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2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Program in Public Safety and Security

College of Applied Studies

Web Page: http://pc.fsu.edu/Academics/Undergraduate-Programs/Public-Safety-Security

Program Coordinator: Tom Kelley; Instructional Systems Faculty III: Banyon Pelham; Teaching Faculty III: Mark Feulner, Mike Zinzer

Public Safety and Security combines disciplines within both social science and physical science to address problems presented by criminal behavior. The Public Safety and Security BS degree prepares students to practice within most of the public safety and security professions.

The Public Safety and Security degree integrates practical exercises, both analytic and hands-on, with theoretical principles to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities required by the competencies for law enforcement, security, intelligence, and investigations. The guiding perspective of public safety is as an operational spectrum from prevention to response to investigation, under laid with intelligence, connected by a management information system, all facilitated by an overarching management system. The core and required courses are designed to provide students with an overview of this entire spectrum and also the opportunity to focus on operating within a portion of the system.

An undergraduate degree in Public Safety and Security offers broad preparation for positions in law enforcement, public and private security, Department of Homeland Security agencies, the intelligence services, community and residential corrections, court services, probation and parole, and may serve as a foundation for law school or graduate school.

Advising

Florida State University Panama City provides academic advising to students interested in pursuing coursework in Public Safety and Security. For more information, please contact Angie Sexton by e-mail at asexton@pc.fsu.edu or by phone at (850) 770-2178.

Admissions

All students must meet the University-wide baccalaureate degree requirements summarized in the "Undergraduate Degree Requirements" chapter of this General Bulletin. In order to enroll in the College of Applied Studies, an undergraduate must be certified by the Division of Undergraduate Studies or be a transfer student with fifty-two or more semester hours of accepted credit. World language completion (or exemption) is also required. Under certain circumstances, students may be admitted without these, but will be required to complete both while enrolled in the program in addition to other program requirements. In addition, there are three alternative criteria for admission to the program.

  1. Completion of an AA degree from a Florida public college with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. The AA degree shall include the completion of the Florida State general education requirements.
  2. Transfer students from a regionally accredited postsecondary institution who have sixty or more semester hours of transferable credit. Transfer students must have a minimum grade point average of 2.5. These students must complete the Florida State University general education requirements while enrolled in this program.

Transcripts for students entering with more than the specified hours for the AA will be evaluated for whether any of the hours are applicable to the degree. Hours applicable will be subtracted from the nominal sixty (AA or transfer) required to a maximum of fifteen hours of underclass hours. Transcripts for transfer students will be evaluated in a similar fashion and some upper-level hours may be accepted to a maximum of thirty hours because the last thirty hours must be taken at FSU. Hours not applicable to the Public Safety and Security degree will not be transferred to avoid a possibility of a student incurring an excess hours charge.

Students applying for admission to either the Public Safety and Security programs or the Underwater Crime Scene Investigation Certificate must apply through Florida State University's Panama City Office of Admissions and Records online at http://pc.fsu.edu/Admissions.

Academic Performance and Retention

A grade of "C–" or above is required for credit in all core courses. A student who accumulates more than four unsatisfactory grades (U, F, D–, D, D+) in courses taken for college credit at FSU or elsewhere after admission to the program, whether repeated or not, will not be permitted to continue or graduate as a major in the College.

Degree Requirements

General graduation requirements include:

  • A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in all work attempted.
  • Completion of the Composition and Mathematics requirements.
  • Completion of the Oral Competency, Computer Skills Competency, and Diversity course requirements.
  • Satisfaction of the state of Florida's world language requirement. Credit hours required to satisfy this requirement are in addition to the sixty (Post AA) required.
  • Completion of at least twenty-seven of the Public Safety and Security credit hours at FSU; completion of forty-five hours at the 3000/4000 level; and, completion of the last thirty hours for the degree at FSU.
  • Twelve/thirteen hours in core courses, taken at FSU, and completed with a "C" or better,
  • Three hour integrated capstone course,
  • Eighteen hours in liberal studies to complete the thirty-six hour general education requirement.
  • Thirty-three hours in restricted electives and/or required major courses,
  • Twelve hours in a minor or elective hours approved by the College.

Additional graduation requirements will depend on whether the student was admitted as an AA transfer student from a Florida public college, or as a non-Florida AA transfer student.

