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2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin

Jim Moran School of

Entrepreneurship

Web Pages: http://jimmoranschool.fsu.edu

Director: Susan S. Fiorito; Associate Director: James E. Dever; Professors: Fiorito, S., Kim, Schofield, Weishar; Assistant Professors: Manchiraju, McQuerry, Clayton; Senior Lecturers: Dever; Associate Lecturer: Garner, Steed; Assistant Lecturer: Baber, Breed, Haley, Hand, Langston, Lewis, Parker, Tatum; Jim Moran Professors: Dever, Fiorito, S.

The Jim Moran School of Entrepreneurship administers the undergraduate degree programs in Commercial, Social, and Retail Entrepreneurship.

The undergraduate majors in entrepreneurship are designed for those who want to learn more about opportunity recognition and evaluation, and new venture start-up and growth in various industries. Students admitted into these majors will participate in courses and seminars staffed by faculty members, as well as entrepreneurs and business owners/managers. Students will have opportunities to learn firsthand what is needed to start a new business venture, and to run an existing business.

The purpose of the Entrepreneurship majors are to give students the knowledge, skills, and confidence to start, run, and grow their own business.

Students who successfully complete the Entrepreneurship major receive a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in entrepreneurship with a major in commercial or social entrepreneurship, or a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in retail entrepreneurship (limited access). The program Web site is accessible at http://jimmoranschool.fsu.edu.

Computer Skills Competency

All undergraduates at Florida State University must demonstrate basic computer skills competency prior to graduation. As necessary computer competency skills vary from discipline to discipline, each major determines the courses needed to satisfy this requirement. Undergraduate majors in Commercial, Social, and Retail Entrepreneurship satisfy this requirement by earning a grade of "C–" or higher in any courses designated by the university to satisfy the computer skills competency.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites

The state of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions, necessary for admission into this upper-division degree program:

  1. ECO X013
  2. ECO X023
  3. MAC X233 or MAC 1105
  4. STA X023 or STA X122 or QMB X100
  5. LDR XXXX

Entrepreneurship Program Requirements

All students must complete: (1) the University-wide baccalaureate degree requirements summarized in the "Undergraduate Degree Requirements" chapter of this General Bulletin; (2) the state of Florida common prerequisites for entrepreneurship majors; (3) at least sixty semester hours of courses in non-business disciplines; and (4) the major area requirements for entrepreneurship majors.

Note: The Commercial, Social and Retail entrepreneurship majors are limited access programs. The entrepreneurship majors are designed to take two years. Students are encouraged to apply for admission to the commercial or social entrepreneurship majors in the Spring semester of their sophomore year. Students must apply to the Jim Moran School of Entrepreneurship (http://jimmoranschool.fsu.edu) before the announced deadline each Spring semester. Students must meet the admission requirements for the entrepreneurship programs in the Jim Moran School of Entrepreneurship by the end of their second year in order to be admitted into the major. These admission requirements are described in the "Jim Moran School of Entrepreneurship" chapter of this General Bulletin.

General Entrepreneurship Core Requirements

All entrepreneurship majors must complete the following nine courses. A grade of "C" or better must be earned in each course.

ECO 3041 Personal Finance (3).

ENT 3003 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3).

ENT 3414 Measuring Financial Success (3).

ENT 4XXX Team Building (3).

Major Area Requirements

All commercial entrepreneurship majors must complete thirty-nine credit hours as listed below. A grade of "C" or better must be earned in each course used to satisfy the entrepreneurship major area requirements.

ENT 3001 Experiences in Entrepreneurship I (3).

ENT 3002 Experiences in Entrepreneurship II (3).

ENT 3111 Creating Value through Customer Acquisition (3).

ENT 3203 Managing New Venture Growth (3).

ENT 3607 Innovation by Design (3).

ENT 3629 Entrepreneurial Technologies (3).

ENT 4XXX Entrepreneurial Law and Ethics (3).

ENT 4114 Business Plan Design (3).

ENT 4255 Negotiations (3).

RMI 3011 Risk Insurance (3).

ENT 4XXX Simulation Capstone (3).

ENT 4XXX New Product Development (3).

ENT 4943 Internship (3).

Plus at least six credit hours from the following list of courses:

ENT 2630 Themed Experience (3).

ENT 2802 Entrepreneurship in Contemporary Society (3).

ENT 3173 Franchising (3).

ENT 3203 Managing New Venture Growth (3).

ENT 3273 Family Business (3).

ENT 3283 Women and Minorities in New Ventures (3).

