bulletin for details.

Definition of Prefixes

APK—Applied Kinesiology

ATR—Athletic Training

DIE—Dietetics

FOS—Food Science

FSS—Food Service System

HSC—Health Sciences

HUN—Human Nutrition

PET—Physical Education Theory

Undergraduate Courses

APK 2001. Medical and Scientific Terminology (3). Prerequisite: PET 3322 or BSC 2085. This course is the study of medical and scientific terminology, the language of medicine that focuses on prefixes, suffixes, word roots and their combining forms by review of each body system and specialty area. Emphasis is on word construction, usage, comprehension, pronunciation, and spelling. In addition, students gain information regarding anatomy and physiology, pathology, diagnostic/surgical procedures, pharmacology, scientific equipment and instruments, and abbreviations.

APK 3113. Methodology of Strength and Conditioning (3). Corequisite: ATR 1810. This course covers topics involving the development of speed, strength, power, and endurance, and explores specific methods of strength and conditioning.

APK 3164. Eating Disorders and Body Image (3). Prerequisite: HUN 1201. This course presents current science based information on the prevention, contributing factors, characteristics and treatment of eating disorders, dieting and body image. Diverse populations with eating disorders, cultural and societal emphasis on thinness, and the role of the media are addressed.

ATR 1800. Introduction to Athletic Training (1). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA. This course offers an introduction to the educational and professional requirements necessary to become a Certified Athletic Trainer. Students are exposed to the daily operations of athletics training facilities and the job responsibilities of all members of a sports-medicine team. This course provides the framework for the formal application process for the Athletic Training Education Program.

ATR 1810. Athletic Training Clinical I (1). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: ATR 1800. This course offers a study of the cognitive, affective, and motor skills required to perform athletic-training techniques in practice settings. The techniques employed in this course reflect those presented in the lecture and laboratory course taken the previous semester.

ATR 2020. First Aid (2). This course includes adult CPR, child CPR, and first aid. In addition, OSHA recommendations, blood borne pathogen precautions, and injuries are discussed. Successful completion allows students to earn American Red Cross certification as a professional rescuer.

ATR 2820. Athletic Training Clinical II (1). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: ATR 1810. This course offers a study of the cognitive, affective, and motor skills required to perform athletic-training techniques in practice settings. Techniques reflect those presented in the lecture and laboratory courses taken the previous semester.

ATR 3132. Kinesiology (3). Prerequisite: PET 3322. This course introduces basic physical concepts as they apply to human movement. Emphasis is placed upon structural anatomy, neuromuscular physiology, and biomedical principles as they apply to sport skills, injury assessments, fitness activities, and rehabilitative exercises.

DIE 3005. Introduction to Dietetics (1). (S/U grade only.) This course is an introduction to dietetics, the professional opportunities for registered dietitians, the importance of public policy, and the role of the American Dietetic Association in dietetics education and practice.

FOS 3395. Food and the Consumer (3). Prerequisites: CHM 1045 and HUN 1201 with a grade of "B–" or better. This course explores food composition, nutritional quality, and safety. Influence of food processing on food quality and safety. Consumer aspects of food including food selection, food management, and safety.

HUN 1201. The Science of Nutrition (3). This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.

HUN 2125. Food and Society (3). This course examines the impact of society on human food ways; role of food and nutrition in national development and global politics. For nonmajors.

HUN 3403. Life Cycle Nutrition (3). Prerequisite: HUN 1201. This course examines nutrition during pregnancy, lactation, and growth from infancy to the elderly. Effects of nutrition on mother and child. Interrelationships of diet, nutrition, emotional development, behavior, stress, and aging.

PET 1081. Living Learning Center Colloquium (1). This course explores different aspects of the transition to college life. The emphasis is on topics related to wellness, and activities address the health and development of individuals, families, and communities. The course is limited to the College of Human Sciences Reynolds Hall students.

PET 2084. Personal Fitness and Wellness (3). This course integrates aspects of nutrition, diet, fitness, and health/wellness for personal well being. This course cannot be used as a department elective.