Credit hours are to be distributed as follows:

  • Forty-eight credit hours in Public Safety and Security with specific requirements of:

Admitted with an AA from a Florida public college – one hundred twenty total hours are required. The post-AA credit hours are to be distributed as follows:

  • Forty-eight credit hours in Public Safety and Security with specific requirements of:

Admitted as a transfer student – one hundred twenty total hours are required. The remaining hours are to be distributed as follows:

  • Forty-eight credit hours in Public Safety and Security with specific requirements of:

In addition, transfer students must complete FSU's general education requirements, either as part of the twelve hours of unrestricted electives or in addition to them.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in public safety and security satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in CGS 2060 or CGS 2100.

Internships

A variety of internships are available at the local, state, and federal levels. Students can choose from the fields of law enforcement, courts, corrections, criminal justice planning, criminological research, and private sector opportunities. Internships are available for juniors and seniors who have completed the core courses and have satisfied the college-level proficiency skills in reading, writing, and mathematics requirement. The intern receives a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) grade, and full credit is given upon successful completion of both the academic component and work hours.

Students are advised that information pertaining to all matters of public record, such as arrests and convictions, may be required by the agencies accepting interns. Although a reasonable effort is made to place a student in an internship, FSU Panama City will not be liable if a student cannot be placed. Students are responsible for all living and transportation expenses during internship experiences.

Certificates

The College of Applied Studies, Public Safety and Security, offers an Underwater Crime Scene Investigation (UCSI) Certificate that may be earned independently or as part of a bachelor's. For more information, visit http://pc.fsu.edu/Academics/Underwater-Crime-Scene-Investigation-UCSI or contact Dr. Tom Kelley by e-mail at tkelley@pc.fsu.edu.

Student Honor Society

Garnet Key Honor Society of the Panama City campus, founded in 1986, recognizes students primarily for service and scholarship, but also for spirit and leadership. Activities are generally service projects and functions for the Panama City campus. Applicants must have completed fifteen semester hours at that campus with a GPA of 3.5 or higher. For more information, contact Cristina Rios by e-mail at crios@pc.fsu.edu.

Student Activities

The Scuba, Hyperbaric, and Recreational Club (SHARC) Dive Club was established to coordinate and facilitate SCUBA training due to FSU Panama City student interest in scientific and recreational diving. Membership is open to all regardless of certification status. Certified divers that are members have access to club resources such as regulators, dive lights, and buoyancy compensators. For more information, contact Darren DeDanio by e-mail at sharcfsupc@gmail.com, contact the FSU Panama City Dive Locker at (850) 770-2206, or visit the club's Web site at http://pc.fsu.edu//Students/Student-Organizations/SHARC.

Definition of Prefixes

CCJ—Criminology and Criminal Justice

CJC—Corrections

CJE—Law Enforcement

CJJ—Juvenile Justice

CJL—Law and Process

CPO—Comparative Politics

DSC—Domestic Security

ISC—Interdisciplinary Sciences

Undergraduate Courses

CCJ 3024. The Criminal Justice System (3). This course provides an advanced overview of principles and practical applications of criminal law, criminal procedure, and criminological theory. Special emphasis is placed on how the components of the criminal justice system: the prosecutorial and defense function, the judiciary, and the field of corrections are synthesized into a functioning process of public safety and security.

CCJ 3032. Crime in Media (3). This course provides students with an understanding of the impact of the media on crime, criminals, the criminal justice system, and the general public. The focus of this course is the historical impact of media and its influences on the outcomes of both routine and sensational cases within the American criminal justice system and how media reporting affects the policy making processes and the social definitions of crime.

CCJ 3071. Computer Applications in Criminal Justice (3). This course is designed to prepare the student for the use of IT in various professions within the Criminal Justice community. This includes, the fundamentals of computing, the use of data processing, word processing, e-mail, Computer Automated Dispatch, Records Management Systems, use of the Internet and IT Security protocols.

CCJ 3484. Ethics in Policing and Intelligence (3). This course explores ethics for both the criminal justice system and intelligence professionals. It compares and contrasts the differing roles ethics plays in policing and intelligence communities. The course probes significant past and current events to illuminate issues relevant to ethics in intelligence and policing.