ENT 3613 Innovation and Creativity (3).

ISM 4882. Mobile Technology (3).

CTE 3862 Retail Operations (3).

All social entrepreneurship majors must complete forty-two credit hours as listed below. A grade of "C" or better must be earned in each course used to satisfy the entrepreneurship major area requirements.

ISS 3241 Foundations of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3).

ENT 3629 Entrepreneurial Technologies (3).

ENT 3111 Creating Value Through Customer Acquisition (3).

ENT 3203 Managing New Venture Growth (3).

ENT 4XXX Entrepreneurial Law and Ethics (3).

ENT 3607 Innovation by Design (3).

ECS 3022 Immersive Social Entrepreneurship (3).

ENT 4505 Survey of Social Enterprise Finance (3).

ISS 4936 Human-Centered Design for Social Innovation (3).

ENT 3XXX Evaluating Social Impact (3).

ENT 3XXX Strategic Social Entrepreneurship (3).

ENT 4XXX Senior Experience I (3).

ENT 4XXX Senior Experience II (3).

ISS 4944 Internship (3).

Plus at least six credit hours from the following list of courses:

ENT 2630 Themed Experience (3).

ENT 2802 Entrepreneurship in Contemporary Society (3).

ENT 3173 Franchising (3).

ENT 3203 Managing New Venture Growth (3).

ENT 3273 Family Business (3).

ENT 3283 Women and Minorities in New Ventures (3).

ENT 3613 Innovation and Creativity (3).

ISM 4882 Mobile Technology (3).

CTE 3862 Retail Operations (3).

CTE 3808 Consumers in a Complex Marketplace (3).

CTE 3512 History of Dress (3).

CTE 3881 Elective Internship (3).

CTE 4937 Special Topics (3).

All retail entrepreneurship majors focusing on retail merchandising must complete thirty-nine credit hours as listed below. A grade of "C" or better must be earned in each course used to satisfy the retail entrepreneurship major area requirements.

CTE 3806 Merchandising Principles (3).

CTE 3763 Product Analysis and Costing (3).

CTE 3XXX Retail Technology (3).

CTE 1401 Introductory Textile Science (3).

CTE 4822 Quantitative Merchandising Management (3).

CTE 3835 Merchandise Presentation and Inventory Analysis (3).

CTE 4826 Merchandising Buying (3).

CTE 3808 Consumers in a Complex Marketplace (3).

CTE 4882 Professional Internship (3).

CTE 4XXX E-Commerce for Retail (3).

CTE 4843 Retail Branding (3).

CTE 4829 Global Sourcing (3).

ENT 4114 Business Plan Design (3).

Plus at least six credit hours from the following list of courses:

ENT 2630 Themed Experience (3).

ENT 2802 Entrepreneurship in Contemporary Society (3).

ENT 3173 Franchising (3).

ENT 3203 Managing New Venture Growth (3).

ENT 3273 Family Business (3).

ENT 3283 Women and Minorities in New Ventures (3).

ENT 3613 Innovation and Creativity (3).

ISM 4882 Mobile Technology (3).

CTE 3862 Retail Operations (3).

CTE 3808 Consumers in a Complex Marketplace (3).

CTE 3512 History of Dress (3).

CTE 3881 Elective Internship (3).

CTE 4937 Special Topics (3).

All retail entrepreneurship majors focusing on product development must complete forty-three credit hours as listed below. A grade of "C" or better must be earned in each course used to satisfy the retail entrepreneurship major area requirements.

CTE 3806 Merchandising Principles (3).

CTE 3763 Product Analysis and Costing (3).

CTE 3XXX Retail Technology (3).

CTE 1401 Introductory Textile Science (3).

CTE 4822 Quantitative Merchandising Management (3).

CTE 3XXX Product Development II (3).

CTE 3XXX Retail Technology II (3).

CTE 3808 Consumers in a Complex Marketplace (3).

CTE 4882 Professional Internship (3).

CTE 4443 Quality Assurance for Textiles and Apparel (4).

CTE 4829 Global Sourcing (3).

CTE 4XXX Retail Senior Capstone (3).

CTE 4XXX Sustainability and Social Responsibility (3).

ENT 4114 Business Plan Design (3).

Plus at least six credit hours from the following list of courses:

ENT 2630 Themed Experience (3).

ENT 2802 Entrepreneurship in Contemporary Society (3).

ENT 3173 Franchising (3).

ENT 3203 Managing New Venture Growth (3).

ENT 3273 Family Business (3).

