Skip to main content

This is your Donation message.

2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Department of Physics

College of Arts and Sciences

Web Page: http://www.physics.fsu.edu/

Chair: Horst Wahl; Associate Chairs: Ingo Wiedenhoever, Nicholas Bonesteel; Professors: Adams, Berg, Blessing, Boebinger, Bonesteel, Cao, Capstick, Chiorescu, Cottle, Dobrosavljevic, Duke, Eugenio, Gorkov, Green, Hill, Hoeflich, Manousakis, Owens, Piekarewicz, Prosper, Reina, Rikvold, Riley, Roberts, Schlottmann, Tabor, Van Winkle, Wahl, Wiedenhoever, Xiong, Yang, Zhou; Associate Professors: Askew, Crede, Lind, Ng, Okui, Vafek, Volya; Assistant Professors: Almaraz-Calderon, Beekman, Collins, Gao, Hsiao, Huffenberger, Koleberg, Murphy, Yohay; Professors Emeriti: Albright, Desloge, Edwards, Fletcher, S. Hagopian, V. Hagopian, Kemper, Kimel, G. Moulton, Philpott, Plendl, Robson, Schrieffer, Skofronick, Testardi, von Molnár

Florida State University's Department of Physics offers exciting programs and opportunities for students interested in learning physics. Our physics curriculum provides a solid foundation for future graduate work or immediate employment opportunities. There are many reasons students seek the challenges and rigors that come from making physics a part of their undergraduate studies. Those who choose physics find themselves in a field that both expands their abilities and provides them with an immense feeling of accomplishment. Perhaps the most important benefits gained from physics training are the confidence and the ability to tackle complex technical problems. As a result of this training, physicists are able to contribute in many professions.

Physics is the foundation of all sciences and has been the pursuit of some of the greatest minds in history, including Aristotle, Galileo, Newton, Maxwell, Einstein, and Dirac. Their discoveries and quest for knowledge form the foundation of our physics program. This proud tradition and passion for inquiry has produced a modern professional community of physicists whose contributions are continually expanding and changing our society. Whether it is on the end of a space-boom fixing the Hubble space telescope, creating and developing the World Wide Web, searching for the fundamental fabric of our universe, exploring safer and more reliable ways to diagnose and treat illnesses, or finding new and better ways to live, you will always find physicists on the frontier. So if you enjoy mathematics and science and are ready for a challenge, you should make physics a part of your education.

The internationally recognized faculty includes many who have earned prestigious awards for their research and teaching. The faculty believe that the quality of teaching, at all levels, is enhanced by a strong research program. Undergraduates, graduate students, and post-doctoral fellows participate in all aspects of research in physics at Florida State University. In fact, most undergraduate physics majors participate in research projects, and many are co-authors on publications. This research includes strong programs in computational physics and both experimental and theoretical studies in astrophysics, biophysics, and high energy, nuclear, condensed matter, and atomic and molecular physics. There are also many opportunities for interdisciplinary research, particularly at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) and the Institute of Molecular Biophysics (IMB), and as a separate degree program in chemical physics.

Experimental facilities include the following: a 9.5 MV Super FN Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator with superconducting post accelerator; the RESOLUT radioactive beam facility; a state-of-the-art gamma spectrometer array; electron spin resonance and electron double nuclear resonance spectrometers; liquid helium refrigerators; thin film preparation facilities including sputtering and laser ablation; ultrahigh vacuum instrumentation including surface analysis (LEED, Auger, optical) and molecular beam epitaxy; synthesis and characterization facilities for novel materials; three X-ray diffractometers with various sample stages for high and low temperature studies, multi-sample analysis and small angle studies; scanning electron, tunneling, and optical microscopes with image analysis; SQUID and vibrating sample magnetometers; and a helium atom surface scattering facility. The NHMFL provides a modern infrastructure enabling research in magnetic fields, including the highest-powered DC fields in the world, mainly used for materials science research, and facilities providing the highest fields in the world for nuclear, ion cyclotron, and electron magnetic resonance spectrometers as well as magnetic resonance imaging. Experimental work in high energy physics is done at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois and at the CERN laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland.

Computers are an integral part of all research programs in the department. The computational infrastructure is upgraded continuously to keep pace with advances in technology. In addition to using computers in research, students are expected to utilize numerical methods for problem solving in their course work.

