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2020-2021 Undergraduate Bulletin

Undergraduate Department of

Biomedical Sciences

College of Medicine

Website: https://med.fsu.edu/biosci/home

Chair: Richard Nowakowski; Professors: Blaber, Delp, Diaz, Galasko, Hajcak, Hurt, Joyce, Kabbaj, Laywell, Levenson, Nowakowski, Olcese, Overton, Ren, Stefanovic, Suo, Y. Wang; Associate Professors: Arbeitman, Bienkiewicz, Gunjan, Horabin, Kumar, Leadem, Lee, Meckes, Megraw, Pinto, Stanwood, Zhou; Assistant Professors: Irianto, Rizkallah, Tomko, Y. Wang; Eminent Scholar: Bhide; Research Faculty I: Duclot, Graham, Kao, Nemec, Pritchard, Rodriguez, Zhang; Research Faculty II: McCarthy, X. Wang, Zorio; Assistants in Medicine: Bradley, Connolly, Wu; Associates in Research: Foster, Vied, Y. Yang; Senior Research Associate: Didier, Mercer

Degrees Offered

The Department of Biomedical Sciences offers programs leading to the Bachelor of Science (BS) in Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Biomedical Sciences.

The Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences (IMS) Bachelor of Science degree program is designed to prepare students for work in healthcare. Departments in seven Colleges at FSU have partnered to provide the curriculum for the program: College of Arts and Sciences, College of Communication and Information, College of Human Sciences, College of Medicine, College of Nursing, College of Social Sciences and Public Policy, and the College of Social Work. The IMS degree is based on competencies thought to be fundamental for careers in the health professions. These competencies include communication skills, use and knowledge of technology, awareness and respect for the roles of members of the health care team, ability to navigate in the health care system, scientific knowledge, life-long learning skills, and critical thinking skills.

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Biomedical Sciences at the Florida State University College of Medicine is designed to train modern biomedical scientists who use genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and other contemporary approaches to address questions of developmental, cell, and molecular biology related to human health. The program is appropriate for students with majors in biochemistry, biology, or other health-related fields. Three broad areas of research are emphasized: development, neuroscience, and the molecular basis of human disease. Research rotations during the first year allow students to make an informed choice regarding the research area and major professor with whom they will conduct their PhD work. A core curriculum of the fundamentals, the choice of electives from other departments, and intellectual interaction with faculty and postdoctoral fellows encourage graduate students to mature into independent scientists.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. This requirement is satisfied through BSC 2010L Biological Sciences I Lab course.

Oral Communication Competency

Students must demonstrate the ability to orally transmit ideas and information clearly. This requirement may be met with an approved college-level course.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

At the time this document was published, some common program prerequisites were being reviewed by the state of Florida and may have been revised. Please visit https://dlss.flvc.org/admin-tools/common-prerequisites-manuals for a current list of state-approved prerequisites.

The following lists the common program perquisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into this upper-division degree program:

  1. BSC X010C or BSC X007/X007L or BSC X005/X005L
  2. CHM X045, X045L General Chemistry I and Lab or equivalence
  3. CHM X046, X046L General Chemistry II and Lab or equivalence
  4. PSY X012
  5. MAC X114
  6. ENC X101

Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences (BS)

The Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences (IMS) Bachelor of Science degree program is designed to provide a broad background to develop scientific and psychosocial knowledge, and an understanding of the healthcare team and the healthcare system. So that students may pursue their specialized and professional interests, three (3) interdisciplinary majors are offered: Clinical Professions; Community Patient Care; and Health Management, Policy and Information. The IMS degree program's rigorous science core curriculum, individualized advising, experiential service learning, and developmental seminar and capstone course sequence enable students to reach their potential academically and personally, determine a career path best suited for them, and develop the skills, attitudes, and acumen to attain their career goals.