ENT 3283 Women and Minorities in New Ventures (3).

ENT 3613 Innovation and Creativity (3).

CTE 3862 Retail Operations (3).

CTE 3808 Consumers in a Complex Marketplace (3).

CTE 3512 History of Dress (3).

CTE 3881 Elective Internship (3).

CTE 4937 Special Topics (3).

Requirements for a Minor in Entrepreneurship

Any student who has been accepted to Florida State University is eligible to get a minor in Entrepreneurship. This is not a University degree program leading to a diploma. Students completing the minor will gain knowledge about how to initiate and manage new ventures, sources of funding, and business planning. Students interested in a minor in entrepreneurship must take a total of twelve hours in entrepreneurship as described below.

ENT 3003 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3).

ENT 3423 Funding Sources for Entrepreneurial Opportunities (3).

ENT 4114 New Venture Creation (3).

Plus one course from the following list of courses:

ENT 2802 Entrepreneurship in Contemporary Society (3).

ENT 3173 Franchising (3).

ENT 3203 Managing New Venture Growth (3).

ENT 3273 Family Business (3).

ENT 3283 Women and Minorities in New Ventures (3).

ENT 3613 Innovation and Creativity (3).

ENT 4255 Negotiation in Entrepreneurship (3).

ENT 4943 Entrepreneurship Internship (3).

ISM 4882. Mobile Technology (3).

Definition of Prefix

COA—Consumer Affairs

CTE—Clothing and Textiles

ECO—Economics

ENT—Entrepreneurship

GEB—General Business

IFS—Interdisciplinary Florida State University Courses

ISS—Interdisciplinary Social Sciences

Undergraduate Courses

Courses without a description still need to be developed.

CTE 3862. Retail Operations (3). This course addresses a variety of topics including financial requirements, location strategy and selection, hiring and staffing, information systems and supply chain, creating an inventory plan, vendor selection and negotiations, buying the merchandise, and managing the store.

CTE 1401C. Introductory Textile Science (4). This course is an introduction to fibers, yarns, fabric structures, coloration, and finishes related to performance, selection, and care. It includes laboratory experience in the identification and analysis of fibers, yarns, fabrics, finishes, and textile coloration.

CTE 2800. Textile, Apparel, and Retail Analysis (3). This course offers an overview of the textile, apparel, retail, and support services industries and the career opportunities available within these industries. The nature, scope, and structure of each segment of each industry in the domestic and international marketplace is analyzed.

CTE 3201. Design Elements and Principles (3). This course is an introduction to design as process and product: with applications in functional, structural, and decorative design; optical illusions; art elements and principles; design analysis.

CTE 3431. Product Development (3). Prerequisites: CTE 1401C, CTE 3201, and CTE 3763. This course introduces students to the processes of apparel product development including forecasting, color and fabric management, garment styling and line development, concept to product processes, developing the brand, business planning and creative development.

CTE 3512. History of Dress (3). This course explores the development of Western dress from the 15th century to the present as a reflection of socio-cultural factors including cultural values, ethnicity, gender, class, art, customs, economy, politics, religion, geography, and technology.

CTE 3763. Product Analysis and Costing (3). Prerequisite: CTE 1401C. This course offers an evaluation of apparel products in relation to costing and product development.

CTE 3806. Merchandising Principles (3). Prerequisites: CTE 2800 and CTE 3201. This course is an overview of businesses that design, produce, distribute, and sell fashion and basic goods. Theoretical foundations and practical application of the principles of retail merchandising.

CTE 3808. Consumers in a Complex Marketplace (3). Prerequisite: CTE 2800. This course explores the decision making behavior of consumers in a complex and diverse marketplace, including consumer rights and responsibilities.

CTE 3809. Trend Analysis and Forecasting (3). Prerequisites: CTE 2800, ECO 2013, and ECO 2023. Corequisite: CTE 3806. This course explores the process and methods of trend analysis and fashion forecasting with a dual focus on both consumer and business aspects.

CTE 3835. Merchandise Presentation and Inventory Analysis (3). Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in ACG 2021, CGS 2060 or CGS 2100, CTE 3806, ECO 2013, ECO 2023, and MAC 1105 or MGF 1106. This course is an analysis of consumer trends, inventory needs, and merchandise presentation methods to drive a business from a store and buying perspective using visual merchandising methods, current inventory analysis software, retail store reports, and the Macy's Merchandising Laboratory.