Programs Offered

The Department of Physics offers programs leading to the following degrees: Bachelor of Science (BS), Master of Science (MS), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). The department offers the following majors: Physics, Physics and Astrophysics, Physical Science, and Physical Science with FSU-Teach. The departmental course offerings include courses for non-science majors, for non-physical-science majors, for K–12 educators, and for physical science majors. Honors work is available. Details may be obtained from the chair of the department.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in Physics as well as Physics and Astrophysics satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in PHZ 4151C. Undergraduate majors in Physical Science and Physical Science/FSU-Teach satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in COP 3014, ISC 3313, or PHZ 4151C.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into these upper-division degree programs:

Physics, Physics and Astrophysics

  1. CHM X045C, or CHM X040 and CHM X041, or CHM X045/X045L
  2. CHM X046C or CHM X046/X046L
  3. MAC X311 or MAC X281
  4. MAC X312 or MAC X282
  5. MAC X313 or MAC X283
  6. PHY X048/X048L and PHY X049/X049L, or PHY X048C and PHY X049C

Physical Science

  1. CHM X045/X045L, or CHM X040 and CHM X041, or CHM X045C
  2. CHM X046/X046L or CHM X046C
  3. MAC X311 or MAC X281
  4. MAC X312 or MAC X282
  5. MAC X313 or MAC X283
  6. PHY X048C and PHY X049C, or PHY X048/X048L and PHY X049/X049L
  7. MAC X312

Note: MAC X312 is a prerequisite for PHY X049C

Physical Science/FSU-Teach

  1. CHM X045/X045L, or CHM X040 and CHM X041, or CHM X045C
  2. CHM X046/X046L or CHM X046C
  3. MAC X311 or MAC X281
  4. MAC X312 or MAC X282
  5. MAC X313 or MAC X283
  6. PHY X048C and PHY X049C, or PHY X048/X048L and PHY X049/X049L
  7. MAC X312

    Note: MAC X312 is a prerequisite for PHY X049C

  8. SMT X043
  9. SMT X053

Note: Transfer students will be able to take SMT X043 and SMT X053 when admitted to upper division.

Requirements

Please review all college-wide degree requirements summarized in the "College of Arts and Sciences" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Degree requirements and outlines of undergraduate programs that will meet all departmental and University requirements are available at http://www.academic-guide.fsu.edu.

The University oral competency communication requirement is satisfied for Physics, Physics and Astrophysics, and Physical Science/FSU-Teach majors by taking PHY 3091, Communication in Physics. Physical Science majors may take any university course satisfying the University communication requirement. The University computer competency requirement is satisfied for Physics and Physics and Astrophysics majors by taking PHZ 4151C; it is satisfied by Physical Science and Physical Science/FSU-Teach majors by taking COP 3014, ISC 3313, or PHZ 4151C.

Policy on Prerequisites

All prerequisite courses must be passed with a grade of "C–" or better.

Physics Major

A Physics major is required to take:

  1. The following core courses: Discovering Physics (PHY 1090), General Physics A (PHY 2048C), General Physics B (PHY 2049C), Communication in Physics (PHY 3091), Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101), Physics Problem Solving (PHY 3045), Mathematical Physics (PHZ 3113), Mechanics I (PHY 3221), Intermediate Laboratory (PHY 3802L), Electricity and Magnetism I (PHY 4323), Thermal and Statistical Physics (PHY 4513), Quantum Theory of Matter A (PHY 4604), and Advanced Laboratory (PHY 4822Lr).
  2. At least four of the following courses: Introduction to Astrophysics (AST 4211), Optics (PHY 3424), Mechanics II (PHY 4222), Electricity and Magnetism II (PHY 4324), Quantum Theory of Matter B (PHY 4605), Phenomena in Condensed Matter Physics (PHZ 3400), Particle and Nuclear Physics (PHZ 4390), and Special and General Relativity (PHZ 4601).
  3. The following computational course: Computational Physics Lab (PHZ 4151C).
  4. One of the following sets of chemistry courses: General Chemistry I/Laboratory (CHM 1045/1045L) or Honors General Chemistry I/Laboratory (CHM 1050/1050L).
  5. The following mathematics classes: Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (MAC 2311), Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (MAC 2312), Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (MAC 2313), and Ordinary Differential Equations (MAP 2302) or Engineering Mathematics I (MAP 3305).

Students who are planning to conduct graduate work in physics are strongly advised to include Quantum Theory of Matter B (PHY 4605), Mechanics II (PHY 4222), and Electricity and Magnetism II (PHY 4324) in their programs.

An Honors Thesis or Senior Thesis (minimum of 6 credit hours) may be substituted for the Advanced Lab (PHY 4822Lr).