CCJ 3612. Behavioral Science in Criminal Justice (3). This course introduces the major issues, influences, and trends considered in the behavioral analysis of criminal and delinquent activity. Course material includes explanation and analysis of theory as it applies to human behavior. A theoretical tool is offered as a method of understanding the interaction of the individual with the environment.

CCJ 3651 Drugs and Crime (3). This course provides students with a broad introduction to both illicit and licit drug usage and their impact on the justice system. Drugs and behavior are examined from various perspectives including historical, criminal justice, sociological, and biological perspectives. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the logic of the discourse surrounding drug policy by the opposing advocates.

CCJ 3661. Terrorism and Violence (3). This course provides a critical examination and analysis of major issues, definitions, and controversies associated with the development of terrorism in the modern world. Historical, religious, psychological, and sociological aspects that explain terrorism are covered, along with the characteristic means and methods of terrorist groups.

CCJ 3678. Policing Diversity: Race, Gender, Religion, and Crime (3). This course provides students with a theoretical and practical foundation for addressing issues of diversity as public safety and security practitioners. Focus is on an analysis of current local, regional, and national demographics regarding the impact of race, ethnicity, gender, and religion in criminal justice as both producers and victims for crime. Students explore some of the various strategies municipalities have implemented to better serve diverse populations such as policies, laws, and procedures.

CCJ 4072. Crime Mapping and Analysis (3). Prerequisites: CCJ 4710. This course is designed to introduce the student to Crime Mapping (coordinate tracking of criminal events and GIS) and Crime Analysis (the statistical evaluation of criminal events and criminal intelligence). Students work with crime data, coordinate data, UCR data and gathered intelligence, to understand correct force deployment and response to crime, for crime-prevention and solvability. They are also introduced to serialized crime identification, recognition and response.

CCJ 4710. Applied Probability for Research and Investigation (3). Prerequisite: CCJ 4744. This course explores how probability and statistics underlie the decisions of researchers and investigators and how to evaluate the expression of probabilistic and statistical information being used to support such decisions. It provides an overview of types of quantitative data products concentrating on their interpretation and application. Techniques for combining multiple forms of evidence to achieve proof are examined.

CCJ 4744. Evidential Reasoning for Research and Investigation (3). This course introduces the formal and informal approaches for making decisions on information that is uncertain and from diverse sources. Techniques are examined for collecting and using both qualitative and quantitative data to draw inferences about public safety and security programs and investigations.

CJC 3311. Corrections: Practices and Perspectives (3). This course introduces the major issues concerning the history, law, practices, and perspectives in American Corrections. Students examine the interaction of correctional perspectives and practices, their consequences, and policies being advocated to change them.

CJE 1760. Foundations of Underwater Investigation (3). This course presents the history, physics, physiology, and basic scientific methodology as they relate to exposure to compressed gas environments and how to deduce safe parameters from those principles. The course provides the theoretical foundation for individuals preparing to be investigators for scientific research and data collection underwater.

CJE 1760L. Foundations of Underwater Investigation Lab (1). Corequisite: CJE 1760. This laboratory course presents the principles and practice of compressed-gas as a life-support system for underwater hyperbaric exposure. The course is designed to develop proficiency in the basic skills required to perform safe underwater investigations including recording observations and conducting underwater environmental surveys.

CJE 3065. Police and Society (3). This course provides an advanced comprehensive overview of the foundations of policing in modern American society. Emphasis is on the functions of law enforcement and its interaction with a democratic society.

CJE 3612. Interview and Interrogation (3). Prerequisite: CJE 4611. This course provides both a theoretical and practical introduction to collecting reliable information via interviewing and interrogation for use in criminal justice and corporate investigations. Students examine and evaluate the key concepts of differential techniques of interviewing and interrogation, explanations of behavioral symptom analysis, principles of kinesics, aspects of verbalizations, explanation of legal constraints on confessions, the production of evidence indicating deception and malingering, and management aspects of the interview.

CJE 3648. Crime Scene Professionalism (3). This course emphasizes the qualities that mark a true professional in the field of crime scene investigation. The course covers crime scene safety, chain of custody, ethics, impartiality, the manipulation, and mishandling or misinterpreting of evidence. There is a focus on preventing contamination, report writing, and courtroom reputation and presentation.