PET 3102. Introduction to Exercise Sciences (1). (S/U grade only.) This course introduces students to fields of study and careers in areas of exercise physiology, motor behavior, athletic training, health and fitness, and physical therapy. Students will examine preparation for careers, including the role of various accrediting organizations. Current professional issues will be discussed. This course is open to non-majors.

PET 3322. Functional Anatomy and Physiology I (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201 and CHM 1045. Corequisite: PET 3322L. The first part of a two-semester sequence, this course covers the functional anatomy and physiology of the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and endocrine systems, as well as part of the nervous system.

PET 3322L. Functional Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I (1). Prerequisites: HUN 1201 and CHM 1045. Corequisite: PET 3322. The first part of a two-semester sequence, this lab covers the functional anatomy and physiology of the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and endocrine systems, as well as part of the nervous system.

PET 3323C. Functional Anatomy and Physiology II (4). Prerequisite: PET 3322. This course is a continuation of a two-semester sequence of functional anatomy and physiology that includes the integumentary, nervous, lymphatic, immune, and reproductive systems.

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

APK 3110C. Applied Exercise Physiology (4). Prerequisite: PET 3322. This course studies the nature of muscular, metabolic, cardiovascular, and respiratory adjustment to acute and chronic exercise.

APK 4914r. Tutorial in Exercise Physiology (1). (S/U grade only.) This course consists of small group discussions or project work. Topics selected in contemporary issues or current research. Maximum enrollment of ten students per tutorial. Repeatable to a maximum of four semester hours when the topic changes.

ATR 3012C. Orthopedic Assessment–Upper Extremity (3). Prerequisite: ATR 2820. In this course, athletic training students examine the following topics included in this course: clinical orthopedic anatomy; evaluation; and assessment and special test protocols for the shoulder, elbow, forearm, wrist, hand, finger, eye, face, nose, throat, mouth, teeth, cervical spine, head, and neck.

ATR 3102. Athletic Training I (3). Prerequisite: ATR 1800. This course covers basic topics and issues pertaining to athletic training as established by the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries will be introduced.

ATR 3112. First Responder (3). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course allows students to develop basic emergency medical skills and knowledge that enables them to assist people who sustain an accidental injury or who suffer a sudden illness. This course covers all the information from the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) First Responder National Standard Curriculum.

ATR 3213C. Orthopedic Assessment–Lower Extremity (3). Prerequisite: ATR 3832. In this course, athletic training students examine the following topics: clinical orthopedic anatomy; evaluation; and assessment and special test protocols for the foot, toes, ankle, knee, pelvis, thigh, thoracic and lumbar spine, and gait analysis.

ATR 3312C. Therapeutic Exercise/Rehabilitation (3). Prerequisite: ATR 3832. In this course, athletic training students examine various exercise and rehabilitation topics including the following: concepts of healing; evaluation and assessment techniques; range of motion and flexibility; goniometric measurement; manual therapy techniques; muscle strengthening; plyometrics; proprioception; posture; ambulation and ambulation aids; core stabilization; aqua therapy; joint rehabilitation protocols; and spine rehabilitation protocols.

ATR 3512. Administration of Athletic Training Programs (3). Prerequisite: ATR 4842. This course explores the aspects of athletic training organization and administration. Topics include program management, human resource management, athletic insurance, risk management, ethical considerations, pre-participation physical exams, and facility design.

ART 3802. First Responder Practicum (1). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: ATR 3112. This course is designed to emphasize patient assessment and care procedures at the first-responder level. The skills learned in the didactic First Responder course are refined with actual patient encounters by assisting crew members of the First Responder Unit.

ATR 3832. Athletic Training Clinical III (1). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: ATR 2820. This course offers a study of the cognitive, affective, and motor skills required to perform athletic-training techniques in practice settings. Techniques reflect those presented in the lecture and laboratory courses taken the previous semester.