AA transfer students are not required to take PHY 1090.

No physics, chemistry, or math course with a grade below "C–" may be used to satisfy the above requirements. A student who has received three or more unsatisfactory grades (U, F, D–, D, D+) in courses required for the Physics major, whether offered by the Department of Physics at Florida State University or elsewhere, whether repeated or not, will not be permitted to graduate with a degree in this major.

In addition to satisfying the above requirements, students must satisfy the general requirements of both the College of Arts and Sciences and the University.

Physics and Astrophysics Major

A Physics and Astrophysics major is required to take:

  1. The following core courses: Discovering Physics (PHY 1090), General Physics A (PHY 2048C), General Physics B (PHY 2049C), Communication in Physics (PHY 3091), Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101), Physics Problem Solving (PHY 3045), Mechanics I (PHY 3221), Electricity and Magnetism I (PHY 4323), Thermal and Statistical Physics (PHY 4513), Quantum Theory of Matter A (PHY 4604), Mathematical Physics (PHZ 3113), Astrophysics Laboratory (AST 3721L) or Intermediate Laboratory (PHY 3802L), Introduction to Astrophysics (AST 4211), and Extragalactic Astronomy (AST 4419) or Observational Techniques in Astrophysics (AST 4722).
  2. At least three of the following courses: Physics of Stars (AST 4217), Cosmology and Structure Formation (AST 4414), Particle and Nuclear Physics (PHZ 4390), Special and General Relativity (PHZ 4601), and Nuclear Astrophysics (PHZ 4316).
  3. The following computational course: Computational Physics Laboratory (PHZ 4151C).
  4. One of the following sets of chemistry courses: General Chemistry I/Laboratory (CHM 1045/1045L) or Honors General Chemistry I/Laboratory (CHM 1050/1050L).
  5. The following mathematics classes: Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (MAC 2311), Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (MAC 2312), Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (MAC 2313), and Ordinary Differential Equations (MAP 2302) or Engineering Mathematics I (MAP 3305).

Students who are planning to conduct graduate work in astrophysics are strongly advised to include Planetary Geology (GLY 1042), Mechanics II (PHY 4222), and Quantum Theory of Matter B (PHY 4605) in their programs.

AA transfer students are not required to take PHY 1090.

No physics, chemistry, or math course with a grade below "C–" may be used to satisfy the above requirements. A student who has received three or more unsatisfactory grades (U, F, D–, D, D+) in courses required for the Physics and Astrophysics major, whether offered by the Department of Physics at Florida State University or elsewhere, whether repeated or not, will not be permitted to graduate with this degree.

In addition to satisfying the above requirements, students must satisfy the general requirements of both the College of Arts and Sciences and the University.

Physical Science Major

The Physical Science program is designed to provide students with opportunities to explore the natural and technological worlds broadly, from the Earth and space sciences to modern physics to computer science and mathematics. A Physical Science major is required to take:

  1. The following core courses: General Physics A (PHY 2048C), General Physics B (PHY 2049C), and Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101).
  2. One of the following sets of chemistry courses: General Chemistry I/Laboratory (CHM 1045/1045L) and General Chemistry II/Laboratory (CHM 1046/1046L) or Honors General Chemistry I/Laboratory (CHM 1050/1050L) and Honors General Chemistry II/Laboratory (CHM 1051/1051L).
  3. One of the following computational courses: Programming I (COP 3014), Computational Physics Lab (PHZ 4151C), or Introduction to Scientific Programming (ISC 3313).
  4. The following mathematics courses: Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (MAC 2311) and Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (MAC 2312).
  5. At least nine courses from the following list (at least twenty-seven credit hours): Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (MAC 2313), Ordinary Differential Equations (MAP 2302) or Engineering Math I (MAP 3305), Applied Linear Algebra I (MAS 3105), Introduction to Astrophysics (AST 4211), Physics Problem Solving (PHY 3045), Mechanics I (PHY 3221), Optics (PHY 3424), Intermediate Laboratory (PHY 3802L) or Astrophysics Laboratory (AST 3721L), Mathematical Physics (PHZ 3113), Condensed Matter Physics (PHZ 3400), Particle and Nuclear Physics (PHZ 4390), Survey of Organic Chemistry and Lab (CHM 2200 and 2200L) or Organic Chemistry I (CHM 2210), Introduction to Analytical Chemistry and Lab (CHM 3120 and 3120L), General Physical Chemistry (CHM 3400), Programming I (COP 3014, unless used to satisfy the computer skills requirement), Object Oriented Programming (COP 3330), Introduction to Unix (COP 3353), Physical Geology (GLY 2010C), Historical Geology and Lab (GLY 2100 and 2100L), Mineralogy and Crystallography (GLY 3200C), Physical Climatology (MET 2101), General Meteorology (MET 2700), Introduction to Atmospheric Dynamics (MET 3300). Other upper-division courses in physics, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology, meteorology, and mathematics may also be accepted. Please speak with a Physics advisor to see if particular courses satisfy this requirement. Courses required for a minor or an additional major will not be counted toward satisfying this requirement.