CTE 3881r. Elective Internship in Retail, Merchandising and Product Development (3–6). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisites: CTE 1401C, CTE 2800, and CTE 3806. This elective course introduces students to a hands-on approach to basic retail merchandising (prior to the intern block) in the following areas: selling, merchandising, product knowledge, inventory control and management.

CTE 4443. Quality Assurance for Textiles and Apparel (4). Prerequisite: CTE 1401C. This course offers an evaluation of textile materials for specific end users, industry compliance, certified performance, and government standards.

CTE 4707. International Topics in Design Industry (3). Prerequisite: CTE 1401C, CTE 3201, and CTE 3806. This course offers an in-depth study of designers and of the design industry in international sites. Students gain a perspective on the influence of fashion on economic, social, artistic, and global culture.

CTE 4803r. International Topics in Merchandising (3). Prerequisite: CTE 3806. This course is the study of current practices and technology in merchandising in an international setting. The course requires students to travel to and live at international sites at their own expense. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

CTE 4811. Retail Merchandising Planning Strategies (3). Prerequisites: Senior standing, a 2.50 GPA, as well as a grade of "C" or better in CTE 3835, CTE 4822, and MAR 3023. Corequisites: CTE 4826 and CTE 4882. This course provides an overview of strategic planning as a framework for retail-firm analysis. Through the completion of retail-store business plans, students hone their leadership, negotiation, and interpersonal skills.

CTE 4822. Quantitative Merchandising Management (3). Prerequisites: A 2.0 GPA as well as grade of "C" or better in ACG 2021, CTE 3806, ECO 2013, ECO 2023, MGF 1106, MGF 1107, and MAC 1105. This course examines principles of effective merchandising management through mathematical procedures.

CTE 4826. Merchandising Buying (3). Prerequisites: A 2.50 GPA as well as a grade of "C" or better in CTE 3835, CTE 4822, and MAR 3023. Corequisites: CTE 4811, CTE 4866, and CTE 4882. This course examines techniques and theories of retail buying, concentrating on buying functions, and the strategic role of the buyer in retail management. This course is part of the intern block for merchandising majors only.

CTE 4829. Global Sourcing (3). Prerequisites: CTE 3806, ECO 2013, and ECO 2023. This course covers global trade, trade practice and theories, as well as the global sourcing related to the textile, apparel, and retail industries.

CTE 4866. Executive Perspectives on Retail Management (3). Prerequisites: CTE 3835, CTE 4822, and MAR 3023. Corequisites: CTE 4811, CTE 4826, and CTE 4882. This course prepares students to assume a professional role in retail, merchandising, product development, or the industry support services through developing career strategies that emphasize solid management and leadership concepts and principles. The course provides exposure to retail and manufacturing industry leaders, and assistance in preparing for the role of an intern.

CTE 4882. Professional Internship (6). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisites: Major status, CTE 4811, CTE 4826, and CTE 4866. This internship in a retail setting allows students to understand merchandising functions through management, buying, or product development. Both professional development and career preparation are emphasized.

CTE 4905r. Directed Individual Study (1–6). Prerequisite: A 2.50 GPA. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.

CTE 4937r. Special Topics (1–3). This course is an analysis of current issues and practices in textiles and consumer sciences. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours as topics vary.

CTE 4970r. Honors Work (1–6). This course provides qualified, upper-division majors in textiles and consumer sciences an opportunity to undertake an independent and original research project in their particular area of interest. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. A minimum of two semesters is required to complete an honors project.

ECO 3041. Personal Finance (3). This course is designed to help students better understand personal finance, and provide them with the tools to make better choices and live a more fulfilling life.

ENT 2630. The Themed Experience (3). This course provides a broad overview of the creation and concepts that drive the themed experience. Students discuss historical themed spaces and current industry trends in retail venues, theme parks to formal gardens, instillation art and theatrical venues. Students gain understanding of storytelling through designed placemaking.

ENT 2802. Entrepreneurship and Contemporary Society (3). This course explores entrepreneurship in society by understanding how innovation can lead to commerce and how commerce impacts our daily lives. Topics include the process of innovation, the nature of entrepreneurialism, the essence of Problem-Opportunity-Venture-Operations (POVO) model, the lean start-up business model, different kinds of entrepreneurship (commercial, social, scientific, and artistic), and an introduction to competencies that have facilitated success in other entrepreneurs.

ENT 3XXX Financing Social Innovation & Operations.