ATR 3942r. Sports Medicine Practicum (0–6). Prerequisite: ATR 1800. This course is designed for athletic training students to investigate and research athletic training special topics through individual study and seminars. Enrollment is allowed by permission of the athletic training curriculum coordinator.

ATR 4302C. Therapeutic Modalities (3). Prerequisite: ATR 1800. This course trains students in common modalities employed by sports medicine. Where applicable, modalities of treatment will examine biophysical principles, effects of treatment, application techniques, and indications and contraindications to treatment. Safety is emphasized during instruction and practical experience.

ATR 4502. Athletic Training Professional Development (3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: ATR 4852. This course covers the cognitive, affective, and motor skills required to perform athletic-training techniques in practice, non-traditional settings. Techniques reflect those presented in previous athletic-training administration lecture/lab courses. This course prepares students for the Board of Certification (BOC) examination and provides information on how the BOC examination is developed and scored.

ATR 4503. Athletic Training II (3). Prerequisite: ATR 3102. This course covers advanced topics pertaining to athletic training.

ATR 4842. Athletic Training Clinical IV (1). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: ATR 3832. This course offers a study of the cognitive, affective, and motor skills required to perform athletic-training techniques in practice settings. Techniques reflect those presented in the lecture and laboratory courses taken the previous semester.

ATR 4852. Athletic Training Clinical V (1). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: ART 4842. This course covers the cognitive, affective, and motor skills required to perform athletic-training techniques in practice settings. Techniques reflect those presented in previous the orthopedic assessment/lower and the therapeutic exercise/rehabilitation lecture/lab courses.

ATR 4862. Athletic Training Clinical VI (1). Corequisite: ATR 4932. This course is designed as a capstone for advanced-level students who intend to enter the profession of athletic training. Students are evaluated on cognitive, affective, and motor skills - all required to perform athletic training techniques in practice settings. Additional content includes oral, practical, and written examinations; professional-development activities; and a research project. All students enrolled in this course must show proof of current membership in the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA).

ATR 4932. Issues in Sports Medicine (3). Prerequisite: ATR 1810. This course addresses advanced issues relevant to athletic training and sports medicine. Current topics include athletic training administration, athletic training pharmacology, advanced assessment techniques, orthopedic surgical observation, and general medical conditions.

ATR 4947. General Medical Issues Clinical (1). Prerequisite: ATR 4932. This course allows athletic training students to observe practitioners in the allied and affiliate site settings, including medical doctors, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, chiropractors, off-campus certified athletic trainers, and others in the sports medicine setting.

DIE 4243. Medical Nutrition Therapy I (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201, HUN 3403, PET 3322, PET 3322L. This course presents how diet, nutrition, and functional foods, can help promote health, control weight, and manage chronic diseases. This course includes guidelines for client assessment, nutritional diagnosis, intervention, education, monitoring and evaluation.

DIE 4244. Medical Nutrition Therapy II (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201, HUN 3403, PET 3322, PET 3322L and DIE 4243. Corequisites: DIE 4244L and HUN 3226. Part two of a two part sequence, this course covers the pathophysiology of diseases and nutrition therapy in the treatment and prevention of acute disease states and includes guidelines for client assessment, nutritional diagnosis, intervention, education, and monitoring.

DIE 4244L. Medical Nutrition Therapy II Laboratory (1). Prerequisites: BCH 3023C, BSC 2085, DIE 4243, HUN 3224, PET 3322, and PET 3322L. Corequisites: DIE 4244 and HUN 3226. This laboratory covers the application of the principles of nutrition in the treatment and prevention of specific diseases.

DIE 4310. Community Nutrition (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201 with a grade of "B–" or better and DIE 3005. This course explores the planning, implementation, and evaluation of nutrition programs in the community; public nutrition policy formulation.

FOS 3026. Foods (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201 with a grade of "B–" or better and CHM 1032. This course is an introduction to the physiochemical properties of food and the relationship of these properties to preparation techniques and food quality. Management and service of food.

FOS 3026L. Foods Laboratory (1). Corequisite: FOS 3026. This course is an introduction to the physiochemical properties of food and the relationship of these properties to preparation techniques and food quality. Management and service of food.