No physics, chemistry, computer science, geology, meteorology, or math course with a grade below "C–" may be used to satisfy the above requirements. A student who has received more than five unsatisfactory grades (U, F, D–, D, D+) in courses required for the Physical Science major, whether offered by the Department of Physics at Florida State University or elsewhere, whether repeated or not, will not be permitted to graduate with this degree.

In addition to satisfying the above requirements, students must satisfy the general requirements of both the College of Arts and Sciences and the University.

Physical Science/FSU-Teach Major

Physical Science/FSU-Teach majors are required to declare a second major in Science Teaching and to take:

  1. The following core courses: General Physics A (PHY 2048C), General Physics B (PHY 2049C), Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101), Intermediate Laboratory (PHY 3802L) or Astrophysics Laboratory (AST 3721L), and Communication in Physics (PHY 3091).
  2. One of the following sets of chemistry courses: General Chemistry I/Laboratory (CHM 1045/1045L) and General Chemistry II/Laboratory (CHM 1046/1046L) or Honors General Chemistry I/Laboratory (CHM 1050/1050L) and Honors General Chemistry II/Laboratory (CHM 1051/1051L).
  3. One of the following computational courses: Programming I (COP 3014), Computational Physics Lab (PHZ 4151C), or Introduction to Scientific Programming (ISC 3313).
  4. The following mathematics courses: Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (MAC 2311) and Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (MAC 2312).
  5. One Physics Learning Assistantship course (PHY 3012).
  6. Research Methods (ISC 3523C).
  7. Four of the following five physics courses: Physics Problem Solving (PHY 3045), Optics (PHY 3424), Phenomena in Condensed Matter Physics (PHZ 3400), Particle and Nuclear Physics (PHZ 4390), and Introduction to Astrophysics (AST 4211).

No physics, chemistry, computer science, or math course or ISC 3523C with a grade below "C–" may be used to satisfy the above requirements. A student who has received more than five unsatisfactory grades (U, F, D–, D, D+) in courses required for the Physical Science/FSU-Teach major, whether offered by the Department of Physics at Florida State University or elsewhere, whether repeated or not, will not be permitted to graduate with this major. In addition to the above requirements, students must satisfy the general requirements of both the College of Arts and Sciences and the University and the requirements for the Science Teaching major.

Minor

The required mathematics courses for the Physics and Physics and Astrophysics programs constitute an acceptable minor in mathematics, but a student who so desires may take an additional approved minor. For the Physical Science and Physical Science/FSU-Teach programs, the required collateral courses may contribute to a minor if not also used to meet Liberal Studies or other requirements. However, a student may select another minor.

Minor in Physics

To obtain a minor in physics, a student is required to take General Physics A (PHY 2048C), General Physics B (PHY 2049C), and Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101). Grades below "C–" will not be accepted for a minor.

Minor in Biomedical Physics

The Physics Department offers a minor in Biomedical Physics designed for students preparing for graduate studies in the biological sciences, for medical school, or for medical professions such as physical therapy. Students are required to take either General Physics A and B (PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C), or College Physics A and B (PHY 2053C and PHY 2054C), and Biomedical Physics I and II (PHZ 4702 and PHZ 4703). Grades below "C–" will not be accepted for a minor.

Honors in the Major

The Department of Physics offers a program in Honors in the Major to encourage talented juniors and seniors to undertake independent research as part of the undergraduate experience. For requirements and other information, see the "University Honors Office and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin.

FSU-Teach Program in Teaching Physics

For those interested in teaching physics, FSU-Teach is an innovative approach to teacher education that involves a collaboration between scientists, mathematicians, and education faculty at Florida State University. In FSU-Teach, students will develop deep science or mathematics knowledge and the knowledge, skill, and experience needed to be an effective science or math teacher. The program will pay for tuition for the first two courses, and work-study positions with scientists, mathematicians, and local schools are available. For more information, see the Web site: http://FSU-Teach.fsu.edu.