The program includes three to four 1-credit hour experiential seminar courses that engage students with the challenges of healthcare in community, clinical, political, and research venues. The medical sciences seminar sequence leads to a senior capstone course which requires the submission of a scholarly report, an analytical essay on a healthcare issue, and a poster and oral presentation at a graduation colloquium. The capstone course meets the Scholarship in Practice and Upper Division Writing liberal studies requirements.

Resources are available to help students locate opportunities in clinics, community service organizations, hospitals, pharmacies, and physician offices for students to engage in the various ways healthcare is accessed. Students are required to obtain a minimum of 64 hours of experiential learning hours each academic year for a total of 256 experiential learning hours before graduation. These hours must be approved by the community coordinator in advance.

Although housed in the College of Medicine, the curriculum is delivered by seven (7) colleges at FSU. In addition to the College of Medicine, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Communication and Information, the College of Human Sciences, the College of Nursing, the College of Social Sciences and Public Policy, and the College of Social Work are IMS degree program partners.

Curriculum guides stating specific degree requirements for the undergraduate majors are available through the Office of Undergraduate Programs and through our Website: https://med.fsu.edu/imsDegree/home.

Minor Requirements

Students majoring in any of the IMS majors are not required to complete a minor for their IMS degree. The FSU Registrar does not recognize, certify, or document minors in any way on a transcript. Therefore, the IMS degree program will not certify, document, or clear minors for students.

The IMS program does not offer any minors.

Honors in the Major

Because healthcare is a broad field of study and practice and the IMS degree spans seven colleges and numerous departments, an Honors in the Major thesis can be completed in a variety of disciplines. The Honors in the Majors topics must be health related and approved by the IMS Honors Director for the College of Medicine.

The Thesis Director for Honors in the Major must be full-time tenured or tenure-track FSU faculty member appointed in one of the FSU colleges approved for the IMS majors and meet the Thesis Director requirements of the University Honors Program.

Honors in the Major requires junior standing, a 3.2 GPA on at least 15 semester hours at FSU and all transfer work, and completion and defense of an honors thesis for 6 hours credit under the direction of a faculty committee. To graduate with honors is a worthwhile distinction. For more information, contact the IMS Honors Director, Dr. Elizabeth Foster, or the Honors Program office at (850) 644-1841.

Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences Core Course Requirements (86–91 hours)

All courses required for the IMS BS degree program must be completed with a grade of "C-" or better.

BSC 2010. Biological Science I (3)

BSC 2010L. Biological Science I Laboratory (1)

BSC 2011. Biological Science II (3)

BSC 2011L. Biological Science II Lab (1)

CHM 1045. General Chemistry I (3)

CHM 1045L. General Chemistry I Laboratory (1)

CHM 1046. General Chemistry II (3)

CHM 1046L. General Chemistry II Laboratory (1)

CHM 3120. Analytical Chemistry I (3)

CHM 3120L. Analytical Chemistry I Lab (1)

IHS 1100. Exploring Health Professions (1)

IHS 2121. Delivering Patient Care (1)

IHS 3122. Introduction to Medical Sciences (1)

IHS 3931. Problems and Issues in Healthcare (1)

IHS 4501. Inquiry in Healthcare Research (1)

IHS 4901. Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences Capstone Course (3)

MAC 1105. College Algebra (3)

MAC 1114. Analytic Trigonometry (3)

MAC 1140. Precalculus Algebra (3)

PHY 2053C. College Physics A (4)

PHY 2053L. College Physics A Laboratory (0)

PHY 2054C. College Physics B (4)

PHY 2054L. College Physics B Laboratory (0)

PSY 2012. General Psychology (3)

Organic Chemistry Sequences

Students must choose one of the following Organic Chemistry Sequences:

Organic Chemistry Option 1 (12 hours): Students thinking about Veterinary, Dental, or Pharmacy School will need to take this sequence.

CHM 2210. Organic Chemistry I (3).

CHM 2211. Organic Chemistry II (3).

CHM 2211L. Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (3).

BCH 4053. General Biochemistry I (3).