CJE 3732. Criminal Intelligence (3). This course focuses on the production of intelligence from the analysis of multiple and diverse sources of information and on its use by formal and informal intelligence agencies. Emphasis is placed on the role of local public safety and security personnel and organizations as both producers and consumers of intelligence and on their relationship to the formal intelligence agencies.

CJE 3761. Introduction to Underwater Investigation (3). This course presents the history and principles of basic oceanography, physics, and physiology as they relate to exposure to compressed gas environments and how to deduce safe parameters from those principles. This course provides the theoretical foundation for individuals preparing to be scientific investigators underwater.

CJE 3761L. Introduction to Underwater Investigation Laboratory (1). Corequisite: CJE 3761. This laboratory course presents the principles and practice of compressed-gas as a life-support system for underwater hyperbaric exposure. This course is designed to develop proficiency in the basic skills required to perform safe underwater investigations, including recording observations and conducting underwater environmental surveys. Additional equipment fee required.

CJE 3762. Forensic Science in Investigation (3). This course combines various theories of the conduct of crime with knowledge of how physical evidence is produced during the commission of a crime to produce information that enables the investigation and prosecution of criminal activity. The course emphasizes decision-making in forensic science examinations and evaluation of their reliability.

CJE 3762L. Forensic Science in Investigation Laboratory (1). This course combines various theories of the conduct of crime with knowledge of how physical evidence is produced during the commission of a crime to produce information that enables the investigation and prosecution of criminal activity. The course emphasizes decision-making in forensic science examinations and evaluation of their reliability.

CJE 4135. Impression and Pattern Evidence (2). Pre- or corequisites: CJE 3762 and CJE 3762L. In this course, students are introduced to the concepts of identification and individualization employed in forensic science. In the course, students learn how to use class characteristics, wear characteristics, and individualizing characteristics in the identification and individualization process.

CJE 4135L. Impression and Pattern Evidence Lab (2). Prerequisites: CJE 3762 and CJE 3762L. Corequisite: CJE 4135. This course teaches forensic techniques used by crime scene professionals to detect, document and preserve various impression and pattern evidence commonly encountered in violent crimes. Students become familiar with the forensic application and collection of evidence, as well as documentation protocols.

CJE 4220. Introduction to Forensic Entomology (3). This entry-level course provides fundamentals necessary to prepare the student in successfully completing a series of four courses leading to a graduate certificate in medicocriminal forensic entomology. Instruction covers a broad range of topics in basic entomology as related to forensic science.

CJE 4221. Forensic Entomology: Field Collection Techniques (3). Prerequisite: CJE 4220. This course provides instruction on entomological equipment, supplies, techniques and procedures utilized to collect, rear, and preserve insects and related arthropods of medicocriminal forensic importance. Equipment and methods for acquiring weather, climatological and other relevant data are covered as well.

CJE 4222. Forensic Entomology: Case Studies and Legalities (3). Prerequisite: CJE 4220. This course delves into the legal aspects of medicocriminal entomology with the aim of preparing the student to present entomological evidence in a court of law. Information is covered on how to present evidence in an admissible manner using expert witnesses. The importance of establishing "chain of custody" and pitfalls with presenting evidence are explored through case study reviews.

CJE 4223. Forensic Entomology: Taxonomy and Post Mortem Interval (3). Prerequisite: CJE 4220. This course encompasses the identification of field-collected specimens; analyzing meteorological and crime scene temperature data; and, calculating estimates of post-mortem interval (i.e., time since death). Students also learn about using dichotomous keys, microscopy, and entomological equipment for specimen storage and presentation.

CJE 4241. Trace and Biometric Evidence (1). Prerequisites: CJE 3762 and CJE 3762L. This course teaches the properties of trace evidence that are most useful in forensic comparison. It also covers biometric identification through biological characteristics that can be used for recognition.

CJE 4241L. Trace and Biometric Evidence Lab (2). Prerequisites: CJE 3762 and CJE 3762L. Corequisite: CJE 4241.This course teaches microscopy as it relates to trace evidence and the different types of trace evidence and the techniques used to recover, store and analyze the evidence using various techniques like microanalysis, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. It also looks at the quickly evolving area of biometrics and how computer software is used to make identifications in areas like fingerprints and facial recognition.