ENT 3XXX HR/Management/Communications

ENT 3XXX Marketing/Professional Sales () The objective of this course is to build a foundation in marketing and sales for entrepreneurs to be successful. Students will focus on Marketing Strategy, 4 Ps of Marketing, Creating your Sales Strategy, and Tactics for making the Sale. This course will have the focus of a new venture and must understand the practical aspects of these Marketing and Sales topics.

ENT 3001. Experiences in Entrepreneurship I (3). In this course, students focus on the most current thoughts, ideas, and industry practices relevant to entrepreneurship. The course provides an understanding of start-up and how to grow one's firm as well as providing a hands on experience for a variety of topics all which are relevant to the student's success as an entrepreneur.

ENT 3002. Experiences in Entrepreneurship II (3). In this course, students focus on the most current thought, ideas, and industry practices relevant to entrepreneurship. The course provides an understanding of their business strengths and how to grow one's firm as well as providing a hands on experience for a variety of topics, all which are relevant to the student's success as an entrepreneur.

ENT 3003. Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3). This course is a broad survey of entrepreneurship. It exposes students to different types of entrepreneurship, and covers an array of topics that span from idea generation through venture formation, financing, and management while helping students build knowledge and skills to be a successful entrepreneur.

ENT 3111. Creating Value Through Customer Acquisition (3). Must be a major within the Jim Moran School of Entrepreneurship. This course builds a foundation in marketing and sales for entrepreneurs to be successful. Students focus on Marketing Strategy, the four Ps of Marketing, Creating Sales Strategy, and Tactics for Making the Sale.

ENT 3173. Franchising (3). Prerequisites: ENT 3003 or both ENT 2010 and ENT 2011. This course focuses on the special role of franchising as a form of entrepreneurship in the U.S. and international economies. Topics include success rates of franchisors and franchisees, advantages and disadvantages of franchising for both franchisors and franchisees, the process of franchising a business idea, and the process of selecting and working with a franchisor.

ENT 3203. Managing Growth (3). This course addresses the management of rapidly growing entrepreneurial firms. Topics include building an infrastructure, planning stage financing, managing under adversity, and managing a business with rapid growth.

ENT 3273. Family Business (3). Prerequisites: ENT 3003 or both ENT 2010 and ENT 2011. This course covers special issues facing entrepreneurial and family businesses: choice of organizational form, business planning, tax and compensation planning, business valuation, and succession strategies. Time is also devoted to the unique challenges often found in family business context, such as dealing with family conflicts, how to motivate and evaluate employees when a mix of family and non-members are involved, and planning for succession.

ENT 3283. Women and Minorities in New Ventures (3). Prerequisites: ENT 3003 or both ENT 2010 and ENT 2011. This course focuses on the emergence and current impact of women- and minority-owned businesses. The course also considers special challenges and opportunities that women and minority entrepreneurs confront. Course may include discussions with successful women and minority business owners.

ENT 3413. New Venture Finance (3). Prerequisite: ENT 2010 with a grade of "b-" or better and ENT 2011 with a grade of "b-" or better. Corequisite: FIN 3403. This course introduces future entrepreneurs to the concept of financial thinking by utilizing tools and techniques which have been adapted for use in the realm of entrepreneurship. It is designed to inform students of various techniques of obtaining financing for new enterprises and to maximize the financial potential of their existing companies and is structured to train students in the financial management of entrepreneurial firms. As most are small growing firms, understanding finance requires an understanding of marketing, management, and planning functions of these firms.

ENT 3414. Measuring Financial Success (3). Prerequisite: Admission to the JM School. This course provides students with a survey of the techniques and managerial tasks associated with developing and executing the financial reporting requirements needed for the management and financing of an entrepreneurial growth business from inception to financial scale.

ENT 3423. Funding Sources for Entrepreneurial Opportunities (3). Prerequisite: ENT 3003. This course introduces future entrepreneurs to the concept of financial thinking by utilizing tools and techniques which have been adapted for use in the realm of entrepreneurship. It is designed to inform students of various techniques of obtaining financing for new enterprises and to maximize the financial potential of their existing and is structured to train students in the financial management of entrepreneurial firms. As most are small growing firms, understanding finance requires an understanding of marketing, management, and planning functions of these firms.

ENT 3607. Innovation by Design (3). This course teaches methods common to human-centered innovation frameworks such as Design Thinking: empathizing, framing and reframing problems, ideating, prototyping and testing solutions. Students learn the process of developing products, services, systems and other solutions from the initial discovery of needs, to presenting a tested solution ready for deployment.