Organic Chemistry Option 2 (8 hours): Recommended for students who have earned a B or higher in both CHM 1045/L and CHM 1046/L.

CHM 3217. One Semester Organic Chemistry (3).

CHM 3217L. One Semester Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1).

CHM 3218. One Semester Biochemistry (4).

Clinical Professions Major

The Clinical Professions major expands and develops the solid science foundation needed to apply to medical school, dental school, physician assistant programs, and a number of other healthcare professions that require post-baccalaureate training. A student's program-of-study in the Clinical Professions major is dependent upon the health profession the student wishes to enter. Whether it is medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, physician assistant, or another field, pre-requisites, although similar, are different for each program. Students will meet with advisors to develop their individual program-of-study according to the admissions exams and requirements of their respective program goals. Students are responsible for knowing the requirements of the professional schools where they plan to apply.

Clinical Professions Upper Division Major Electives (33 hours)

  • 6 hours of Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 6 hours of Non-Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 21 hours mixed from both Science and Non-Science electives from IMS approved list

Clinical Professions Major Minimum Program Requirements - Summary

Total hours required: 120

  • General Education: 36*; Prerequisite Coursework: 28*; Major Coursework: 59–64*; Minor Coursework: 0
  • Computer Skills Competency: 0 beyond major
  • Oral Communication Competency: 0–3

*24 to 27 hours of General Education, Prerequisite, and Major Coursework may overlap.

Community Patient Care Major

The Community Patient Care major prepares students to work directly with patients in a variety of venues, from health clinics to nonprofit respite providers. Students have five (5) areas in which they can concentrate their studies: Medical Spanish Interpreter, Developmental Disabilities, Child Welfare Practice, Gerontology/Aging Studies, or Patient Health Navigation/Advocacy. Certificate programs are available for some of these options. Students do not receive a certificate for completing the courses required for the Community Patient Care major. In order to participate and earn the certificate options, students must consult with the home Colleges offering the certificates. Certificate programs have specific requirements beyond the requirements for the Community Patient Care major.

Community Patient Care Focus Options and Upper Division Major Electives (33 hours)

Community Patient Care majors must complete the series of courses within one of the five focus options in the major. In addition to the Focus Option Requirements listed below, a student's program of studies must include at least six credits of upper-level science courses and six credits of upper level non-science courses from the Major Electives List for a total of 33 hours of major electives.

Medical Spanish Interpreter Option

Prerequisites: SPN 3300 or SPN 3350, SPN 3400, and SPC 3210..

ADV 3410. Hispanic Marketing Communication (3).

OR

ADV 4411. Multicultural Marketing Communication (3).

OR

NSP 3185. Multicultural Factors and Health (3).

SPC 2730. Global Perspectives: Communication (3).

OR

SPC 4710. Interracial/Intercultural Communication (3).

OR

NSP 3185. Multicultural Factors and Health (3).

SPN 4036. Spanish Medical Interpreting (3).

SPN 4420. Advanced Spanish Composition and Translation (3).

  • 6 hours of Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 6 hours of Non-Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 9 hours mixed from both Science and Non-Science electives from IMS approved list

Total elective credits: 33 hours

Developmental Disabilities Option

EAB 3703. Applied Behavior Analysis (3).

FAD 3220. Individual and Family Life Span Development (3).

OR

SOW 4602. Social Work in Health Settings (3).

SPA 2001. Introduction to Communication Sciences and Disorders (3).

3 credits from the following list:

ARE 4930. Special Topics in Art and Education (3).

ASL 2510. Deaf Culture (3).

CHD 2220. Child Growth and Development: The Foundation Years (3).

EDF 2085. Teaching Diverse Populations (3).

EEX 4201. Typical and Atypical Development and Learning (3).

EEX 4770. Study of Human Exceptionality (3).

FAD 2230. Family Relationships: A Life Span Development Approach (3).

FAD 3220. Individual and Family Life Span Development (3).

FAD 4601. Foundations of Counseling (3).