Definition of Prefixes

AST—Astronomy

PHY—Physics

PHZ—Physics: Continued

PSC—Physical Sciences

Undergraduate Courses

Courses for Non-Science Majors

AST 1002. Planets, Stars, and Galaxies (3). This course provides general acquaintance with some of the facts, concepts and scientific methods of astronomy. As a liberal study course, the goal is to help students learn some basic facts of astronomy as well as gain an appreciation of astronomy as a science, the universe, and the current scientific ideas about its history and its future.

AST 1002L. Planets, Stars, and Galaxies Laboratory (1). Corequisite: AST 1002. This course, which consists of outdoor and indoor labs, provides a hands-on introduction to astronomy as an observational science. In the outdoor labs students learn how to make observations and measurements of planetary, stellar and galactic objects using either your unaided eyes, binoculars or a telescope. The indoor labs acquaint them with the telescope, the coordinate system used to locate astronomical objects on the sky, the motion of objects in the sky and other basic concepts of astronomy.

PHY 1020. Physics and Technology for Future Presidents (3). This course is for non-science majors and contains the essential physics students need in order to understand today's core science and technology issues, and to become the next generation of world leaders. The course empowers students possessing any level of scientific background with the tools they need to make informed decisions and to argue their views persuasively with anyone, expert or otherwise.

PHY 1020L. Physics and Technology for Future Presidents Laboratory (1). Corequisite: PHY 1020. This course is designed to accompany the PHY 1020 lecture course. Although the lab material generally follows the lecture, some topics may be treated earlier or later in the lab syllabus.

Courses for Non-Physical-Science Majors

PHY 2053C. College Physics A (4). Prerequisites: MAC 1114 and MAC 1140 with grades of "C–" or better or suitable mathematics examination placement score. Corequisite: PHY 2053L. This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence for life-sciences students and is intended to provide a general knowledge of the basic concepts of physics relating to mechanics, energy, gravity, rotational motion, fluids, heat, thermodynamics, vibrations and waves. Physics is based on problem solving and this class involves both solving word problems and performing laboratory exercises. The level of mathematical skill necessary to complete this course is a strong proficiency with algebra (especially word problems) and trigonometric functions; calculus is not used.

PHY 2053L. College Physics A Laboratory (0).

PHY 2054C. College Physics B (4). Prerequisite: PHY 2053C or PHY 2048C. Corequisite: PHY 2054L. This course is an introduction to electromagnetism, light, and modern physics for non-physical-science majors. Two lectures, one recitation, and one laboratory each week. Students who have previously received credit for PHY 2049C may not register for PHY 2054C.

PHY 2054L. College Physics B Laboratory (0).

PHZ 4702. Biomedical Physics I (3). Prerequisites: PHY 2053C and PHY 2054C or PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C. This course is the first in a series of two introductory courses on the applications of physics in biology and medicine. The course discusses applications of classical mechanics, hydrodynamics, and thermodynamics to motion, to the structure of the musculoskeletal, respiratory, and circulatory systems, as well as to the biology of the cell. The course is intended for students preparing for graduate studies in the biological sciences, for medical school, or for medical professions such as physical therapy and nursing.

PHZ 4703. Biomedical Physics II (3). Prerequisites: PHY 2053C and PHY 2054C or PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C. This course is the second in a series of two introductory courses on the applications of electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics to the nervous system, to vision, to modern topics in biomolecular research, as well as to microscopy and to modern biomedical imaging techniques. The course is intended for students preparing for graduate studies in the biological sciences, for medical school, or for medical professions such as physical therapy and nursing.

Physics for K–12 Educators

PSC 2801C. Physical Science for EC/EE Teachers (4). This course is designed for prospective elementary and early childhood education majors. The course combines physics and chemistry and the laboratory is integral to the course. Students work in groups in a hands-on, minds-on approach to learning physical science.

PHY 3012. Learning Assistantship in Physics (2). Prerequisites: PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C. Corequisite: PHY 3101. This course focuses on apprentice teaching in an inquiry-based physics learning environment under the direction of a faculty member. In addition, the course provides an examination of theoretical issues such as conceptual development, conceptual change, collaborative learning, technology in education, and students' conceptions of various topics in physics, as well as practical issues encountered in facilitating learning, managing the classroom, formative and summative assessment, and differentiating instruction in a collaborative environment.