ENT 3613. Innovation and Creativity (3). Prerequisites: ENT 3003 and MAN 3025. This course covers the quest for ideas that lead to true innovation of a product, service or process, with the courage to create, with risks of failure or mistakes by the student. Solving problems in an environment of uncertainty and dynamic change. Creativity is the central focus. Students are challenged to demonstrate true entrepreneurial thinking; taking ideas and concepts where none has been before. Students experience what it means to fully engage with the patterns that produce breakthrough ideas. Students are exposed to a systematic approach to changing the way you create, identify and sell these ideas. In addition, students are introduced to a number of techniques, concepts and methods that can be added to the students' creative skills toolkit.

ENT 3629. Entrepreneurial Technologies (3). This course gives the opportunity to critically assess current and emerging technologies. Students learn a defined process for efficiently and effectively coming up to speed on new technologies and how to think critically about the economic potential, societal impact, and ethical consideration of new technologies.

ENT 4XXX Evaluating Social Impact.

ENT 4XXX New Product Development.

ENT 4XXX Entrepreneurship Capstone () This course applies the tools and concepts acquired in other entrepreneurship courses in a hands-on business simulation of competitive dynamics with an eye toward contemporary, emerging competitive issues confronting senior executives and entrepreneurs.

ENT 4XXX Law and Ethics () Students will be exposed to fundamental aspects of U.S. law that are important to creating, operating, and growing a small business.

ENT 4114. Business Plan Design (3). Prerequisite: ENT 3423. This course gives students the opportunity to complete a business plan for the creation of a new venture. In the process of development, they identify new or emerging opportunities for providing goods or services, demonstrate the need for such goods or services through market research, and develop financial statements for the proposed venture.

ENT 4900r. Directed Independent Study (1–3). May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.

ENT 4934r. Special Topics in Entrepreneurship (1–3). Prerequisites: ENT 2010, ENT 2011, and ENT 3003. This course allows students to learn about special topics in entrepreneurship that are not taught as part of the regular major or certificate programs in entrepreneurship. Special topics may include: environmental entrepreneurship, managing high growth, venture and angel capital, international entrepreneurship, and creativity in opportunity recognition. This course is repeatable to a maximum of six semester hours, as topics vary.

ENT 4943. Entrepreneurship Internship (3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: ENT 3003. This course is designed to provide an experiential learning lab on how to perform business research and to apply that research to the Internship Sponsor. Students learn basic competitive intelligence techniques and utilize critical thinking skills to synthesize data and intelligence into a presentation that will provide a useful and practical result to the Internship Sponsor. These techniques can be applied to a wide range of industries.

FOS 4209. Food Safety and Regulations (3). Prerequisites: HUN 1201 and FOS 3026 or departmental permission. In this course, topics include food spoilage and food poisoning, food-borne pathogens, food laws and regulations, HACCP, and safe food handler practices, with an emphasis on current issues related to the quality and safety of food.

IFS 2076. The Lean Machine: The 21st Century Entrepreneur (3). This course explores entrepreneurship from antiquity to contemporary society. In particular, the course examines how contemporary entrepreneurship is undergoing a fundamental shift towards a powerful new kind of consumer called the "prosumer." Additionally this course seeks to explore how innovation and lean concepts are leading to successful commerce and how that commerce impacts culture and daily lives.

ISS 4931r. Special Topics (1-3). May be repeated with the permission of the Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Social Science to a maximum of eighteen semester hours.

RMI 3011. Risk Management/Insurance (3). This course is an introduction to the principles of risk management and insurance and their application to personal and business pure risk problems.

Graduate Courses

COA 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

CTE 5807. Retail Merchandising Concepts (2–4).

CTE 5815. Retail Technologies (3).

CTE 5816. Merchandising Organization (3).

CTE 5828. Merchandising Buying (3).

CTE 5834. Merchandising Theory and Research (3).

CTE 5847. Retail Branding and Promotion (3).

CTE 5884. Advanced Fashion Merchandising Practicum (6). (S/U grade only.)

CTE 5906r. Directed Individual Study (1–3).

CTE 5911. Research Analysis in Clothing and Textiles (3).

CTE 5912r. Supervised Research (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

CTE 5930r. Clothing and Textiles Seminar (1).

CTE 5942r. Supervised Teaching (1–3). (S/U grade only.)

CTE 6436. Product Innovation and Management (3).

CTE 6936r. Special Topics in Clothing/Textiles/ Merchandising (3).

ENT 5627. Healthcare Innovation and Medical Entrepreneurship (3).

ENT 5901r. Directed Independent Study in Entrepreneurship (1–6).