IDS 2321. The Blindness Experience (3).

MUY 4401. Music Therapy: Methods and Practicum I (3).

NSP 3185. Multicultural Factors and Health (3).

NSP 3425. Women's Health Issues: Concerns Through the Life Cycle (3).

SOW 4602. Social Work in Health Settings (3).

SOW 4615. Family Violence Across the Life Span (3).

SOW 4645. Gerontological Social Work (3).

SOW 4650. Child Welfare Practice (3).

  • 6 hours of Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 6 hours of Non-Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 9 hours mixed from both Science and Non-Science electives from IMS approved list

Total elective credits: 33 hours

Child Welfare Practice Option

SOW 4615. Family Violence across the Lifespan (3).

SOW 4650. Child Welfare Practice (3).

SOW 4658. Child Maltreatment and Child Welfare (3).

SOW 4702. Substance Abuse and Misuse (3).

  • 6 hours of Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 6 hours of Non-Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 9 hours mixed from both Science and Non-Science electives from IMS approved list

Total elective credits: 33 hours

Gerontology/Aging Studies Option

DEP 4404. Psychology of Adult Development and Aging (3).

OR

NSP 3425. Women's Health Issues: Concerns Through the Life Cycle (3).

SOW 4602. Social Work in Health Settings (3).

SOW 4645. Gerontological Social Work (3).

SYP 3730. Aging and the Life Course (3).

  • 6 hours of Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 6 hours of Non-Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 9 hours mixed from both Science and Non-Science electives from IMS approved list

Total elective credits: 33 hours

Patient Health Navigation/Advocacy Option

CLP 3305. Clinical and Counseling Psychology (3).

OR

NUR 3177. Holistic and Complementary Approaches to Health and Healing (3).

IHS 4123. Narrative Medicine: Patient-Centered Care and the Individual Story (3).

NUR 3076. Communication in Health Care (3).

OR

NSP 3185. Multicultural Factors and Health (3).

3 credits from the following list:

ECP 4530. Economics of Health (3)

PAD 4844. Public Health and Emergency Management (3)

PHC 4030. Introduction to Epidemiology (3)

PHC 4101. Introduction to Public Health (3)

PHC 4157. Health Policy and Society (3)

PHC 4470. Health Behavior and Health Promotion (3)

PUP 4931. Special Topics: Health Services Organization and Policy (3).

  • 6 hours of Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 6 hours of Non-Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 9 hours mixed from both Science and Non-Science electives from IMS approved list

Total elective credits: 33 hours

Community Patient Care Major Minimum Program Requirements - Summary

Total hours required: 120

  • General Education: 36*; Prerequisite Coursework: 28*; Major Coursework: 59–64*; Minor Coursework: 0
  • Foreign Language: 0–12 (recommended, not required); Computer Skills Competency: 0 beyond major
  • Oral Communication Competency: 0–3

*24 to 27 hours of General Education, Prerequisite, and Major Coursework may overlap.

Health Management, Policy and Information Major

The Health Management, Policy and Information major prepares students for research or work in government, public health, and hospital and clinic administration and management. Students choose one of two (2) focus options; health information technology or public health administration and policy. Health Management, Policy and Information majors must complete the series of courses within 1 of the 2 focus options in the major. Certificate programs are available for one of the options. Students do not receive a certificate for completing the courses required for the Health Management, Policy and Information major. In order to participate and earn the certificate options, students must consult with the home College offering the certificate.

Health Management, Policy and Information Major Electives (33 hours)

Health Management, Policy and Information majors must complete the series of courses within one of the two focus options in the major. In addition to the Focus Option Requirements listed below, a student's program of studies must include at least six credits of upper-level science courses and six credits of upper level non-science courses from the Major Electives List for a total of 33 hours of major electives.

Health Information Technology Option

IDS 3493. Empowering Health Consumers in the eHealth era (3).

OR

LIS 4772. Introduction to Consumer Health Informatics (3).

LIS 4776. Advanced Health Informatics (3).