General Physics for Physical-Science Majors

PHY 2048C. General Physics A (5). Prerequisite: MAC 2311. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how and why things move. Topics covered include kinematics, forces, energy, momentum, oscillations, and thermodynamics. The course is intended for physical science majors and engineers and to be taken as a sequence with General Physics B (PHY 2049C) and Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101). Completing Modern Physics entitles students to a minor in physics. Calculus is used in this course.

PHY 2048L. General Physics A Laboratory (0).

PHY 2049C. General Physics B (5). Prerequisites: PHY 2048C and MAC 2312. This course is an introduction to electricity, magnetism, and optics for physical science majors. Calculus is used. Course consists of lectures, recitations, and laboratory.

PHY 2049L. General Physics B Laboratory (0).

Courses for Majors

AST 3721L. Astrophysics Laboratory (2). Prerequisite: PHY 3101. This course offers an introduction to experimental methodology, data analysis and interpretation, calibration techniques, scientific model validation, as well as data presentation and communication of results. The laboratory experiments have astrophysical relevance.

AST 4211. Introduction to Astrophysics (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2312 and PHY 2049C; science majors only. This introductory course covers key aspects and concepts of modern astronomy and astrophysics, including coordinate systems, instrumentation, our sun and planets, stars and stellar evolution, binary systems and variable stars, stellar explosions, as well as galaxies and the evolution of the universe.

AST 4217. The Physics of Stars (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3101 and PHY 3221. This course serves as an introduction to star formation, evolution, and death through simple theoretical modeling and through a strong emphasis on the underlying physics concepts.

AST 4341. Hydrodynamics and Plasma for Astrophysics (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3221 and PHZ 3113; or instructor permission. This course is an introduction to the hydrodynamics, plasma physics, and magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) necessary for an understanding of astrophysical processes. No prior knowledge of hydrodynamics is required.

AST 4414. Cosmology and Structure Formation (3). Prerequisites: AST 4211 and PHY 3101. This course covers the evolution of the universe from the "Hot Big Bang" to the current epoch. Topics include cosmological expansion, the Hubble constant and other cosmological parameters, the microwave background radiation, early universe nucleosynthesis, the growth of large-scale structure, the "dark ages" and the re-ionization of the universe, the horizon and other fine-tuning problems, distance determinations, redshift surveys, inflation, cosmological acceleration, as well as dark matter and dark energy.

AST 4419. Extragalactic Astronomy (3). Prerequisite: AST 4211. This course offers a survey of the physics and phenomenology of galaxies and galaxy structures. Topics include stellar populations, classifications systems, interstellar and intergalactic material, chemical abundances and evolution, galaxy formation, structure, dynamics and evolution, extragalactic distance determination, interacting systems, as well as active galactic nuclei.

AST 4722. Observational Techniques in Astrophysics (3). Prerequisite: AST 4211. This course covers principles and techniques used in obtaining modern astronomical data. Includes an overview of current and next-generation astronomical instrumentation, discussion of calibration schemes and observing strategies, and an introduction to analysis techniques.

PHY 1090r. Discovering Physics (1). This course is an introduction to being and becoming a physicist. May be repeated to a maximum of two semester hours.

PHY 3045. Physics Problem Solving (3). Prerequisites: PHY 2048C and PHY 2049C. Corequisites: PHY 3101 and MAP 2302, or instructor permission. This course includes instruction and practice in solving advanced, calculus-based, multi-step problems in classical mechanics and E&M.

PHY 3091. Communication in Physics (2). Prerequisite: PHY 2048C. Corequisite: PHY 2049C. This course consists of instruction and practice in oral communications for physicists. Students choose physics topics in consultation with instructor and present them to the class.

PHY 3101. Intermediate Modern Physics (3). Prerequisite: PHY 2049C. This course focuses on special relativity, quantum properties of light and matter, and origins of the universe.

PHY 3221. Mechanics I (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3045, PHY 3101, and MAP 2302. Corequisite: MAC 2313. This course focuses on Newtonian mechanics of a single particle, oscillations, nonlinear oscillations and chaos, gravitation, central force motion, systems of particles, and motion in noninertial reference frames.

PHY 3424. Optics (3). Prerequisite: PHY 2049C. This course focuses on topics such as: geometrical optics, wave optics, optical instrumentation, properties of light, lasers, fiber optics.

PHY 3802L. Intermediate Laboratory (2). Prerequisite: PHY 3101. This course focuses on experiments in optics, modern physics, and electricity and magnetism. The emphasis is on the development of experimental technique, assessment of the validity of experimental data, and the development of skill in the written presentation of results.