CJE 4410. Community Policing (3). This course introduces students to the dynamics of community policing from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Emphasis is on both understanding the origins of community policing and practical application through the use of problem solving and partnership strategies.

CJE 4611. Criminal Investigation: Theory and Practice (3). Prerequisite: CCJ 4710. This course gives the student an opportunity to explore and understand investigative facets of law enforcement service delivery. The students focus on the historical relevance of the investigative process, the evolution of investigation, the procedural guidelines for effective investigations, and the mechanics of the modern day investigative process.

CJE 4615. Conduct of Investigation (3). Prerequisite: CJE 4611. This course builds on the Criminal Investigations: Theory and Practice course to provide students the practice in applying investigative procedures within legal constraints; the use of specialized documentation and analyses required in the investigation of injury and death, crimes against persons and property; and the combination of evidence from crime scenes, medical-legal examinations, records, and interviews to produce legal proof and articulate its reliability.

CJE 4638. Forensic Death Investigation (2). Prerequisites: CJE 3762 and CJE 3762L. Corequisite: CJE 4638L. This course focuses on the investigation used to determine the cause, manner, and mechanism of deaths under criminal, unusual, or unexpected circumstances and presents on overview of medico-legal investigative systems.

CJE 4638L. Forensic Death Investigation Lab (2). Prerequisites: CJE 3762 and CJE 3762L. Corequisite: CJE 4638. This advanced course focuses on all aspects of the initial investigation on sudden and violent death scenes to include special procedures and techniques to be evaluated in a major crime investigation. The course introduces the procedures and technologies used to document the different modes of death. Students perform various documentation protocols with the forensic application and collection of evidence.

CJE 4655. Crime and Accident Scene Imaging and Reconstruction (1). This course teaches the various theoretical principles used by crime scene professionals to recreate accurate representations of a crime or accident scene for future use in investigation or for court purposes. Students become familiar with the collection of scientific data, expressing measurement, and interpretation of data.

CJE 4655L. Crime and Accident Scene Imaging and Reconstruction Lab (2). Corequisite: CJE 4665. This course teaches the various operational procedures used by crime scene professionals to document and recreate accurate representations of a crime or accident scene for future use in investigations or courtroom presentations. Since agencies vary greatly in their access to technology, this course introduces many different techniques, systems and software used to document, map and measure crime scenes. Students will perform the operations required to gather and collect the information needed to properly appraise the scene.

CJE 4710r. Public Safety and Security Capstone (3–15). Prerequisites: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3071, CCJ 3484 and CCJ 4710. This course focuses on the integration of knowledge, skills, and capabilities learned in the program through a capstone project through working with a Public Safety and Security Agency or Guided Research.

CJE 4733. The Intelligence Process (3). Prerequisites: CJE 3732, MAC 1105, and CCJ 4710 or STA 2023 or STA 2122. This course covers a number of structured analytic techniques that provide an objective approach to conducting the intelligence process. The techniques presented in this course are used to process all-source intelligence which is applicable to law enforcement intelligence, counterterrorism, tactical military, and competitive intelligence analysis.

CJE 4734. Intelligence Collection Strategies (3). Prerequisites: CJE 3732 and STA 2023. This course examines the formal intelligence collection process with emphases on Open Source and Human Intelligence. Students become familiar with the process, developing comprehensive strategies for the production of intelligence by satisfying levied requirements using a variety of intelligence sources available to local public safety and security personnel.

CJE 4763. Scientific Underwater Investigation (3). Prerequisite: CJE 3761. This course builds upon the Introduction to Underwater Investigation course by providing the technology to collect data in an underwater environment according to the scientific method. The course delineates the similarities and differences of investigative techniques used in forensic science and other science disciplines that function underwater.

CJE 4763L. Scientific Underwater Investigation Laboratory (1). Prerequisite: CJE 3761L. Corequisite: CJE 4763. This laboratory builds upon the Introduction to Underwater Investigation Laboratory course by providing the tools and techniques to collect data in an underwater environment for prolonged periods of time. The underwater data collection techniques use traditional underwater technology adapted from forensic science and various other scientific disciplines. Additional equipment fee required.