LIS 4785. Introduction to Health Informatics (3).

NUR 3076. Communication in Health Care (3).

  • 6 hours of Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 6 hours of Non-Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 9 hours mixed from both Science and Non-Science electives from IMS approved list

Total elective credits: 33 hours

Public Health Administration & Policy Option

PHC 4030. Introduction to Epidemiology (3).

PUP 4931r. Special Topics in Public Policy [Only this Special Topics course will be accepted: Health Services Organization & Policy (3).

OR

ECP 4530. Economics of Health (3).

OR

PAD 4844. Public Health and Emergency Management (3).

OR

PHC 4101. Introduction to Public Health (3).

OR

PHC 4157. Health Policy and Society (3).

SYO 4402. Medical Sociology (3).

9 credits from the following list:

ECP 4530. Economics of Health (3).

GEO 4450. Medical Geography (3).

PAD 4372. Leadership & Communication in Emergency Management (3).

PAD 4833. International and Comparative Disaster Management (3).

PAD 4844. Public Health and Emergency Management (3).

PHC 4101. Introduction to Public Health (3).

PHC 4157. Health Policy and Society (3).

PHC 4470. Health Behavior and Health Promotion (3).

SYD 3020. Population and Society (3).

SYP 3730. Aging and the Life Course (3).

SYA 4930 Special Topics [Only these Special Topics courses will be accepted: Sociology of Death & Dying, Sexual & Reproductive Health, or Politics of Reproduction] (3)

  • 6 hours of Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 6 hours of Non-Science electives from IMS approved list
  • 3 hours mixed from both Science and Non-Science electives from IMS approved list

Total elective credits: 33 hours

Health Management, Policy and Information Major Minimum Program Requirements - Summary

Total hours required: 120

  • General Education: 36*; Prerequisite Coursework: 28*; Major Coursework: 59–64*; Minor Coursework: 0; Computer Skills Competency: 0 beyond major
  • Oral Communication Competency: 0–3

*24 to 27 hours of General Education, Prerequisite, and Major Coursework may overlap.

IMS Major Elective Courses: Science and Non-Science

ANT 2410. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

ANT 2511. Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Prehistory (3)

ANT 4462. Introduction to Medical Anthropology (3)

ANT 4468. Bones, Bodies, & Disease (3)

ANT 4525. Human Osteology (3)

APK 2001. Medical and Scientific Terminology (3)

BCH 4054. General Biochemistry II (3)

BMS 4007. Introduction to Molecular Medicine (4)

BMS 4901r. DIS in Biomedical Sciences (1–4)

BMS 4932. Special Topics in Biomedical Sciences (1–3)

BMS 4XXX. Ethics and Professionalism in Healthcare (3)

BSC 2085. Anatomy and Physiology I (3)

BSC 2085L. Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory (1)

BSC 2086. Anatomy and Physiology II (3)

BSC 2086L. Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory (1)

BSC 4933r. Special Topics in Biological Science (3)

CHD 3243. Contexts of Adolescent Development (3)

CHM 4610. Inorganic Chemistry (3)

CHM 4610L. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (1)

CHM 4130. Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3)

CHM 4130L. Advanced Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (1)

CLP 3305. Clinical and Counseling Psychology (3)

CLP 4143. Abnormal Psychology (3)

ECP 4530. Economics of Health (3)

ENT 4934. Special Topics in Entrepreneurship (3) [Only these Special Topics courses will be accepted: Biomedical Innovation and Entrepreneurship]

FAD 2230. Family Relationships: A Life Span Development Approach (3)

FAD 3220. Individual and Family Life Span Development (3)

FAD 3343. Contexts of Adult Development and Aging (3)

FAD 4451. Human Sexuality Education (3)

FAD 4455. Family Life Education (3)

GEO 4450. Medical Geography (3)

HIS 3491. Medicine and Society (3)

HSC 4711. Wellness/Health Risk Reduction (3)