FOS 4114C. Food Science (4). Prerequisites: CHM 2200C, FOS 3026, and FOS 3026L. This course discusses the chemistry of foods and their behavior during processing. Assessment of food quality.

FOS 4209. Food Safety and Quality (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201 and FOS 3026 or departmental permission. In this course, topics include food spoilage and food poisoning, food-borne pathogens, food laws and regulations, HACCP, and safe food handler practices, with an emphasis on current issues related to the quality and safety of food.

FSS 4135. Institutional Food Economics (3). Prerequisites: DIE 3005, ECO 2000 or ECO 2013, FOS 3026, and FOS 3026L. This course discusses cost analysis, cost containment, organizational structure, food laws, and food and beverage procurement in health care settings.

FSS 4312. Food Service Management (3). Prerequisites: DIE 3005, FOS 3026, FOS 3026L, and HUN 1201. This course focuses on managerial concepts and administration concerns involved with institutional food production.

FSS 4315L. Institutional Organization and Administration Laboratory (3). Prerequisites: FSS 4315, FOS 3026, FOS 3026L, and instructor permission. This course gives practical laboratory experience in the application of management concepts to health care and institutional food administration.

HSC 4711. Wellness/Health Risk Reduction (3). In this course the emphasis is on positive lifestyle practices to reduce one's risk for disease and for the maintenance of health and vitality. Topics include health behavior, stress, psychological health, chronic diseases, sexually transmitted infections, immunology, and psychoactive substance use and abuse.

HSC 4999r. Tutorial in Health Promotion (1). (S/U grade only.) This tutorial consists of small group discussions or project work. Topics selected in contemporary issues or current research. Maximum enrollment of ten students per tutorial. May be repeated when topics change to a maximum of four semester hours.

HUN 3224. Intermediary Metabolism of Nutrients I (3). Prerequisites: CHM 2200C and HUN 1201 with a grade of "B–" or better. This course is part of a two-semester sequence emphasizing the physiochemical role of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in metabolic pathways; their integration and regulation; bases for determining requirements for energy-yielding nutrients and energy and dietary standards; cell growth and body composition.

HUN 3226. Intermediary Metabolism of Nutrients II (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201 with a grade of "B–" or better; BCH 3023C or HUN 3224; and BSC 2086 or PET 3322. This course is part of a two-semester sequence that emphasizes the physiochemical role of vitamins, minerals, and water in metabolic pathways; their integration and regulation; bases for determining requirements for vitamins, minerals, and water and dietary standards; nutrition surveys and evaluation of nutrition status.

HUN 3934r. Special Topics in Food and Nutrition (3–6). Prerequisite: HUN 1201 with a grade of "B–" or better. This course focuses on topics in community nutrition, food science and technology, developmental and metabolic aspects of nutrition. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours as content changes.

HUN 4362r. Functional Foods and Human Health (3). Prerequisite: HUN 1201. This course focuses on what makes a food or a food product functional, chemistry, bioavailability, and health benefits of various functional foods.

HUN 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

HUN 4913r. Honors Thesis (3–6). May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

HUN 4914r. Tutorial in Nutrition (1). (S/U grade only.) This tutorial consists of small group discussions or project work. Topics selected in contemporary issues or current research. Maximum enrollment of ten students per tutorial. May be repeated when topics change to a maximum of four semester hours.

HUN 4931. Honors Seminar (1).

HUN 4941r. Nutrition Practicum (1–4). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisites: HEE 4054 and a 2.50 GPA. This practicum consists of supervised field experience with a selected government or nongovernment agency at the local or state level. May be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours.

PET 3361. Nutrition and Sports (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201 with a grade of "B–" or better and PET 3322. This course studies the effects of sports training upon individual nutrient stores and requirements and the effects of nutrient intake upon sports performance.

PET 3932r. Special Topics in Wellness and Exercise Science (3–6). This course discusses topics in wellness, health promotion, exercise physiology, biomechanics, and motor behavior. Consult instructor. May be repeated as content changes to a maximum of six semester hours. May be repeated within the same semester.