CJE 4764. Underwater Crime Scene Methodology (3). Prerequisites: CJE 4762 and CJE 4763. This course synthesizes the various theories for the conduct of crime with the knowledge of how physical evidence is produced during the commission of a crime on or under the water in order to produce information that enables the investigation and prosecution of criminal activity.

CJE 4764L. Underwater Crime Scene Methodology Laboratory (1). Prerequisites: CJE 4762 and CJE 4763. Corequisite: CJE 4764. This laboratory applies various techniques for the examination of physical materials generated during the commission of a crime on or under the water in order to produce information that enables the investigation and prosecution of criminal activity. Additional equipment fee required.

CJE 4765. Underwater Crime Scene Investigation (3). Prerequisite: CJE 4764. This course combines the various analytical underwater examinations into a holistic investigation process designed to locate and detect persons and physical evidence involved in, or victims of, crimes in or on the water. Emphasis is placed on the theory of the technology and the scientific decision-making required for its optimum application.

CJE 4765L. Underwater Crime Scene Investigation Laboratory (1). Prerequisite: CJE 4764L. Corequisite: CJE 4765. This laboratory course applies methodology based on advanced technology to enhance the location and detection of physical evidence used, or intended for use, in the commission of underwater crimes. Emphasis is placed on the use of the Incident Command System and the UCSI Process for management of a crime scene investigation. Additional equipment fee required.

CJJ 3013. Youth Culture and Crime (3). This course explores the unique characteristics of juvenile offending and victimization by examining the cultural traits that differentiate youths from society in general. In doing so, the class investigates various distinct subcultures globally and the relationship between specific forms of offending and subcultural traits.

CJL 3133. Evidence and Criminal Procedure (3). This course covers the structures and functions of state and federal court systems with emphasis on the specific roles and duties of the participants in criminal trials. Special emphasis is placed on the rules of evidence applicable in criminal cases and the consequences of not having or not following those rules. Examination and analysis of actual appellate court cases utilizing the law school technique of case briefing will be used as a basis for applying the concepts studied.

DSC 3013. Homeland Security and Criminal Justice (3). This is an introductory course covering the relationship of homeland security and criminal justice agencies as it impacts public safety and security. Students are introduced to salient issues regarding the interconnection of the homeland security mission and the roles of criminal justice agencies at the local, state, and federal levels in dealing with both terrorist threats and with natural and man-made disasters.

ISC 4930r. Special Topics in Applied Studies (1–3). This course allows for special topics in Interdisciplinary Studies to be taught, focusing on Applied Methods and Theory, specific to the concept of Applied Studies and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

Graduate Courses

CCJ 5079. Managing Intelligence Analysis Functions (3).

CCJ 5616. Profiling Criminal Behavior (3).

CCJ 5748. Advanced Evidentiary Reasoning for Criminal Intelligence (3).

CJE 5225. Introduction to Forensic Entomology (3).

CJE 5226. Forensic Entomology Field Collection Techniques (3).

CJE 5227. Forensic Entomology: Case Studies and Legalities (3).

CJE 5228. Forensic Entomology: Taxonomy and Post Mortem Interval (3).

CJE 5743. Introduction to Public Safety and Leadership (3).

CJE 5744. Strategic Planning in Public Safety and Leadership (3).

CJE 5745. Use of Force in Public Safety and Security (3).

CJE 5767. Scientific Underwater Investigation (3).

CJE 5767L. Scientific Underwater Investigation Laboratory (1).

CJE 5768. Underwater Crime Scene Methodology (3).

CJE 5768L. Underwater Crime Scene Methodology Laboratory (1).

CJE 5769. Underwater Crime Scene Investigation (3).

CJE 5769L. Underwater Crime Scene Investigation Laboratory (1).

CPO 5429. Political Islam: Ideology or Religion (3).

DSC 5595. Human Intelligence Collection (3).

ISC 5930r. Special Topics in Applied Studies (3).

PURCHASING/MATERIALS MANAGEMENT:

see Management Information Systems

RADIO/TELEVISION:

see Communication

READING EDUCATION AND LANGUAGE ARTS:

see Childhood Education, Reading, and Disability Services; Middle and Secondary Education

REAL ESTATE:

see Risk Management/Insurance and Real Estate and Legal Studies