HUN 3403. Life Cycle Nutrition (3)

IDS 3493. Empowering Health Consumers in the eHealth Era (3)

IHS 4120. Frontiers in Medicine (3)

IHS 4123. Narrative Medicine: Patient-Centered Care and the Individual Story (3)

IHS 4932r. Special Topics in Health Sciences and Healthcare (1–3)

MCB 4403. Prokaryotic Biology (3)

MCB 4403L. Prokaryotic Biology Laboratory (2)

MHS 4001. The Human Services Profession (3)

NUR 3076. Communication in Healthcare (3)

PAD 4833. International and Comparative Disaster Management (3)

PAD 4844. Public Health and Emergency Management (3)

PAD 4372. Leadership and Communication in Emergency Management (3)

PAS 2054r. Introduction to the PA Profession (3)

PCB 4701. Human Physiology (3)

PCB 3063. General Genetics (3)

PCB 3134. Cell Structure and Function (3)

PCB 3743. Vertebrate Physiology (3)

PCB 4024. Molecular Biology (3)

PCB 4233. Immunology (3)

PCB 4233L. Laboratory in Immunology (1)

PCB 4253. Developmental Biology (3)

PCB 4253L. Developmental Biology Laboratory (3)

PCB 4701. Human Physiology (3)

PET 3322. Functional Anatomy and Physiology I (3)

PET 3322L. Functional Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I (1)

PET 3323C. Functional Anatomy and Physiology II (4)

PET 4076. Physical Dimensions of Aging (4)

PHZ 4702. Biomedical Physics I (3)

PHZ 4703. Biomedical Physics II (3)

PSB 2000. Introduction to Brain and Behavior (3)

PSB 3004C. Physiological Psychology with Laboratory (4)

PSY 4930r. Special Topics in Psychology (3) [Only this Special Topics course will be accepted: Industrial and Organizational Psychology]

REL 3180. Religion and Bioethics (3)

SOP 3004. Social Psychology (3)

SOW 4935. Special Topics in Social Work (3) [Only this Special Topics course will be accepted: Treating Tobacco Dependency]

SYO 4402. Medical Sociology (3)

SYO 3100. Families and Social Change (3)

SYP 3000. Social Psychology of Groups (3)

SYP 3730. Aging and the Life Course (3)

URP 4936. Special Topics in Urban and Regional Planning (3) [Only this Special Topics course will be accepted: Healthy Cities, Healthy Communities]

ZOO 3713C. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (4)

ZOO 4753C. Histology (4)

Definition of Prefixes

ADV—Advertising

ANT—Anthropology

APK—Applied Kinesiology

ARE—Art Education

ASL—American Sign Language

BCH—Biochemistry

BMS—Biomedical Sciences

BSC—Biological Sciences

CHD—Home Economics: Child Development

CHM—Chemistry

CLP—Clinical Psychology

DEP—Developmental Psychology

EAB—Experimental Analysis of Behavior

EDF—Foundations and Policy Studies

EEX—Education: Exceptional Child

ENT—Entrepreneurship

FAD—Family Development

GEO—Geography: Systematic

GMS—Graduate Medicine Sciences

HSC—Health Sciences

HUN—Human Nutrition

IHS—Interdisciplinary Health Sciences

ISS—Interdisciplinary Social Sciences

MCB—Microbiology

MDU—Undergraduate Medicine Courses

MUY—Music Therapy

NSP—Nursing: Special

NUR—Nursing

PAD—Public Administration

PAS—Physician Assistant

PCB—Process Biology

PSB—Psychobiology

PET—Physical Education Theory

PHC—Public Health Concentration

PHY—Physics

PHZ—Physics (Continued)

PUP—Public Policy

REL—Religion Undergraduate

SOW—Social Work

SPA—Speech Pathology and Audiology

SPC—Speech Communication

SPN—Spanish Language

SOW—Social Work

SYO—Sociological Organization

SYP—Social Processes

URP—Urban and Regional Planning

ZOO—Zoology

Undergraduate Courses

BMS 4007. Introduction to Molecular Medicine (4). Prerequisites: CHM 2210 and CHM 2211; or CHM 3217. This course introduces the concept of the main molecular mechanisms that mediate human health and disease and emphasizes molecular cell biology and immunology to understand human health and diseases, and the mechanisms that impact immune response such as inflammation and cancer. Students also participate in active learning, applying the knowledge they acquire in the lectures.