PHY 4222. Mechanics II (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3221, PHZ 3113, or instructor permission. This course focuses on Lagrangian dynamics, Hamiltonian dynamics, dynamics of rigid bodies, coupled oscillations, waves in one-dimensional continuous systems, and special relativity.

PHY 4323. Electricity and Magnetism I (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3221 and PHZ 3113. This course focuses on electric fields for static charge distributions, electric fields in matter, magnetic fields for constant current configurations, magnetic fields in matter, and Maxwell's equations.

PHY 4324. Electricity and Magnetism II (3). Prerequisite: PHY 4323. This course focuses on electromagnetic wave solutions to Maxwell's equations; reflection, transmission, dispersion, and absorption of electromagnetic waves; scalar and vector potentials; electromagnetic dipole radiation; electrodynamics; and relativity.

PHY 4513. Thermal and Statistical Physics (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2313, PHY 3221, and PHZ 3113. This course studies the fundamental laws of thermodynamics and their application to simple systems, the kinetic theory of an ideal gas, and is an introduction to the classical and quantum statistical mechanics of weakly interacting systems.

PHY 4604. Quantum Theory of Matter A (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3101, PHY 3221, and PHZ 3113. This course focuses on quantum mechanics and its applications to particles, nuclei, atoms, molecules, and condensed matter.

PHY 4605. Quantum Theory of Matter B (3). Prerequisite: PHY 4604. This course focuses on quantum mechanics and its applications to particles, nuclei, atoms, molecules, and condensed matter.

PHY 4822Lr. Advanced Laboratory (2). Prerequisite: PHY 3802L. This course consists of experiments in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and other areas of modern physics. Students are expected to work without detailed instructions. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours for special projects arranged in advance between the student and the instructor.

PHZ 3113. Mathematical Physics (3). Prerequisites: PHY 3045 and PHY 3101. Corequisite: MAP 2302 or MAP 3305. This course focuses on: mathematical methods applied to physical systems; vectors, specialized techniques of integration, integral transforms, special functions, boundary-value problems, numerical methods.

PHZ 3400. Phenomena in Condensed Matter Physics (3). Prerequisite: PHY 3101. This course covers topics such as: crystal structures, phonons and thermal properties, electron energy bands, metals, semiconductors, superconductors, and magnetism.

PHZ 4151C. Computational Physics Laboratory (3). Prerequisites: MAP 2302 or MAP 3305, PHY 3221, and PHZ 3113. This course introduces students to the use of computers to solve computationally intensive problems, including basic instruction in physics problem solving using numerical solutions of differential equations, numerical integration, Monte Carlo methods, linear algebra, and symbolic algebra. Provides instruction in computational techniques and software development skills and practice in using network and software development tools including telnet, ftp, spreadsheets, databases, code management tools, and the World Wide Web.

PHZ 4316. Nuclear Astrophysics (3). Prerequisite: AST 4211. Corequisite: PHY 4604. This course offers an introduction to the role of nuclear reactions and decays in astrophysics. Topics cover the origin of elements in the context of Big Bang, major burning stages in the life of a star, stellar explosions, and processes in interstellar matter.

PHZ 4390. Particle and Nuclear Physics (3). Prerequisites: MAP 2302 or MAP 3305 and PHY 3101, or instructor permission. This course examines the properties of nuclei and particles, nuclear and particle decays, the Standard Model, and accelerator and detector techniques.

PHZ 4470. Materials Characterization (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2313, PHZ 3400, and PHZ 4471. This course is an introduction to a large variety of materials characterization techniques that have been developed and are currently used in materials science research.

PHZ 4471. Materials Synthesis and Applications (3). Prerequisites: MAC 2313, PHY 3101, and PHZ 3400. This course is an introduction to materials synthesis and materials applications.

PHZ 4601. Special and General Relativity (3). Prerequisite: PHY 3221. Corequisite: PHY 4323. This course examines the special theory of relativity, tensor analysis and curvature, general theory of relativity, experimental tests, black holes, gravitational radiation, and cosmology.

Research and Special Topics

AST 4218r. Astrophysics Seminar (1). Prerequisite: AST 4211. This seminar introduces students to current research topics in astronomy and astrophysics through presentation and discussion of recently published research papers, their own research work, and occasional review publications. Topics cover observational and theoretical astrophysics alike. May be repeated to a maximum of two semester hours.