PET 4076. Physical Dimensions of Aging (4). This course deals with the quality of life and individual differences as we age; physical decline of physiological systems (cardiovascular, muscular, joints, bone, neuromuscular); health, exercise, and well-being; and the pathology of aging. Assists students in developing an understanding of the physical aspects of aging to apply to settings such as physical therapy, sports medicine, and health and fitness programs in hospitals and retirement communities.

PET 4551. Exercise Testing and Prescription (3). Prerequisite: APK 3110C. This course examines techniques of evaluation for physical fitness and health with a particular emphasis on aerobic capacity, flexibility, strength, and body composition and to design, implement, and administer programs for developing physical fitness and lifestyle changes.

PET 4948r. Practicum in Exercise Sciences (1–6). Prerequisites: A 2.75 GPA, ATR 2020 or equivalent, APK 3110C, and instructor permission. This course consists of supervised field experience in exercise physiology or motor control. May include research, athletic training, or community fitness projects. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours with permission of the instructor.

Graduate Courses

APK 5111C. Advanced Exercise Physiology (3).

APK 8945r. Exercise Physiology Internship (1–9). (S/U grade only.)

DIE 5248. Advanced Medical Nutrition Therapy (3).

DIE 5935. Current Topics in Dietetics (3). (S/U grade only.)

FOS 5205. Food Safety and Quality (3).

FOS 5424. Food Preservation (3).

FOS 5930r. Seminar in Food and Nutrition Science (1).

FOS 5936. Selected Topics in Food Science and Technology (3).

FOS 6351C. Physical and Chemical Techniques in Food and Nutrition (3).

FOS 6930r. Seminar in Food and Nutrition Science (1).

HSC 5603. Models of Health Behavior (3).

HUN 5242. Carbohydrates, Fats, and Proteins (3).

HUN 5243. Vitamins and Minerals (3).

HUN 5297. Eating Disorders, Body Image, and Healthy Weight Maintenance (3).

HUN 5802. Research Design and Methodology (2).

HUN 5802L. Research Design and Methodology Laboratory (3).

HUN 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–9). (S/U grade only.)

HUN 5910r. Supervised Research (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

HUN 5930r. Food and Nutrition Seminar (1–4).

HUN 5938r. Special Topics in Nutrition (3).

HUN 6248r. Advances in Nutrition and Food Science (3–12).

HUN 6906r. Directed Individual Study (1–9). (S/U grade only.)

HUN 6911r. Supervised Research (3–5). (S/U grade only.)

HUN 6930r. Food and Nutrition Seminar (1).

HUN 6940r. Supervised Teaching (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

HUN 8945r. Supervised Field Experience (1–12). (S/U grade only.)

PET 5052. Motor Memory (3).

PET 5077. Physical Dimensions of Aging (4).

PET 5367. Nutrition and Exercise Performance (3).

PET 5389. Strength Program Development for Competitive Athletes and Sport (3).

PET 5412. Professional Practices for the Sports Scientist (3).

PET 5553. Cardiorespiratory and Anthropometric Evaluation and Development of Exercise Programs (3).

PET 5653. Cardiovascular Program Development for Competitive Athletes and Sport (3).

PET 5751. Sports Fitness Testing and Evaluation for Competitive Athletes and Sport (3).

PET 5930r. Seminar in Movement Sciences (1).

PET 5945r. Sports Sciences Practicum (3).

PET 6317. Skeletal Muscle Structure and Function (4).

PET 6365. Exercise and the Cardiorespiratory System (4).

PET 6368. Metabolic Responses to Exercise (3).

PET 6386. Environmental Aspects of Exercise (3).

PET 6387. Endocrinology in Health and Exercise (3).

PET 6388. Exercise and Disease (3).

PET 6930r. Seminar in Movement Sciences (1).

PET 6931r. Advanced Topics (1–4).

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

Organismal Biology:

see Biological Science