BMS 4861. Multicultural Health Care and Health Disparities (3). This course reviews the impact of culture and ethnicity on health, illness, and health care practices. The course exposes students interested in a career in health care to the challenges of providing care to a multicultural society through exposure to theory, evidence-based practices, and self-exploration through service learning with an underserved population.

BMS 4901r. DIS in Biomedical Sciences (1–4). Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Must have a combined GPA of 3.0 in biology, chemistry, and physics coursework. This directed individual study course in biomedical sciences offers a unique opportunity for undergraduate students to perform research in the biomedical science laboratories in the College of Medicine. Students perform special supervised study or research in the area of the faculty member's research. An oral presentation and a final report of the research in the format of a short scientific publication is required. May be repeated to a maximum of fifteen semester hours.

BMS 4903r. Honors Work in Biomedical Sciences (1–3). Prerequisite: Admission to the FSU Honors in the Major Program and approved by the IMS Honors Liaison. This course involves participation in a supervised research problem. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. A maximum of nine research credit hours may count toward IMS degree upper division electives. This may be a combination of DIS and/or Honors Work. DIS and Honors Work in the Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences Program are letter graded.

BMS 4906r. Honors Work in Clinical Sciences (1–3). Prerequisite: Admission to the FSU Honors in the Major Program and approved by the IMS Honors Liaison. This course involves participation in a supervised research problem. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. A maximum of nine research credit hours may count toward IMS degree upper division electives. This may be a combination of DIS and/or Honors Work. DIS and Honors Work in the Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences Program are letter graded.

BMS 4932r. Special Topics in Biomedical Sciences (1–3). Prerequisites: BSC 2011, CHM 1046, and PCB 3063; or instructor permission. This course teaches students to identify the intersection of the fields of biology and medicine with a focus on human health issues and demonstrate knowledge in areas such as biochemical functions, physiological functions, anatomical and histological structures, epidemiology of population groups, or pharmacology applications by delving into related cell and molecular biology, parasitology, and toxicology, found in biomedical research. May be repeated within the same term up to nine semester hours.

IHS 1100. Exploring Health Professions (1). Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences major status. This seminar informs students on careers and career pathways in health professions and the academic, professional, and personal preparation needed to pursue a career in health. Class meetings, activities, and guest speakers are planned to inform students on healthcare and the health professions, knowledge of the various roles of the healthcare team, and the resources to help students explore their career interests and goals.

IHS 3931. Problems and Issues in Healthcare (1). Prerequisite: IHS 2121, or IHS 3122; and Interdisciplinary Medical Science Major status. In this course, students build upon experiential learning opportunities and further their understanding of key issues facing healthcare, patients, providers, institutions, and communities by examining and reading scholarly works. Assignments and activities help students to identify and generate content (through research or hands-on experiences that emphasize a breadth of knowledge in the field) to serve as the foundation for future research on a problem or issue in healthcare.

IHS 4120. Frontiers in Medicine (3). This course aims to provide advanced undergraduate students the opportunity to gain an understanding of common human disease conditions through a highly interactive set of learning activities. We recommend that students have taken physiology, genetics and biochemistry. Examples of topics covered include heart failure, cancer, diabetes, depression and Alzheimer's disease.

IHS 4123. Narrative Medicine: Patient-Centered Care and the Individual Story (3). Prerequisites: ENC 1101, and one of the following courses; ENC 1102 or ENC 2135, for a total of six credits of English. In this course, students learn the tenets of narrative medicine and explore the role of narrative in improving clinician understanding of the individual patient's unique experience. To build narrative skill, students analyze and interpret various illness experiences as depicted in select stories, poems, and non-fiction medical narratives. Students also expand their understanding of narrative medicine and what it means to practice patient-centered care through various analytical and reflective writing assignments.