PHY 1921r. WIMSE Colloquium (1). This course is a colloquium for the Women in Math, Science and Engineering Living-Learning Community. Students must be members of the WIMSE Living-Learning Community.

PHY 3949r. Experiential Learning (0). (S/U grade only.) This course is a non-credit experiential learning course, which offers students an opportunity to gain "real world" on-the-job work experience related to a specific academic field of study. Students must register for this course through the FSU Career Center.

PHY 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

PHY 4910r. Research Participation (1–3). This course consists of projects in theoretical or experimental physics arranged in advance between the student and a member of the teaching faculty of the physics department. May be repeated to a maximum of eight semester hours.

PHY 4936r. Special Topics in Physics (1–3). Prerequisite: Senior standing or instructor permission. This course consists of advanced applications of physics to topics of interest, such as relativity, astrophysics, particle physics, advanced solid state physics, or advanced nuclear physics. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

PHY 4937r. Undergraduate Tutorial in Physics (1–3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Upper-division undergraduate standing. This course consists of selected topics in modern physics. Examination of primary research literature. May be repeated to a maximum of fifteen semester hours. A maximum of eight students allowed in each tutorial.

PHY 4970r. Honors Work (1–6). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

PHY 4975. Senior Thesis (1). Pre- or corequisite: PHY 4910. This course consists of a written report and an oral presentation discussing research work done under PHY 4910. The grade is assigned by a committee of three faculty members.

PHY 4990r. Senior Seminar (1). Prerequisite: PHY 3101. Corequisites: PHY 3091 and PHY 4910r. In this course, students present results of their physics research to the class for discussion. May be repeated to a maximum of two semester hours.

Graduate Courses

AST 5210. Introduction to Astrophysics (3).

AST 5219r. Astrophysics Seminar (3).

AST 5245. Radiative Processes in Astronomy (3).

AST 5342. Hydrodynamics and Plasma for Astrophysics (3).

AST 5416. Cosmology and Structure Formation (3).

AST 5418. Extragalactic Astronomy (3).

AST 5725. Observational Techniques in Astrophysics (3).

AST 5760. Computational Astrophysics (3).

AST 5765. Advanced Analysis Techniques in Astronomy (3).

PHY 5157. Advanced Numerical Applications in Physics (3).

PHY 5226. Intermediate Mechanics (3).

PHY 5227. Advanced Mechanics (3).

PHY 5228. Mechanics II (3).

PHY 5246. Theoretical Dynamics (3).

PHY 5326. Electricity and Magnetism I (3).

PHY 5327. Electricity and Magnetism II (3).

PHY 5346. Electrodynamics A (3).

PHY 5347. Electrodynamics B (3).

PHY 5515. Thermal and Statistical Physics (3).

PHY 5524. Statistical Mechanics (3).

PHY 5607r. Quantum Theory of Matter A (3).

PHY 5608r. Quantum Theory of Matter B (3).

PHY 5645. Quantum Mechanics A (3).

PHY 5646. Quantum Mechanics B (3).

PHY 5657. Group Theory and Angular Momentum (3).

PHY 5667. Quantum Field Theory (3).

PHY 5669. Quantum Field Theory B (3).

PHY 5670. Quantum Many-Body Physics (3).

PHY 5904r. Directed Individual Study (3).

PHY 5909r. Directed Individual Study (1–12). (S/U grade only.)

PHY 5918r. Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only.)

PHY 5920r. Colloquium (1). (S/U grade only.)

PHY 5930. Introductory Seminar on Research (1). (S/U grade only.)

PHY 5940r. Supervised Teaching (0–5). (S/U grade only.)

PHY 6937r. Selected Topics in Physics (1–3).

PHY 6938r. Special Topics in Physics (3). (S/U grade only.)

PHY 6941r. Graduate Tutorial in Physics (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

PHZ 5156C. Computational Physics Laboratory (3).

PHZ 5305. Nuclear Physics I (3).

PHZ 5307. Nuclear Physics II (3).

PHZ 5315. Nuclear Astrophysics (3).

PHZ 5354. High-Energy Physics I (3).

PHZ 5355. High-Energy Physics II (3).

PHZ 5430. Physics of Materials (3).

PHZ 5475. Materials Characterization (3).

PHZ 5491. Condensed Matter Physics I (3).

PHZ 5492. Condensed Matter Physics II (3).

PHZ 5606. Special and General Relativity (3).

PHZ 5715. Biophysics I (3).

PHZ 5716. Biophysics II (3).

For listings relating to graduate course work for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

PHYSIOLOGY:

see Biological Science