IHS 4900r. Honors Work in Health Sciences (1–3). Prerequisite: Admission to the FSU Honors in the Major Program and approval by the IMS Honors Liaison. This course involves participation in a supervised research problem. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. A maximum of nine research credit hours may count toward IMS degree upper division electives. This may be a combination of DIS and/or Honors Work. DIS and Honors Work in the Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences Program are letter graded.

IHS 4904r. Directed Individual Study in Health Sciences (1–4). This course is for undergraduate students who wish an individualized research experience in the Medical Humanities and Social Sciences, Public Health, or other fields represented in the College of Medicine. Students receive training in research methods and improve their readiness for and appreciation of research in health-related science.

IHS 4932r. Special Topics in Health Sciences and Health Care (1–3). This course provides students instruction in the health sciences such as healthcare disparity, patient-centered care, and other topics necessary to understand the healthcare system and patient care issues.

ISS 4304. Contemporary Social Problems (3). This course is designed to introduce the benefits and methods of interdisciplinary research and study. This course uses multiple and interrelated perspectives to identify and explore social issues and problems. Students are guided through the process of building interdisciplinary perspectives to maximize cognitive skills, critical thinking and problem solving skills.

MDU 1000. Careers in Medicine: Preparation to Practice (1). (S/U grade only.) This course is intended for all undergraduates who are seriously considering a career in medicine. Students learn how to successfully prepare for the academic, personal, and professional rigors of medical school and for a career in medicine. Students are encouraged to take this course early in their undergraduate years, so they can pursue the appropriate academic coursework, volunteer, and earn medical experience that will help them become successful medical school applicants and health professionals.

Graduate Courses

BMS 5081. Introduction to Clinical Ethics (2).

BMS 5082. Ethics in the Clinical Setting (4–6).

BMS 5122. Insights into Human Congenital and Developmental Disorders (3).

BMS 5185r. Research Opportunities in Biomedical Sciences (1–4).

BMS 5186C. Research Techniques in Biomedical Sciences (2–4).

BMS 5525. Bioregulation (4).

BMS 5905r. Directed Independent Study in Biomedical Sciences (1–12).

BMS 5931. Graduate Tutorial in Biomedical Sciences (1). (S/U grade only.)

BMS 5935r. Advanced Topics in Biomedical Sciences (1–2).

BMS 6900r. Directed Individual Study in Biomedical and Clinical Sciences (2–9).

BMS 6936r. Seminar in Biomedical Sciences (1–2).

ENT 5626. Biomedical Entrepreneurism (3).

GMS 5095r. Modeling Human Disease (3).

GMS 5098. Critical Review of the Scientific Literature (1–2). (S/U grade only.)

GMS 5222r. Chromatin Structure, Epigenetics and Human Health (3).

GMS 5303. Molecular Mechanism of Common Human Diseases (3).

GMS 5304. RNA Silencing and Disease (3).

GMS 6001r. Special Topics in Biomedical Sciences (1–3).

GMS 6097Cr. Biomedical Sciences Research (3).

GMS 6955. Presentation Skills in Biomedical Sciences (3). (S/U grade only.)

IHS 5503r. Proposal Development (1).

IHS 5515. Ethics and Professional Integrity in Research (1).

IHS 5905r. Directed Individual Study in Health Sciences (1–12).

IHS 5906r. Directed Individual Study in Medical Sciences (1–12).

IHS 5933. Seminar on Medical Science Education (1).

IHS 5935r. Health Sciences Seminar (1).

IHS 5945r. Supervised Teaching (1–5).

For listings relating to graduate coursework for thesis, dissertation, and master's and doctoral examinations and defense, consult the Graduate Bulletin.